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					               Department of Psychology




                  Graduate Student Handbook
                                 2009-2010 Academic Year




Psychology Department                                                 www.psyc.sfu.ca
Simon Fraser University                                    http://members.psyc.sfu.ca
RCB 5246-8888 University Drive                                    voice: 778-782-3354
Burnaby, BC, Canada V5A 1S6                                         fax: 778-782-3427
                             Graduate Student Handbook
                             Department of Psychology




                                                                               Contents
Introduction..........................................................................................................................................................1
Staff .......................................................................................................................................................................2
Administrative Staff .................................................................................................................................................................2
Information Technology Staff ..................................................................................................................................................2
Lecturers .................................................................................................................................................................................3
General Expectations..........................................................................................................................................4
Research.................................................................................................................................................................................4
Course-Work ...........................................................................................................................................................................4
Area Seminars ........................................................................................................................................................................4
Evaluating Your Courses.........................................................................................................................................................5
Student Progress ....................................................................................................................................................................5
Admission to the PhD Program ...............................................................................................................................................5
PhD Comprehensive Examinations.........................................................................................................................................5
Supervisory Committees and Guidelines ................................................................................................................................5
Ethical Guidelines for Interpersonal Conduct ..........................................................................................................................6
Scholarships and Fellowships ...........................................................................................................................7
Graduate Fellowships..............................................................................................................................................................8
Employment Opportunities: RA, TA/TM, and SI Work .....................................................................................8
Research Assistant (RA) .........................................................................................................................................................8
Teaching Assistant and Tutor Marker (TA/TM) .......................................................................................................................8
Sessional Instructor (SI) ..........................................................................................................................................................9
Resources to Help You .......................................................................................................................................9
Computer and Laboratory Services.........................................................................................................................................9
Copying as Part of Your TA/TM Duties ...................................................................................................................................9
Support for Research Costs ....................................................................................................................................................9
Courier, FAX, and Miscellaneous Costs................................................................................................................................10
Subject Pool and Payment ....................................................................................................................................................10
Conference Travel.................................................................................................................................................................10
Medical and Dental Insurance...............................................................................................................................................10
Thesis and Manuscript Preparation.......................................................................................................................................10
Transportation .......................................................................................................................................................................10
The Graduate Studies Committee and the Graduate Programs ...................................................................11
Appendix A1.               Application to the PhD Program ...............................................................................................................12
                           Complete Online Application ....................................................................................................................12
                           Submit Additional Application Materials to the Graduate Program Assistant............................................12
                           Applications will be evaluated using the following criteria.........................................................................12
Appendix A2.               Fast-Track Transfer from MA to PhD in Psychology Graduate Program ..................................................13
                           Departmental Requirements for Fast-Track PhD Program in Psychology Graduate Program ................13
Appendix B.                Guidelines for the PhD Comprehensive Examinations in the Psychology Graduate Program..................14
                           General.....................................................................................................................................................14
                           Formal Structure .......................................................................................................................................14
                           Suitable Comprehensive Examination Tasks ...........................................................................................14
                           Unacceptable Comprehensive Examination Tasks...................................................................................15
Appendix C:                Guidelines for the Comprehensive Examinations in the Clinical Program ................................................15
Appendix D:                Guide to the Relationship between Graduate Student and Senior Supervisor .........................................16
                           General.....................................................................................................................................................16
                           The Role of Supervisor and Your Role as Research Student...................................................................16
                           Your Research Thesis/Dissertation ..........................................................................................................16
                           Authorship ................................................................................................................................................17
                           Problems ..................................................................................................................................................17


                                                                       Revised: December 10, 2009
                Graduate Student Handbook
                Department of Psychology



Appendix E:   Ethical Guidelines for Supervisory Relationships in the Department ........................................................18
              General.....................................................................................................................................................19
              Teaching...................................................................................................................................................19
              Research ..................................................................................................................................................20
              Peer Relationships....................................................................................................................................20
              Therapy ....................................................................................................................................................20
              Summary of Ethical Guidelines.................................................................................................................20
Appendix F:   SFU Code of Academic Honesty ..............................................................................................................21
              1.0 Statement of Principle .......................................................................................................................21
              2.0 Jurisdiction.........................................................................................................................................21
              3.0 Forms of Academic Dishonesty .........................................................................................................21
              4.0 Notification of Standards of Academic Honesty.................................................................................22
              5.0 Procedures and Penalties .................................................................................................................22




                                                         Revised: December 10, 2009
                 Graduate Student Handbook
                 Department of Psychology




                                                Introduction
Welcome to graduate studies in the Psychology Department at Simon Fraser University! You are a member of a
large student body belonging to the Psychology and Clinical Psychology Graduate Programs. Faculty, staff and
students all hope that your time in the program will be productive and fulfilling.
This Handbook lays out specific features of your life within the Department. It is intended to let you know how the
Department works, both in relation to your work as a student and researcher, and in employment roles as a
Teaching Assistant, Research Assistant, and Sessional Instructor. Other general documents you may wish to
consult include the University Calendar for general and graduate regulations, and the SFU Graduate Studies
Handbook, www.sfu.ca/dean-gradstudies.


                  Department Chair                          Dr. J. Don Read
                                                            778-782-3250 RCB 5245
                                                            jdonread@sfu.ca
                  Associate Chair                           Dr. Alex Chapman
                    Graduate Program                        778-782-6932 RCB 8303
                                                            alchapma@sfu.ca
                  Director                                  Dr. David Cox
                    Clinical Training Program               778-782-6667 RCB 7320
                                                            cox@sfu.ca
                  Area Coordinators
                       Cognitive & Biological               Dr. Mario Liotti
                                                            778-782-4561 RCB 6324
                                                            mliotti@sfu.ca

                       Developmental                        Dr. Jeremy Carpendale
                                                            778-782-5483 RCB 8306
                                                            Jcarpend@sfu.ca

                       Social                               Dr. Stephen Wright
                                                            778-782-4342 RCB 8308
                                                            scwright@sfu.ca

                       Theory and Methods                   Dr. Michael Maraun
                                                            778-782-5685 RCB 4202
                                                            maraun@sfu.ca

                       Law and Psychology                   Dr. Kevin Douglas
                                                            778-782-3123 RCB 7317
                                                            douglask@sfu.ca

                  Graduate Program Assistant                Mrs. Anita Turner
                                                            778-782-4367 RCB 5251
                                                            turner@sfu.ca




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                 Graduate Student Handbook
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                                                     Staff
Many of the Staff members of the Department provide support and assistance to graduate students. To provide
brief introductions, the following people and some of their functions are listed.

