Report to facilitate the estimation of Slovenia's

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					                             REPUBLIKA SLOVENIJA
                      MINISTRSTVO ZA OKOLJE IN PROSTOR




               Slovenia's initial report
              under the Kyoto Protocol
Report to facilitate the calculation of the assigned amount pursuant to Article
                  3, paragraphs 7 and 8 of the Kyoto Protocol




                  Submission to the UNFCCC Secretariat
                                  July 2007
                                                        Slovenia's initial report under the Kyoto Protocol




Introduction
Ministry of the Environment and Spatial Planning has prepared this report to the UN
FCCC Secretariat, to facilitate the calculation of the assigned amount of the Republic of
Slovenia pursuant to Article 3, paragraphs 7 and 8 of the Kyoto Protocol. The report is in
accordance with paragraphs 6-8 of the Annex to decision 13/CMP.1 (Modalities for the
accounting of the assigned amounts under Article 7, paragraph 4, of the Kyoto Protocol)
divided into two parts.


PART 1
  - greenhouse gas emissions in the year 1986 and in the period 1990-2004;
  - base year for HFCs, PFCs and SF6;
  - calculation of Slovenia’s assigned amount;

PART 2
  - calculation of Slovenia’s commitment period reserve;
  - selection of threshold values for forests under Articles 3.3 and 3.4 of the Kyoto
     Protocol;
  - activities under Articles 3.3 and 3.4;
  - description of Slovenia’s National GHG Inventory System;
  - description of Slovenia’s Registry System.
                                                                                   Slovenia's initial report under the Kyoto Protocol



                                                       CONTENTS

1    Greenhouse gas emissions for 1986,1990-2004 ................................................................. 4
1.1     National Inventory Report snd CRF Tables ................................................................... 4
1.2     Base year emissions and time series consistency ........................................................... 4
2    Selected base year for HFCs, PFC and SF6 in accordance with Article 3.8 .......................... 9
3    Calculation of Slovenia's assigned amount ...................................................................... 10
4    Calculation of Slovenia's commitment period reserve ..................................................... 11
5    Selection of threshold values for the forest definition to be used for reporting under
Articles 3.3 and 3.4 .................................................................................................................. 11
6    Selection of activities under Article 3.4 ........................................................................... 12
7    Slovenia’s National GHG Inventory System ................................................................... 12
7.1     Description of the institutional arrangement for inventory preparation ....................... 12
7.2     Brief description of the process of inventory preparation ............................................ 12
7.3     Brief general description of methodologies and data sources used ............................. 16
7.4     Information on the QA/QC plan including verification and treatment of confidentiality
issues where relevant ................................................................................................................ 17
8    Slovenia’s National Registry ............................................................................................ 18
                                                        Slovenia's initial report under the Kyoto Protocol – PART I1




1     Greenhouse gas emissions for 1986,1990-2004


1.1    National Inventory Report snd CRF Tables

A complete inventory on greenhouse gas emission and removals for the base year 1986 and
for the period 1990 – 2004 is provided in the Slovenia’s National Inventory Report 2006.
The methodologies used for estimating GHG emissions are consistent with the Revised 1996
IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories and the IPCC Good Practice
Guidance and Uncertainty Management in National Greenhouse Gas Inventories.

For the submission 2006, Slovenia made many improvements recommended by ERT from
previous reviews. The most important are: use of improved EF for methane emission from
transport and distribution of natural gas; development of country specific EF for CO2
emissions from lime production; use of more adequate set of data about amount and
composition of solid waste which have been disposed on the SWDS from 1964 on; a
reallocation and correction of solid fuel used in iron and steel production to better estimate
CO2 emissions in Energy and in Industrial Processes sectors and to assure consistency in
time series; improvement of estimates on GHG emissions from cattle and swine in
agriculture and starting with reporting in LULUCF sector according to the new IPCC Good
Practice Guidance on Land Use, Land Use Change and Forestry.

The recalculations have resulted in the following changes: the base year emissions without
LULUCF have decreased for 0.11% and in 2003 for 1.28%.

Following the ERT suggestions during the in-country review in June 2007, Slovenia
additionally estimated CO2 emission from underground coal mining and N2O emissions from
cultivation of histosols and improve its CO2 estimates from Glass production and combustion
of natural gas.


1.2    Base year emissions and time series consistency

In 2004, total GHG emissions accounted for 20.072 Tg CO2 eq.). The biggest fraction among
gases belongs to CO2 (82.1%), followed by CH4 with 10.5%, N2O with 6.3% and F–gases
with 1.1% of GHG emissions. The largest fraction in emissions among the sectors belongs to
the energy sector (80.9%), agriculture accounts for 10.0% of total GHG emissions, industrial
processes for 5.7%, waste for 3.3% and solvent and other product use for 0.2%. The most
important emission source in energy sector with 97.7% of emissions is the fuel combustion
sub-sector, which is split further into energy supply (40.0%), transport (27.0%), Other 1
(17.9%), and Industry and Construction sectors (15.0%). CO2 emission sinks due to the Land
Use Change and Forestry are assumed to amount to 5.644 Tg.

Compared to the base year, the greatest fraction increase has been that of CO2 emissions,
namely from 80.0% in 1986 to 82.1% in 2004.

1 Other sectors represent emissions that are caused by fuel combustion in households, commercial sector,
services, forestry
 and agriculture.


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                                                                  Slovenia's initial report under the Kyoto Protocol – PART I1




As a result of the restructuring of economy and the process of gaining independence, the
lowest emission level was reached in 1992. The first peak was reached in 1997 because of
low fuel prices in Slovenia, which increased motor fuel purchases by foreigners, while the
second peak was reached in 2002, due to lower electricity production in hydroelectric power
plants, which was made up for by increased electricity production in thermal power plants. In
2004, GHG emissions were 1.19% below the emissions in 1986.

CO2 emissions in 2004 represented 82.1% of overall emissions of greenhouse gases. CO2
emissions followed the consumption of energy and with regard to their fraction exerted a
major influence on total emissions. Compared to 1986, in 2004 they increased by 1.2%. CH4
emissions represented 10.5% of total emissions in 2004 (11.7% in 1986) and were lower than
in 1986 by 11.3%. Compared to the previous year, N2O emissions have decreased by 3.7%
and represented 6.3% of total emissions, but were nevertheless lover of N2O emissions in
1986 by 7.9%. F-gasses represent 1.1% of total emissions and some of them (HFC and SF6)
have shown significant increase since 1986.


