Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL) by ndy15701

VIEWS: 180 PAGES: 79

									                                           Revised on Feb. 7, 2007




       Teaching English as a Second
                Language (TESL)




        Literacy/TESL Graduate Program

                        Handbook


                Division of Teacher Education
College of Education, Criminal Justice, & Human Services (CECH)
                 University of Cincinnati
                         February, 2007
                                    Disclaimer

This handbook contains current general information related to Literacy/TESL
Graduate Program description, policies, and procedures. The program will do its
best to provide the most up-to-date information. However, students are strongly
advised to check with their advisors as well as the Division of Teacher Education, the
College of Education, Criminal Justice, and Human Services, the Graduate School,
and the university websites regularly for any possible changes and additional
information, including the university rules and codes of conduct, which all students
must adhere to. Check http://www.cech.uc.edu/ and http://www.grad.uc.edu/.
Contact information for various offices is provided in the relevant sections of this
handbook. It’s also available through the university’s website at www.uc.edu.




                                          i
                                Acknowledgements
We would like to acknowledge Joanna Wolfenberger’s substantial contribution to this
handbook during her studies for the Master’s Degree in Literacy/TESL. Joanna put a lot of
time and effort into compiling the initial drafts of it under the supervision of Drs.
Gulbahar Beckett, Mary Benedetti, and Eric Paulson. We would also like to thank Drs.
Keith Barton and Cheri Williams for sharing their ideas, advising guides, and handbooks
with us. Some of the forms included in the appendixes of this handbook are gratefully
borrowed from their documents with permission.




                                           ii
Table of Contents
Section 1: Program Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
General Program Description. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Program Mission. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Program Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Section 2: TESL Faculty & Students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-7
About our Faculty Members………………..….3-4
Primary TESL Faculty…………………………4-5
Associate Faculty………………………………6
About our Students…………………………......7

Section 3: Literacy/TESL Graduate Program Descriptions. . . . . . . . .8-39
Ohio TESOL Endorsement Online……..………8-11
Certificate in Adult/International TESL…..……12-15
Master’s Degree in Literacy/TESL……..….......16-31
Doctor of Education in Literacy/TESL.………..32-41

Section 4: Financial Aid and Scholarship Opportunities. . . . . . . . . . . 42-43
Types of Awards……………………...………42-43
Criteria for Termination of Financial Aid...…..43

Section 5: Graduation Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Section 6: The Center for ESL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45-46
About the Center for ESL………...……………45
Oral English Proficiency Testing Office………45
The ESL Learning Center & ESL Credit
Courses at UC………………………………....45
English Language Institute…………..………..46

Section 7: Other Academic Opportunities in TESL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47-49
Individualized Field Experience Opportunities.…47
International Practicum…………………….……47
Academic & Professional Organizations….…….47-49

Section 8: Important Contact Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50-55

Section 9: Appendixes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56-75
            (Various important forms)


                                                               iii
                 Section 1: Program Overview

                General Program Description …………………...p. 1
                Program Mission …………………………...……p. 1
                Program Options……………………… …...……p. 2




General Program Description
Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL) is a strand of the Literacy Graduate
Program. Therefore, it’s referred to as Literacy/TESL Graduate Program. The
Literacy/TESL Graduate Program offers state approved Ohio Endorsement Online,
university-issued Certificate, Master’s of Education Degree (P-12 and Adult/International
strands), and Doctor of Education Degree. The Endorsement Online and Master’s Degree
P-12 strand prepare theoretically informed and practically equipped caring, committed,
and competent English as a Second Language (ESL) teachers and curriculum specialists
for US public and private school systems and related educational organizations (e.g.,
schools, school boards, and various departments of education). The Certificate in
Adult/International TESL and the adult strand Master’s Degree prepare theoretically
informed and practically equipped caring, committed, and competent ESL and English as
a Foreign Language (EFL) teachers, curriculum designers and developers, as well as
administrators at ESL language schools, colleges, and university Intensive English
programs internationally. The doctoral program prepares future university and college
professors, researchers, and curriculum specialists. It develops students’ expertise in
second language acquisition and socialization theories, along with research related to
teaching English as a second and foreign language.


Program Mission
The Literacy/TESL Graduate Program is a community of scholars and professionals
committed to promoting research and academic excellence, delivering student-centered
teaching, and building relationships and partnerships with local, national, and
international communities. It creates professional and scholarly opportunities for students
to become theoretically informed and practically equipped, caring, committed, and
competent educators and scholars. The Literacy/TESL Graduate Program also
encourages individuality and creativity where faculty, students, and staff contribute
toward the common good of the program through expression of their views and their
work. The program aligns its mission with UC|21, Ohio Teaching English to Speakers of
Other Languages (TESOL), National Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
(TESOL), and National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE)
missions.