Administrative Staff
Department Manager:                            Bev Davino
  for assistance with office space, keys, teaching assistant (TA) assignments, course scheduling, grant
   administration, RA and payroll appointments.
Graduate Program Advisor:                        Anita Turner
   for information and assistance regarding all aspects of the Psychology graduate programs.
Undergraduate Advisor:                           Tracey Anbinder
   for information concerning transfer credit, pre-registration queries, pre-requisite waivers, undergraduate
    regulations and procedures, graduation requirements.
Chair’s Secretary:                               Jeni Koumoutsakis
   for information regarding faculty matters and related university policy and procedures.
Financial Assistant                              Joan Wolfe
   provides financial support for the Department re: supplies, equipment and software purchases and expenses.
    Also responsible for departmental email lists, course email lists, equipment bookings, replenishing printer
    toners, and also setting up faculty academic websites.
Undergraduate Secretary:                         Deborah Jopling
   for information concerning course textbook orders, custom courseware, desk copies, course outlines, class
    lists, library reserves, departmental and library copying cards. Word processes mid-term and final exams and
    arranges exam duplication. Coordinates the departmental subject.
Receptionist:                                    Cassandra Gilliam
   for general information regarding all aspects of the Psychology Department. Arranges room bookings,
    maintains office supplies, provides user training for departmental copiers, assists with copier jams and
    problems, distributes mail, makes courier arrangements, sends outgoing and distributes incoming faxes,
    updates current events on Department website.

Information Technology Staff
Information Technology Manager:                  Richard Blackwell
   provides technical support to the Psychology Department by developing and maintaining computer systems,
    providing network development and administration, and serving as a resource person for consultations on a
    broad range of information technology related topics. Liaises with Facilities Management on behalf of faculty
    and the department on renovation projects.
Electronics Technician:                          Peter Cheng
   provides technical support to the Psychology Department by developing and maintaining hardware systems,
    audio/visual systems and by serving as a resource person for consultations on a broad range of related
    topics.




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Computer Technician:                              Harry Janke
   provides technical support to the Psychology Department servicing trouble calls, installing software and
    maintaining computer systems, assisting with network administration and maintenance, and by serving as a
    resource person for consultations on a broad range of computer-related topics.
Teaching and Research Resource Assistant:         Jianping Chen
   provides technical assistance with software and equipment to Departmental members in pursuit of their
    research, teaching and administrative efforts, assists in development of experiments using E-Prime, maintains
    an inventory of equipment used in teaching and research.

Lecturers
Senior Lecturer:    George Alder
Instructs and coordinates introductory psychology laboratory activities.
Senior Lecturer:     Russell Day
Instructs and coordinates introductory psychology laboratory activities.




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                                        General Expectations
Graduate Studies are Full Time
All graduate programs in Psychology are full-time. We strongly discourage students from engaging in work that
occurs off campus and is not part of the academic curriculum of our graduate programs. When students do
engage in such work, the number of hours per week must be kept to a maximum of 10. This requirement applies
to all types of work, including supervised clinical work that occurs off campus but is not part of our academic
curriculum (i.e., not a practicum). Students who wish to work for more than 10 hours per week, or who cannot
maintain full time graduate studies for other reasons (e.g., illnesses, family issues, disabilities) must provide a
written application (http://members.psyc.sfu.ca/students/LeaveOfAbsence.pdf) to their Supervisory Committee to
request “On-Leave” status. This request requires approval from the Graduate Studies Committee and the Dean of
Graduate Studies. On-Leave application forms are available on the Dean of Graduate Studies website.

Research
Research will be the primary focus of your activities at SFU. In order for you to focus on research, you are
encouraged to complete your formal course-work and comprehensive examinations as quickly as possible in both
the MA and PhD programs.
Efficient and timely degree completion is of direct benefit to you. For a Master’s degree, you are encouraged to
complete within six semesters. For a Doctoral degree, aim to complete courses, comprehensive examinations
and thesis research within nine semesters. For students in the Clinical Psychology Program, this will allow for a
further three semesters at the end of your program to do your internship. You should discuss any extension
beyond this general plan with your Supervisor.
We hope you will play an active role in the intellectual life and research activities of the Department. It is of great
benefit both to you and to your colleagues!
Appropriate Clinical Practicum Work
Graduate students in the Clinical Psychology Program are required to undertake pre-doctoral clinical work only if
it meets satisfactory standards for supervision. To ensure that such work is properly supervised, students must
complete both a Senior Practicum Placement form and a Practicum Supervision Commitment form (available on
the Psychology Members’ website), and obtain prior approval from the Director of Clinical Training. Once
approved, PhD students should register in PSYC 881, the Senior Practicum to ensure they receive credit for the
work being done off campus.

Course-Work
The calendar regulations outline course requirements for each program area and degree. You are encouraged to
ask faculty members for their course outlines before classes begin. We encourage you to keep the outlines of all
the courses you take throughout your graduate program, as you may be required to provide them for registration
purposes, to future employers, etc. A schedule of course offerings is available from online at
http://www.psyc.sfu.ca/grad/.

Area Seminars
Registration and attendance at Area Seminars is mandatory for all graduate students who are currently at SFU.
Remember that graduate training in psychology is full time for the entire duration of the program. We require all
students (clinical or non-clinical, pre- or post-internship) who are currently at SFU to register in and attend the
area seminars. There are, of course, benefits to attendance at these seminars throughout your graduate careers,
including educational opportunities, the chance to connect with peers and faculty members in your research area
(or other areas), and increased opportunities for consistent involvement in the life of the department (which we
consider important for all students, but perhaps especially for those who are no longer taking classes). You are,

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however, welcome to attend other area research seminars that are of interest to you. Given the diversity of faculty
and student interests and activities in our department, these seminars are a gold mine for students seeking to
learn about research in a variety of areas of psychology.

Evaluating Your Courses
Students are strongly encouraged to complete course evaluations forms. Faculty members often use the
comments from students to enhance their courses for subsequent cohorts and to improve their teaching.
Additionally, these course evaluations are often used in the process of evaluating faculty members for salary
increases, contract renewal, tenure, and promotion. You can complete these online in the Microcomputer Lab
under conditions of privacy and answered anonymously. Completed electronic evaluations should be submitted
as a hard copy, or as an email attachment, to the Graduate Program Assistant, who provides them as feedback to
the instructors after all grades have been submitted.

Student Progress
In the spring term each year, the Graduate Studies Committee reviews the progress of all graduate students
(refer to Graduate General Regulations 1.8.1 Progress Evaluation, and 1.8.2 Review of Unsatisfactory Progress).
This review, required by the University, focuses on student progress through the program (in areas including
academic progress, research, coursework, and clinical activities) and (except in the case of unsatisfactory or
marginal performance) does not provide detailed feedback regarding student performance. For more specific or
detailed feedback, students should consult with their Senior Supervisors. Students are also welcome to meet with
the Director of Clinical Training, the Clinic Director, or the Chair of the Graduate Program for further feedback, if
applicable. Following the annual review, the Graduate Studies Committee sends a letter to each student advising
him or her of the results of the evaluation. Students are encouraged to discuss their evaluation with their
Supervisors, or to write the Chair of the Graduate Program advising them of additional information. Any student
who receives an unsatisfactory rating on her or his annual evaluation may (as per Graduate General Regulation
1.8.2) be (a) withdrawn from the program, or (b) required to make specific changes and improvements. Students
who receive a “marginal” or “unsatisfactory” rating on their annual student evaluation must provide a one-page
document indicating a specific plan to remediate any problems indicated in the annual review. Students must
review this plan with their Senior Supervisors, who must provide a signature on the plan indicating that they
approve it. Students are welcome to meet with the Chair of the Graduate Program or the Graduate Studies
Committee regarding their evaluations.

