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Creation and Science Syllabus

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Syllabus for Creation and Science class, Winter session 2009

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CREATION AND SCIENCE SYLLABUS SI 161 Winter session 2009 Ozark Christian College Class sessions: 8 AM – 4 PM, Mon.-Friday, Class sessions: Jan.5-9 w/ assignments beyond 2 Credit Hours TERRY CHANEY 417-624-2518, Extension 2500 tchaney@occ.edu Office: MO23 Classroom: M26

Course Description This class critically evaluates the major supporting evidences of creation and evolution by means of lecture, class discussion, and independent readings/research. Students will learn the scientific validity of the supernatural creation of Genesis and its foundational relationship to New Testament Christianity. College Mission The ultimate mission of Ozark Christian College is to glorify God by evangelizing the lost and edifying Christians worldwide. The immediate mission of Ozark Christian College is to train men and women for Christian service through an undergraduate Bible college education. College Learning Objectives (CLO) 1. A knowledge of sound doctrine taught from the Word of God. 2. An acquaintance with historical evidences and an understanding of the basis of faith in Christ and the Bible. 3. An approach to Bible study that seeks to understand the author's intended meaning. 4. An intellectual development that will enable the students to be good learners, clear thinkers, and competent judges of what is right, for a whole lifetime of applying the word of God to the accomplishment of God's will. 5. Skills for effective written and oral communication. 6. A personal growth in Christian character and fellowship with Christ; included are faith, feeling, zeal to serve, self-denial, discipline, stability, and strength. 7. A variety of skills for leading others to Christ, building believers to maturity in Christ, and equipping them to be fruitful in the service of Christ. General Studies Area Objectives (GSAO) 1. Practice the principles of clear thinking and effective written and oral communication. 2. Demonstrate knowledge of the principles, methods and tools of interpretation that can be applied to the Bible and to any piece of literature. 3. Manifest knowledge of the relationship of Christianity to the history of western civilization. 4. Identify geographical locations important to an understanding of biblical history. [This class will include here geographical locations important to an understanding of history in general] 5. Understand key contemporary worldviews and be able to explain and defend the Christian worldview.
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6. Develop proficiency in the use of Biblical languages so he or she can gain the best possible understanding of the word of God, provided the BTh program is elected.