                                             1
Program Options
The Literacy/TESL Graduate Program provides the following options:

     Options                                   Minimum Credits

     Ohio TESOL Endorsement Online                      24
     Certificate in Adult/International TESL           24-36
     Master’s of Education in Literacy/TESL             45
     Doctor of Education in Literacy/TESL               135




                                           2
           Section 2: TESL Faculty & Students

                 About our Faculty Members………………….p. 3-4
                 Primary Faculty……………………..………..p. 4-5
                 Associate Faculty……………………………..p. 6
                 About our Students…………………………...p. 7


About our Faculty Members
Literacy/TESL faculty members are recognized nationally and internationally for their
scholarship and professional services and leadership. They have:
   ● Published in such journals as TESOL Quarterly; Modern Language Journal; the
     Canadian Modern Language Review; English Language Teaching Journal; TESL
     Canada Journal; TESOL Journal; Journal of Asian Pacific Communication;
     Bilingual Research Journal; NABE Journal of Research and Practice; Journal of
     Research on Computing in Education; Canadian Higher Education Profile;
     Reading Research Quarterly; Applied Measurement in Education; Journal of
     School Leadership, Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences, Journal of
     Adolescent and Adult Literacy, and Reading Psychology. They have also
     published numerous books and book chapters on second and foreign language as
     well as bilingual education research and practice. In addition, they regularly
     present at national and international conferences such as Teaching English to
     Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), American Association of Applied
     Linguistics (AAAL), American Educational Research Association (AERA),
     National Association of Bilingual Education (NABE), American Council on the
     Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL), National Council of Teacher
     Education (NCTE), and International Reading Association (IRA).

   •   Served as Editors, Guest Editors, and Editorial Board members of such journals as
       the NABE Journal of Research and Practice, Bilingual Research Journal, TESL
       Canada Journal, and Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education:
       International Journal. They also regularly review manuscripts for various TESL
       related journals such as TESOL Quarterly; Modern Language Journal; the
       Canadian Modern Language Review; TESL Canada Journal; Language and
       Education; Education Research Quarterly; Educational Researcher; Journal of
       Educational Psychology (APA); Cultural Diversity & Mental Health Journal
       (APA); and Bilingual Research Journal;

   •   Served as officers and board members of major professional associations such as
       the National Association of Bilingual Education; North American Systemic
       Functional Linguistics Association, American Reading Forum, and Ohio TESOL.
                                           3
   •   Received grants and fellowships from the Social Sciences and Humanities
       Research Council of Canada; the Fulbright Foundation; the College Board; the
       Smart Board Foundation of Canada; Ontario Industrial Accident Prevention
       Association; University of British Columbia; University of Cincinnati, The
       Wohlgemuth Herschede Foundation, and Head Start.

   •   Taught internationally in countries such as Canada, China, Colombia, Mexico,
       South Korea, and Turkey in secondary and post-secondary ESL and EFL
       contexts.

Primary TESL Faculty
Gulbahar H. Beckett (Ph.D.)
Assistant Professor and Chair
Literacy/TESL Graduate Program
Director, Center for ESL
Office: 4130.U, Edwards Center One
Tel: (513) 556-2898, Fax: (513) 556-1001
E-mail address: gulbahar.beckett@uc.edu
Biography: http://www.cech.uc.edu/faculty_staff.php?p=biographies_list&cn=BecketGH
Homepage: http://homepages.uc.edu/~becketgh/

   Education
   •  Ph.D., The University of British Columbia, Canada,
      Area of Specialization: TESL and Modern Languages
   •  M.Ed., Queen’s University, Canada,
      Area of Specialization: Curriculum and Instruction

   Research Interests
   •  Project-based second and foreign language education: Theory and practice
   •  Content-based second language teaching and learning: Theory and practice
   •  Second language acquisition and socialization: Theory and practice
   •  Second language literacy (focus on writing): Theory and practice
   •  Computer-assisted language teaching/learning: Theory and practice

Mary Benedetti, (Ed.D.)
Associate Professor, Literacy/TESL Graduate Program
Office: 4130.S, Edwards Center One
Tel: (513) 556-2817, Fax (513) 556-1001
E-mail address: mary.benedetti@uc.edu
Biography: http://www.cech.uc.edu/faculty_staff.php?p=biographies_list&cn=BenedeMS


   Education
   •  Ed.D., University of Cincinnati
      Area of Specialization: Literacy/TESL
   •  M.A., Xavier University
      Area of Specialization: English