Admission to the PhD Program
Upon successful completion of the MA degree requirements, the student may apply for admission to the PhD
program. The application review will consider all aspects of the student’s performance in the MA program
including quality of research, research productivity, grades, timeliness of progress, and TA/TM performance. All
applications for the PhD program require approval from the Graduate Studies Committee. Details of the material
that will be reviewed by the Graduate Studies Committee may be found in Appendix A1. Under exceptional
circumstances, a Master’s student may apply to transfer to the Doctoral program without completion of the
Master’s degree (see Dean of Graduate Studies website, SFU Graduate Regulation 1.3.4 and Appendix A2).
PhD Comprehensive Examinations
The University Calendar outlines the requirements for comprehensive examinations for Doctoral programs. In
addition, the Department has created Guidelines for students in the Psychology and Clinical Psychology Graduate
Programs.See Appendix B for the Psychology Comprehensive Examination Guidelines, and Appendix C for the
Clinical Psychology Comprehensive Examination Guidelines.

Supervisory Committees and Guidelines
Students must establish their Supervisory Committee by the end of the second semester in their program. The
MA supervisory committee will consist of at least two Department of Psychology faculty members, one of whom
will be the senior supervisor and committee chair. The PhD supervisory committee will consist of a Department

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of Psychology faculty member who will be the senior supervisor and committee chair, and two or more additional
members, at least one of which must be from the Department of Psychology. Other faculty members outside the
Department who are considered necessary by the student and senior supervisor may serve on MA and PhD
committees. MA and PhD Examination Committees consist of the Supervisory Committee, the Chair of the
defense (selected from within the department), the External Examiner (who must not be in conflict of interest with
the student or the student’s senior supervisor - see Graduate General Regulations 1.6), and, for the PhD only, an
Internal-External Examiner.
The Department has agreed upon Guidelines describing the research relationship between students and their
Supervisory Committees. Please see these guidelines in Appendix D.

Ethical Guidelines for Interpersonal Conduct
Simon Fraser University endeavors to provide a working and learning environment that is supportive of
scholarship and research and the fair treatment of all members of the University community. The basis for
interaction among all members of the University is mutual respect, cooperation, and understanding. Harassment
of any kind (including discrimination) violates fundamental rights, personal dignity, and personal integrity. The
University, by its Human Rights policy, declares that it will not tolerate any form of harassment. Confidential
advice may be sought from the Director of Human Rights at 778-782-4446.
In addition, the Psychology Department has defined "Ethical Guidelines for Supervisory Relationships in the
Department". The Guidelines, which outline the standards of general ethical conduct expected of students, staff
and faculty, may be seen in Appendix E.
Professionalism
Students are expected to exhibit appropriate professionalism, including appropriate interactions with other
graduate students, faculty members, research participants, and clients. As graduate students in the Psychology or
Clinical Psychology program, you are part of the professional and academic community. As such, you often serve
as representatives for the Psychology Department, Simon Fraser University, and the profession and academic
field of psychology more broadly. Therefore, we encourage our students to display appropriate professional
demeanor, dress, and behaviour in professional settings, including the Psychology Department,
classroom/teaching settings, the Clinical Psychology Centre, practicum or professional/academic placements,
research sites, professional conferences, and other such settings. It is also important to remember that behaviour
on the Internet must be considered “public.” Students, supervisees, clients, and members of the public often can
easily access information shared on the Internet, even when the person sharing such information believes it to be
private. Students are encouraged to exercise discretion in their activities on social networking sites, such as
Facebook, and to set appropriate filters and controls to ensure that their private, personal social activities remain
appropriately private. Finally, although we have no wish to restrict the social or recreational activities of our
students, students are encouraged to keep these issues in mind when they are in public settings as well (such as
bars, clubs, restaurants, or other such settings).




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                               Scholarships and Fellowships
You are encouraged to apply for all the scholarships and fellowships for which you are eligible. When you are
successful, the money and the prestige are important. Even if you do not always succeed, the preparation of
applications gives you valuable practice in applying for grants, which may be an important aspect of your future
career.
A listing of all graduate scholarships and awards relevant to psychology is available on the Dean of Graduate
Studies web page (http://www.sfu.ca/dean-gradstudies/scholarships_and_awards/), with detailed descriptions of
each scholarship offered both by the university and by outside agencies. One useful strategy is to make a
personal list of those scholarships for which you qualify, and organize these in your calendar by deadline date.
Although scholarship applications vary in the length of time required for completion, you can reduce your
preparation time by keeping on hand copies of previously completed applications, and amending these to fit the
current scholarship requirements.
Scholarships and fellowships represent an important source of funding during graduate school. On occasion,
scholarship funds are not disbursed because of a lack of applicants. It is not always easy to obtain scholarship
funds, but perseverance and a methodical approach greatly assist in the task. Remember, the only scholarship
you are guaranteed not to win is the one for which you didn't apply.
One graduate student who has been successful in achieving scholarship support advises: "Take the time to
familiarize yourself with the scholarships relevant to your research and qualifications. Apply to every suitable
scholarship, and reapply if you are not successful the first time around. Don't be shy to inquire about funding
sources and strategies for improving your application. If you have missed a deadline, ask if the application will be
accepted late. Many agencies are sympathetic to extenuating circumstances, and some will allow transcripts or
other supporting documents to arrive after the deadline.”
Certain awards are Traineeships or Fellowships, rather than scholarships. Examples of such awards include the
SSHRC Master’s and Doctoral fellowships, the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research (MSFHR)
traineeships, and NSERC fellowships. The intent of these awards is to provide the student with the time (and
sometimes, extra research or travel funding) to engage in hands-on research and research-related training
activities. As such, these awards are not “scholarships” that provide the student with the funding and extra time to
pursue non-research related activities. Students must (a) ensure that their activities and involvement in research
meet the requirements of these awards, and (b) are expected to reduce their hours spent on TA/TM-ships when
they hold externally funded traineeships/fellowships, or Graduate Fellowships conferred by the University.
Fellowships, traineeships, and scholarships will be considered in the process of allocating TA/TM-ships.

You must abide by the Terms of Reference of any award you receive. If you do not abide by the terms of
reference, (1) you will be asked to submit a specific written plan to bring your activities into compliance with the
terms of reference for your award, and this plan must be signed by your Senior Supervisor, (2) you will receive an
unsatisfactory rating on your progress report (if applicable) to the funding agency, and (3) if, following this
process, you remain non-compliant with the terms of reference, the Graduate Studies Committee will inform the
office of the Dean of Graduate Studies as well as the funding agency, potentially resulting in the withdrawal of the
award. Please note that, in some cases, your Senior Supervisor may elect to inform the funding agency of non-
compliance even prior to the steps above.
Notification of successful awards should be provided to the Graduate Program Assistant for our records.