Course Goals The course is intended to . . . 1. Explain the nature and importance of both science and faith in the life of the modern Christian. 2. Impress the student with the need to be able to answer the questions of those confused about the issue of science versus faith. 3. Present the case made for both the evolutionary and creation models of origins. 4. Give the student opportunities to practice writing critical and college level papers. 5. Strengthen the Christian in faith and encourage him in his worship of the one who made all things ex nihilo. 6. Impress upon one the distinction between macro and micro evolution. 7. Introduce the student to the dogmatism present in much of science on the issue of evolution. 8. Explain the implications of accepting evolutionary theory. 9. Examine the origins of both the universe and our solar system. 10. Survey some of the evidence that points to a designer creator. 11. Analyze the problem of the age of the earth and universe. 12. Confront the student with the absurdity of the idea that extensive biological progress has been made through chance occurrences. 13. Present a critical analysis of some of the more popular proofs that have been used for evolution. 14. Introduce the student to the geologic column, the fossil record, and the problems paleontology presents for evolutionary theory. 15. Analyze the evolutionary ideas concerning the origin of humankind. 16. Explain some of the mechanics and implications of the universal flood of Noah. 17. Examine the theistic evolution and gap theories as alternative explanations for the origin of all things. 18. Consider the position of Hugh Ross and his ministry in the light of science and scripture. Course Objectives Upon completion of this course, a student should be able to: 1. Identify and recognize the impact of primary scientific and philosophical contributors to the creation-evolution controversy. [CLO 4, 5 and GSAO 1,3] 2. Understand that the supernatural creation of Genesis is a plausible scientific belief and recognize its foundational relationship to the N.T. [CLO 1,3,4,5 and GSAO 1,3,5] 3. Refute the basic scientific ―facts‖ that the secular world uses to ―prove‖ that evolution is the only intellectually acceptable model of origins. [CLO 4,5 and GSAO 1,3] Course Curricular Placement Creation and Science is required for each of the following degrees: B. Th., BBL, and BCM. It is also required in several other programs of study. Until recently SI 161 has normally been taken
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during a student's first year at OCC. In the Fall of 2008 the class was reclassified as a Junior level course. We remain in a transition period. Course Rationale The Christian of today lives in a world where science dominates much of life. In such a world it is essential for the Christian to know how his faith is to be related to science. This is especially true in light of the fact that much of what is considered to be scientific is permeated with evolutionary thinking. The Christian must be able to distinguish true science from false. He must also be aware of the real challenge the theory of evolution presents to the faith of believers and the potential faith of unbelievers. ADA Accommodation If you have a disability and are requesting an accommodation, please contact the Executive Director of Admissions at 417-624-2518 Extension 2006 as soon as possible. Information Literacy Ozark Christian College is committed to information literacy training. This training will be intentional, incremental, and missional. Students will learn to access, evaluate, and utilize pertinent information in their ministry preparation. Late Work Assignments are due by the time designated on Moodle of the day the paper is due. Assignments handed in after that time will be late. Late assignments will be penalized one letter grade for each day late (for sake of clarity note that Saturday and Sunday and Monday are one day each). This includes reading and ALL other assignments. Assignments will not be accepted after one week has passed from the due date. Nothing will be accepted after the final exam. There are no incomplete grades. Exams When a scheduled exam (one announced to the class beforehand either in writing or orally—all exams in this course are scheduled) is missed, the teacher will determine if you can make up the exam and if so whether there will be any penalty. If you are allowed to makeup the exam, then a fee of $5.00 must be paid to the Business Office. Bring the receipt to me. I will give all makeup exams for my classes. This means that you are not to bother the Learning Center and that you will have to make arrangements with me for a time. In no case can an exam be made up after one week has passed from your return to school. If you miss a quiz, you cannot make it up. Any student wishing to take the final exam at a time other than scheduled must receive approval from the Academic Dean, make arrangements with the teacher and pay a fee of $25. Attendance Policy From the OCC Catalog: "CLASS ATTENDANCE Attendance is taken seriously because Christian leaders must be self-disciplined. The student receives a benefit from the discussion, interaction and emphasis of a class session, which s/he
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can get in no other way even by additional make-up work. When the student is absent from class, s/he experiences a loss which may not show up on examinations but is nevertheless real. The student is expected to attend each meeting of the class in which s/he is enrolled. Roll will be taken in each class. Faculty members may make specific requirements regarding attendance stated in their course syllabi that students will need to meet, but general attendance regulations apply to all classes. After a total of two weeks of absence plus one day in a class, the student will receive an "F" for the course. In cases of extenuating circumstances beyond the student's control, appeal for credit must be made to the faculty committee. This appeal must be in writing, state reasons for the absences and presented to the Assistant to the Academic Dean before final exams begin for the semester in question. Petition forms are available in the Academic Dean's Office." Absences In addition to the college policy above, the following policies will be followed in this course. Keep a record of your absences and reasons for them in case the school administration requests that information. Do not expect notification to be given when you approach or exceed the absence limit. The Moodle record of attendance will help keep you informed, though remember the Moodle record is generally updated on weekends and NOT every day; therefore, it may not include more recent absences when you consult it. You are responsible for keeping a record of your absences and for alerting me to any errors that appear in the Moodle record so that we can discuss them. NOTE: Because of the nature of this time-compressed course, absences will be recorded in terms of minutes of class missed. PLEASE NOTE that this means each 50 minutes missed is equivalent to one absence. As a result, by missing more than 200 minutes of class during winter session, one will become over-absent and have to appeal to the faculty committee to receive credit for the course. Please pay careful attention to this. Tardies From the OCC Catalog: "Tardies Tardy students will be counted absent for the period unless they inform the professor of their presence at the conclusion of the class period. Four tardies constitute an absence. Any tardiness over fifteen minutes constitutes an absence. Faculty are free to establish their own reporting procedures.” A student is considered tardy when not present and ready for class at the time class is scheduled to begin. Please note that tardiness has nothing to do with whether one‘s name has yet been called in the roll or even whether the teacher has begun to call the roll. Also, arriving in time for class but then leaving the classroom means that one is tardy. In accordance with the college catalog, four tardies will be considered equivalent to one absence. Missing more than 15 minutes of class is not a tardy but an absence. Please note: as hard as I try I cannot note the tardy arrival of every student. When the roll has been taken and I have moved on to other things, I often do not think to record a tardy student's arrival. Therefore, in accordance with the school catalog the student is responsible for notifying the teacher that he was tardy and not absent. Do this after class is over. Even if you have to chase me down, this must still be done. Failure to draw the
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teacher's attention to one's tardiness may result in the tardy being recorded as an absence. Please do not forget. In the end the teacher‘s record is the final judge regarding absences and tardies. Sleeping in class Those who sleep in class will be considered tardy or absent at the teacher‘s discretion based on the severity of the problem. The teacher will not necessarily warn you before recording your sleep as a tardy or absence. Please feel free to move to the back of the room and stand if sleep becomes a continuing problem for you. Absences and tardies due to sleep are generally indicated such in the comments section of the Moodle absence record. Grading Policies Grading Scale. See the scale in the college Catalog. When I grade essays, papers, or reports, the letter grades mean the following: A Excellent. Shows creativity, completeness, clarity of expression, accuracy and good organization. B Good. Accurate information, well organized, though lacking in one or more of the following areas: creativity, completeness, clarity of expression. C Average. Meets basic requirements but is not strong in organization, clarity or completeness. May also indicate an abundance of typing and grammatical errors. D Poor. Barely acceptable because of limitations in completeness, accuracy, organization, and form. F Failing. Work is unacceptable for credit. Falls short of what is required for a passing grade. Plagiarism As human disciples of Christ we all fall short on many occasions. However, as human disciples of Christ, we seek to please him always. This continues to be true when we complete our school assignments. When writing your papers, there is no reason to commit plagiarism. It is avoidable. Just to be sure everyone is on the same page, please carefully consider the following: Plagiarism occurs when  You submit a paper that is not your own work as if it were. It does not matter whether the actual author of the paper knows and/or consents to your use of it.  You submit a paper that is only partially your own work. The rest is the work of someone else that you are passing off as if it were your own.  You include in your paper either the words or ideas of another without documenting your source. If you borrow it, then document it.  You include in your paper the words of someone else but do not use quotation marks to indicate that you are quoting them directly. This is plagiarism whether you document your source or not. If you take 2 or more words from another source, indicate that you are quoting through the proper use of quotation marks.