Table 1.1:GHG emission trends by gas
                                                                                                                 Change from
GREENHOUSE GAS
               Base year*                  1986        1990         1995         2000        2003        2004    base to latest
EMISSIONS
                                                                                                                reported year
                           CO2          CO2         CO2         CO2           CO2         CO2         CO2
                                                                                                                           (%)
                         equ. (Gg)    equ. (Gg)   equ. (Gg)   equ. (Gg)     equ. (Gg)   equ. (Gg)   equ. (Gg)
CO2 emissions
including net CO2 from   14,692.585 14,692.585 11,547.235 10,046.564 10,020.682 10,718.062 10,840.296                    -26.2
LULUCF
CO2 emissions
excluding net CO2 from   16,281.838 16,281.838 14,732.982 14,951.805 15,195.843 16,036.290 16,484.016                      1.2
LULUCF
CH4                       2,376.290   2,376.290   2,289.367   2,118.183     2,136.052   2,123.174   2,108.716            -11.3
N2O                       1,369.750   1,369.750   1,246.517   1,197.252     1,319.478   1,309.813   1,261.280             -7.9
HFCs                        28.957      NA.NO        NA.NO         28.957      31.127      56.913      79.501            174.5
PFCs                       285.685      276.291     257.444       285.685     105.612     118.990     120.008            -58.0
SF6                         11.522       10.241      10.303        11.522      15.738      17.915      18.312             58.9
 Total (including net
                          18,764.789 18,725.157 15,350.867 13,688.163 13,628.689 14,344.867 14,428.113                   -23.1
 CO2 from LULUCF)
 Total (excluding net
                          20,354.042 20,314.410 18,536.614 18,593.404 18,803.850 19,663.095 20,071.833                    -1.4
 CO2 from LULUCF)
* Base year = 1986 and 1995 for F-gasses




Carbon dioxide – CO2
CO2 emissions in the period 1986-2004 may be split into five segments. In the first segment,
1986-1991, emissions diminished due to reduction of industrial production and the war for
independence in 1991. Emissions rose strongly in the 1991-1997 period, when emissions
increased also due to gasoline tourism. Then came a short period of emission reduction as a
consequence of the reduction of gasoline tourism and decreased consumption of fossil fuels
for the production of electrical energy. After 1999, emissions have risen again, mainly as a
consequence of the production of electrical energy. CO2 emissions in 2002 thus amounted to
16.23 Mt of CO2, which is nearly the same as in the 1986 base year. However, in 2003,
emission of CO2 decreased by 1.2%, which was mainly due to lower emission from Energy
Industries and in 2004 increased again by 2.8%, which is mainly due to traffic.



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                                                   Slovenia's initial report under the Kyoto Protocol – PART I1



In that entire period of time, the strongest increase of CO2 emissions was in traffic emissions,
namely by as much as 108%, from 1.97 Mt CO2in year 1986 to 4.09 Mt CO2 in 2004.




Methane – CH4

Methane emissions have in the 1986-2004 period constantly kept diminishing from 2.38 Mt
CO2 eq.. in 1986 to 2.11 Mt CO2 eq. in 2004. CH4 emissions have diminished by 11.3% in
spite of the increase of emissions from waste by 17.5%, compared to the base year. This
reduction was mainly due to Agriculture (-14.6%) and Energy sector (-29.1%)

Nitrous oxide - N2O
N2O emissions have been reduced from 1.37 Mt CO2 eq. in 1986 to 1.26 Mt CO2 eq. in 2004.
In agriculture, which is the main source of N2O emissions, emissions diminished chiefly due
to reduced number of animals and the reduced extent of arable crop production, particularly
legumes and papilionaceous plants. Partly, this reduction is due to the changed manner of
manure storage, since the fraction of straw based systems is diminishing on account of the
increasing fraction of accommodation on slatted floor. Recently, an increase of the fraction
of traffic in total N2O emissions has been observed, this fraction rising from 1.9% in 1986 to
12.5% in 2004.


Hydro-fluorocarbons - HFC
HFC emissions keep growing from year to year. In 2004, emissions increased by 16.5%
compared to the previous year, which is mostly the consequence of increasing fraction of air
conditioners in motor vehicles.


Per-fluorocarbons - PFC
The only source of PFC in the Republic of Slovenia is the primary production of aluminium.
Improving the technology in the production of aluminium since 1995 almost halved the then
emissions, which diminished from 276 kt CO2 eq. to 120 kt CO2 eq. A more detailed
description of the reduction of emissions is given in chapter 4.11, Aluminium Production


Sulphur-hexafluoride - SF6
The main source of SF6 emissions is high-voltage gas insulated switchgear and circuit
breakers. SF6 emissions represent only 0.1% of total GHG emissions.




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                                                                       Slovenia's initial report under the Kyoto Protocol – PART I1



Figure 1.1: GHG Emissions in Slovenia by gas

                25.000



                20.000



                15.000
   Gg CO2 eq.




                10.000



                 5.000



                    0
                          1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

                         CO2 emissions excluding net CO2 from LULUCF         CH4         N2O        HFCs       PFCs        SF6




In accordance with UNFCCC Reporting Guidelines, inventories are grouped into six
emission categories: Energy, Industrial Processes, Solvent use, Agriculture, Land-Use, Land
Use Change and Forestry, and Waste.


Table 1.2: Slovenian GHG emissions and removals by sector
  GREENHOUSE GAS                                                                                                         Change from
     EMISSIONS                         1986         1990         1995           2000            2003         2004        base to latest
                                                                                                                         reported year
                                     CO2 equ.      CO2 equ.     CO2 equ.      CO2 equ.      CO2 equ.        CO2 equ.
                                                                                                                              (%)
                                      (Gg)          (Gg)         (Gg)          (Gg)          (Gg)            (Gg)
1. Energy                           16,043.958     14,366.412   14,807.392    15,032.172    15,808.877      16,231.538                1.2
2. Industrial Processes              1,288.059      1,292.156    1,109.470       970.143       1,097.665     1,147.843              -10.9
3. Solvent and Other
Product Use
                                        81.903        43.400       17.251          42.729         33.332       39.246               -52.1
4. Agriculture                       2,334.296      2,242.726    2,117.364     2,162.344       2,092.458     1,998.536              -14.4
5. Land Use, Land-Use
Change and Forestry
                                    -1,589.253     -3,185.747   -4,905.241    -5,175.161       -5,318.228   -5,643.721              255.1
6. Waste                               566.194       591.921      541.928        596.461         623.780      654.670                15.6
7. Other                                      NA           NA           NA             NA              NA           NA                  -
Total (excluding net CO2
                                     20,314.410    18,536.614   18,593.404    18,803.850    19,663.095      20,071.833               -1,2
from LULUCF)(3), (6)


Of all sectors, the most important sector is Energy with a lion’s share of 80.9% of all
emissions of GHG. Within this sector, the biggest fractions are Electricity and Heat
Production with 39.1%, and Traffic with 26.4%, where road traffic accounts for 99% of all
traffic emissions, followed by Households and Other Commercial Usage with 17.5%, and
Industry and Construction with 14.7%. The remainder (2.3%) was fugitive emissions.




