Dietary Assessment Project

Document Sample
Dietary Assessment Project Powered By Docstoc
					                      Dietary Analysis Project




Part 1. Keep track of your food intake for three days.

Part 2. Enter data and perform computer analysis; print required reports.

Part 3. Use the printouts from your dietary analysis to complete the assignment.

___________________________________________
                      Part 1. Recording Your Food Intake

1. Record all the food and drink that you consume throughout the day for three
days; record one weekend day and two weekdays.

Guidelines and Helpful Tips:

If you regularly take vitamin or mineral supplements, do not enter them into your
computer analysis. The goal of this project is to determine your nutritional status
without them.

Be very careful when entering food items into the computer.

Ex: 2C popcorn does not equal 2C unpopped popcorn
    2 oz cheese does not equal 2 lb cheese

**Entering misinformation will invalidate this study. Your grade will be affected.**

If your calorie amounts are unusually large (ie: >3000 kcal for one day)
reexamine your food entry. Make sure everything is correct.

Food Recording Basics:

Mesa Community College
Nutrition Faculty
The following are some general guidelines to follow when recording your food
intake...

Be specific - Please record all the foods you consume throughout the day. For
example, if you eat a hamburger, please record each part of the sandwich (i.e.
the bun, the meat, the toppings, etc.).

Be exact - (as much as possible). The food database is quite large and
continually growing. It is likely that most of the foods you will consume on a daily
basis will be in the database. If not, please select the closest match or use the
new Personal Nutrition Label form to customize your entry.

Be diligent - Try to stick to the food recording protocol as closely as possible. The
accuracy of this study depends on you the participant. Try to set aside a certain
time each day to enter your foods into the Computer.

Be prepared - If you are going to be away from a computer for an extended
period of time, feel free to record foods in a small notebook to be entered into
NAT at a more convenient time.

Be honest - For dietary analysis it is important to record a fairy accurate portrayal
of your food intake. You may want to measure your food intake. Most people
underestimate their caloric intake. One study revealed that normal-weight woman
underreported calorie intake by 282 calories per day, whereas over weight
women underreported by 621 calories a day. In one week that would amount to
about 4300 calories. One pound of body fat is equivalent to 3500 calories, so
their misreporting could account for one pound of weight per week that was not
lost! You are not going to be criticized or judged on the foods you eat. All
information regarding your food intake is confidential, so report honestly and
accurately.




Mesa Community College
Nutrition Faculty
               Part 2. Instructions for Using Diet Analysis Plus


Tools you will need: 1. Disk to save data
                    2. Your 3-day food record

   1. Follow prompts for entering personal data and class information. This will
      create your student record.
   2. Follow prompts to create a daily intake or follow the directions below:

How do I enter my data?

      Click on the “1” from the list “1 2 3 4 5 6 7” This will allow you to enter
       food for day one.
      Type food item. Press “Enter”.
      Choose your food item from the available list (be as accurate as possible);
       click OK.
      Enter amount, choose unit (1 cup, 1 slice, etc)
              **Follow this step until all food for the day has been entered.

Once all food has been entered for day one, follow the same steps for day 2 and
day 3.
Use the numerals on the menu bar “1 2 3 4 5 6 7”. Click “2” for day two, etc.
Follow the same steps as above for entering food data.

When you have finished entering your 3-day food record, your food intake will be
recorded under the numerals “1, 2 or 3”.

What do I print?

      Click “1” on the menu bar for day one.
      Click “Foodlist” menu from the menu bar. Choose “Analysis / Reports”
      Your choices will contain the following: Bar Graph, Ratios and Percents,
       Pyramid, Nutrition facts.
      You will need to print each report for each day (Total of 4 reports for each
       day)

      Click “2” on the menu bar for day two, etc. Follow the instructions above
       for printing data.


       ** Use this data for answering the questions for this assignment.
 The food record, printed analysis and completed questions are all required for
    completion of this project. All three must be turned in to your instructor.

