Response to Literature Essay Writing - PowerPoint by jae10613

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									 Response to
 Literature
Essay Writing
Intro. Paragraph   Thesis with 3 major reasons
with thesis
statement*


Body Par. #1       Reason #1 discussed in
                   this paragraph



                   Reason #2 discussed in
Body Par. #2       this paragraph




Body Par. #3       Reason #3 discussed in
(optional)         this paragraph



Concluding
Paragraph                Final thoughts
Introductory Paragraph -- Like a funnel, start with a broad
connection to the topic and then hone in on your point (thesis).


       Start with a “hook.” Mention the title,
       author and genre (TAG) and add a
       couple of focus sentences that lead to
       the thesis statement.

                  The thesis statement is a
                  debatable claim or point
                  you wish to prove.


                                                      Diagram
INTRODUCTORY PARAGRAPH: the first
paragraph in your essay. It begins creatively
in order to catch your reader’s interest
(HOOK), provides essential background
about the literary work, and prepares the
reader for your major thesis. The
introduction must include the title, author,
and genre (TAG) of the work as well as an
explanation of the theme to be discussed.

The major thesis goes in this paragraph,
usually at the end.
HOOK (also CREATIVE OPENING): the beginning
   sentences of the introduction that catch the
   reader’s interest. Ways of beginning creatively
   include the following:

1) A startling fact or bit of information
2) A snatch of dialogue between two characters
3) A meaningful quotation (from the work or another
   source)
4) A universal idea
5) A rich, vivid description of the setting
6) An analogy or metaphor
1)    A startling fact or bit of
            information
  “The Americans of 1776 had the
 highest standard of living and the
lowest taxes in the Western World!”
 2) A snatch of dialogue between
          two characters
  Mother frowned, “You mean your
 troops are stealing from your own
               people?
“A starving man will steal food from
       babies,” Sam replied.
 3) A meaningful quotation (from the
         work or other source)
General Putnam, on Sam’s execution:
    “He is thinking…if he executes
 somebody he’ll shorten the war and
save more lives… one man’s agony is
like another’s, one mother’s tears are
    no wetter than anybody else’s.”
           4) A universal idea
   Although the survivors may reap the
  benefits of war, the casualties see no
               such benefit.
5)      A rich, vivid description of the
                     setting
     It was an exercise in contrasts. The
      sun was shining and the birds were
        chirping as Tim approached the
      church, flanked on one side by the
         trainband and the other by the
                   graveyard.

        6) An analogy or metaphor
       Protests are battles in a war of
                conscience.
TAG -- acronym for title, author,
genre

(Genre -- tell whether the literature
selection is a novel, play, short
story, poem, essay, etc.)
              Connection
• 2nd part of intro
• transition statement from hook to the topic
• must include TAG (title, author, genre)
T: My Brother Sam Is Dead
A: James Lincoln Collier and Chistopher Collier
G: historical fiction novel


  “We’ve beaten the British! We’ve
  beaten the British!” Such were the
  exuberant, opening words of Sam
  Meeker in Collier and Collier’s historical
  fiction masterpiece, My Brother Sam Is
  Dead.
             Summary
• 3rd part of intro
• follows the hook and connection
• 2-3 line summary of topic
                Hook, TAG, Summary

   “We’ve beaten the British in Massachusetts!” (2). Such were
the exuberant, opening words of Sam Meeker in Collier and
Collier’s historical fiction masterpiece, My Brother Sam Is Dead.
Sixteen year-old Sam Meeker, who comes from a family of
Loyalists, enlists in the Rebel army. This story follows Sam and
his brother, Tim, along with their parents, through the ever-
changing landscape of the Revolutionary War.
THESIS STATEMENT: a statement
that provides the subject and
overall opinion of your essay.
Many thesis statements explicitly
outline the major points of the
body paragraphs.
    Thesis with Subtopics

The devastation of war is
exemplified throughout this
novel. Mankind’s worst
behaviors are revealed, family
relationships are threatened,
and communities are
irreparably damaged because
of war.
            Intro Paragraph
   Mother frowned, “You mean your troops are stealing
from their own men?”
   Sam replied, “A starving man will steal food from
babies.” Man’s callousness in war is demonstrated in this
dialogue from the historical novel My Brother Sam Is Dead
by Collier and Collier.
 Sixteen year-old Sam Meeker, who comes from a family of
Loyalists, enlists in the Rebel army. This story follows Sam
and his brother, Tim, along with their parents, through the
ever-changing landscape of the Revolutionary War. The
devastation of war is exemplified throughout this novel.
Mankind’s worst behaviors are revealed, family
relationships are threatened, and communities are

irreparably damaged because of war.
Intro. Paragraph   Thesis with 3 major reasons
with thesis
statement*


Body Par. #1       Reason #1 discussed in
                   this paragraph



                   Reason #2 discussed in
Body Par. #2       this paragraph




Body Par. #3       Reason #3 discussed in
(optional)         this paragraph



Concluding
Paragraph                Final thoughts
BODY: the support paragraphs of your essay.
These paragraphs contain supporting
examples (concrete detail) and
analysis/explanation (commentary) for your
topic sentences.