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                                                  Slovenia's initial report under the Kyoto Protocol – PART I1



The Energy sector shows a growing trend, emissions in 2004 have risen compared to the
previous year by 2.7%, while in the 1999-2002 period they have risen by as much as 5,6%,
which is chiefly a consequence of increased consumption of fuels in thermal power plants
and cogeneration plants and an increase in the consumption of liquid fuels in traffic.

The strong increase of emission in the Electricity and Heat Production is an indication of the
dependence of the production of electrical energy on fossil energy sources (in the Republic
of Slovenia particularly from coal).

Traffic emissions have since 1986 increased already by 112,2%, mainly due to a large
increase of the vehicle stock as a consequence of a rise in purchasing power of the
population, and an increased need for transportation of goods as a consequence of permanent
economic growth in the period 1991-2004. The growth trend in 2002 levelled off, as GHG
emissions, compared to the previous year 2001, have risen only by 0.6%. However, GHG
emissions have risen in 2003 by 3.6% and by 3.7% in 2004 when Slovenia joined the EU.

Emissions from Households and Other Commercial Use are stable. The 1990-2004 is
characterized in particular by the growth of consumption of primary energy and substitution
of solid fuels with natural gas. This substitution process is finished, since the quantities of
solid fossil fuels consumed in this sector in year 2004 were negligent.

Emissions from Industrial Processes which represent 5.7% of total emissions have in the last
year grown by 2.7%. This growth was mostly due to the emissions from the sector of
Consumption of Halocarbons (main emissions driver is the Air Conditioning Equipment sub
sector), which have increased by 13.1%. The consumption of solvents in the Republic of
Slovenia represents a mere 0.2% of total GHG emissions and has shown practically no
change over the years. Considering their negligible fraction, these emissions have been
estimated in a very rough manner and with a considerable uncertainty.

Emissions from agriculture represent 10.0% of total GHG emissions and 51.6% of methane
emissions in the Republic of Slovenia. Emissions from agriculture have, compared to the
base year, diminished by 14.4%.

Emissions from waste have in the 1986-2004 period increased by 15.6%, comparing to the
last year by 5%. Methane emissions from the Solid Waste Disposal on Land (SWD) with
represents 63.5% of total emissions have increased by 39.1% compared to the base year and
by 5.6% in reported year. The increase is a consequence of increase of amount of waste
disposed to the solid waste disposal sites. On the other hand emissions from wastewaters
have decreased by 10,6% in the period 1986-2004 due to the reduction of industrial
wastewater.

The sink in Land-Use, Land Use Change and Forestry sector are still not estimated fully in
accordance with 2003 GPG for LULUCF. According to the estimates, calculated only on
aggregated level sink amounted to 5.644 Mt of CO2, which is considerably more than the
amount allocated to Slovenia (1.32 Mt). The improved estimation of the sink is foreseen for
the next NIR.




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                                                                             Slovenia's initial report under the Kyoto Protocol – PART I1



Figure 1.2:GHG Emissions in Slovenia by sector: 1986-2004

                 25.000


                 20.000


                 15.000
    Gg CO2 eq.




                 10.000


                  5.000


                       0


                  -5.000


                 -10.000
                             1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

                             1. Energy                                                  2. Industrial Processes
                             3. Solvent and Other Product Use                           4. Agriculture
                             5. Land Use, Land-Use Change and Forestry(5)               6. Waste




2                Selected base year for HFCs, PFC and SF6 in accordance with Article 3.8


The time series for the emissions of the hydrofluorocarbons (HFC), perfluorocarbons (PFC)
and sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) are presented in Table 1.2. The emissions in 1995, expressed
in CO2 equivalent are 36,6Gg CO2 equivalent higher than in 1990.

In accordance with Article 3.8 of the Kyoto Protocol (any Party included in Annex I may use
1995 as its base year for hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons and sulphur hexafluoride.
for the purposes of calculating its assigned amount in accordance with Article 3.7). In
accordance with this, Slovenia has chosen the year 1995 as the base year for the emissions of
the hydrofluorocarbons (HFC), perfluorocarbons (PFC) and sulphur hexafluoride (SF6).
Slovenia has made decision based on the latest revised inventory information.

Table 2.1: Emissions of HFCs, PFCs, SF6 for the period 1990-2004
                     1990      1991   1992     1993    1994    1995    1996     1997       1998   1999    2000    2001    2002    2003    2004
HFCs                  NO        NO     NO     NO,NE NO,NE       29,0    27,3     32,9      27,2    24,1    31,1    38,4    47,5    56,9    66,3
PFCs                 257,4    302,6   243,0    251,1   281,6   285,7   239,5    194,4     149,3   105,6   105,6   105,6   116,4   119,0   120,0
SF6                   10,3     10,1    10,1     11,0    11,4    11,5    11,8     12,0      13,4    16,1    15,7    16,1    17,3    17,9    18,3
Total F-
                     267,7    312,7   253,2    262,2   293,0   326,2   278,7    239,3     189,9   145,8   121,4   121,7   133,8   136,9   204,6
gasses




                                                                         9
                                                 Slovenia's initial report under the Kyoto Protocol – PART I1



3    Calculation of Slovenia's assigned amount


The assigned amount is calculated according to Articles 3.7 and 3.8 of the Kyoto Protocol,
on the basis of the latest base year inventory of anthropogenic emissions by sources and
removals by sinks of greenhouse gases not controlled by the Montreal Protocol.

Slovenia’s estimate of its assigned amount is derived from the base year emissions (1986,
1995 for F-gasses), multiplied by the limit implied by the Slovenia’s 8% Kyoto target ie.
0,92, multiplied by 5 representing the five years of the first commitment period.

