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                             Course Information
            North West Food Trail (09SP44)
                           Tutor: John Crouch
                Monday 3 to Friday 7 August 2009
            9.15am to 4.45pm (with a break for lunch)

 Spend a week in Cumbria as a gastronomic tourist finding out about traditional food and
 drink in the county. In the company of a real food lover, you will take a fascinating look at
 the historical, geographical and social backgrounds of traditional Cumbrian food and
 observe time-honoured methods of production in a working mill, farms and dairies. Visits
 include Sizergh Barn organic farm, gallery and shop; Cowmire Hall famous for its
 traditional recipe damson gin; the tiny gingerbread shop in Grasmere that attracts visitors
 from across the world, a cheesemakers and for any chocoholics in the group, a chocolate
 house. Tasting is mandatory and you will have plenty of opportunities to purchase the
 foods.

 A brief history of Cumbrian food
 2,000 years ago the Romans saw salmon jumping in Cumbria and called them Salmo –
 the leaper. They were so common at one time that a rule was laid down that boys at a
 charity school in Kendal were not „compelled to dine on salmon more than three days a
 week‟.

 Ginger, pepper and nutmeg have been popular ingredients in traditional Cumbrian cooking
 since the 18th century when the area had a flourishing trade with the Far East - wool for
 carpet making in exchange for spices was exported from the ports of Whitehaven,
 Workington and Maryport.

 The Cumberland breed of pig is now extinct but recipes using pork and ham, like
 Cumberland Ham and Cumberland Sausage, still carry the old county name and maintain
 links to past. Cumberland Sauce is certainly one of today‟s most delicious sauces and
 although it has no direct association with the county it has been adopted by the region and
 become a local speciality. It is thought to be German in origin and named after Ernest,
 Duke of Cumberland and brother of George IV who became the last independent ruler of
 Hanover.


   YOU WILL RECEIVE A SUMMER PROGRAMME HANDBOOK BEFORE THE START OF THE COURSE
Many traditional dishes of Cumbria feature potatoes in their ingredients. The first recorded
instance of potatoes as a garden crop in the north was in 1673 at Swarthmoor Hall,
Ulverston, the home of the Quaker Fell family, who were friends and protectors of George
Fox.

Hazelnuts, which can be found growing in the hedgerows of Cumbria, may be freely
gathered in the autumn. This nut is the Celtic emblem of wisdom. Wild fruits are found in
abundance and are not only used fresh in puddings and desserts but also in jelly-making
and preserves. Black kite is a local name for blackberry and hinberry is the Cumbrian
name for raspberry.

Rum Nicky is a local pudding made with apples, dried fruit, brown sugar and rum. The
county has its share of local apple varieties including Forty Shilling, Carlisle Coddling and
Keswick Codling. With trade between the Allerdale ports of Workington and Maryport and
the West Indies, rum, molasses and Barbados sugar have become established as part of
the culinary heritage of the area.

Most farmhouses made cheese for household consumption and occasionally one or two
farms produced cheese for sale in the market. The Whillimoor area of West Cumbria was
particularly famous for “Whillimoor Wang”, a cheese which when sold in Carlisle market,
was described as being „lank and lean but cheap and clean‟ – a slogan hardly designed to
promote sales.
A great deal of home-brewed ale was drunk in Cumbria, and each farm yielded milk. Tea
and coffee didn‟t come into the lives of the folk in the remote dales until about the time of
William Wordsworth.
                                                                               John Crouch

During your course we will cover:
After a Monday introductory session on campus on the course will mainly take place in the
field. There will be many stops along the way – for cups of tea, to visit small producers,
look in the hedgerows, to discuss an interesting place-name or simply to admire the
beautiful view. As you travel around the area some of the key issues concerning
gastronomic tourism and regionality will be discussed:

   What does it mean to be a tourist/traveller/visitor? How can gastronomy and
    regionality come together to offer the traveller a glimpse of the history, geography and
    culture of a region by introducing them to food and drink specialities?
   What does it mean for a recipe or food to belong to a region? Who owns it? Who or
    what decides how techniques and ingredients become fixed?
   How can learning about regional food teach us about folk customs and the way people
    lived in the past?
   Do tourists care about food and drink? How can a focus on gastronomy enhance a
    travelling experience? How do tourists‟ relationships with food change when they see
    where it comes from and meet the producers?
   How have the Slow Food Movement and the Countryside Alliance affected the way we
    think about local food, seasonal food and organic food? How have BSE and Foot and
    Mouth affected British agriculture and the choices we make about food and drink?
   How have fusion cooking, celebrity chefs, the rise of supermarkets and fashionable
    trends affected the way we eat? What does it mean that we know more varieties of
    olive oil than we do potatoes? Can gastronomic tourism counteract the trend for new,
    different, global fast foods?

    YOU WILL RECEIVE A SUMMER PROGRAMME HANDBOOK BEFORE THE START OF THE COURSE
   Why and how should we ensure that certain foods remain historically associated with
    the North West? How can we teach people to be gastronomic tourists?

