Municipal Solid Waste Thermal Treatment in Canada (2006 by gpc19797

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									Municipal Solid Waste Thermal Treatment in Canada (2006)



                          Submitted to:
                       Environment Canada




                           Submitted by:
                       GENIVAR Ontario Inc.
             In Association with Ramboll Danmark A/S




                     With Funding Provided by:
      The Program of Energy and Research Development (PERD)




                            March 2007
MSW Thermal Treatment in Canada (2006)




Executive Summary
There are currently seven municipal solid waste (MSW) thermal treatment facilities operating in
Canada that have a capacity greater than 25 tonnes per day (tpd). These seven facilities are
located in: British Columbia (1), Alberta (1), Ontario (1), Quebec (3) and Prince Edward Island
(PEI) (1). The facilities are all publicly owned, except for the Ontario and PEI facilities, which
are both privately owned. The facilities are all privately operated, with the exception of the
facilities in Levis and Iles de la Madeleine in Quebec.
Four of the seven facilities use mass burn incineration technology while three of the facilities use
multiple stage modular technology. The approved capacities of the mass burn facilities range
from 31 tpd to 920 tpd, while the multiple stage modular facilities’ capacities range from 27 tpd
to 455 tpd. The thermal units in the mass burn facilities are on average larger than the modular
units; an average of 145 tpd compared to 51 tpd.
Experience shows that mass burn facilities tend to have a longer lifespan. There have been no
thermal treatment facilities constructed in Canada since 1995 with the exception of
demonstration facilities in Ontario and Quebec.
In 2006, the range of MSW processed at the seven operating facilities ranged from 3,681 tonnes
to 293,300 tonnes. An annual total of approximately 773,000 tonnes were processed in the seven
facilities. These facilities process primarily residential MSW, on average 66%, combined with
commercial MSW, which accounts for 30%. The only Canadian facility that processes biosolids
is the one in Quebec City; approximately 10% of its stream is sewage sludge. The Greater
Vancouver Regional District (GVRD) Waste to Energy (WTE) facility in B.C. processes
screenings from its wastewater treatment plant, but these account for less than 1% of its waste
feed. The Wainwright Regional WTE facility in Alberta is the only facility to process medical
waste. In 2006, 72% of its feedstock was medical waste.
Over 180,000 tonnes of bottom ash and over 26,000 tonnes of fly ash and air pollution control
(APC) residue were generated in 2006 from four of the facilities. The average quantity of bottom
ash at these facilities is 25% by weight of input material. Fly ash and APC residue combined
represents 4% of the input waste. The quantity of ash generated at the other facilities was not
available. The bottom ash from the four facilities with available data is disposed of at non-
hazardous landfills. For example, approximately 90% of the bottom ash from the GVRD WTE
facility is used as landfill cover. The remaining 10% is used for road-base construction, normally
on GVRD’s landfill site or on other GVRD properties. The bottom ash from the Algonquin
Power Peel EFW Facility in Ontario is used as landfill cover (74%), as an aggregate substitute
(2%) and the remaining 24% of the bottom ash is disposed of in a landfill. Fly ash is generally
stabilized and/or sent to secure landfills.
All of the thermal treatment facilities are equipped with air pollution control systems. The Lévis
and MRC des Iles de la Madeleine facilities in Québec are the only ones that do not have energy
recovery systems. Of the five facilities that have energy recovery systems, four of the facilities
recover steam as their primary product while the other generates electricity. The GVRD WTE
facility and the Quebec City facility generate steam, which they sell to neighbouring paper mills.
The GVRD WTE facility also produces electricity, which it sells to BC Hydro. The steam that is
Municipal Solid Waste Thermal Treatment in Canada (2006)




generated from the PEI Energy Systems EFW facility is used in Charlottetown’s district heating
system. The steam that the Wainwright facility in Alberta generates is sold to a neighbouring oil
seed processing facility. The Algonquin Power Peel EFW facility generates electricity, which it
feeds into the electricity grid and sells to Ontario Power Generation. In 2006, the largest four
facilities generated approximately 5,229,000 GJ of energy and sold more than 2,644,000 GJ in
the form of steam, electricity and hot water.