                                          4
   Research Interests
   •  Adult and international education
   •  Immigrant and minority access to higher education
   •  Sociocultural and sociopolitical issues in language education
   •  Preparing teachers for linguistic and cultural diversity
   •  Second language literacy

Virginia Gonzalez, (Ph.D.)
Professor, Literacy/TESL Graduate Program
Office: 4130.N, Edwards Center One
Tel: (513) 556-5116, Fax (513) 556-1001
E-mail address: virginia.gonzalez@uc.edu
Biography: http://www.cech.uc.edu/faculty_staff.php?p=biographies_list&cn=GonzalVA

   Education
   •  Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin
      Area of Specialization: Educational Psychology, Major in Cognition, Learning,
      and Instruction
   •  M.A., University of Texas at Austin
      Area of Specialization: Bilingual Special Education

   Research Interests
   •  Multidisciplinary assessment and instructional models for cognitive and language
      development in ESL/bilingual Hispanic Preschool to Grade 12 (P-12) students
   •  Second language learning and cultural adaptation in college students
   •  Assessment and diagnosis of ESL/bilingual Hispanic P-12 students

Secondary TESL Faculty
Eric Paulson, (Ph.D.)
Associate Professor, Literacy Graduate Education
Office: 4130.P, Edwards Center One
Tel: (513) 556-2943 Fax: (513) 556-1001
E-mail Address: eric.paulson@uc.edu
Biography: http://www.cech.uc.edu/faculty_staff.php?p=biographies_list&cn=PaulsoE
Homepage: http://homepages.uc.edu/~paulsoe/

   Education
   •  Ph.D., University of Arizona
      Area of Specialization: Language, Reading, & Culture
   •  M.S., Florida State University
      Area of Specialization: Multilingual/Multicultural Education

   Research Interests
   •  First and second language reading
   •  Reading processes
   •  Eye movements and miscue analysis
   •  Metaphor/analogy
   •  Adult and college literacy
   •  ESL/EFL
                                           5
Associate TESL Faculty
Carolyn Aufderhaar, (Ed.D.)
Adjunct Faculty, Literacy/TESL Graduate Program
E-mail: crauf@fuse.net

   Education
   •  Ed.D., University of Cincinnati
      Area of Specialization: TESL/Literacy
   •  M.A., Bowling Green State University, English
      Specialization: TESL

   Research Interests
   •  Applied Phonology
   •  Project-based second language teaching and learning: Theory and practice
   •  Literature-based approaches for English language learners in Elementary schools

Thomas Dinsmore, (Ed.D.)
Associate Professor, Humanities & Social Sciences
Clermont College
Tel: (513)732-8962, Fax: (513)732-5304
E-mail: thomas.dinsmore@uc.edu

   Education
   •  Ed.D., University of Cincinnati
      Area of Specialization: Literacy/TESL
   •  M.A., University of Cincinnati
      Area of Specialization: English/Linguistics
   •  M.A., University of Cincinnati
      Area of Specialization: French Civilization

   Research Interests
   •  First and second language writing
   •  Linguistics and second language acquisition connection

Paul Chamness Miller, (Ph.D.)
Assistant Professor, Foreign Language Education
Office: 4130.M, Edwards Center One
Phone: (513) 556-0794 Fax: (513) 556-1001
E-mail: paul.miller@uc.edu
Biography: http://www.cech.uc.edu/faculty_staff.php?p=biographies_list&cn=MillerPS

   Education
   •  Ph.D., Purdue University
      Area of Specialization: Foreign Language Education
   •  M.A., Purdue University
      Area of Specialization: French Linguistics

   Research Interests
   •  Foreign language education
                                          6
   •    Second language acquisition
   •    Multicultural education
   •    Education & social justice issues pertaining to immigrant adolescents and
        international college students
   •    Gay, lesbian, bisexual, & transgendered social justice issues


About our Students
Students and graduates of the Literacy/TESL Graduate Program come from a variety of
backgrounds, bringing a diverse experience and knowledge. Graduates of the program
currently work in educational contexts as teachers, program coordinators, and curriculum
specialists in P-12 system, adult/international language schools and institutes, community
colleges, and universities both in the US and abroad. Graduates have also found work in
many non-school settings such as immigrant and community associations, educational
publishers or computer companies, training programs for multinational corporations, and
other international agencies.