Itinerary
Monday
Campus Introduction & morning coffee
Upfront Gallery for lunch - http://www.up-front.com/
Thornby Moor Dairy
High Head Sculpture Valley and Farm - http://highheadsculpturevalley.co.uk/farm.htm

Tuesday
Country Fare - http://www.country-fare.co.uk/index.php
Bessy Beck Trout Farm - http://www.bessybecktrout.co.uk/
Ivinson‟s Farm Shop for lunch
Deer n Dexter - http://www.deer-n-dexter.co.uk/
Abbot Lodge - http://www.abbottlodgejerseyicecream.co.uk/

Wednesday
Low Sizergh Barn - http://www.lowsizerghbarn.co.uk/
Cowmire Hall Damson Gin - http://www.cowmire.co.uk/
Lucy‟s of Ambleside for lunch - http://www.lucysofambleside.co.uk/
Grasmere Gingerbread - http://www.grasmeregingerbread.co.uk/

Thursday
The Watermill, Little Selkeld - http://www.organicmill.co.uk/index2.html
Acorn Bank for lunch
    http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/main/w-acornbankgardenandwatermill
Saunders Chocolate
     http://www.saunderschocolates.co.uk/chocolate-gallery/chocolate-gallery.html

Friday
Mystery Day

By the end of the course you can expect to:
 have an understanding of the essential aspects of gastronomic tourism and why it is
   important to regions, specifically north-west England
 be able to analyse how food and drink interact with history, geography, culture and
   consumerism and consider the effects of food policies, movements and choices on the
   north-west
 be able to taste and describe a variety of north-west foods




What to bring/wear
A notebook and pen. Please wear comfortable walking shoes and as we cannot predict
the weather, bring a warm sweater, light waterproof clothing, sunscreen and a sunhat.

Walking will be around the various venues. At some places the ground may be uneven. If
you have any mobility problems or concerns, please contact the Summer Programme
office.


    YOU WILL RECEIVE A SUMMER PROGRAMME HANDBOOK BEFORE THE START OF THE COURSE
About the Course Tutor - John Crouch
John Crouch moved from Kent to Cumbria in 1981 and is now a well-known freelance chef
and food consultant. He is a regular broadcaster on BBC Radio Cumbria and a food
promoter and cookery demonstrator for Made in Cumbria, North West Fine Foods, the
National Trust and the Cumbria Tourist Board. His talks which include „The History of
Cumbrian Food‟, „A Cumbrian Christmas‟, „Roman Cooking‟ and the more traditional
classic „Mrs Beeton‟, regularly draw in large audiences throughout the county. At
workshops such as „Hedgerow Cookery‟ for the Field Studies Council, he takes students
out to gather wild fruits, berries and nuts which he demonstrates how to cook on their
return to the Blencathra Centre. In the past year John has attracted much publicity for
„Cumbria‟s Cooking‟, a LEADER+ funded heritage cookery production which aims to keep
alive the traditions of Cumberland and Westmorland cooking and to support the growing
number of quality local food producers. He writes a „Good Curry Guide‟ column in
Cumbria Life magazine and spends part of the year taking Cumbrian food to the people of
Mumbai and Goa.


Cancellation Policy
If you wish to cancel your place on a course and/or your accommodation please do so in
writing to the Summer Programme office. A cancellation is only effective when written
confirmation is received by us.

Residents: Please note that your deposit will not be refunded if you cancel your booking.
For cancellations of course places after 26 June, or if you fail to register, the full course
and accommodation fees are payable.

Non-residents: When notification of cancellation of your place on a course is received in
writing on or before 26 June, 20% of the course fee is payable. The remaining 80% of the
course fee will be refunded to you. For cancellations of course places after 26 June, or if
you fail to register for the course, the full course fee is payable.

Please note: If a course has not reached viable numbers by 26 June 2009 the course
may be cancelled. Students already enrolled will have the opportunity to transfer to
another course where there are still places available, or will be given a full refund.

Insurance
You are strongly advised to take out personal insurance against the financial loss which
you would suffer if you were to cancel your booking. Personal property left unattended
during your stay is not insured, and so you are advised to take out insurance for your
personal possessions while you are here.



  Data Protection
The information about yourself that you give us is confidential and will be treated in
accordance with the Data Protection Act 1998. Information will be processed primarily for
maintenance of the student record, the management of academic processes and for
keeping you informed of our courses. Information will be released to the Higher Education
Statistics Agency and may also be released to anyone funding your course. If you

  YOU WILL RECEIVE A SUMMER PROGRAMME HANDBOOK BEFORE THE START OF THE COURSE
subsequently wish to use credits towards a qualification at another institution, your details
may be released to that institution also. If you do not wish to receive information about
future courses, please contact us. The University's Data Protection Policy is available at
www.lancs.ac.uk/depts/studreg/ or by contacting the Department.



            Special Requirements
If you have a disability or particular requirement we will do our best to ensure that you can
take part in the course on equal terms. We will be happy to discuss your requirements
and make any necessary arrangements such as communicating with the tutor or sending

you information in large print or on a disk. We can only make such arrangements if you let
us know what your needs are preferably well in advance of the course.
Please contact Janet Bunting on 01524 592716 or send an email to:
dce.student.support@lancaster.ac.uk


Parking on the Lancaster University Campus
Non-residents - In order to park on campus you need to buy a Play & Display ticket (£2
for 4 hours or £3 all day) or buy a scratch-card from the Reception Building, which is for a
single use only and costs £3 per day. Please note that the Summer Programme Office
cannot issue parking permits.

Blue Badge holders - free parking spaces are available at all times.

Residents - the Conference Office will provide you with a parking pass when you register
on Sunday, at no extra charge.


Enjoying your course
We want you to enjoy your course and your time at Lancaster University. If there is
anything which you feel could be improved during your stay please contact a member of
the Summer Programme team.

If you would like advice on any aspect of the programmes offered by DCE, please
contact the departmental office


Department of Continuing Education – Summer Programme
Lancaster University
Ash House
Lancaster LA1 4YT
Tel: 01524 592623
E-mail: summer.programme@lancaster.ac.uk

Office hours: 9.00 am – 5.00 pm Monday to Friday




  YOU WILL RECEIVE A SUMMER PROGRAMME HANDBOOK BEFORE THE START OF THE COURSE
YOU WILL RECEIVE A SUMMER PROGRAMME HANDBOOK BEFORE THE START OF THE COURSE

				
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