                                                                    ii
Municipal Solid Waste Thermal Treatment in Canada (2006)




Table of Contents

Executive Summary ………………………………………………………………………………………………. i
Table of Contents…………………………………………………………………………………...……………. iii

1.   Introduction ......................................................................................................................................... 1

2.   Facility Information ............................................................................................................................. 2

3.   Facility Equipment .............................................................................................................................. 3

4.   Facility Operations .............................................................................................................................. 4
     4.1      Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Processed .............................................................................. 4
     4.2      Ash ............................................................................................................................................. 5
     4.3      Energy........................................................................................................................................ 6
Municipal Solid Waste Thermal Treatment in Canada (2006)




1.      Introduction
Over the past several years, there has been renewed interest and attention surrounding the
potential for thermal treatment and other energy from waste technologies to manage a portion of
the residual MSW stream. As a result of this increased interest, there have been a growing
number of requests for information related to MSW thermal treatment. The primary purpose of
this study is to compile the most current information on MSW thermal treatment in Canada. This
report provides an overview of all MSW thermal treatment facilities currently operating in
Canada with a capacity in excess of 25 tpd.
Municipal Solid Waste Thermal Treatment in Canada (2006)




2.      Facility Information
There are currently seven MSW thermal treatment facilities operating in Canada with a capacity
greater than 25 tpd. Table 2-1 lists these seven facilities’ name, owner, operator, location, and
number of employees.
Table 2-1 Facility Information


Name                                Owner                          Operator                 Location             Number of
                                                                                                                 employees
Greater Vancouver Regional          Greater Vancouver              Montenay Inc.            Burnaby, BC          44
District Waste to Energy Facility   Regional District
Algonquin Power Peel Energy-        Algonquin Power                Algonquin Power          Brampton, ON         62
From Waste Facility
L’incinérateur de la Ville de       Ville de Québec                TIRU (Canada) Inc.       Quebec City, QC      75
Québec
PEI Energy Systems EFW Facility     PEI Energy Systems             PEI Energy Systems       Charlottetown, PEI   31
L’incinérateur de Lévis             Ville de Lévis                 Ville de Lévis           Lévis, QC            24
MRC des Iles de la Madeleine        Municipalité des Iles-de-la-   Municipalité des Iles-   Havre-aux-           Not available
                                    Madeleine                      de-la-Madeleine          Maisons, QC
Wainwright Energy From Waste        Wainwright Regional            GM Pearson               Wainwright, AB       10
Facility                            Waste to Energy Facility       Biomedical Waste
Municipal Solid Waste Thermal Treatment in Canada (2006)




3.      Facility Equipment
Details of the thermal treatment units, heat recovery systems and air pollution control equipment
in the seven Canadian facilities are shown in Table 3-1. Four of the seven facilities use mass
burn thermal treatment technology while three of the facilities use multiple stage modular units.
The approved capacities of these facilities range from 27 tonnes per day to 920 tonnes per day.
All of the facilities have heat recovery systems except for the Levis and MRC des Iles de la
Madeleine facilities. All of the facilities are equipped with air pollution control systems. Table
3-2 lists the dates the facilities were commissioned and details of past and future upgrades.
Table 3-1: Facility Equipment (1)




Table 3-2: Facility Equipment (2)
Municipal Solid Waste Thermal Treatment in Canada (2006)




4.      Facility Operations
4.1       Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Processed
In 2006 the range of MSW processed in the seven operating facilities ranged from 3,681 tonnes
to 293,300 tonnes. These facilities process primarily residential MSW combined with
commercial MSW. The annual MSW processed and the composition of feed material is
presented in Table 4-1.
Table 4-1 Facility Operations – MSW Processed
Municipal Solid Waste Thermal Treatment in Canada (2006)