Our students have also been productive members of the academic community. They
have:
    •   Single and/or co-authored books
    •   Single and/or co-authored articles published in such journals as TESOL Quarterly
        and TESOL Journal
    •   Single and/or co-authored book chapters
    •   Received single and/or co-authored external as well as internal grants from such
        organizations as the Fulbright Foundation, the Smart Board Foundation of
        Canada, and the University of Cincinnati
    •   Regularly presented at local, national, and international conferences such as Ohio
        TESOL, Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), American
        Association of Applied Linguistics (AAAL), American Educational Research
        Association (AERA), National Association of Bilingual Education (NABE), and
        International Reading Association (IRA).
    •   Provided services to professional organizations such as Ohio TESOL and
        Ohio/Kentucky/Indiana Association of Bilingual Education
    •   Taught in such countries as China, Colombia, Costa Rica, France, Greece, Japan,
        Russia, Turkey, and the US.




                                            7
  Section 3: Literacy/TESL Program Descriptions

                    Ohio TESOL Endorsement Online……………p. 8-11
                    Certificate in Adult/International TESL………p. 12-15
                    Master’s Degree in Literacy/TESL…………....p. 16-31
                    Doctor of Education Degree in Literacy/TESL..p. 32-41


                      Ohio TESOL Endorsement Online

Description
The Ohio Endorsement in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) is
designed for licensed teachers who are interested in becoming specialized in teaching
English as a Second Language (ESL) for students preschool through grade 12 (P-12). A
flexible alternative for inservice teachers, this course of study is delivered completely
online and features an interactive multimedia learning environment. It offers a high
quality, from research to practice, professional development model “for preparing
committed, caring, and competent educators” to meet Ohio state standards and federal
mandates under the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001, Title III. The
Endorsement is approved by the Ohio Department of Education and meets the same high
standards of excellence for similar on-campus teacher preparation programs accredited by
the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).

Course of Study
The TESOL Endorsement Online requires 24 quarter credit hours. It consists of eight
online courses and is designed to be completed in four consecutive quarters if begun in
Summer Quarter. Each course is 5 weeks in length. Completion of the required
coursework and passing the Praxis II-ESOL #0360 Exam is required for the
Endorsement. No degree is awarded upon completion of this course of study. Candidates
who successfully fulfill all requirements are recommended for the Ohio TESOL
Endorsement.

   A. Required Courses (21 quarter credits)

     Course Number Course Title                                             Credit

     18-PRFS-590       Teaching Reading & Writing in ESL                    3 cr.

     18-PRFS-775       Theories of Second Language Acquisition              3 cr.

     18-PRFS-608       Methods of TESL I                                    3 cr.
                       (Prerequisite: PRFS 775)

     18-PRFS-621       Phonetics for TESL                                   3 cr.

     18-PRFS-609       Methods of Teaching ESL II                           3 cr.

                                              8
                       (Prerequisite: PRFS 608)

     18-PRFS-610       Sociolinguistics for TESL                             3 cr.

     18-PRFS-778       Practicum in TESL (P-12)                              3 cr.
                       (Prerequisites: PRFS 775, PRFS 608, PRFS 609)

     18-PRFS-601       Grammar for TESL                                      3 cr.


Advanced Standing: Advanced standing may be applied for up to 9 credits of
Endorsement courses if the class that is being substituted covers the same content as the
class it is replacing. For example, in order to receive advanced standing for PRFS 590
Teaching ESL Reading & Writing, the candidate must have taken a graduate-level ESL-
oriented class within the last 5 years class that focuses on both ESL reading and ESL
writing issues.

   B. Praxis Exam (0 credits)
       Passing the Praxis II-ESOL #0360 Exam is required for the endorsement. This
       test is prescribed by the State of Ohio to earn the Ohio TESOL Endorsement.
       Praxis II tests are administered every two months, September through June.
       Information about and applications for the Praxis II test can be found by calling
       Student Services at (513) 556-2336 located in 1110 Edwards One or by going to
       www.ets.org/praxis/prxaboutII.html.

Course Descriptions
18-PRFS-590 Teaching Reading and Writing in ESL (3 hrs)
Research-based principles, theories, and methods for literacy and biliteracy pedagogical
applications for Pre-K through Grade 12 ESL students.

18-PRFS-601 Grammar for TESL (3 hrs)
Pedagogical analysis of English grammar for Pre-K through Grade 12 ESL students’
instruction.

18-PRFS-608 Methods of TESL I (3 hrs)
Principles, methods, and strategies of teaching language development and improving
academic achievement in Pre-K through Grade 12 ESL students; and lesson plans across
content areas.

18-PRFS-609 Methods of TESL II (3 hrs)
Methods, curriculum, and materials development for teaching ESL and techniques for
testing, assessment and evaluation.

18-PRFS-610 Sociolinguistics for TESL (3 hrs)
Socio-cultural influences on variation in first and second language acquisition and use
and its pedagogical implications for Pre-K through Grade 12 ESL students.