Mesa Community College
Nutrition Faculty
                         Part 3. Assignment Questions

CALORIES

1. What was your average calorie intake per day?



CARBOHYDRATES

2. On average, how many grams of carbohydrate did you consume per day?




3. How many calories does this represent?




4. Carbohydrates comprise what percentage of your average daily calories?




5. The acceptable range of carbohydrate intake is 45 to 65% of daily calories.
   How does your intake compare to this recommendation?




FAT

6.    On average, how many grams of fat did you consume per day?




7.    How many calories does this represent?


Mesa Community College
Nutrition Faculty
8.   Fat comprises what percentage of your average daily calories?




9.   The acceptable range of fat intake is 20 to 35% of daily calories. How does
      your intake compare to this recommendation?




10. If your fat intake is higher than the recommendation, which specific foods in
      your three day intake could you reduce, eliminate or replace with other
      foods in order to lower the fat content?




CHOLESTEROL

11. On average, how many milligrams of cholesterol did you consume per day?




12. How does your dietary cholesterol intake compare with the suggested limit
     of 300 milligrams a day?




13. If your intake is above that target, identify foods in your three day record
      that are contributing to the excess.

PROTEIN

14. On average, how many grams of protein did you consume per day?




Mesa Community College
Nutrition Faculty
15. How many calories does this represent?




16. Protein comprises what percentage of your average daily calories?




17. The acceptable range of protein intake is 10 to 35% of daily calories. How
     does your intake compare to this recommendation?




Mesa Community College
Nutrition Faculty
18. Using the following formula calculate your RDA for protein (show all
     calculations):
             Current body weight in kilograms x 0.8 grams protein/ kg of body weight =
              Protein RDA.




SODIUM

19. It is recommended that most adults limit their sodium intake to 2400
      milligrams per day. On average, how many milligrams of sodium did you
      consume per day?




20. How does your diet compare to the recommendation? If you exceeded the
     recommended limit what changes could you make in your three day record
     to lower sodium intake?




FIBER

21. The recommended daily intake for fiber is 25 grams for women and 38
     grams for men. How does your daily fiber intake compare to this
     recommendation?




22. List five changes you could make in your three day record that would
     increase your fiber intake, if necessary.




VITAMINS

23. Your printout lists your daily intake of thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, Vitamin A,
     Vitamin C and folate. For each day state whether each vitamin was
     adequate, low or considerably over the DRI.



Mesa Community College
Nutrition Faculty
24. Do you think you need to take a daily vitamin supplement? Explain why or
     why not.



MINERALS

25. What is the DRI for calcium for your gender (male or female) and age
     group? On average, how many milligrams of calcium did you consume per
     day?




26. If your intake is below the DRI, list five foods you could consume to improve
      your calcium intake.




27. What is the DRI for iron for your gender and age group? On average, how
     many milligrams of iron did you consume per day?




28. If your intake is below the DRI, list five foods you could consume to improve
      your iron intake.




SUMMARY

29. Look over your three day food records. List five strengths and five
     weaknesses about the way you currently eat? What health problems might
     you face in 20 years if your dietary patterns remain the same?




Mesa Community College
Nutrition Faculty
Using the food printout, write the one food in your list
that is the highest source for each of these nutrients.

Nutrient                    Highest food source
Calories (Calories)
Protein (Pro)
Fat (Fat)
Carbohydrate (Carb)
Fiber (Fiber)
Sodium (Na)
Potassium (Pot)
Saturated fat (satF)
Monounsat fat (monoF)
Polyunsat fat (polyF)
Cholesterol (Chol)




30. This question deals with the logistics of this assignment:

    a) What problems did you face when using this method of dietary
    assessment? (Hint: Think of all the possible errors associated with each
    step.)



    b) How accurate do you think this method is? What could be done to improve
    its accuracy?



    c) Considering these factors, what conclusions can you draw about your
    dietary analysis?




Mesa Community College
Nutrition Faculty
   d) Write a brief reaction to this exercise.




All three parts of this assignment should be given to your instructor.




Mesa Community College
Nutrition Faculty

				
DOCUMENT INFO