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You use the research of someone else but pass it off as if it were your own. For example, using something quoted by someone else but giving only the original source documentation as if you found it in the original source is plagiarism. Even borrowed quotes must be documented to show where you actually got it and not just where it occurred originally. You submit a paper to more than one class without receiving prior permission. Some go so far as to suggest that any time one submits a paper to more than one class, it is plagiarism. However, in my own experience, most teachers just want to know ahead of time so that additional guidelines can be suggested if desired. For example, a teacher may suggest that it is okay to submit a paper as long as the final submission is twice as long as the normal assignment. You should discuss the issue with your other teachers individually. In my class I ask that you do not resubmit a paper from another class. If you do, it will be considered plagiarism and subject to the associated penalties.

Each student is to read the following in accordance with the Moodle schedule. Please note especially the examples of plagiarism and of legitimate use of sources found in the articles.  Plagiarism by Earl Babbie [http://www.csub.edu/ssric-trd/howto/plagiarism.htm]  Avoiding Plagiarism @ OSU [http://oregonstate.edu/admin/stucon/plag.htm]  Plagiarism Tutorial [http://www.indiana.edu/~istd/] Office Hours I can be contacted by email (tchaney@occ.edu) and by the Moodle messaging system. If you need to reach me by phone, my number is 624-2518, x2500. I am also glad to meet with you if there are any problems or questions that you would like to discuss. My office hours are posted outside my office door (MO23 on floor 2 of Missions Building). I am glad to arrange an appointment convenient to you. In addition, I specifically invite students to come by Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursdays from 1:30 to 2:30 if they need to speak to me. Course Materials: Selected readings from the following books and other resources will be used. These are accessible online or you may buy the hard copy books. See the Reading Assignments on Moodle for specifics. 1. Refuting Evolution by Jonathan Sarfati. Master Books, 1999. http://creationontheweb.com/content/view/4014/ 2. Refuting Evolution 2 by Jonathan Sarfati. Master Books, 2002. http://creationontheweb.com/content/view/4013/ 3. The Revised and Expanded Answers Book: The 20 Most-Asked Questions About Creation, Evolution, & the Book of Genesis Answered! By Ham, et al. New Leaf Press, October 1990. http://www.answersingenesis.org/articles/nab Assignments for the Course (See the Moodle site for due dates):

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Reading. Reading is a major part of this course and as such is worth a great deal toward your final grade. Each student is expected to complete all reading assigned for the course. Reading consists of the class texts located online (also available for purchase in book form) and sometimes additional internet material. Reading is to be done according to the schedule found at the class Moodle site: http://moodle.occ.edu/course/view.php?id=136&cal_m=2&cal_y=2009. By the reading date assigned, report the completion of the assignment [Note that incomplete reading assignments are not accepted. Reading can only be reported when it is 100% complete. This means if you read 85% of an assignment but do not get it entirely done by the due date, it cannot be reported and will not be accepted. Afterward, however, you can submit it late—though take note of the penalty for late work explained in the syllabus.] and submit 15 or more multiple choice questions over the reading. Include at least one question for each of the articles, chapters or websites read. Take time to construct these questions carefully and do a quality job with good multiple choice options. Failure to do a good job can result in a reduction in the grade. In your multiple choice questions, mark the correct choice by underlining or something similar. Use the model below: 1. In the article on ―Earth: A Planet Unlike Any Other‖ what is said to be unique about the nature of water? a. Its chemical structure is more complex than any other element b. It can exist in three different forms: liquid, solid or gas c. It has not been found outside of earth d. It expands when it freezes while most things contract 2. In the video, ―Life is What You Make It,‖ which of the following is NOT one of the requirements for life? a. The right materials b. The right kind of materials c. The right electrical charges d. The right atmosphere