                                              9
18-PRFS-621 Phonetics for TESL (3 hrs)
Analysis of the sound system of English for diagnosis and instruction of pronunciation
problems for Pre-K through Grade 12 ESL students.

18-PRFS-775 Theories of Second Language Acquisition (3 hrs)
Theories of second language acquisition and their implications for the development of
ESL/EFL teaching methods.


18-PRFS-778 Practicum in TESL (3 hrs)
Supervised practice in teaching Pre-K through Grade 12 ESL students. Consists of a 40
hour field experience and an online seminar.


Licensure Requirements
   •   For teachers holding a standard Ohio teaching license, the Endorsement in
       TESOL will be limited to the age and grade levels listed on the teaching license.
   •   The Ohio TESOL Endorsement will be issued to an individual who possesses a
       standard Ohio teaching license, who has successfully completed the required
       coursework, who has passed the Praxis II examination prescribed by the Ohio State
       Department of Education, and who has been recommended by the University of
       Cincinnati.
   •   Students seeking TESOL Endorsement in a state other than Ohio or in a country
       other than the United States are advised to contact the licensing bureau in that
       state or country.


 Application Requirements
   •   Applicants must hold a current and active early childhood, middle childhood, or
       adolescent/young adult license.
   •   Applicants must submit a copy of their teaching license or equivalent during
       application process.
   •   Must have an undergraduate GPA of at least 2.8 on a 4.0 scale and submit copy of
       transcripts during the application process.
   •   Applicants may apply any quarter.
   •   To submit an application or register for courses, please contact Carol Frazier at (513)
       556-3590 or ESL1@email.uc.edu.


 Additional Information
   •   TESOL Endorsement students take all courses as professional development
       students; therefore, students do not need to be admitted to a Master’s program.
       Such students pay 50% of regular in-state tuition. In-state and out-of-state
       students pay the same tuition.

                                            10
   •   Endorsement students can transfer up to 9 graduate quarter credits from other
       accredited universities and colleges and apply for advanced standing for
       equivalent University of Cincinnati courses. In order to do this, students must
       submit a copy of their transcript(s) and course descriptions from an official
       university publication and a completed application form to the TESOL
       Endorsement Coordinator.
   •   In addition to the TESOL Endorsement Online, the University of Cincinnati also
       offers on-campus doctoral, masters, and certificate programs in Literacy/TESL.
       The following three (3) Endorsement courses (up to 9 quarter credits) may be
       transferred into the Literacy/TESL Master’s program: 18-PRFS-608; 18- PRFS-
       609; and 18- PRFS-778. For more information on Literacy/TESL graduate
       programs, please contact Carol Frazier at (513) 556-3590 or ESL1@email.uc.edu.

                              Additional Information
This is general information about the Ohio TESOL Endorsement Online available
at the time of the creation of this handbook. Students are strongly advised to check
with the Endorsement Coordinator, the Literacy/TESL Graduate Program, and/or
the College of Education, Criminal Justice, and Human Services Professional
Development office regularly for any possible changes and additional information.
For more and additional information about the TESOL Endorsement Online, visit
the College of Education, Criminal Justice, & Human Services website at
http://www.cech.uc.edu/ and click on "Programs & Majors," then click on
"Professional Development."




                                           11
                   Certificate in Adult/International TESL

Program Description
The Certificate strand is designed for those who intend to teach English as a Second
Language (ESL) or English as a Foreign Language (EFL) to adult learners, either
domestically or abroad. The certificate is issued by the University of Cincinnati.
Graduates of the Certificate strand of the Program are qualified to work in international
language schools or in community ESL programs for adults. Graduates who also hold
advanced degrees (e.g., Masters of Arts, Masters of Science, Masters of Education) may
be qualified to teach in community college ESL programs or domestic and international
postsecondary language institutes.

Program Requirements
The Certificate Program is comprised of a minimum of 24 quarter credit hours. Additional
elective or practicum credits are permitted but not required. 9 credit hours are transferable
to the M.Ed. Program in Literacy/TESL (Adult/International Strand). Students who are
admitted to the M.Ed. Program after completing more than nine credit hours in the
Certificate Program may not be able to apply those additional credits toward the M.Ed.
For information on admission to the M.Ed. Program in Literacy/TESL, please refer to the
information guide for that program. Please note that the Certificate in Adult/International
TESL does not qualify graduates to teach in Preschool to Grade 12 (P-12) schools in the
US. For information about Literacy/TESL programs that prepare individuals to teach in
elementary, middle, and secondary schools, please refer to the information guide for the
Ohio TESOL Endorsement On-line.