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Graduate Fellowships
The University offers Graduate Fellowships (GFs) to students with a minimum CGPA of 3.5. Applications from
current students are typically considered in September. The Psychology department considers the following
criteria when adjudicating graduate fellowship applications.
     1. For MA students: undergraduate and graduate GPA and GREs
     2. For PhD students: cumulative GPA in MA and PhD course-work, and time-to-completion
     3. The annual progress report
     4. Research productivity: a special departmental form is provided by each applicant, describing research
         activities in greater detail than is possible on the university form
     5. Applications for outside funding where appropriate
Note: Students funded by other major scholarships/fellowships are not considered in the GF competition.


            Employment Opportunities: RA, TA/TM, and SI Work
Research Assistant (RA)
Subject to funding availability, a faculty member may hire a graduate student(s) as a Research Assistant. In
addition to general work in the laboratory, this support may sometimes be provided to assist in thesis/dissertation
research activity. The duties and level of support are individually arranged with the faculty member. In previous
years, up to three quarters of our graduate students have received at least one semester’s support by faculty
research funds in the amount of $1,000-$6,000.

Teaching Assistant and Tutor Marker (TA/TM)
The Department provides some graduate students with financial support through Teaching Assistant and Tutor
Marker appointments for part of their graduate program, subject to performance and availability of funding.
Workshops for TA/TMs are organized and advertised in the Fall semester with a follow-up session in Spring.
TA/TMs are employees of the University, appointed on a semesterly basis to assist with tutorial/laboratory
instruction, grading, and other teaching related matters. This employment is regulated through a contract between
the University and the Teaching Support Staff Union (TSSU). A copy of the TSSU Collective Agreement will be
distributed with your first assignment.
Applications for TA/TM positions are distributed approximately two months prior to the start of every semester.
You will have the opportunity to request specific assignments and rank order your choices. Your requests are
given to the Instructors, and assignments are based on your request, feedback from the Instructor, and the
demands of the undergraduate program. All TA/TM applications should be completed and submitted to the
Departmental Manager before the beginning of every semester. You may not want to apply for a TA/TM position if
it will unreasonably delay your progress in coursework or research.
Currently, a full TA/TMship totals 205 hours over a 16-week semester, requiring approximately 13 hours per
week. The current salary for a full TA/TMship is $5,474 at the Master's level and $6,459 at the PhD level (rates
are subject to change upon contract re-negotiation by the TSSU). After you have been assigned your course, the
Instructor will discuss your teaching duties and time allocations with you, and complete a form to be and returned
to the Department Manager.
Informal and formal teaching instruction is available from the Learning and Instructional Development Centre and
the Department faculty.
   Practical Note: Please arrange for your students to hand in papers to you during your office hours, lab/
   tutorial hours, or at lectures. With over 4,000 students registered in undergraduate psychology courses
   each term, Department staff will not guarantee or date papers being dropped off or picked up. Please post
   your office hours on your office door so students know when they will be able to consult with you.


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Sessional Instructor (SI)
Recognizing that many of its graduate students will go on to work in academic settings that involve teaching, the
Psychology Department is keen to provide its students with opportunities to develop and practice their teaching
skills. While the TA/TM program offers the opportunity for graduate students to gain valuable experience in small
group instruction, the Department also considers doctoral students for Sessional Instructor positions to teach
undergraduate courses. A SI is hired as the instructor for one course for one semester.
The following Guidelines have been adopted by the Department for employing graduate students as Sessional
Instructors:
The Department endeavors to hire Sessional Instructors who have the expertise to teach a course and who
demonstrate the potential to be excellent instructors. The appointment of a graduate student as a SI should not
unreasonably delay the student's progress toward completion of the PhD dissertation.
In order to ensure that the above principles are satisfied when appointing a graduate student as a Sessional
Instructor, normally the following criteria should be fulfilled: Graduate students are in good standing in the PhD
program in the Department of Psychology at Simon Fraser University (or UBC); PhD candidates must have
completed all course work, comprehensive examinations, and their dissertation proposal. Applicants in this
category must submit three letters of reference, including a letter from their Senior Supervisor. In addition, a letter
of support from the Supervisory Committee is required.


                                      Resources to Help You
Computer and Laboratory Services
Graduate students have access to the Psychology Department’s network and Academic Computing Services
(ACS) facilities. The Department has several up-to-date computer laboratories available for teaching and research
activities. The Department's network provides access to software packages such as the Microsoft Office suite
(Word, Excel, PowerPoint, etc.); several current statistical packages (including SPSS, SYSTAT, MathCAD, Lisrel,
etc.); and Firefox, Secure Shell, FTP (file transfer), WinRar, Email, and anti-virus software. ACS has a variety of
UNIX-based machines that are accessible via the Departmental network and other locations on campus. ACS
accounts are distributed to newly registered students during the first week of class. Our Members’ website
(http://members.psyc.sfu.ca/resources) is also a good source of useful information.

Copying as Part of Your TA/TM Duties
At the request of the instructor, TA/TMs have access to duplicating services in support of their duties. Larger
orders (50 pages or more) are sent to Document Solutions as they provide the most cost-effective service.
Smaller orders (50 pages or less) can be copied in the Department – please see the Receptionist for a course
copy card.
Whenever possible, Document Solutions prefers to receive your order 3-5 working days in advance. Please
contact the Receptionist if required earlier.
Send course duplication via email to the Receptionist in pdf or Word format providing necessary details (e.g.
single or double sided, # copies, etc.). When delivered, print orders are put in your mailbox and larger orders are
left on top of the mailboxes in the General Office.

Support for Research Costs
You should look first to your Senior Supervisor for research support. Your supervisor may have research grant
funds available which can help with your costs.
Research support to a maximum of $300 at the MA level and $400 at the PhD level is available to you from the
Psychology Department. These funds may be applied to the costs incurred by you for your research activities,

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such as testing materials, duplicating costs for questionnaires, postage, etc. The Department Manager is
responsible for the disbursement of these funds.
Psychological test materials necessary for the conduct of thesis research may be ordered through the Department
and charged against your research fund. You should consult with your Senior Supervisor about your research
requirements. Provide a copy of your request, approved by your Supervisor, and the materials will be ordered
(allow 6-8 weeks for orders to be completed). All non-consumable materials (manuals, scoring keys, question
booklets, etc.) remain the property of the Department and must be returned upon completion of the research
project.

Courier, FAX, and Miscellaneous Costs
The Department does not cover the costs of courier, fax, photocopying, postage, office supplies etc., but these
services are available on a user-pay basis from the General Office. Use your calling card for long-distance FAX
calls. Note: Do not ask your undergraduate tutorial students to FAX their papers to you.

Subject Pool and Payment
As a general rule, students should not consider paying honorariums to subjects for moderate participation in
thesis research. A Departmental subject pool is coordinated by the Undergraduate Program Assistant. A call for
subject pool requests for "hours" goes out at the end of each semester. Occasionally, participants may be
required to make extensive contributions of time and effort, and payment may be necessary in order to obtain a
sufficient number of volunteers. In these circumstances, the student should approach the thesis supervisor for
guidance and research support, and make use of fellowship funding when available.