Table 3.1:Slovenia’s assigned amount
                                                        Emission
                                                      (Gg CO2 equ,)
Emissions (without F-gasses and LUCF) in 1986                 20,027.878
Emissions of F-gasses in 1995                                     326.164
TOTAL Base Year Emission                                      20,354.042
Kyoto target                                                           -8%
Annual average emissions (2008-2012)                          18,725.719
Estimated assigned amount                                     93,628.593

Slovenia’s AA= 20,354.042 x 0.92 x 5 = 93,628.593Gg CO2 equivalent




                                                10
                                                       Slovenia's initial report under the Kyoto Protocol – PART I1




4    Calculation of Slovenia's commitment period reserve

The commitment period reserve (CPR) is calculated in accordance with decision -/CMP.1
(Article 17) as 90% of the proposed assigned amount or 100% of its most recently reviewed
inventory2 times five, whichever is lowest.


Slovenia's estimated CPR = 0.9 x 93,628.593= 84,265.734Gg CO2 equivalent
or
Slovenia's estimated CPR = 5 x 20,071.833= 100,359.166 Gg CO2 equivalent


Therefore Slovenia's estimated CPR is 84,265.734Gg CO2 equivalent (90% of the
proposed assigned amount).


5    Selection of threshold values for the forest definition to be used for reporting under
     Articles 3.3 and 3.4

Slovenia has chosen to account for forest management under the elective activities of
Article 3, paragraph 4 of the Kyoto Protocol.

Slovenian forest land definition for reporting under Article 3.4 according to the Slovenian
Forest act (1994) and its amendments (2007) is:

         (1) Forest means land overgrown with forest trees in the form of stands or other
             forest plants which provides any of the functions of a forest. Forest according to
             this Act also includes overgrown plots of land defined as forest in the spatial
             element of the forest management plan.
             Minimum area for forest land area: 0,25 ha
             Minimum value for tree crown cover: 30 %
             Minimum tree height: 2 m


According to the Slovenian Forest act (1994):
- Forest management plans shall be produced as overall plans for all forests irrespective of
ownership, taking into consideration the particularities of individual regions.
- Management of forests includes carrying out protection and silvicultural measures and all
other work which is required for ensuring the ecological and social functions of forests,
building and maintaining forest infrastructure, exploiting and using forests and disposing of
forests.




2
  Slovenia's most recent reviewed inventory is considered the inventory submitted in june 2007 to the UNFCCC
as a response to the ERT comments during in-country visit.



                                                    11
                                                   Slovenia's initial report under the Kyoto Protocol – PART I1




Method of identification of forest land areas
All forests defined according to the Slovenian Forest act (1994) and its amendments (2007)
are subject to forest management planning and are considered as managed.

Areas of abandoned agricultural land which have been abandoned for less than 20 years and
have a tree crown cover between 30 and 75 % are defined as forests but are not included in
forest management plans. We consider them as unmanaged.


6     Selection of activities under Article 3.4

Slovenia has chosen to use activities under Article 3.4, forest management, for compiling
with its commitment under the period 2008-2012 of the Kyoto Protocol.


Choice of accounting periodicity for activities under Article 3, paragraphs 3 and 4

Slovenia has chosen to account for emissions and removals from the LULUCF for the entire
commitment period at the end of the commitment period.


7     Slovenia’s National GHG Inventory System


7.1    Description of the institutional arrangement for inventory preparation

In the Republic of Slovenia, the institution charged with the responsibility for making GHG
inventories is the Environmental Agency of the Republic of Slovenia. In accordance with its
tasks and obligations to international institutions, the Environmental Agency is charged with
making inventories of GHG emissions as well as emissions that are defined in the
Convention on Long Range Transboundary Air Pollution within the laid-down time-limit. To
this effect, the Environmental Agency has increased the number of its staff. In making the
inventories, the Environmental Agency cooperates with numerous other institutions and
administrative bodies which relay the necessary activity data and other necessary data for
making the inventories.

The chief sources of data are the Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia and the
Ministry of Environment and Spatial Planning; however, the Environmental Agency obtains
much of its data through other activities, which it performs under the Environmental
Protection Act. Emissions from two sectors are calculated by two external institutions:
emissions from Agriculture are calculated by the Slovenian Agriculture Institute, sinks in the
Land Use Change and Forestry sector by the Slovenian Forestry Institute.


7.2    Brief description of the process of inventory preparation

Owing to the ever increasing obligations of the Republic of Slovenia with regard to
reporting, the Environmental Agency of the Republic of Slovenia has decided to implement a
unified system of collecting data for the purposes of making inventories, as well as secure

                                                  12
                                                Slovenia's initial report under the Kyoto Protocol – PART I1



reliable financing in accordance with the annual program of its work. The ability to fulfil its
obligations with regard to reporting was also improved by the participation of Environmental
Agency in the GEF project “Capacity building for improving GHG inventories”, which has
finished in June 2006, and thus the Republic of Slovenia has in due time made the
inventories and sent them in the required form to the UNFCCC Secretariat.

A Memorandum of Understanding has been concluded with institutions that participate in the
preparation, binding these institutions to submit quality and verified data to the
Environmental Agency in due time, because the time limits for making inventories and the
NIR have shortened with the entry of Slovenia into EU, since inventories and part of the NIR
for the year before last must be made until 15 January with ability for corrections and final
submission of NIR until 15 March. In view of this, an agreement has been reached with the
participating institutions for them to shorten the time limits for submitting data. For reasons
of complexity, attention was mostly focused on Joint Questionnaires of the Statistical Office
of the Republic of Slovenia, on the basis of which the Statistical Office produces the energy
balance of the Republic of Slovenia, wherein the most important date on energy sector are to
be found.

The year 2003 saw the end of the process of harmonisation of data collection among the
Directorate of Energy, Ministry of Environment and Spatial Planning, and the Statistical
Office of the Republic of Slovenia. An end was put to previous parallel double collecting of
data. The competence of collecting data has in accordance with the law passed to the
Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia, which checks the data and eliminates potential
reporting errors, and submits consolidated data to the Directorate of Energy, which publishes
data annually in its Energy Yearbook of the Republic of Slovenia. In terms of its contents,
data are identical as those submitted in Joint Questionnaires to the IEA.

All data from external institutions are submitted in the same form. Data are stored on a
network server. Access to files is limited in accordance with the security policy. Backup
copies on server are done at regular intervals in accordance with the requirements of the
information system. The archive is stored at several locations and on several types of media.
All support research projects are stored both in digital form as well as in hard-copy form.