Program of Study (24 quarter credits)
 Course Number            Course Title                                        Credits
 18-LTCY-775              L2 Acquisition Theory                               3 cr.

 18-LTCY-673              Phonetics & L2 Education                            3 cr.

 18-LTCY-674              Grammar& L2 Education                               3 cr.

 18-LTCY-869              Teaching and Assessing College ESL: Oral            3 cr.
                          Teaching and Assessing College ESL: Reading and     3 cr.
 18-LTCY-868
                          Writing
 18-LTCY-779              Sociolinguistics in L2 Education                    3 cr.

 18-LTCY-801              Foundations of Postsecondary Literacy Instruction   3 cr.

 18-LTCY-731              Adult/International Practicum                       3-15 cr.*
*3 credits minimum required; additional credits optional.
NB 1.: Students are strongly encouraged to consult their advisors for their credit hour and
practicum location choice. Students who have three or more years of teaching ESL/EFL
experience may take 3 practicum hours. Students who have less than three years of
                                                    12
ESL/EFL teaching experience must take a minimum of 4 practicum hours. Students who
have no teaching experience or wish to add teaching experience in another context may
take up to 15 practicum hours. However, the additional practicum must be in addition to
other required courses, not in lieu of them.

NB 2.: NB: Please note that the international part of the practicum is optional and
voluntary. That is, the Literacy/TESL program provides opportunities for students who
wish to have international practicum experience, but does not make it a requirement.
Students who wish to have this experience may do so in close consultation with their
advisors and the program.

Course Descriptions


18-LTCY-673 Phonetics & L2 Education (3 credits)
Analysis of sound system of English for diagnosis and instruction of pronunciation and
intonation problems for ESL students.

18-LTCY-674 Grammar & L2 Education (3 credits)
Analysis of the linguistic systems that constitute the English language and pedagogical
applications of that analysis.

18-LTCY-731 Adult/International Practicum (3-15 credits)
Supervised practice teaching in adult ESL or EFL context.

18-LTCY-775 L2 Acquisition Theory (3 cr.)
Theories of second language acquisition and their implications for development of ESL
teaching methods.

18-LTCY-779 Sociolinguistics & L2 Education (3 cr.)
Overview of regional and societal variations of language, pidgins, and Creole, world
Englishes, societal multilingualism, inter-cultural communication, and language planning
and policy.

18-LTCY-868 Teaching and Assessing College ESL: Reading & Writing (3 cr.)
Examination of research, principles, and procedures of teaching and assessing college
and university ESL courses related to the development of ESL reading and writing.

18-LTCY-869 Teaching and Assessing College ESL: Oral Focus (3 cr.)
Examination of research, principles, and procedures of teaching and assessing college and
university ESL courses related to the development of ESL listening and speaking.

LTCY 801 Foundations of Postsecondary Literacy Instruction (3 cr.)
Examination of postsecondary literacy instruction from historical, theoretical, and
pedagogical perspectives.

                                            13
Admission Requirements
  1. Applicants to the Certificate in Adult/International TESL must possess a
     Baccalaureate (i.e., university) degree from an accredited college or university.
     The Baccalaureate degree can be in any relevant major area. It does not need to be
     in the area of education.
  2. Applicants must possess a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.8 at the
     undergraduate level leading to the Baccalaureate degree. International applicants
     whose transcripts show a different grading scale must present the US equivalent.
  3. International students whose native language is not English are required to take
     the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and to have a minimum score
     of 550 (paper version) or 213 (computer version) across areas or 79-80 (internet-
     based test); a minimum score on the Test of Written English (TWE) of 4.5.
     Applicants who fall into one or more of the following categories are exempt from
     the TOEFL requirement:
         •   nonnative English speakers who hold degrees or diplomas from
             postsecondary institutions in English-speaking countries (e.g., the United
             States, Canada, England, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand);
         •   nonnative English speakers who earned at least a 6.5 on the International
             English Language Testing System (IELTS) exam or at least a B on the
             Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) exam;
         •   nonnative English speakers who have successfully completed at least a
             two-year course of study in which English was the language of instruction;
         •   nonnative English speakers who have taken the TOEFL test within the
             past two years and obtained and can submit satisfactory scores.
     Requests for a TOEFL waiver should be sent to the Senior Assistant University
     Dean of the Graduate School with appropriate documentation. See
     http://www.grad.uc.edu/ for details.