Conference Travel
When Departmental budget permits, a student who is first author and has a paper accepted for presentation at a
recognized professional meeting may apply for travel support (currently $300-$500). The student must complete
an application form (members.psyc.sfu.ca/students/GradTravelAwardApplicationForm.pdf) & provide confirmation
of presentation acceptance and original receipts, including airline tickets and boarding passes. Funds are
disbursed once a year (March) for the period covering the previous fiscal year (Apr 1-Mar 31).

Medical and Dental Insurance
The University will maintain the Medical Services Plan (MSP) for all eligible employees and dependents during
the period of employment as a TA/TM. Application must be made through Human Resources. SFU will pay the
required premiums for MSP and will deduct 50% of the cost of the premium(s) from your salary (see the TSSU
Collective Agreement for additional information).

Thesis and Manuscript Preparation
We ask students to exercise fiscal responsibility when using printing resources. Print one copy of the thesis or
document and arrange for the duplication of multiple copies through Document Solutions. All printing costs are
monitored.
Theses       and      dissertations     must      meet      University     Senate        and     Library guidelines
(http://www.lib.sfu.ca/help/writing/theses). The Library requires two copies and the Department requires one. The
SFSS Copy Centre facilitates the binding of the Department copy, which is paid for by the Department. The cost
of binding all other discretionary copies (currently $25/copy) is the responsibility of the student.

Transportation
SFU is accessible by bus and skytrain from all areas of the Lower Mainland. Many of the bus schedules are
available at the Student Society office located in the Maggie Benston Centre. Bus information and schedules can
be found at http://www.translink.bc.ca.




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                        The Graduate Studies Committee and
                              the Graduate Programs
The SFU Calendar describes the Graduate General Regulations and the Department of Psychology program.
Within the Department of Psychology most policy matters affecting graduate students are the responsibility of the
Graduate Studies Committee (GSC). The Committee consists of the Graduate Studies Chair, Area Faculty
Representatives, and two elected student representatives. Students have full voting rights on the Committee for
all matters considered in "open" meetings. These matters include general policies, new courses, and programs.
To appeal a decision made by the GSC, direct your query in the first instance to the Graduate Studies Chair. A
final appeal may be made to the Dean of Graduate Studies. Refer to Section 1.16 of the Graduate General
Regulations for procedures.




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Appendix A1. Application to the PhD Program

Complete Online Application
      Access the online registration system (http://www.sfu.ca/gradstudents/applicants/index.html). Use your
       existing SFU email (without @sfu.ca) to sign in and complete the application. It is not necessary to fill in
       the Academic Information, Test Scores, or Awards sections, as this information is already on file. The
       $75 application fee is waived for current SFU students.

Submit Additional Application Materials to the Graduate Program Assistant
      CV (include educational background, professional experience,              awards,    TA-ships,   committee
       memberships, publications, conference presentations and talks)
      Unofficial Transcript
      Reference Letters – Two references (one from your Senior Supervisor) are required (write “Waived” for
       third referee on form).          The referee form is available on our members’ website
       (http://members.psyc.sfu.ca/students/GradAppRefForm_SFU-MA-Students.pdf); an additional letter may
       be attached

Applications will be evaluated using the following criteria
   1. MA grades, with special attention to grades in required courses. An MA GPA below 3.5 is considered
      unacceptable by the University
   2. Reference letters
   3. Research promise and productivity, both in terms of quality of thesis and other research and in terms of
      research productivity as shown in publications and conference papers in relation to the length of time in
      the program
   4. MA completion time
   5. TA/TM evaluations - may be used as indicators of academic competence and teaching potential
   6. Other examples of MA activities that indicate professional commitment, including participation in
      collaborative research, attendance at laboratory group meetings, participation in professional societies,
      membership on Departmental committees, attendance at Departmental colloquia, workshops and
      research group meetings
   7. For students in the Clinical program, clinical suitability will also be taken into consideration.




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Appendix A2. Fast-Track Transfer from MA to PhD
             in Psychology Graduate Program
SFU Graduate General Regulation 1.3.4 allows for fast track transfer from MA to PhD Programs
(http://www.sfu.ca/dean-gradstudies/downloads/TransferMtoD-fillable.pdf ). The Departmental supplemental
requirements outlined below are based on items (a. ii) and (b) in this regulation. They augment but do not
supplant the Psychology Department’s current MA-PhD progression for students in the Psychology Graduate
Program. This option is not available for students in the Clinical Program.

Departmental Requirements for Fast-Track PhD Program in
Psychology Graduate Program
1)   Graduate CGPA of at least 3.67 (A-)
2)   Total time in program to date of less than 2 years.
3)   Research Publication. In keeping with GGR 1.3.4b (requiring a demonstration of research aptitude), the
     primary criterion for fast-track admission to the PhD will be the publication of an original scholarly article,
     based solely on research conducted at SFU subsequent to admission into the graduate program. The
     publication must meet the following conditions:
     (i)    published (in press / accepted / accepted subject to minor revision may be acceptable with
            documentation) in a peer-reviewed empirical journal of recognized good stature (generally meaning that
            the journal is indexed in Medline/PubMed or PsycInfo; Faculty members in the relevant area will be
            consulted in ambiguous cases)
     (ii)   Unacceptable publications include: a review paper, case study, book review, a book, or a chapter in an
            edited book. A paper on theoretical or methodological issues would generally be unacceptable unless
            such issues constitute the primary research focus of the student – as in the case of students in the
            Theory and Methods Area.
     (iii) In the case of co-authored publications being submitted for consideration, the student must be the first
           author. A statement providing a detailed description of the contributions of all other authors, signed by
           all other authors, must accompany the application. The expectation is that the student will have done
           most of the experimental design, all of the data collection and analyses, and most of the writing.
4)   Coursework: All Master’s-level coursework need not be complete in order to apply. However, PSYC910 and
     PSYC911 must be completed satisfactorily before applying, and all remaining courses must be completed by
     the end of the second year of the PhD.
5)   Recommendation for admission to the fast-track PhD: The Senior Supervisor, 1 Supervisory Committee
     Member, the Area Coordinator and the Graduate Program Chair (GPC) will be asked to provide
     recommendations. In cases where there is unanimous recommendation in favour, and all other conditions
     have been met, the GPC will approve the application and the student will be transferred to the PhD program.
     In any case other than unanimous support for the application, the file will be referred to the full Graduate
     Studies Committee for review and decision. The decision of the GSC (by majority vote) will be final.
6)   Extenuating Circumstances. Students who wish to apply for admission under extenuating circumstances
     should initially discuss their case for admission with the GPC. At the discretion of the GPC, the application
     may be forwarded to the full GSC for review; the decision of the GSC (by majority vote) will be final.




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Appendix B.               Guidelines for the PhD Comprehensive
                          Examinations in the Psychology Graduate
                          Program
                 Approved as Departmental Policy at a Departmental Meeting, 29 October 1992.