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Acts & Facts Newsletter. This assignment is to go to http://www.icr.org/signup/ at the Institute for Creation Research website and sign up for a free subscription to the publication Acts and Facts. The mail address if you prefer is: ICR, P.O. Box 2667, El Cajon, CA92021. In order to receive credit for this it must be done by the date found on Moodle. Interview Report. Interview at least 5 people not associated with OCC. Try to get a variety of people from different walks of life. Record at least the audio of the interview by whatever means you like and then report the results here by writing out the details. Ask the following questions and note carefully their responses: 1. What is science about and what does it try to do? 2. Do you believe in creationism, evolution or both? 3. Which do you believe should be taught in public schools: creationism, evolution, neither or both?

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4. What do you think is the strongest argument for evolution? 5. Is the earth really old (billions of years) or really young (thousands of years)? 6. Do you believe the Bible is completely true, mostly true, partly true or not true at all? Conclude with a WIGOOTA (What I Got Out Of This Assignment) paragraph at the end. Tips: Security at some businesses such as the mall has asked students to stop in the past. Family works as do co-workers. Parks, college campuses and churches can be good locations. Be polite. To initiate the interview ask the person for permission to ask a few questions ("Hi, can I ask you a few questions for a school project? We have an assignment to record an interview with several people."). Thank them when you are done. Answer any questions about the interview that they may put to you. Transcribe your recorded interview. You should do this in a word processor rather than trying to transcribe your recording directly into the Moodle assignment. Save a copy on your computer before copying and pasting each question of each interview into Moodle. Note that this will take considerable time. Be sure to start this whole process early enough to get it all done by the assigned date. WARNING: This is going to take more time than you think! Note that the interviews are to be completed earlier than the finished project. See the Moodle calendar for the due dates.  Project #3. A Presentation Project in Four Easy Steps Overview of the assignment (this and the individual parts are found on the Moodle site): Each student will prepare and submit an original, quality PowerPoint presentation which contains the essence of what has been taught at least once to a small group. The lesson is to be titled, "Why I am a Creationist." In the lesson clearly state the three or four biggest and most convincing reasons why you personally are a creationist (in the event that you are not, you may substitute the title, "Why I am Not a Creationist," and give those reasons). Focus on reasons that carry weight in convincing others. Some sample reasons might include: 1) Because abiogenesis is impossible. 2) Because of the evidences for a young earth. 3) Because of the Genesis description in ch. 1. 4) Because of the fossil record. 5) Because of thermodynamics. 6) Because of the evident design in living creatures. 7) Because of the design in the cosmos. 8) Because of irreducible complexity. Please make your choice based on the issues discussed in this class. See the discussions in the reading assignments. Avoid overly broad or subjective reasons such as 1) Because the Bible says so or 2) Because the Bible can be trusted or 3) Because I was raised that way. Be sure that the lesson is full of factual data for each of the clear reasons you submit. Presentation will be graded down for ranting, raving and name-calling. Stick to the facts and do not get emotional or insulting to the other side. Do not get all your facts from only one or two sources. Gather several (I suggest a minimum of five). Make it popular and interesting. Presentation will be graded down if it cannot be understood by ordinary
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adults or if it is boring to ordinary adults. Include illustrations and stories to make it interesting. Be sure it is DOCUMENTED! This means that anything you borrow from anyone else (and you should be borrowing most everything!) must be referenced. Tell where you get everything you use. See the information on plagiarism located here. Failure to do this properly can result in a zero for the assignment, failure in the class and/or submission of your name to the school administration. Sounds scary, right? Want to avoid it and never have to worry about it? All you have to do is document borrowed material by simply putting the author's name, the source title and page number in the notes section of each slide (Justan Example, Creator of All, 494). Do not put the documentation in the presentation slide itself, though the author's name might be good. If you quote more than a couple of his words, use quotation marks. Try to quote little and summarize instead. This assignment will employ the Peer Review Process. Be sure to familiarize yourself with it. Make it a full lesson of at least 25 minutes. All normal presentations take place at the rate of more than 100 words per minute. Thus, if your presentation has fewer than 2500 words, it will be considered short. Time your presentation to make sure it is long enough. Include graphics, color and visuals in your slides to make them more interesting. Include a note in the note section of slide one that describes the persons and situation where you delivered the lesson. Follow these instructions precisely and work hard on this significant project. The Four Step Program: 1. Step One of the major presentation project. On this day, turn in the outline you will be using and an explanation of each point. All you need to do is to give each of the 3 or 4 reasons you will present as to why you are a creationist. Also include a short paragraph under each reason which summarizes what you intend to say about it. 2. Step Two of the major presentation project. On this day, the manuscript (fully written paper) portion of the following presentation assignment is due to be submitted to your peers. Consult the Peer Review check sheet [available at the Moodle site] to see how your submissions will be evaluated. Be sure that you follow the directions below for content. Don't forget to DOCUMENT EVERYTHING YOU BORROW and EDIT CAREFULLY! Follow the research paper guide from the bookstore! 3. Step Three of the major presentation project. On this day the finished presentation including all PowerPoint slides is due to be submitted to your peers. Consult the Peer Review check sheet [available at http://faculty.occ.edu/terrychaney/peer_review.htm] to see how your submissions will be evaluated. Be sure that you follow the directions for content. Don't forget to DOCUMENT EVERYTHING YOU BORROW and EDIT CAREFULLY! Be sure to submit in PowerPoint format. If you use another presentation software program, save it in .ppt format before submitting it. It is best to put your manuscript information in the notes of the slides.
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Final Step of the major presentation project. After making whatever changes need to be made based on Peer feedback, submit your final version of the presentation to be graded by the teacher. Be sure to submit in PowerPoint format. If you use another presentation software program, save it in .ppt format before submitting it to me. It is best to put your manuscript information in the notes of the slides.