                                              13
                                                       Slovenia's initial report under the Kyoto Protocol – PART I1




Figure 7.3: Data flow of Slovenian Inventory System

Subsequent to the making of an inventory, all support files are frozen so that they may not be
changed anymore. CRF tables are stored both in digital form as well as a hard copy.

For submitting reports to different institutions, various report formats have been made, since
the database is used to report to UNFCCC, as well to EEA, EC, and CLRTAP. All external
reports of the Environmental Agency of the Republic of Slovenia are conducted in
accordance with ISO 9001 via the Agency's reporting service, which keeps inventories of
reports. Parallel to that, emission data are submitted to the Statistical Office of the Republic
of Slovenia, which publishes emission data in its publications and submits them to
EUROSTAT and IEA. Establishing a single reporting system in 2003 has ensured above all
the uniformity and traceability of reporting.




                                                      14
                              Report on the determination of Slovenia's assigned amount under the Kyoto Protocol


Table 7.1: Inventory Institutional Arrangements and Data Sources
IPCC category                 IPCC sub-category                        Sources of data
                                                                        Large Combustion Plants (LCP)
                                                                        Ministry of Energy, Directorate of
                                                                        Energy (DGE): annual energy statistics
                              CRF 1A1 - Energy Industry                 Energy Agency
                                                                        Statistical Office of the Republic of
                                                                        Slovenia: Joint Questionnaires, Energy
                                                                        Balances
CRF 1 A – Energy. Fuel                                                  Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia:
                              CRF 1A2 - Manufacturing Industries and
Combustion                                                              Environmental Agency of the Republic of
                              Construction                             Slovenia
                                                                        Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia:
                                                                       Joint Questionnaires, Energy balances
                              CRF 1A3 – Transport                       Ministry of Transport, Directorate for
                                                                       National Roads (DRSC)
                                                                        Ministry of Internal affairs (vehicle stock)
                              CRF 1A4 – Other Sectors                   Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia:
                                                                         Ministry of the Economy, Directorate of
CRF 1 B – Fugitive                                                      Energy (DGE)
Emissions from Fuels                                                    Agency of Energy
                                                                        Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia:
                                                                        Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia:
                              CRF 2A – Mineral Products                 Environmental Agency of the Republic of
                                                                       Slovenia
                                                                        Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia:
                              CRF 2B – Chemical Industry                Environmental Agency of the Republic of
                                                                       Slovenia
CRF     2   –    Industrial                                             Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia:
Processes                     CRF 2C – Metal Production                 Environmental Agency of the Republic of
                                                                       Slovenia
                                                                        Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia:
                              CRF 2D – Other Production                 Environmental Agency of the Republic of
                                                                       Slovenia
                              CRF 2F – Consumption of Halocarbons       Environmental Agency of the Republic of
                              and SF6                                  Slovenia
                                                                        Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia
CRF 3 – Solvent and Other
                                                                        Environmental Agency of the Republic of
Product Use                                                            Slovenia
                                                                        Agricultural Institute of Slovenia
CRF 4 – Agriculture
                                                                        Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia
CRF 5 – Land Use Change                                                 Slovenian Forestry Institute
and Forestry                                                            Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia
                                                                        Environmental Agency of the Republic of
                              CRF 6A – Solid Waste Disposal on Land
                                                                       Slovenia
CRF 6 – Waste                                                           Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia
                              CRF 6B – Wastewater Handling              Environmental Agency of the Republic of
                                                                       Slovenia
                                                   Slovenia's initial report under the Kyoto Protocol – PART I1




7.3   Brief general description of methodologies and data sources used

Inventories of GHG emissions were presented on the basis of the IPCC (IPCC 1996, GPG
2000) methodology for all the gases and sectors, except in a few cases where they were
presented separately. Some emission sources that were registered and assessed were not
covered by the IPCC methodology. Due to the importance of the source and accessible data,
different approaches (tiers) from within the IPCC methodology were used. National emission
factors were used for assessment of emissions from domestic coal and natural gas (Tier 2),
while for other fuels, mainly default IPCC emission factors were used.

The quantities of fuels and consumed fuel energy values were taken from energy annual
inventories, prepared by Ministry of Economy, Directorate of Energy, based on the data of the
Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia. Additional data on the energy use of some types
of waste (waste tyres, oils and solvents) were acquired. Data on the fuel consumption in
agriculture and forestry refer to mobile sources only, while the rest of the fuel consumption of
those sub-sectors is included in the public and service sub-sector. Default IPCC emission
factors and oxidation fractions were used for energy consumption of liquid fossil fuels. Due to
the greater fraction of methane in natural gas used in Slovenia, the more appropriate, slightly
lower CH4 emission factor than the default emission factor was used for the whole period.
CH4 and N2O emissions in road transport were determined according to a more specific
methodology and CORINAIR emission factors. From the potential emissions for diesel-
fuelled vehicles, we subtracted carbon that was included in emitted solid parts, while for
gasoline vehicles a 100% fuel oxidation was assumed. Under CO2 fugitive emissions in the
Energy sector, those emissions were considered that were released during flue gas
desulphurisation in thermal power plants and were calculated on the basis of data on the
consumption of calcium carbonate. CO2 emissions in post-mining activities were not assessed
due to the lack of data on desorption. However, they appeared greater than those that were
released directly during coal excavation. Emission factors for fugitive emissions of CH4 in
mining activities were determined on the basis of measurements of methane concentrations in
ventilation shafts in mines and estimated quantities of released methane.
The emission factor that was determined in this manner was lower than the default IPCC
emission factor. The regional default IPCC emission factor for transmission and distribution
of natural gas does not correspond to the conditions in Slovenia; consequently, in calculating
CH4 emissions due to the distribution of natural gas, data of the companies that manages the
distribution and transportation network were used. Distribution losses were estimated
according to the length of individual types of transmission pipelines with regard to the pipe
type, applying specific losses per unit of length, as presented in the German Inventory, and
this appears a sensible solution considering the level of maintenance and low average age of
the distribution network.