General
Comprehensive Examinations are considered "Specialty Comprehensives". Their topics and focus should be on
the student's special areas of research interest.
The general supervision of the Comprehensive is the responsibility of all members of the Supervisory Committee,
both in the original plan and in the evaluations of the final work.
The Supervisory Committee in collaboration with the student shall design a specific Comprehensive Examination
to include three tasks organized to test the student's competence in depth, on topics related to his or her
research. This plan must be approved by the area coordinator and Graduate Studies Committee.
Comprehensives must be completed within two years or six semesters in the PhD program. Ideally, completion of
comprehensives in year one (3 semesters) is best. A Comprehensive exam should require about the equivalent
effort of one graduate course or one semester’s worth of course work. The Comprehensive Exams directly call
upon career-relevant skills, and create final products that are useful in the early career of a faculty member.

Formal Structure
Students must write three comprehensive examinations. For each Comprehensive exam, students must obtain
approval from their senior supervisor and Graduate Program Chair, and complete a Psyc 999 form
(http://members.psyc.sfu.ca/students/PSYC999_ExperimentalComps.pdf). Completed forms for all three exams
are kept in the students’ file.
Comprehensive exams are graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U) basis. Unsatisfactory performance
means that the examination must be repeated, and it may be repeated only once. Unsatisfactory performance on
more than one comprehensive exam represents unsatisfactory progress in the graduate program, and will be
referred to the Graduate Studies Committee. Students must register in PSYC 999, which formally identifies the
course work as that of a comprehensive examination, in the semester in which the third Comprehensive exam will
be completed in order that a grade may be assigned.

Suitable Comprehensive Examination Tasks
A recommended list of acceptable Comprehensive examination tasks includes, but is not limited to, any
combination of three from among the following:
   1. A major review paper of the traditional Psychological Bulletin type, or essay.
   2. A journal article or a technical report including analysis of either original data or data derived from an
        ongoing lab, where the program of analysis and interpretation is done by the student.
   3. Preparation of an upper-levels undergraduate course with some complete lectures, specified texts, and
        readings; or, preparation of a senior undergraduate seminar on an advanced topic, with readings and
        study questions for each week's topic.
   4. A grant proposal that meets current federal granting-agency criteria (i.e., a program of studies rather than
        a single study).
   5. One-week take-home examination, or a sit-down (e.g., three-hour) examination.
Any of these tasks might be supplemented by an oral examination at the discretion of the Senior Supervisor.




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Unacceptable Comprehensive Examination Tasks
Certain tasks were considered by the Graduate Studies Committee and judged to be unacceptable as
Comprehensive tasks; these include "review of a grant proposal", and "review of a journal submission".




Appendix C:               Guidelines for the Comprehensive
                          Examinations in the Clinical Program
Comprehensive exams are taken at the end of each of the required core clinical courses [Personality (PSYC 770),
Psychopathology (PSYC 744), Assessment (PSYC 820), Intervention (PSYC 822), Research Issues in
Psychology (PSYC 824), Ethics and Professional Issues (PSYC 819)]. These exams are graded on a
satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U) basis. Students who do not receive a passing grade on any exam are required to
do remedial work, which may include additional readings, literature reviews, reexaminations, or other tasks
assigned by the clinical faculty. Normally, the ethics oral examination takes place following completion of PSYC
819 “Ethics and Professional Issues” offered in the spring semester. We have standardized the oral exam to help
prepare students for licensing. It is administered by three clinical faculty members, and takes place in one day.
All comprehensive examinations must be successfully completed prior to registering in the PhD Internship (PSYC
886). Credit for all comprehensive exams is recognized by registering in PSYC 999.




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Appendix D:                Guide to the Relationship between Graduate
                           Student and Senior Supervisor

General
Your Supervisor is your mentor and should be available to meet with you to provide guidance. A senior
supervisor should be consulted for advice in choosing course-work options, planning a sequence of tasks over an
extended period, discussing training opportunities, or developing career-related plans.

The Role of Supervisor and Your Role as Research Student
The main role of your Supervisor is to help guide your research thinking. This will include providing a critical
appraisal of your ideas so as to ensure your research is feasible and worth doing. Your Supervisor can also
direct you to possible resources and give constructive comments on your written work.
The frequency of contact between student and Supervisor varies widely owing both to differences in the nature of
activities and to individual differences in supervisory and student styles. At times this may require weekly
individual or research group meetings, while at other times consultation may be less frequent. For those reasons
it will be important for you to meet with your Supervisor early in your first semester to review mutual expectations
concerning frequency of contact, laboratory work, and the development of your research proposal. If you are not
working alongside your Supervisor in a laboratory setting you should expect these discussions to be arranged by
appointment within regular working hours on campus. Supervisors and students share an equal responsibility for
keeping appointments and for fulfilling commitments arising from such meetings. Graduate Students have the
right to meet with their senior supervisors at least once every 2 weeks.
When you bring your Supervisor written work for review you should normally expect it to be attended to in a timely
manner. There should be some general agreement as to when further discussions should proceed. Normally you
should expect comments within two weeks. You should not ask your Supervisor to review major manuscripts on
short notice unless this arrangement has been agreed to in advance. If your Supervisor is expecting major time
demands from an off-campus commitment or will have a research semester involving absences from campus, you
have a right to be informed of these absences well in advance. It is up to you both to plan your consultations
effectively. Your requests for letters of reference for scholarships, job applications, or to Internship settings
should be made well in advance (one month is recommended), and should be supported by useful documentation
of your work in the program as information to assist your referee.
It is to your benefit to take advantage of every opportunity to participate in additional research projects being run
by your Supervisor, other faculty members, or other graduate students. This is true even if some of the work is
quite routine, for you gain experience in collaboration, you may share some of the rewards by participating in
presenting the results to the scientific community, and you may experience reciprocal benefits by receiving help
from others on your own projects.
As part of your general education in psychology you are expected to attend Departmental Colloquia as a means
of maintaining familiarity with contemporary research that may fall outside the bounds of your own research area.
Your Supervisory Committee may also require you to complete extra course work if it considers such experience
desirable for the fullest development of your competencies.

Your Research Thesis/Dissertation
A thesis is the product of its author, assisted by guidance from the Supervisor. In guiding your research efforts
your Supervisor will advise and direct you to resources whenever necessary and possible, but much of the
responsibility for seeking resources, subjects, and materials is yours. The ideas being tested in your research
should represent your ideas, the specific thesis problem is your choice based on your interests, and the final
document is a reflection of what you think to be important. Your Supervisor may give you strong advice on
occasion but you have the freedom to disagree with it, recognizing that you will have to defend your choices. You

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are responsible for your scholarly decisions. You own every aspect of your thesis including the final text, whether
or not it is consistent with the interests and ideas of your Supervisor.

