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INSTRUMENTATION _ORCHESTRATION

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					                                    SYLLABUS

              INSTRUMENTATION /ORCHESTRATION
                                        MU 136
                              Stephen E. Tucker, Instructor

                                   Four Credit Hours
                                     Spring 2003

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Instrumentation or Orchestration introduces the student to
the technique of scoring for a variety of instrumental combinations. This course uses the
works of successful composers as a model for training future composers, conductors, and
interpreters.

       I.     RATIONALE: Musicians pursuing careers in any of the many areas of
              musical performance or research need the skills necessary to dissect an
              orchestral score. In order to fully comprehend the content and intent of
              the music of the masters, musicians need to acquire the skill of
              anticipating musical colors and texture as created by instrumental
              combinations. With an understanding of these aspects of musical
              interpretation, every performer is better able to decide on matters of
              balance, tempo, and even generalities of style found in the printed score.

       II.    PREREQUISITES:

              A.      All Music Theory Courses
              B.      Music History up through 40 C
              C.      Ability to read in Treble, Bass, Alto and Tenor Clefs.
              D.      Fair level of piano proficiency.

       III.   OVERALL OBJECTIVES

              A.      Cognitive

                        1.     Through a series of reading assignments, listening and
                               scoring exercises, the student will acquire the ability to
                               recognize and reproduce very effective instrumental
                               combinations.




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             B.      Practical

                       1.    At least two projects (one for smaller ensemble and
                             another for full orchestra) will be produced in full score.
                             The final project (one fully orchestrated work with parts)
                             will be played and recorded by the university symphony.

      IV.    PRE-ASSESSMENT
             None


      V.     INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES

             C.      Lecture (Review of reading assignments)
             D.      Listening (CD’s provided as auxiliary materials)
             E.      Scoring exercises (Workbook)

      VI.    Additional Skills Recommended

                Some ability to transcribe music using a computer. Although handcopying
      is still acceptable, it is far more time-efficient to have scores in computer format.
      Changes are much more easily accomplished and the final output is often much
      easier to read. The Music Media Center (MMC) has computers and software!


Course Materials: Textbook: The Study of Orchestration, Samuel Adler
                           + Workbook; Music Manuscript Paper
                            (capable of multiple staved writing)
                          You will need a good supply of pencils!



      VI.    GRADING

              All class assignments are graded and count towards the final grade.
              Although the final project counts for a hefty 40% of the final grade, it is
              unlikely that one will be successful without consistent completion of daily
              assignments (30%). The mid-term and final exams each count for 15%.




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ASSIGNMENTS

Listed readings and workbook assignments are due on the date on which they are listed.
This means that the first class assignment must be prepared before the first class meeting.


Week 1
April 1 – Reading: pgs. 3 – 6; 9; 11- 14; 17 – 20 (top of page 21); 41-50.
          Workbook assignment: Test Yourself I (pgs. 1 – 3) Test yourself exercises
should be done in order to ensure knowledge. If necessary, consult your textbook.

 Discussion of tuning of strings for all bowed strings. (include Mandolin – pgs. 103
 Lowest pitches and relative highest pitches on all.

April 3 – Reading: pgs. 21 – 28. pgs. 31 – 41.
          All terms should be learned in English, French, and Italian.
          Workbook assignment: Worksheet 1 (pgs. 5 – 9);
          Worksheet 2 (pgs. 11 – 14)

Week 2
April 8 – Harmonics. Reading: pgs. 41 – 48 [also pgs. 57 – 59; 80 – 81; 86]
          Worksheet 3 (pgs. 15 & 16)

April 10 – Scoring for Strings ( Chapter 5 – pg. 111- 148)
            Worksheet 4
Week 3
April 15 – Harp concentration. – Reading: Chapter 4 (pgs. 89 – 101)
           Workbook: Worksheets 5 & 6 (pgs. 33 – 41)
            Particular attention should be paid to Harp pedal notation.

April 17 – Review of Strings and Harp


Week 4
While exploring the possibilities for scoring for woodwinds and strings you will often
feel frustrated or overwhelmed. Please do not let inexperience be a hindrance or a
discouraging element. Over time you will feel more comfortable with taking chances.
Consult scores in the library to see how other composers have voiced similar forces.

April 22 – Woodwinds – Chapter 6 (pgs. 164 – 179)
            Individual Winds ( Flutes: pgs. 180 – 193; Oboe: pgs. 193 – 198; English
Horn: pgs. 199 – 201; Clarinet: pgs. 205 – 217; Bassoons: pgs. 221 – 228.
            Test Yourself II (Workbook: pgs43 – 45); Worksheet 7




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April 24 – Scoring for Woodwinds: Chapter 8 (pgs. 229 – 259)
           Pay particular attention to “chords for winds in pairs” pgs. 253 – 255.
            Worksheet 9

Week 5
April 29 – Scoring practice. – Workbook pg. 62 –
           MID-TERM REVIEW
May 1 – Worksheet 10 – MID-TERM EXAM!

Week 6
May 7 – Reading: Chapter 9 – Brass (pgs. 295 – 356)
        Instrument characteristics, ranges, and transpositions must be learned.
        Test Yourself III; Worksheet 11
May 9 – Reading: pgs. 363 – 423; Worksheet 12, no.2 (only one Bach excerpt; choose);
         no. 3.

Week 7
May 14 – Reading: Chapter 12 – The Percussion Ensemble (pgs. 431 – 467)
         Test Yourself IV; Worksheet 18, nos. 1 & 2. Study both carefully! You should
          be able to reproduce this scoring if given only the piano part.
May 16 – Reading: Chapter 13 – Celesta, Harpsichord & Organ (pgs. 475-482; Uses of
          the Percussion (pgs. 497 – 544.

Week 8
May 21 – Chapter 15 – Scoring for Orchestra (pgs. 547 – 610.
         Chapter 17 – Transcribing for Orchestra (pgs. 666 – 757)
May 23 – Chapter 18 – The Preparation of Score and Parts (pgs. 757 –784)

Week 9
May 28 – Final projects assigned. This project will be assigned from either a piano,
organ, harp, or vocal score, and should be prepared for full orchestra of: 1 piccolo, 2
flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 1 bass clarinet, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 3 trumpets, 3 trombones,
1 tuba, timpani, 2 percussion, 1 harp, strings. Note: You do not have to use all the
instruments specified. Score carefully and effectively!

May 30 – Review of Ranges and Techniques.

Week 10
June 4 – Chapter 18 – The Preparation of the Score and Parts.
June 6 – Final Project due. Final project should be a carefully prepared, clear, legible full
score and parts to be recorded at the orchestra’s final exam.
Review and final examination preparation.

Final Exam
Test of ranges, transpositions, score layout, terms and all relevant material covered in the
course.



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