  4. Two current letters of recommendation addressing the applicant’s academic or
     professional background and/or potential for success in the Certificate Program.
     Letters written within the 3 year-period preceding admission are acceptable.
  5. Official transcripts must be presented (or UC “on campus” transcripts can be
     requested if the degree is from UC) of all the undergraduate and graduate course
     work completed, including degrees granted and dates of degrees. International
     applicants need to present a translated English certified copy of transcripts.
     Consult with the International Student Services Office at UC at 556-2879 or
     http://www.isso.uc.edu for a list of certified translators in the Cincinnati area.
     Overseas applicants may consult the American embassies in their areas.




                                          14
Submit all the required documents to:
       Carol Frazier
       4130 Edwards Center One
       College of Education, Criminal Justice, and Human Services
       ML 0022
       45-51 Corry Boulevard
       Cincinnati, OH 45221
       USA.
For more information about the Certificate in Adult/International TESL, contact Carol
Frazier at esl1@email.uc.edu or 513-556-3590 and/or
Dr. Mary Benedetti at (513) 556-2817 or mary.benedetti@uc.edu


Applicants should also visit the university Graduate School website at:
http://www.grad.uc.edu/certificate-programs.aspx for additional information.


                             Additional Information
        This is general information about the Certificate in Adult/International
TESL available at the time of the creation of this handbook. Students are strongly
advised to check with their advisors as well as the Literary/TESL Program, Division
of Teacher Education, the College of Education, Criminal Justice, and Human
Services web-sites regularly for any possible changes and additional information.
An advisor is assigned to each student upon admission. Important websites to check:
http://www.cech.uc.edu/ and http://www.grad.uc.edu/certificate-programs.aspx.




                                           15
                 Master’s Degree (M.Ed.) in Literacy/TESL

Program Description
The Master’s in Education Degree (M.Ed.) Literacy/TESL specialization offers three
options: 1) P-12 track; 2) P-12 plus Endorsement track, and 3) Adult/International track.
Details are described below.


M.Ed. in Literacy/TESL, P-12 Track AND P-12 Plus Endorsement Track
The Literacy/TESL Master’s Degree (M.Ed.) Program Preschool to Grade 12 (P-12)
Track AND P-12 Plus Endorsement Track are geared toward individuals who are
licensed in single or multiple subject areas and are interested in teaching English as a
Second Language (ESL). The program is designed to meet the national TESOL
standards. The aim of the program is to prepare theoretically informed and practically
equipped, caring, committed, and competent ESL teachers, curriculum developers and
consultants, and program administrators for domestic public and private schools.
Graduates of this program may also work for organizations such as school boards and
departments of education.


M.Ed. in Literacy/TESL, Adult/International Track
The Adult/International Track of the Literacy/TESL Master’s Degree (M.Ed.) Program is
geared toward individuals who are interested in teaching English as a Second/Foreign
Language (ESL/EFL) in international language schools, community colleges, or in the
public school system (if they already hold a teaching license). This program is designed
to meet the OHIO TESOL and international TESOL standards. The aim of the program is
to prepare theoretically informed and practically equipped caring, committed, and
competent ESL/EFL teachers, curriculum developers and consultants, as well as program
administrators for schools, colleges, university ESL and Intensive English Programs
(IEPs) and corporations. Graduates of this program may also work as materials writers
and researchers for publishers and/or other relevant organizations.


Program Requirements
Different programs, specializations, and tracks have different requirements. For the
Literacy/TESL M.Ed. degree, a minimum of 45 quarter credit hours are required. These
credits may be earned through course work, practicum, and one culminating experience
(e.g., comprehensive exam, professional portfolio, master’s project, or master’s thesis).




                                            16
    A. Required Courses (minimum of 36 quarter credits)

Course Number Course Title                                                      Credits
18-LTCY-673          Phonetics & L2 Education                                   3 cr.
18-LTCY-674          Grammar & L2 Education                                     3 cr.
18-LTCY-701          Research in L2 Acquisition                                 3 cr.
18-LTCY-775          L2 Acquisition Theory                                      3 cr.
18-LTCY-779          Sociolinguistics & L2 Education                            3 cr.
18-LTCY-865          Content-based L2 Education: Theory, Research, and          3 cr.
                     Practice
18-LTCY-866          Sociopolitical Issues in L2 Education: Theory & Research   3 cr.
18-LTCY-867          Bilingual Education: Theory, Research, and Practice        3 cr.
18-LTCY-868          Teaching & Assessing College ESL: Reading & Writing        3 cr.
18-LTCY-869          Teaching and Assessing College ESL: Oral Focus             3 cr.
18-LTCY-870          Research in Computer Assisted Language Learning            3 cr.
18-LTCY-731          Adult/International Practicum                              3-15 cr.*
* 3 credits minimum required; additional credits optional

NB 1.: Students are strongly encouraged to consult their advisors for their credit hour and
practicum location choice. Students who have three or more years of teaching ESL/EFL
experience may take 3 practicum hours. Students who have less than three years of ESL/EFL
teaching experience must take a minimum of 4 practicum quarter hours. Students who have
no teaching experience or wish to add teaching experience in another context may take up to
15 practicum hours. However, the additional practicum must be in addition to other required
courses, not in lieu of them.