Poor Writing Any project with more than very few typographical or other errors will be greatly reduced in grade. Indeed, it is possible and regularly happens that a project can receive a failing grade due only to poor writing. Any paper with significant errors will receive a failing grade or, at the teacher's discretion, require rewriting.

Chronological List of Assignments (see Moodle for changes)
Week Assignment 1 Reading Report 1 Sign up for the "Acts & Facts" Newsletter Reading Report 2 Test #1 Reading Report 3 Reading Report 4 Test #2 Reading Report 5 2 Final Exam is DUE Monday, Jan. 12 at 11:55 PM Reading Report 6 Reading Report 7 Plagiarism Information Due Jan. 13. Have you completed the interviews? Due Jan. 14. Reading Report 8 Reading Report 9 Reading Report 10 Interview Assignment Report -- WARNING: This long process is due Jan. 16. Creation & Science with Terry Chaney Due Date and Time Monday, 5 January 2009, 11:55 PM Wednesday, 7 January 2009, 11:55 PM Tuesday, 6 January 2009, 11:55 PM Wednesday, 7 January 2009, 08:00 AM Wednesday, 7 January 2009, 11:55 PM Thursday, 8 January 2009, 11:55 PM Friday, 9 January 2009, 08:00 AM Friday, 9 January 2009, 11:55 PM Monday, 12 January 2009, 11:55 PM Monday, 12 January 2009, 11:55 PM Tuesday, 13 January 2009, 11:55 PM Tuesday, 13 January 2009, 11:55 PM Wednesday, 14 January 2009, 11:55 PM Wednesday, 14 January 2009, 11:55 PM Thursday, 15 January 2009, 11:55 PM Friday, 16 January 2009, 11:55 PM Friday, 16 January 2009, 11:55 PM Winter session 2009

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Page 11 of 17 3 Reading Report 11 Reading Report 12 Reading Report 13 Reading Report 14 Reading Report 15 "Why I Am A Creationist" -- Step 1 4 Reading Report 16 Reading Report 17 Reading Report 18 Reading Report 19 Reading Report 20 "Why I Am A Creationist" Step 2 -Manuscript Submission Due 5 Reading Report 21 "Why I Am A Creationist" Step 2 -Manuscript Assessments Due Reading Report 22 Reading Report 23 Reading Report 24 "Why I am a Creationist" Step 3 -PowerPoint Submission Due Reading Report 25 6 Reading Report 26 Reading Report 27 "Why I am a Creationist" Step 3 -PowerPoint Assessments Due 7 "Why I am A Creationist" Step 4 (Final Submission) Due Monday, 19 January 2009, 11:55 PM Tuesday, 20 January 2009, 11:55 PM Wednesday, 21 January 2009, 11:55 PM Thursday, 22 January 2009, 11:55 PM Friday, 23 January 2009, 11:55 PM Friday, 23 January 2009, 11:55 PM Monday, 26 January 2009, 11:55 PM Tuesday, 27 January 2009, 11:55 PM Wednesday, 28 January 2009, 11:55 PM Thursday, 29 January 2009, 11:55 PM Friday, 30 January 2009, 11:55 PM Friday, 30 January 2009, 11:55 PM Monday, 2 February 2009, 11:55 PM Tuesday, 3 February 2009, 11:55 PM Tuesday, 3 February 2009, 11:55 PM Wednesday, 4 February 2009, 11:55 PM Thursday, 5 February 2009, 11:55 PM Friday, 6 February 2009, 11:55 PM Friday, 6 February 2009, 11:55 PM Monday, 9 February 2009, 11:55 PM Tuesday, 10 February 2009, 11:55 PM Tuesday, 10 February 2009, 11:55 PM Wednesday, 1 April 2009, 01:55 AM