Emissions from industrial processes were mostly determined on the basis of statistical data on
production and consumption of raw materials and by applying the country specific emission
factors. After 1997, the Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia partly changed the
manner of collecting and presenting these data, and therefore some data were obtained from
individual companies. The consumption of anodes and other reducing agents was taken into
account for the production of metals and ferroalloys. Therefore, the consumption of coke was
also included in the steel and iron production since 1997, while for the production of
ferroalloys, the consumptions of coke and petrol coke were used. Emissions from primary
aluminium production were estimated from anode consumption and from PFC emissions,


                                              16
                                                    Slovenia's initial report under the Kyoto Protocol – PART I1



which were determined on the basis of the number and duration of anode effects. When
determining the actual emissions caused by the use of HFC, data were obtained from
companies that use or sell those materials, as well as data on the export and import of
refrigerators. For SF6 emissions, the release of this gas from gas insulated switchgear in the
Energy sector was assessed.

NMVOC emissions from the consumption of solvents and diluents were estimated mostly on
the basis of the CORINAIR methodology. This category also includes emissions that arise
from evaporation during the use of N2O, mostly for anaesthesia.

In agriculture, methane emissions from enteric fermentation in bovine animals were
elaborated in great detail and the Tier 2 approach was upgraded by disaggregating livestock
into 18 categories according to the intensity of breeding. For emissions from manure
management, the Tier 2 approach was used for pig production and bovine animal production.
The Tier 1 approach was used for other animals that represent a smaller fraction in methane
emissions. Input data for N2O emissions from manure handling and from indirect emissions
from fertilisation with animal fertilisers were obtained in the process of estimating methane
emissions. For N2O emissions, default IPCC factors, determining the conversion of nitrogen
into N2O, were used.


Methane emissions from solid waste handling were determined by FOD method which take
into account the time dynamics of methane release. Emissions of N2O from wastewater were
determined according to the consumption of proteins in human nutrition and production data
in food and paper industry.


7.4   Information on the QA/QC plan including verification and treatment of
      confidentiality issues where relevant

The Republic of Slovenia has not yet fully developed a formal Quality Assurance and Quality
Control plan as recommended by IPCC Good Practice Guidelines (IPCC 2000). Activities for
formalizing the plan are under way and Manual of Procedures has already been elaborated
and used for the 2005 submission.

In spite of the not fully developed QA/QC plan, data control procedures covered by the
Manual of Procedures are already in use in developing inventories. The items verified are
input data at the level of sectoral activity data, the appropriateness of chosen emission factors,
the applied methodology as well as intermediate and final calculations of emissions where
deviations between real life emission factors and factors as calculated from the CRF table are
reviewed, too.

In 2006 additional quality control check point was introduced by forwarding assessment of
verified emission reports from installations included in National Allocation Plan to the
Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia (SORS). Role of SORS is to compare data from
installations included in EU-ETS with data from their reporting system and to propose, if
necessary, correctional measures. Outcome of data consistency checks is used as preliminary
information for the Ministry of the Environment and Spatial Planning to perform on site
inspections. However first iteration of data comparison showed that differences are
significantly lower than 5%.


                                               17
                                                   Slovenia's initial report under the Kyoto Protocol – PART I1



8    Slovenia’s National Registry


The GRETA registry system used in Slovenia has been developed for the EU Emissions
Trading Scheme.

This scheme requires its Member States registries to be compliant with the UN Data
Exchange Standards specified for the Kyoto Protocol.

Currently, the development adheres to the standards specified in Draft #7 of the UN DES
document. Slovenia has had the Registry system tested successfully with the EU Commission
and the Registry has since gone live.

In the Environment Protection Act of 7 May 2004 in Slovenia the Environmental Agency of
the Republic of Slovenia has been assigned with the responsibility to administer the National
Registry.

The National Registry under Article 7 of the Kyoto Protocol is not functional yet and the
national as well EU decisions on how it will be implemented are not taken yet. However,
Slovenia is participating in the EU Emission Trading Scheme. The National Registry under
the Kyoto Protocol will be build on the registry developed for the EU Emission Trading
Scheme. In this description, the technical information on the National Registry required in the
Guidelines for the preparation of the information required under Article 7 of the Kyoto
Protocol builds on the performance and technical properties of the registry developed for the
EU Emission Trading Scheme, complemented with information available on issues specific to
the registry under the Kyoto Protocol.


1.   Name and contact information of the registry administrator designated by the Party to
     maintain the national registry

The registry administrator designated by Slovenia to maintain the national registry is:

Environmental Agency of the Republic of Slovenia

Address: Vojkova 1b, SI-1000 Ljubljana
Tel.: +386 1 478 40 00
Contact person: Mrs. Zorana Komar, Tel.: +386 1 478 40 87
Email: zorana.komar@gov.si



2.    Any other Party with which the Party cooperates by maintaining their respective
     registries in a consolidated system

In the EU Emission Trading scheme all Member States are included in the common system.
The Slovenian Registry is currently linked to the other operational EU member states’
National Registries by way of the European Commission CITL (Community Independent
Transaction Log).



                                              18
                                                   Slovenia's initial report under the Kyoto Protocol – PART I1



The names of the other Parties with which the Slovenia will cooperates by maintaining their
national registries in a consolidated system under the Kyoto Protocol has not been decided
when writing this description.


3.   A description of the database structure used in the national registry

The system configuration consists of two physical servers, which are located at one location
and the third one at the other location, where a warm copy of the database is kept for the sake
of increased reliability. National Registry is a three-tier application. A database management
system (DBMS) runs on a separate server and is deep laid in a system. The database server
runs on Microsoft SQL Server 2000, which is installed on top of the Windows 2003 Server
Std. Edition.

The database server is separated from the application server by a firewall and is reachable
only from an application server in such a way that is consistent with a predefined security
policy.
Web services, as a part of an application server, are used for a communication with CITL
(Community Independent Transaction Log). There are internal and external web services.
Internal web services are reachable inside the DMZ, while the external web services are
visible in the Internet via SSL protocol, using also a password protection.

Besides aforementioned services, two other web servers that are used by the end-users of the
ETR application are running on the same physical server. The first one is publicly accessible,
and the second one, with its secured part, only being accessible to the authenticated users. The
entire system is secured at a network level using CISCO PIX 506 firewall, and monitored by
CA Unicenter management system. The entire system scheme is presented graphically in a
continued document. The Fujitsu-Siemens servers and all the software installed there (OS,
RDBMS, Defra application) are owned by EARS. All additional software licenses are
responsibility of a hosting provider.