4.2       Ash
Table 4-2 shows the generated quantity and the utilization/disposal of the bottom ash and fly
ash/APC residue produced at the seven Canadian MSW thermal treatment facilities. Over
183,000 tonnes of bottom ash and over 26,000 tonnes of fly ash and air pollution control (APC)
residue were generated in 2006 from the four largest facilities. The average quantity of bottom
ash at these facilities is 25% by weight of input material. Fly ash and APC residue combined
represents 4% of the input waste. Information on the quantity of ash generated at the other two
facilities was not available.
Table 4-2 Facility Operations – Ash
Municipal Solid Waste Thermal Treatment in Canada (2006)




4.3          Energy
The type of energy generated, the quantity of primary energy produced, the exported energy
produced, as well as the purchaser of the energy for the Canadian facilities are presented in Table
4-3. The average Canadian household uses 111 GJ 1 of natural gas to heat their house and 12
MWh of electricity per year. Therefore, the energy generated at the GVRD WTE facility could
provide electricity for almost 9,600 homes and heating for over 4,000 homes. Similarly the
electricity produced at the Algonquin Power Peel EFW facility in 2006 could provide electricity
for more than 3,500 homes. In 2006, the largest four facilities generated approximately
5,229,000 GJ of energy and sold more than 2,644,000 GJ in the form of steam, electricity and hot
water.
Table 4-3 Facility Operations – Energy
Facility Name     Energy Type            Primary Energy Product           Exported Energy Produced        Purchaser of
                  (Steam, Hot                                                                             Exported
                  Water,                                                                                  Energy:
                  Electricity):          2005              2006            2005              2006

Greater           Electricity and   2,728,925 GJ     2,756,638 GJ     837,253 GJ        867,429 GJ        Norampac
Vancouver         Steam             (871,861         (880,715         (293,773          (304,361          Paper & BC
Regional                            tonnes of        tonnes of        tonnes of steam   tonnes of steam   Hydro
District Waste                      steam)           steam)           & 116,420 MWh     & 115,097 MWh
to Energy                                                             of electricity)   of electricity)
Facility
Algonquin         Electricity       195,210 GJ       214,600 GJ       129,600 GJ        151,528 GJ        Ontario Power
Power Peel                          (54,225 MWh of   (59,611 MWh of   (36,000 MWh of    (42,091 MWh of    Generation
Energy-From                         electricity)     electricity)     electricity)      electricity)
Waste Facility
L’incinérateur    Steam             1,725,405 GJ*    1,725,870 GJ*    1,380,556 GJ*     1,150,115 GJ*     Stadacona
de la Ville de                      (742,000         (742,200         (593,700          (494,600          S.E.C.
Québec                              tonnes of        tonnes of        tonnes of         tonnes of
                                    steam)           steam)           steam)            steam)

PEI Energy        Steam and Hot     575,162 GJ       531,655 GJ       504,397 GJ        474,802 GJ        District Heating
Systems EFW       Water             (56,000 tonnes   (58,000 tonnes
Facility                            of steam)        of steam)

L’incinérateur    None              0                0                0                 0                 -
de Lévis
MRC des Iles      None              0                0                0                 0                 -
de la Madeleine
Wainwright        Steam             Not Available    Not Available    Not Available     115,023 GJ*       Bunge Canada
Energy From                                                                             (49,465 tonnes
Waste Facility                                                                          of steam)

Total (GJ)                          5,225,000        5,229,000        2,852,000         2,644,000




1
 Annual Average Quantity of NG Consumed by Residence = 3,000 m3/yr/HH (OEB File Number RP-2003-0203,
Exhibit A2, Table 2 System-Wide Total Normalized Average Use, Enbridge, December 2003)
Average energy content of natural gas = 37 MJ/m3 ("Fuel Gas." McGraw Hill Encyclopedia of Science & Technology.
McGraw Hill, Inc., 1982.)

								
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