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Reading Assignments—Tentative List: See Moodle for updated readings Reading Outline and assignments Assignment RefEv = Refuting Evolution located at: Number http://creationontheweb.com/content/view/3829 RefEv2 = Refuting Evolution 2 located at: http://creationontheweb.com/content/view/3302/ AnsBk = The Revised and Expanded Answers Book located at: http://www.answersingenesis.org/articles/nab 1. What is this class about? A. Where are the class materials? http://moodle.occ.edu/course/view.php?id=136 B. What does the class cover? C. Why is this class taught? D. What are the class resources? E. What do I have to do in this class? F. What is the ―Peer Review Process‖? G. What about class attendance, tests and late work? 2. What are the issues? (What are creation, science and evolution?) A. READ RefEvChapter 1: Evolution & creation, science & religion, facts & bias B. READ RefEv2Chapter 1: Argument: Creationism is religion, not science C. READ RefEv2Chapter 3: Argument: Evolution is true science, not ‗just a theory‘ 3. Where do the ideas of evolution & creation come from? (What is the history of the debate?) A. Did evolution originate with Darwin? READ http://www.gennet.org/facts/metro21.html B. Who was Charles Darwin? READ http://www.aboutdarwin.com/darwin/WhoWas.html C. Where does Creationism come from? READ http://www.asa3.org/ASA/resources/CMBergman.html 4. How do we know what we know? A. READ chaptr01.pdf Introduction to epistemology and the creation/evolution controversy 5. Does God exist? READ http://www.allaboutphilosophy.org/does-god-exist-cvideo.htm A. What does Romans 1 have to say about our knowledge of God? READ http://www.leaderu.com/orgs/probe/docs/schaeffer.html B. What is the history of the debate? C. Why believe in God? READ AnsBkChapter 1: Does God exist? Optional: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/questionofgod/ownwords/index.html 1. What is the argument from causation? READ
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Reading Assignment #1

Reading Assignment #2

Reading Assignment #3

Reading Assignment #4

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Reading Assignment #5

Reading Assignment #6

Reading Assignment #7

Reading Assignment #8

http://www.philosophyofreligion.info/cosmological.html 2. What is the Anthropic principle? a) READ http://www.icr.org/article/253/ b) READ http://allaboutscience.org/theory-of-relativity-video.htm Optional: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/rossuk/c-anthro.htm 3. What does the design of the universe suggest? a) READ RefEvChapter 9: Is the design explanation legitimate? Optional: Design Inference Website http://www.designinference.com/ D. What are the arguments against God? READ http://www.existence-ofgod.com/arguments-for-atheism.html 6. Why trust the Bible? READ HTTP://MEEKNESSANDTRUTH.ORG/TOOLS/PPT/HTML/ RELIABILITYOFTHEBIBLE.HTM 7. What exactly does the Bible say about origins? A. What are the different ways people interpret Genesis? 1. READ http://www.christiananswers.net/q-aig/aig-c024.html 2. READ http://www.answersingenesis.org/creation/v26/i4/genesis.asp 3. READ http://www.answersingenesis.org/creation/v16/i1/genesis.asp 4. READ http://www.answersingenesis.org/creation/v2/i4/interpretation.asp B. READ AnsBkChapter 2: Did God really take six days? C. Are there two accounts of creation? READ http://www.christiananswers.net/q-aig/aig-c023.html D. What questions arise about the Garden of Eden? 1. How long were Adam and Eve in the garden before they sinned? READ>>See question H on p. 6 of http://www.originsresource.org/pubs/appendixa.pdf 2. How could a snake talk? READ>>See question E on p. 5 of http://www.originsresource.org/pubs/appendixa.pdf 3. Why wasn‘t Eve surprised when a snake talked to her? READ>>See question F on p. 5 of http://www.originsresource.org/pubs/appendixa.pdf 4. If animals were not meant to kill each other, why do snakes have poison? READ>>See question G on p. 6 of http://www.originsresource.org/pubs/appendixa.pdf 5. READ>>AnsBkChapter 6: How did bad things come about? E. What are the major issues after the fall? 1. What was the Mark of Cain? READ>>See question I on p. 6 of http://www.originsresource.org/pubs/appendixa.pdf 2. Where did Cain get his wife? READ>>AnsBkChapter 8: Cain‘s wife—who was she? 3. Why did God reject Cain‘s sacrifice and accept Abel‘s? READ>>See question K on p. 7 of http://www.originsresource.org/pubs/appendixa.pdf 4. How could people live so long? READ>>See question L on p. 7 of http://www.originsresource.org/pubs/appendixa.pdf
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Reading Assignment #9