Each paragraph in the body includes (1) a
topic sentence/support thesis, (2) integrated
concrete details/examples, (3)
commentary/explanation for details/examples,
and (4) a concluding sentence.
      Body Paragraphs - two minimum




Begin with a topic sentence
which supports the major thesis
statement from the introductory
paragraph.
TOPIC SENTENCE: the first
sentence of a body paragraph.
It identifies one aspect of the
major thesis and states a
primary reason why the major
thesis is true.
           Topic Sentence
• The horrors of war bring out the worst in
  man.
LEAD-IN/TRANSITION:
phrase or sentence that
prepares the reader for a
concrete detail by
introducing the speaker,
setting, and/or situation.
CONCRETE DETAIL: a specific
example from the work of literature
used to provide evidence for your
topic sentence/support thesis.

Concrete detail can be a
combination of paraphrase and
direct quotation from the work.
          Concrete Detail with
           lead-in/transition
• For example, ten-year old Jerry Sanford is taken prisoner on
  a British prison ship where he eventually dies of typhus. His
  body is unceremoniously thrown overboard in a weighted
  sack.
• The horrifying aspect of war is again demonstrated with the
  death of Ned, Samuel Smith’s negro slave. As Tim
  witnessed, “The sword flashed in a bright arc, the fastest
  thing I ever saw. Ned’s head jumped off his body and
  popped into the air” (144-5).
COMMENTARY: your explanation
and interpretation of the concrete
detail. Commentary tells the reader
what the author of the text means
or how the concrete detail proves
the topic sentence and supports
the thesis. Commentary may
include interpretation, analysis,
argument, insight, and/or reflection.
                Commentary
• For example, ten-year old Jerry Sanford is taken
  prisoner on a British prison ship where he
  eventually dies of typhus. His body is
  unceremoniously thrown overboard in a weighted
  sack. There is no reason why a young boy should
  suffer this fate solely because he was a friend of a
  Rebel. Even more degrading is he never is
  afforded a proper burial.
CONCLUDING
SENTENCE/CLINCHER:
last sentence of the body
paragraph. It concludes the
paragraph by tying the concrete
details and commentary back to
the topic sentence and/or thesis
statement.
        Concluding Sentence
As Susannah Meeker states, “War turns men into
  beasts” (140). The actions of the characters in this
  novel certainly support this statement.
        Body Paragraph #1
The horrors of war bring out the worst in man. For example,
ten-year old Jerry Sanford is taken prisoner on a British
prison ship where he eventually dies of typhus. His body is
unceremoniously thrown overboard in a weighted sack.
There is no reason why a young boy should suffer this fate
solely because he was a friend of a Rebel. Even more
degrading is he never is afforded a proper burial. The
horrifying aspect of war is again demonstrated with the death
of Ned, Samuel Smith’s negro slave. As Tim witnessed, “The
sword flashed in a bright arc, the fastest thing I ever saw.
Ned’s head jumped off his body and popped into the air”
(144-5). It is not enough to take his life; he is mutilated by
the British soldier. As Susannah Meeker states, “War turns
men into beasts” (140). The actions of the characters
certainly support this statement.
Suggested Outline for Body Paragraphs:

Topic Sentence -- a major reason of support for thesis
statement.
          Lead-in/Transition to Concrete Detail #1
                   (sentence or phrase)
               Concrete Detail #1 sentence
                 Commentary/support sentence for CD#1
                 Commentary/support sentence for CD#1
          Lead-in/Transition to Concrete Detail #2
                   (sentence or phrase)
               Concrete Detail #2 sentence
                 Commentary/support sentence for CD#2
                 Commentary/support sentence for CD#2
Concluding sentence -- summarizes and transitions to next
paragraph
     Concluding Paragraph




              Echo your major thesis
              without repeating words
              verbatim.

    Then, broaden from the thesis to answer the
    “so what?” question for your reader.
Reflect on how your topic relates to the book as a
whole, give your opinion of the novel’s significance,
or connect back to your creative opening.
    Concluding Paragraph
In conclusion, war is horrific. It brings out the
worst in man, it tears families apart, and it
permanently damages communities. Later in
his life, Tim reflects, “There might have been
another way, besides war, to achieve the
same end” (211). Does man have choices
when it comes to war? My Brother Sam Is
Dead thoughtfully ponders this question.
Intro. Paragraph   Thesis with 3 major reasons
with thesis
statement*


Body Par. #1       Reason #1 discussed in
                   this paragraph



                   Reason #2 discussed in
Body Par. #2       this paragraph




Body Par. #3       Reason #3 discussed in
(optional)         this paragraph



Concluding
Paragraph                Final thoughts
Credit:

PowerPoint by Anita Mattos; April, 2006

Based in part on:
Poway Unified School District “A Guide to the
Literary-Analysis Essay” which was based in part on:
Cobb County’s “A Guide to the Research Paper,”
Upland High School’s “Student Writer’s Handbook,”
and the MLA Handbook for Writer’s
of Research Papers.

								
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