Undersea Warfare and Acoustic Intelligence Active Sonar and Marine - PDF - PDF by duc15661

VIEWS: 20 PAGES: 14

									Dionna Dunning
      SYST 680
       Fall 2009
Agenda
 Introduction to Sonar
 Sonar Performance Factors
 Introduction to Active Sonar and Passive Sonar
 Problem: Marine Life and Active Sonar
 Mitigation Measure: Passive Sonar 
 Other Mitigation Techniques
 Questions
Introduction: Sonar
 SONAR – Sound Navigation and Ranging
   Technique that uses sound propagation under water to 
   navigate, communicate with, or detect other vessels
   May be used as a means to detect the echo 
   characteristics of “targets” in the water
   First used in WWI to detect submarines
   Infrasonic to ultrasonic frequencies are used in sonar 
   systems
Sonar Performance Factors
 Sound Propagation – variations in sound speed
   Affected by noise, absorption, temperature, and depth 
   of water
   Speed of sound in feet/second : 4388 + (11.25 ×
   temperature (in °F)) + (0.0182 × depth (in feet) + 
   salinity (in parts‐per‐thousand))
 Reverberation– scattering effect
   Interference in Active Sonar
   Non‐interference in Passive Sonar
Sonar Performance Factors (cont.)
 Target Characteristics – influence performance of 
 sonar
   Sound reflection characteristics known as target 
   strength in Active Sonar
    Radiated noise characteristics in Passive Sonar
 Countermeasures – defense mechanism of target 
 under attack
   Raise noise level in Active Sonar
   Mounting noise generating devices on isolating devices 
   in Passive Sonar
Introduction: Active Sonar
 Uses sound transmitter and receiver
     Monostatic operation : transmitter and receiver in same location
     Bistatic operation: transmitter and receiver in different locations
 Creates a pulse of sound, often called a "ping", and then listens for reflections 
 (echo) of the pulse
 Noise limited conditions at initial detection
     SL − 2TL + TS − (NL − DI) = DT 
 Reverberation limited conditions at initial detection
     SL − 2TL + TS = RL + DT 
Introduction: Passive Sonar
 Listens without transmitting
 Primarily detects marine objects, such as submarines, 
 ships, and marine animals like whales
 Only detects sound waves
 Noise limited conditions at initial detection
   SL − TL = NL − DI + DT 
 Figure of Merit
   FOM = SL + DI − (NL + DT)
Problem
 Active sonar may harm marine animals
   Marine animals such as whales use echolocation systems to locate
   predators and prey 
   Transmitters confuse marine animals and interfere with mating 
   and feeding
   Could panic whales and cause them to surface more frequently 
   making them vulnerable  to harpooning
   Can cause trauma caused by rapid changes of pressure as the 
   whales surface too quickly
   The maximum sound exposure level recommended by Southall et 
   al. for cetaceans is 183 dB re 1 μPa2 s for behavioral effects and 198 
   dB re 1 μPa2 s for hearing damage.
Problem (cont.)
 Active sonar may harm marine animals
   Marine animals such as whales use echolocation 
   systems to locate predators and prey 
   Transmitters confuse marine animals and interfere with 
   mating and feeding
   Could panic whales and cause them to surface more 
   frequently making them vulnerable  to harpooning
   Can cause trauma caused by rapid changes of pressure 
   as the whales surface too quickly
Marine Life and Echolocation
 Echolocation, also called biosonar, is the biological 
 sonar used by several animals such as dolphins, 
 whales, and bats
 Animals emit calls out in the environment and listen 
 for echoes of the calls
   This technique is similar to active sonar




                                      Ultrasound signals emitted by a bat,
                                      and the echo from a nearby object
Mitigation Measure: Passive Sonar
 Because passive sonar only listens for an echo, it’s best 
 to use when marine life such as wells, dolphins, etc 
 are around
 Passive sonar has it’s limitations because of noise 
 generated by the submarine
   Propellers can be designed to emit minimal noise
   Submarines can operate nuclear reactors that can be 
   cooled by batteries
Other Mitigation Techniques
 Don’t operate at specific areas of the ocean 
 that are sensitive to marine life
 Create large margins of safety for exposure 
 levels
 Operate at less than full power
 Don’t operate during night time
References
 http://www.solarnavigator.net/sonar.htm
 www.fas.org/man/dod‐101/sys/ship/weaps/tyler.pdf
 http://www.fas.org/irp/program/collect/lfa.htm
 http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/technology/tools/sonar/son
 ar.html
 http://www.arlut.utexas.edu/sisl/UnderseaWarfare.htm
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sonar
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marine_Mammals_and_Sonar
 http://www.fas.org/man/dod‐
 101/navy/docs/es310/uw_acous/uw_acous.htm
Questions

								
To top