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Reading Assignment #11 Reading Assignment #12

5. Are there gaps in the genealogies of Genesis? READ>>See question M on pp. 7-8 of http://www.originsresource.org/pubs/appendixa.pdf 6. Were Pre-Flood humans primitive and brutish? READ>>See question N on p. 8 of http://www.originsresource.org/pubs/appendixa.pdf 7. Where did the races come from? READ>>AnsBkChapter 18: How did all the different ‗races‘ arise (from Noah‘s family)? F. What about the flood of Noah‘s time? 1. READ>>AnsBkChapter 10: Was the Flood global? 2. READ>>AnsBkChapter 12: Noah's Flood—what about all that water? 3. READ>>AnsBkChapter 13: How did the animals fit on Noah's Ark? 4. READ>>AnsBkChapter 14: How did freshwater and saltwater fish survive the Flood? 5. READ>>AnsBkChapter 17: How did animals get from the Ark to places such as Australia? 6. READ>>AnsBkChapter 19: What happened to the dinosaurs? 7. READ>>AnsBkChapter 11: What about continental drift? 8. READ>>AnsBkChapter 16: What about the Ice Age? 9. Are black people under a curse? READ>>http://www.originsresource.org/pubs/appendixa.pdf p. 9 Question P only 8. Is evolution a fact, theory or both? A. What are the proofs of evolution? 1. READ>>RefEv2Chapter 6: Argument: Common design points to common ancestry 2. READ>>RefEv2Chapter 7: Argument: ‗Bad design‘ is evidence of leftovers from evolution 3. READ>>AnsBkChapter 7: What about similarities and other such arguments for evolution? B. What are the problems of evolution? 1. READ>>RefEv2Chapter 9: Argument: Probability of evolution 2. READ>>RefEv2Chapter 11: Argument: Evolution of sex 3. READ>>Appendix 1: Common arguments for evolution that have been rejected 9. What are the implications of accepting Evolutionary theory? A. READ>>http://www.gennet.org/facts/metro15.html B. READ>>http://www.apologeticspress.org/articles/215 10. What do people believe about the origin of the universe? A. READ>>RefEvChapter 7: Astronomy B. READ>>AnsBkChapter 5: How can we see distant stars in a young universe? 11. How did our solar system get here? A. READ>> http://www.pathlights.com/ce_encyclopedia/Encyclopedia/03ss2.htm
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B. READ>> http://www.pathlights.com/ce_encyclopedia/Encyclopedia/03ss3.htm 12. How old are the universe and the earth? A. READ>>RefEvChapter 8: How old is the earth? A young Earth—it‘s not the issue! READ>>http://www.answersingenesis.org/docs/1866.asp B. What is radiometric dating? 1. READ>>Read the description and view the video at: http://www.teachersdomain.org/6-8/sci/phys/matter/radiodating/index.html 2. READ>>http://www.seeking-god.co.uk/id35.htm C. READ>>AnsBkChapter 4: How about carbon dating? D. Why is there the ―appearance of age‖? 1. READ>>http://www.icr.org/article/1088/ 2. READ>>http://www.gennet.org/facts/metro23.html E. Why is the flood of Noah‘s day so important? READ>>http://globalflood.org/earthage/index.html 13. What do thermodynamics have to do with anything? A. READ>>http://www.trueorigin.org/steiger.asp 14. How did life arise? A. READ>>http://www.answersingenesis.org/docs/4220.asp B. Origin of life: Three-part series by Dr Duane Gish, Ph.D. biochemist, ICR Impact 1976: 1. READ>>Critique of early stage chemical evolution theories 2. READ>>Fox Thermal Model of the Origin of Life 3. READ>>On the Origin of Biological Order 15. What does modern biology have to say about origins? A. What is natural selection? 1. READ>>RefEvChapter 2: Variation and natural selection versus evolution 2. READ>>RefEv2Chapter 4: Argument: Natural selection leads to speciation B. What about genetics and mutation? 1. READ>>RefEv2Chapter 5: Argument: Some mutations are beneficial 2. READ>>Molecular Evidence 3. READ>>Evolutionary Developmental Biology -- Ernst Haeckel 4. READ>>Biochemical Complexity Michael -- Behe 5. READ>>Biogeography 16. What is the ―Origin of Species‖? A. READ>>http://www.allaboutscience.org/origin-of-species.htm B. READ>> http://www.sparknotes.com/biology/evolution/darwin/section2.rhtml 17. Does the fossil record support evolution? A. What are fossils? READ>>http://www.encyclopedia.com/html/f/fossil.asp B. What are index fossils? READ>>http://science.enotes.com/earthOCC SI 161 Winter session 2009