Authorship
There are wide variations in expectation concerning authorship of work arising from research collaborations
between students and faculty members. In all traditions, there is an attempt to ensure that the authorship reflects
the relative contributions of each person to the research. There is a tradition in which your Supervisor is normally
your co-author (second author) on any publication, poster presentation, or talk that results from the
thesis/dissertation work. This is taken to recognize the supervisory guidance that has been provided. Within that
tradition it would be rare for other authors to be included unless there has been appreciable contributions from
other collaborators who might be fairly recognized as third authors, (e.g., another member from your Committee).
Other traditions expect the MA thesis publication to show the student as senior author with the Supervisor as
second author, then encourage publication of the doctoral dissertation with the student as sole author. Because
of these variations in traditions, you should discuss the matter of authorship with your Supervisor. To aid in your
considerations you should review the Department's “Authorship Assignment Guidelines in Faculty-Student
Projects" (members.psyc.sfu.ca/research/index.php?topic=authorship), which are based on the American
Psychological Association (APA) ethical code and the APA Publications Manual.
Under the provisions of both the APA and Departmental guidelines there may be occasions where the Supervisor
is most fairly represented as first author, or even as sole author of research in which the student has played a
minor role. Some of the complexities of authorship were discussed in Fine & Kurdek (1993). Reflections on
determining authorship credit and authorship order on faculty-student collaborations. American Psychologist, 48,
1141-1147.

Problems
If you are experiencing unusual difficulties you may wish to talk to your Supervisor with the expectation that you
will receive a friendly hearing and encouragement, although the relationship is not a therapeutic one. If your
interactions with your Supervisor give rise to concerns over inappropriate behavior, or if you find that there are
major difficulties between you and your Supervisor, you are encouraged to seek assistance from the Associate
Chair of Graduate Studies or the Chair of the Department. You may wish to seek a change in Supervisor for
either personal or research-related reasons. Ask the Graduate Program Assistant about the Change of
Supervisory Committee form.




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Appendix E:                Ethical Guidelines for Supervisory Relationships
                           in the Department
In interacting with others, our conduct is influenced by common social conventions. Some sets of conventions are
explicit (the law), others are implicit (manners); collectively, they determine the expectations we have of those
with whom we interact, and they define what is considered acceptable interpersonal behaviour.
In addition to these broadly applicable sets of conventions, there are others that apply in special cases—such as
when one person stands in a power relationship to the other. One particular power relationship, which is the main
subject of these Guidelines, is the supervisory relationship. The following are examples of supervisory
relationships:
    Course Instructor – enrolled student
    Course Instructor – Teaching Assistant
    Teaching Assistant – enrolled student
    Faculty Supervisor – Graduate/Undergraduate student
    Faculty Supervisor – Research Assistant
    Faculty Supervisor – Clinical Student Practitioner
    Faculty Supervisor – Staff
    Faculty Researcher – Research Subject
    Research Assistant – Research Subject
    Senior Research Assistant – Junior Research Assistant
    Staff Supervisor – Staff
    Staff – Student
In addition, sometimes faculty, staff and students are in a position of authority over one or more of their peers.
The defining characteristic of a supervisory relationship is that one party (the "supervisor") has authority over the
other party (the "supervisee").
The Canadian Human Rights Code and B.C. Human Rights Code address issues of conduct in the workplace.
Based on these codes, Simon Fraser University developed the current Harassment Policy. The policy, endorsed
by the psychology department, defines harassment as follows:
    Harassment is aggressive or threatening behavior which would be considered by a reasonable person to
    create an environment not conducive to work or study.
    Discrimination on the basis of race, ethnic origin, religion, age, sex, marital status, or sexual orientation are
    forms of harassment.
    Harassment may occur between people of the same or different status within the University community, and
    both women and men may be the subject of harassment by members of either sex.
    Harassment may occur during one incident, or over a series of incidents including single incidents which, in
    isolation, would not necessarily constitute harassment.
    Sexual harassment is defined as unwanted sexual attention, sexual solicitation, or other sexually oriented
    remarks or behavior, made by a person who knows or ought reasonably to know that such attention or
    solicitation is unwanted.
Furthermore, psychologists have codes of conduct specified by the College of Psychologists of British Columbia,
the Canadian Psychological Association, and the American Psychological Association.




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With consideration to these formal statements on ethical, professional and moral conduct as well as social
conventions, this document focuses on guidelines for supervisory relationships in general and then more
specifically in the following areas:
    1. Teaching
    2. Research
    3. Peer Relationships
    4. Therapy
All of these areas may involve evaluation or assessment. In any evaluation or assessment of one person by
another, the context of the relationship between the two people should be made explicit.

General
Supervisors are responsible for setting boundaries in their relationships with their students. Romantic intimate
relationships (including but not limited to sexual intimacy) are an unacceptable practice between supervisors and
their students because of the increased potential for harassment, coercion, favoritism, subsequent grievance
processes and legal proceedings. Inherent in intimate relationships between supervisor and supervisee is the
unequal power of the "consenting" parties. The supervisee who fears that failure or reluctance to comply with a
supervisor's sexual demands will be damaging to his/her career faces an unacceptable ethical dilemma.
Supervisors must remove themselves from all supervision and evaluation of a student before pursuing a romantic
intimate relationship with them. If a romantic intimate relationship has already developed, then supervisors must
immediately remove themselves from all supervision and evaluation of the supervisee. Supervision and
evaluation includes but is not limited to the following:
     1. as a clinical or research supervisor
     2. in setting and marking comprehensive exams
     3. in writing letters of reference
     4. in the employment of a research assistant or grantee
     5. as a member of the department tenure committee
     6. all review and evaluation activities.
Although supervisees will, from time to time, consult with their supervisors about a range of professional and
personal issues, supervisors should refrain from providing informal therapy for their supervisees.

Teaching
Sessional instructors, teaching assistants and faculty have power in their role as instructors. Students are keenly
aware of their vulnerability in light of the wide discretionary power of instructors. Whether grounded in reality or
not, the fear of retaliation can influence a student to consent to sexual involvement with an instructor. Students
may consent to unwanted sexual liaisons because of uncertainty regarding the academic consequences of
noncompliance. Therefore, what may appear to be an adult, consensual, private relationship may be the product
of implicit or explicit duress, and it may thus constitute the basis for individual or institutional liability.
Instructors and TA/TMs are responsible for setting boundaries in their relationships with students. Instructors
should be aware that socializing with their students may give rise to harassment or discrimination issues.
Students who are friends of the teacher may be perceived as receiving special treatment. Conversely, those
students may perceive that they are being judged harshly in order to avoid favoritism. The instructor-student
relationship typically lasts the duration of a semester. If a student is already a friend of the instructor, then the
instructor should find an alternate marker for the friend's work. Where a teaching assistant has a friend enrolled
as a student in his/her tutorial, the student or teaching assistant should transfer to a different tutorial section
where feasible.
Four other issues to be sensitive to are: the use of gender neutral language in teaching; the use of humour that
focuses on gender, minority and ethnic groups, or persons with disabilities; inappropriately personal comments
regarding a student's appearance; and films or literature that may be interpreted as offensive. If necessary



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course materials could be disturbing, then it is recommended that the teacher prepare students ahead of time and
allow for discussion afterwards.