Hardware and software

Web and application server:
Fujitsu-Siemens, FS PY RX300 X/3.2/1M 2 GB RAM, Raid1 (2x73 GB + Hot Spare)
Windows 2003 Server Web Edition
WSE 1.0
.NET J redistributable pack
IIS 6
WUS (Windows Update Services)
eTrust AV

Database server:
Fujitsu-Siemens, FS PY RX300 X/3.2/1M 4 GB RAM, Raid1 (2x73 GB + Hot Spare)
Windows 2003 Server Std. Edition
Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Standard

Backup server:
Windows 2003 Server Std. Edition
Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Standard


                                              19
                                                    Slovenia's initial report under the Kyoto Protocol – PART I1




Firewall:
Cisco PIX 506
Capabilities: Network interface speed 100Mbps, allows up to 25000 simultaneous connections


Mail server (SMTP):

Notifications on accomplished transactions are sent by the application via e-mail. The
application therefore needs an access to the SMTP mail server, which then sends the
notifications to the end-users e-mail addresses. Mail server address (SMTP) and sender
address (FROM Address) are set in web.config files, which are located in root folder of the
application.

For the case of difficulties which might arise during sending the e-mail (wrong or suspended
e-mail addresses, troubles with e-mail server), there is an e-mail box created on mail server, in
which return messages on undelivered mail are gathered.

System settings:
      Web server
           Besides the application, the following software is installed on the web server:
           WUS (Windows Update Services) collects latest OS updates and patches and
              forwards them to the database server because of lack of its own direct access to
              the Internet.
           DNS server is intended for central management of servers’ names, but also
              serves for the communication between database server and the web server.

       Database server:
           MS-SQL Server 2000,
           Kiwi syslog – collects the firewall logs.
           IAS (Internet Authentication System) as a part of Windows 2003 Server Std.
             Edition, intended for additional authentication of the users having an access via
             VPN.


4.   A description of how the national registry conforms to the technical standards for the
     purpose of ensuring the accurate, transparent and efficient exchange of data between
     national registries, the clean development registry and the independent transaction log,
     including below.

The national registry conforms to the technical standards for data exchange between registry
systems for the purpose of ensuring the accurate, transparent and efficient exchange of data
between national registries, the clean development mechanism registry and the transaction log
(decision 19/CP.7, paragraph 1)1 as follows:

- The GRETA registry system used in Slovenia has been developed for the EU Emissions
Trading Scheme. This scheme requires its Member States registries to be compliant with the
UN Data Exchange Standards specified for the Kyoto Protocol. Currently, the development
adheres to the standards specified in Draft #7of the UN DES document. Slovenia has had the



                                               20
                                                    Slovenia's initial report under the Kyoto Protocol – PART I1



Registry system tested successfully with the EU Commission and the Registry has since gone
live.

- As part of the GRETA Registry development, functionality has been developed to perform
issuance, conversion, external transfer, (voluntary) cancellation, retirement and reconciliation
processes using XML messages and web-services as specified in draft #7 of the UN Data
Exchange Standards document.

- In addition, 24 Hour Clean-up, Transaction Status enquiry, Time Synchronization, Data
Logging requirements (including, Transaction Log, Reconciliation Log, Internal Audit Log
and Message Archive) and the1 See decision 24/CP.8.different identifier formats as specified
in the UN DES document have been implemented. Extensive tests on these functionalities can
therefore be arranged with the ITL test system once it becomes available.

- With regards to performing tests with the CDM Registry (external transfer for example) this
can also be performed once the ITL test system becomes available.

- The following additional Kyoto functionalities have been identified by Greta that would
need to be developed for our Registry and tested against the ITL test system: Replacement of
t-CER or l-CER, Carry-Over, Expiry Date Change (for t-CER and l-CER), and The whole
area of functionality for ITL Notices (and the Notification Log).

Greta intends to schedule the development of these functionalities in their future releases in
order to meet with the timetable required for Kyoto.

In order to minimize discrepancies between the Registry and the Transaction Log, the
following approach has been adopted for the Registry system development for the EU
Emissions Trading Scheme. The same approach would be adopted for the development of the
remaining Kyoto functionality for Greta’s Registry software:

- Communication between the National Registry and the ITL would be via web-services using
XML messages as specified in the UN DES document. These web-services, XML message
format and the processing sequence would be as specified in the UN DES document;

- As far as possible, the Registry shall validate data entries against the list of checks that are
performed by the ITL as documented in Annex E of the UN DES Annexes document before
forwarding the request to the ITL for processing. This would help to minimize sending
incorrect information to the ITL for approval;

- All units that are involved in a transaction shall be earmarked internally within the Registry;
thereby preventing the units from being involved in another transaction until a response has
been received from the ITL and the current transaction has been completed;

- The web-service that sends the message to the ITL for processing will ensure that a message
acknowledgement is received from the ITL before completing the submission of the message.
Where no acknowledgement message has been received following a number of retries, the
web-service would terminate the submission and roll-back any changes made to the unit
blocks that were involved;




                                               21
                                                   Slovenia's initial report under the Kyoto Protocol – PART I1



- Where a 24 hour clean-up message is received from the ITL, the existing web-service would
roll back any pending transactions and the units that were involved, thereby preventing any
discrepancies in the unit

- Finally, if an unforeseen failure were to occur, the data discrepancies between our Registry
and the ITL can be corrected via a manual intervention function within our registry.
Following this, reconciliation will be performed to validate that the data is in sync between
the Registry and the ITL.


THE SECURITY MEASURES EMPLOYED IN THE NATIONAL REGISTRY OF
SLOVENIA ARE:


Backup plan

Web and application server

An Automatic System Recovery (ASR) copy of the system (a diskette + file) is created
immediately after the OS and application installation. A diskette and DVD disk with the data
are kept in a fireproof wardrobe on the location. ASR is a part of Backup program in
Windows Server 2003 OS and is intended for the automatic IS recovery after a disaster.

Security backup of the Web server is performed once a day. It includes communication logs
with CITL, web server metadata (metabase) and folders with the application. The backup is
performed by a backup server CA Brightstor Enterprise 10.5., situated at the location. DLT
tape is used as a storage media.


Database server

An Automatic System Recovery (ASR) copy of the system (a diskette + file) is created
immediately after the OS and application installation. A diskette and DVD disk with the data
are kept in a fireproof wardrobe on the location. ASR is a part of Backup program in
Windows Server 2003 OS and is intended for the automatic IS recovery after a disaster.