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science/fossils-fossilization C. What do evolution and creationism expect to find in the fossil record? READ>>http://www.parentcompany.com/creation_essays/essay7.htm D. What do we actually find? 1. What is the Cambrian explosion? READ>>http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/evolution/library/03/4/l_034_02.html 2. Are there gaps or not? a) READ>>RefEvChapter 3: The links are missing b) READ>>RefEvChapter 4: Bird evolution? c) READ>>RefEvChapter 5: Whale evolution? 3. What are the suggested transitions/links? a) READ>>RefEv2Chapter 8: Argument: The fossil record supports evolution 4. What are polystrate fossils? READ>>http://www.apologeticspress.org/articles/184 18. What do fossils say about the origin of man? A. READ>>RefEvChapter 6: Humans: images of God or advanced apes? B. READ>>RefEv2Chapter 12: Argument: Evolution of mankind C. READ>>AnsBkChapter 15: Where are all the human fossils? 19. What is ―punctuated equilibrium‖? READ>>http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/evolution/library/03/5/l_035_01.html READ>>http://www.answersingenesis.org/tj/v8/i2/punct.asp A. What is the argument from imperfection? (What does evolution believe about Anatomy and Physiology) 1. Is the panda‘s thumb badly designed? READ>>12.1 The Giant Panda 2. Is the human eye a poor design? READ>>12.2. The human eye B. How does it compare with the argument from design? 20. What other kinds of creationism are out there? A. What is Theistic Evolution? 1. READ>>RefEv2Chapter 2: Argument: Evolution is compatible with Christian religion B. What is the Gap Theory? 1. READ>>AnsBkChapter 3: What about the ‗gap‘ and ‗ruin-reconstruction‘ theories? C. What is Progressive (Old Earth) Creationism? READ>>http://www.answersincreation.org/ READ>>http://www.answersincreation.org/about_aic.htm READ>>http://www.answersincreation.org/faq.htm D. What is the Intelligent Design Movement? 1. What is it? a) READ>>http://www.designinference.com/documents/2005.06.Defense_of_ID.pd f b) READ>>RefEv2Chapter 10: Argument: ‗Irreducible complexity‘
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2. What critiques have been made? a) OPTIONAL>>http://www.leaderu.com/science/intdesignfaq.html b) OPTIONAL >>http://www.leaderu.com/science/disilvestro-dbb.html c) OPTIONAL >>http://www.icr.org/article/2708/ 21. What arguments for creationism should not be used? A. READ>>Appendix 2: Common arguments for creation that should not be used (See Arguments we think creationists should NOT use) [OPTIONAL] 22.What are the legal and educational issues? Reading A. Assignment #28 READ>>http://www.discovery.org/scripts/viewDB/index.php?command=view&i [OPTIONAL] d=2456 B. READ>>http://www.discovery.org/scripts/viewDB/index.php?command=view&i d=2786 C. READ>>http://www.christianlaw.org/newsletter/articles/evolutio_theory.html D. READ>>http://www.christianlaw.org/newsletter/articles/scopes.html E. READ>>http://www.discovery.org/scripts/viewDB/index.php?command=view&i d=48 23. What difference does it make what you believe? A. READ>>AnsBkChapter 20: What can I do? Bibliographies on Creation & Science: Please note and use the extensive bibliographies in your class textbooks. In addition, there are numerous online bibliographies that one may find useful. Below are several online bibliographies.      A Keyword-Indexed Origins Bibliography by Martin R. Leipzig and Wesley R. Elsberry http://www.talkorigins.org/origins/biblio/ Annotated Bibliography for the Intelligent Design - Evolution Debate by Douglas Groothuis, Ph.D., Denver Seminary, 2002 http://www.denverseminary.edu/dj/articles2002/0400/0401 Creation/Anti-Evolution Bibliography courtesy of Eric's Infocenter http://www.rae.org/biblio.html Creationism bibliography from Talk Origins Archive http://www.talkorigins.org/origins/biblio/creationism.html The Young-Earth Creationist Bibliography (#269) by Henry Morris, Ph.D. http://www.icr.org/index.php?module=articles&action=view&ID=398

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