Research
The above recommendations and cautionary comments apply also to the relationships between researchers and
research assistants, and researchers and research subjects. In addition, when the nature of the research
involves disclosure of sensitive personal information it is inappropriate for a student, supervisee, or a colleague of
the researcher to be a participant in the research.

Peer Relationships
Sometimes faculty, staff and students are in a power relationship with one or more of their peers. Thus a faculty
member serving on a Tenure and Promotion Committee may assess a colleague's achievements for promotion
consideration; and one staff member may write a letter of reference for another staff member. In cases where two
colleagues engage in a romantic intimate relationship they should avoid being placed in a situation that requires
one to assess or evaluate the other.

Therapy
A therapist who is providing formal therapy for a client should not engage in supervision of the client, including
teaching, or hire the client as an employee.

Summary of Ethical Guidelines
The following guidelines are expected standards of professional academic behaviour:
     1. In any evaluation or assessment of one person by another, the context of the relationship between the
         two people should be made explicit.
     2. Supervisors are responsible for setting boundaries in their relationships with supervisees.
     3. Romantic intimate relationships are unacceptable between supervisors and supervisees. Supervisors
         must remove themselves from all supervision and evaluation of a supervisee before pursuing a romantic
         intimate relationship with the supervisee.
     4. Supervisors should refrain from providing informal therapy for their supervisees.
     5. When the nature of the research involves disclosure of sensitive personal information, it is inappropriate
         for a student, supervisee, or a colleague of the researcher to be a participant in the research.
     6. Where two colleagues engage in a romantic intimate relationship they should avoid being placed in a
         situation that requires one to assess or evaluate the other.
     7. A therapist who is providing formal therapy for a client should not engage in supervision of the client or
         hire the client as an employee.
In the event that these guidelines are violated, people may direct their concerns to the Psychology Department
Chair (778-782-3358), or to the Human Rights Office, (778-782-4446).
If you wish to discuss any of this information or have any questions, contact the Graduate Program Chair or the
Graduate Program Assistant, 778-782-4367, Office: RCB 5251.




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Appendix F:                SFU Code of Academic Honesty
SFU Policy T10.02 (Approval Date: January 10, 2000) details principles and regulations concerning academic
honesty for all members of the University community. This important code is included below.

1.0 Statement of Principle
All members of the University community share the responsibility for the academic standards and reputation of
the University. Academic honesty is a cornerstone of the development and acquisition of knowledge. Academic
honesty is a condition of continued membership in the university community.
Academic dishonesty, like other forms of dishonesty, includes misrepresentation with intent to deceive or without
regard to the source or the accuracy of statements or findings. Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is
ultimately destructive of the values of the University; it is furthermore unfair and discouraging to the majority of
students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University.

2.0 Jurisdiction
This policy covers matters of academic dishonesty involving SFU students engaged in University-related scholarly
activities. Scholarly activities include credit and non-credit courses, projects, essays, theses and research. This
policy also covers matters of academic dishonesty in University-related scholarly activities involving SFU alumni if
the matters occurred prior to graduation and were unknown at the time of graduation.

3.0 Forms of Academic Dishonesty
The illustrations presented below are considered to be representative but not definitive nor exhaustive of activities
which could be considered to constitute academic dishonesty.
    a. Plagiarism is a form of academic dishonesty in which an individual submits or presents the work of
       another person as his or her own. Scholarship quite properly rests upon examining and referring to the
       thoughts and writings of others. However, when excerpts are used in paragraphs or essays, the author
       must be acknowledged using an accepted format for the underlying discipline. Footnotes, endnotes,
       references and bibliographies must be complete.
    b. Plagiarism exists when all or part of an essay is copied from an author, or composed by another person,
       and presented as original work. Plagiarism also exists when there is inadequate recognition given to the
       author for phrases, sentences, or ideas of the author incorporated into an essay.
    c.   A draft paper, proposal, thesis or other assignment may be subject to penalty for academic dishonesty
         provided the instructor/supervisor has informed the student(s) before the work is submitted.
    d. Submitting the same essay, presentation, or assignment more than once whether the earlier submission
       was at this or another institution, unless prior approval has been obtained.
    e. Cheating on an examination or falsifying material subject to academic evaluation. This includes the
       unauthorized sharing of material, e.g. two or more students using the same textbook during an "open
       book" examination; or the use of course notes or any aids not approved by an instructor during a "closed
       book" examination; unauthorized possession or use of an examination or assignment.
    f.   Submitting as one's original work, essays, presentations or assignments which were purchased or
         otherwise acquired from another source.
    g. Using or attempting to use other students' answers; providing answers to other students; failing to take
       reasonable measures to protect answers from use by other students in assignments, projects or
       examinations; or submitting identical or virtually identical assignments by students who studied together.
    h. Impersonating a candidate in an examination or availing oneself of the results of such impersonation.


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   i.   Submitting false records or information, in writing or orally. This includes the falsification or submission of
        false laboratory results, documents, transcripts or other academic credentials.
   j.   Stealing or destroying the work of another student.
   k.   Removing books or other library material without authorization, or mutilating or misplacing library
        materials, or engaging in other actions which deprive other members of the University community of their
        opportunity to have access to the academic resources of the library.
   l.   Unauthorized or inappropriate use of computers, calculators and other forms of technology in course
        work, assignments or examinations.

4.0 Notification of Standards of Academic Honesty
All members of the university community have a responsibility to ensure that they themselves, and others, are
familiar with generally accepted standards and requirements of academic honesty. Summaries of these shall be
published in the University Calendar and in the Registration Handbook. Ignorance of these standards will not
preclude the imposition of penalties for academic dishonesty.
Course instructors shall inform students at the beginning of the semester of any special criteria of academic
honesty pertinent to the class or course. Encouragement of group work varies greatly between disciplines, and
instructors shall convey to their students the acceptable level of group work.
5.0 Procedures and Penalties
    5.1 Procedures
    Procedures to be followed by the University in finding facts and imposing a penalty for acts of academic
    dishonesty or an appeal therefrom are detailed in the policy T 10.03 establishing the University Board on
    Student Discipline and the Senate Committee on Disciplinary Appeals.
    5.2 Penalties
    Penalties imposed by the University for academic dishonesty may include but are not limited to one or more
    of the following: a warning, a verbal or written reprimand, reassessment of work, failure on a particular
    assignment, failure in a course, denial of admission or readmission to the University, deregistration, forfeiture
    of University awards or financial assistance, suspension or permanent suspension from the University or
    revocation of a degree.
    5.3 Determination of Penalties
    In deciding on the appropriate sanction to be imposed for an act of academic dishonesty, consideration may
    be given to the following factors:
        a. the extent of the academic dishonesty;
        b. whether or not the academic dishonesty was deliberate;
        c. the importance of the work in question as a component of the course or program;
        d. whether the act in question is an isolated incident or part of repeated acts of academic dishonesty;
           and
        e. any other mitigating or aggravating circumstances.




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