Security backup of a database server is performed following the Microsoft SQL Server
backup recommendations and procedures for the databases following so called »FULL
recovery model«. At the beginning of the month, full backup copy of the database and
transaction logs are done. Later during the month, the security copies of the database
transaction logs every 30 minutes, and differential backup of the database every hour, are
made on a server disk. From the disk they are copied to the server at the remote location every
two hours and to the tape of a backup server at location once a day.

Backup tools

Computer Associates Brightstor ARCserve Enterprise Backup 10.5
Backup utility from the operating system
Backup inside MS-SQL server



                                              22
                                                   Slovenia's initial report under the Kyoto Protocol – PART I1



Data archiving

Each month, after creating a full backup, a DVD disk is prepared, containing the following
data that need archiving:

      Full backup of the database.
      All transaction logs, arising from the communication with CITL on a web server
      The content of the folders on the web server, containing the application and the files
       with metadata about the web server.

Later during the year, the aforementioned data are being added to the DVD, which is at the
beginning of a new year rewritten to a new medium and both disks are stored in a safe place.
At the end of January, a new DVD disk in installed in place, ready for an archive for a currant
year. All the archive copies that must be kept more than a year are rewritten to a new media
which is then checked for reading. All the copies are stored in a safe place.


Security plan

While Setting-up the system:

      The security policy is to be established and implemented on firewalls
      On all the servers antivirus protection is to be installed and up to date Microsoft
       security patches as well

While running the system:

      Firewall data logs are checked on daily basis. In the case of attacks, the appropriate
       measures are executed.
      Up to date Security policy according to the system requirements is implemented on
       daily basis.
      Up to date Security patches are installed whenever new releases are published.
      Daily log checking is to be performed.
      Automatic antivirus software updates

Disaster recovery plan

Assuring fault tolerance

Both servers have redundant some crucial parts, which are improving the reliability of the
system despite a potential failure of its individual parts. Among these parts there are
redundant disks - a mirrored disk with one standby, redundant network adapters and a
redundant power supply.

In case of a server failure, business continuity is assured using the servers at a remote
location. On a working day, this can be accomplished within two hours after discovering a
failure. In nonworking time this “takeover” will be accomplished as soon as possible, but not
longer than two hours on the next working day.




                                              23
                                                    Slovenia's initial report under the Kyoto Protocol – PART I1



In case of firewall failure there is always another one on stock and will be replaced in one
hour after a discovery during a working day. Otherwise, the replacement can be done by a
technician on duty, when he’s available or in one hour on the next working day, at the latest.
For a permanent connectivity of the application with the world there are redundant network
connections to the main communication node in place. In case of the failure of any of these
connections, the traffic is rerouted through alternative ways automatically or in one hour after
being informed at the latest.

In case of a natural disaster

In case of a natural or other disaster (force majeure source) an alternative system is
established at a backup location for a time of unavailability of the primary system. The latest
backup of the database and backups of the web and application servers are restored then the
traffic is rerouted from a primary to a backup location. During the operation at the backup
location, all the activities are undertaken to restore a primary location as soon as possible.
When accomplished, the application and the data are returned to the primary location.

Security policy

Access to the servers at location
Direct access to the servers is allowed via system console located in a room besides a server
room. Access to the servers is allowed only to the authorized users.

Access to servers via VPN connection:
Access to servers via VPN connection is enabled. For this purpose Cisco Client software is
used. To enable the access to some machine via VPN, person must get a username and a
password on that machine and become a member of a VPN group on that machine. VPN
access is allowed to the web server only. If a person wants to access a database server, can do
this only via RDP client on a web server.

Security policy for the firewall:

There are two segments defined with a firewall, a DMZ and INSIDE. In DMZ segment, there
is a address space defined, with a gateway, and a web server is located there. In INSIDE
segment, there is a following address space defined, with a gateway. Database server is
located there.

Web server:

Internet access to the server:
       Closed, except for HTTP (TCP 80), HTTPS (TCP 443).

Access to Internet from the server:
       Closed, except for HTTP (TCP 80), HTTPS (TCP 443), SMTP (TCP 25), SNTP (UDP
123), DNS (UDP 53)

Internet access to the server:
       Internet access to the server is blocked.

Access to Internet from the server: Access from the server to Internet is blocked.


                                               24
                                                   Slovenia's initial report under the Kyoto Protocol – PART I1




Access to the server from DMZ: Closed, except for SQL (TCP 1433) and RDP (TCP 3389).

Access to the DMZ from the web server: Closed, except for HTTP (TCP 80), DNS (UDP 53),
SNTP (UDP 123).

VPN connections:
A VPN connection with the system using Cisco Client - Additional authentication method
utilizes aforementioned usernames and passwords.

Web services security settings:
Production & test environment: Internal web services are accessible within DMZ segment
only. Access to these services is restricted by means of IP restrictions on a web server.
External web services are accessible through proper username and password only.

For the Greta Registry the following security measures have been taken:

- By default, access to the Registry is via Username and Password though a different
authentication module can be added locally, if required;

- The actions that a user can perform are controlled by a permissions system, hence
preventing unauthorized access to restricted actions;

- Database manipulations are only carried out by protected, internal stored procedures which
are not accessible directly from the user interface and can only be invoked by our internal
web-services;

In order to preventing operator errors, our Registry software incorporates the following
design:

- Applies validation on all user inputs to ensure that only valid details are submitted for
processing;

- Displays confirmation of user input to help the user to spot any errors that had been made;

- Implements an internal approval process for secondary approval for relevant operations
before submitting the details to the ITL for processing.

Currently, the Greta registry system for the EU Emissions Trading Scheme uses the security
mechanism as specified within the EU Regulation; (Annex XV); that is, it uses basic
authentication and SSL.

For Kyoto, digital cert and VPN will be used when the ITL becomes available. This will be
included in future phase of the Greta registry development project.




                                              25
                                                     Slovenia's initial report under the Kyoto Protocol – PART I1



5. A list of the information publicly accessible through the user interface to the national
registry.

The information publicly available is maintained in accordance with the Commission
Regulation of 21 December 2004 for a standardized and secured system of registries pursuant
to Directive 2003/87/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council and Decision
280/2004/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council. The internet address to the
interface of the Slovenian national registry is http://rte.arso.gov.si

We intend to schedule the development of publicly accessible information in our future
releases in order to meet with the timetable required for Kyoto. These reports will be
displayed publicly.


6. An explanation of how to access information through the user interface of the national
registry.

The internet address to the interface of the Slovenian national registry is http://rte.arso.gov.si.
User than can select the public reports link at the bottom of the page.




                                                26