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Boy Scouts of America – Western Metro

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					Boy Scouts of America – Western Metro
November 7, 2009
9 am – 5 pm (Arrive at 8:00 to set up)
Job description

Team 1: Plant Science – Morning sessions

Date     Time                     Team 1                Location
Nov. 7   9:00 am – 10:00 am       Plant Science         Picnic shelter
Nov. 7   10:15 am – 11:15 am      Plant Science         Picnic shelter

Team 2: Plant Science – Afternoon sessions

Nov. 7   1:00 pm – 2:00 pm        Plant Science         Picnic shelter
Nov. 7   2:15 pm – 3:15 pm        Plant Science         Picnic shelter
Nov. 7   3:15 pm – 4:15 pm        Plant Science         Picnic shelter

Team 3: Gardening - Morning sessions

Date     Time                     Team 2                Location
Nov. 7   9:00 am – 10:00 am       Gardening             Learning Center
Nov. 7   10:15 am – 11:15 am      Gardening             Learning Center

Team 4: Gardening – Afternoon sessions

Nov. 7   1:00 pm – 2:00 pm        Gardening             Learning Center
Nov. 7   2:15 pm – 3:15 pm        Gardening             Learning Center
Nov. 7   3:15 pm – 4:15 pm        Gardening             Learning Center

Each team consists of two Master Gardener volunteers and two Arboretum volunteers


Teams 1 & 2: Plant Science Merit Badge Sessions
This class fulfills the following requirements of the Plant Science merit badge:

Requirement 5:
List by common name at least 10 native plants and 10 cultivated plants that grow near your
home. List five invasive nonnative plants in your area and tell how they may be harmful. Tell
how the spread of invasive plants may be avoided or controlled in ways that are not damaging to
humans, wildlife, and the environment.

Note to instructors: This session leads into the Service project of removing buckthorn at the
Arboretum (pulling it).

Instructors’ responsibilities:
   - Locate / provide 10 native plants (could be in the field or containers)
          o Explain why a plant is considered a “native” plant.
          o Teach how to use a simple key to identify these plants (see Tim Kenny for key)
   -   Locate / provide 10 cultivated plants (use the Learning Center greenhouse)
          o Explain what a “cultivated” plant is and how it differs from a native plant.
          o Teach key characteristics / identifiers
   -   Locate / provide 5 invasive non-native plants (could be pictures or real). Examples:
          o Buckthorn (must-have)
          o Purple loosestrife
          o Garlic mustard
          o Creeping Charlie
          o Canary reed grass
                   Explain why invasives are detrimental to natural areas.
                   Explain how invasives spread vegetatively, mechanically, by animals,
                      people, etc.
                   Explain how we can safely avoid / control / manage the spread of
                      invasives.

Requirement 7:
Option 3: Field Botany
      3. Tell how an identification key works and use a simple key to identify 10 kinds of
      plants (in addition to those in general requirement 5 above). Tell the difference between
      common and scientific names and tell why scientific names are important.

       5. Obtain a list of rare plants of your state. Tell what is being done to protect rare plants
       and natural areas in your state. At home, write a paragraph about one of the rare plants in
       your state.

Instructors’ responsibilities:
   - Teach scouts how to use a key to identify plants (see above)
   - Explain about common and scientific names and why they are important (Shirley K)
   - Provide a list of rare plants in the area / state (Kathy Allen)
          o Explain how plants are protected from extinction / removal / damage. Why do we
              protect them?
                   How does the Arboretum encourage / rescue protected and rare plants
                      (Rich Gjertsen – Wildflower Gardener, Arboretum)
          o Explain how natural areas are protected
          o Explain the importance of maintaining “diversity” in natural areas and the
              benefits to the environment.


Team 3 &4: Gardening Merit Badge Sessions
This session fulfills the following requirements of the Plant Science merit badge:

Requirement 1:
Do the following:
   A. Grow six vegetables, three from seeds and three from seedlings, through harvesting.
   B. Grow six flowers, three from seeds and three from seedlings, through flowering.
   - Materials: a varied selection of vegetable and flower seeds for the scouts to choose from.
   - Instruction sheet about how to plant these seeds and care for the plants (Ext pub? LCtr?)

Requirement 2:
Give the food value of the following:
   A. Three root or tuber crops.
   B. Three vegetables that bear above the ground.
   C. Three fruits.
       - Talk about and give examples of tubers, root vegetables, above ground vegetables and
           fruits.
       - Demonstrate one method of determining the food value of one of these.
               o Vince Fritz: how this could be done in the class room or a resource.
       - Hand out a resource list or give a website where this info is listed.

Requirement 3:
Test 100 garden seeds for germination. Determine the percentage of seeds that germinate.
Explain why you think some did not germinate.
           - Use the ragdoll method to test seeds. What is your percent germination rate?
                   Materials: Paper towels, plastic gallon Ziploc bags
           - Explain “germination.
                   Explain factors for germination (moisture, temperature, scarification)
           - Demonstrate how to plant the germinated seed (for requirement 1 above)

Requirement 4:
Visit your county extension office, local university agricultural college, nursery, or a botanical
garden or arboretum. Report on what you learned.
   - This is satisfied by this weekend at the Arboretum. Scouts will report on their own about
        what they learned this weekend.

Requirement 5:
Identify five garden pests (insects, diseased plants). Recommend two solutions for each pest. At
least one of the two solutions must be an organic method.
    - Japanese beetles
    - EAB
    - Aphids
    - Tomato disease (pictures from Gardening Information
    - Raspberry disease
Demonstrate Gardening Information website / Diagnostic tool
Discuss two solutions – one cultural, one organic, one synthetic (if applicable)
    - Explain the considerations each type of solution
    - Brief explanation of IPM
Materials: Insect and disease samples (Dan Miller), LCD projector, wireless access

				
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