NB 2.: NB: Please note that the international part of the practicum is optional and voluntary.
That is, the Literacy/TESL program provides opportunities for students who wish to have
international practicum experience, but does not make it a requirement. Students who wish to
have this experience may do so in close consultation with their advisors and the program.

Master’s in P-12 Track
Master’s in P-12 Track students are required to take the following courses in lieu of LTCY-
868, LTCY-869, and LTCY-731:
        •    LTCY 776 / PRFS 608: TESL Methods I (3 cr.)
        •    LTCY 777 / PRFS 609: TESL Methods II (3 cr.)
        •    LTCY 778 / PRFS 778: Practicum (3-15 cr.)



                                                   17
   Master’s in P-12 Plus Endorsement Track

   Master’s in P-12 Plus Endorsement Track students must also take the following course as
   co-requisite:

        •       18-LTCY-751: Making Meaning from Text

   Master’s Degree AND Certificate

   Master’s students may also be eligible to receive Certificates in Adult/International TESL.
Students wishing to do so should consult their advisors.

   B. Recommended Electives (0-9 quarter credits)
   For elective courses, students are encouraged to choose from the following list of courses.
   Other appropriate courses may be included in this category with advisors’ approval.
       •    15-SOC-430: Conversation Analysis (3 cr.)
       •    18-CI-864: Global Education I (3 cr.)
       •    18-CI-685: Global Education II (3 cr.)
       •    18-EDFN-835 Human Learning (3 cr.)
       •    18-EDFN-837 Cognition and Development (3 cr.)
       •    18-EDFN-755 Research Methods and Techniques (3 cr.)
       •    18-LTCY-730 Discourse Analysis (3 cr.)
       •    18-LTCY-804 Testing, Assessment, & Evaluation in TESL (3 cr.)
       •    18-CI-649 Computer Based Tools for Teachers (3 cr.)

   C. Culminating Experience Options (0-9 quarter credits)
   In consultation with their advisors, students may choose from one of the following options:
       1.   Comprehensive Examination (No credit)
       2.   Professional Portfolio (3 credits), 18-LTCY-875
       3.   Master’s Project (3-6 credits), 18-LTCY-874
       4.   Master’s Thesis (6-9 credits), 18-LTCY-873


Course Descriptions
18-LTCY-673 Phonetics & L2 Education (3 cr.)
Analysis of sound system of English for diagnosis and instruction of pronunciation and
intonation problems for ESL students.

18-LTCY-674 Grammar & L2 Education (3 cr.)
Analysis of the linguistic systems that constitute the English language and pedagogical
applications of that analysis.



                                            18
18-LTCY-701 Research in L2 Acquisition (3 cr.)
Overview and study of most commonly applied linguistics research methods in
TESL/TEFL and bilingual education.

18-LTCY-731 Adult/International Practicum (3-15 cr.)
Supervised practice teaching in adult ESL or EFL context.

18-LTCY-779 Sociolinguistics & L2 Education (3 cr.)
Overview of regional and societal variations of language, pidgins and Creole, world
Englishes, societal multilingualism, inter-cultural communication, and language planning
and policy.

18-LTCY-775 L2 Acquisition Theory (3 cr.)
Theories of second language acquisition and their implications for development of ESL
teaching methods.

18-LTCY-776 P-12 TESL Methods I: Principles and Procedures (3 cr.)
Methods and techniques of teaching ESL in the P-12 context.

18-LTCY-777 P-12 Methods II: Materials Design and Development (3 cr.)
Methods, curriculum, and materials development for teaching ESL; techniques for testing
and evaluation.

18-LTCY-778 P-12 Practicum (3-15 cr.)
Supervised practice teaching in P-12 ESL contexts.

18-LTCY-865 Content-based L2 Education: Theory, Research, & Practice (3 cr.)
Examination of theoretical foundations, current research, and best practices of content-
based L2 education as applicable to the field of TESL through readings and discussions
of seminal and representative work of major scholars and professionals.

18-LTCY-866 Sociopolitical Issues in L2 Education: Theory & Research (3 cr.)
Introduction of sociopolitical (sociological, legal, ideological, historical, institutional, and
contextual) issues in the teaching of English to speakers of other languages to adult
students domestically and/or internationally.

18-LTCY-867 Bilingual Education: Theory, Research, & Practice (3 cr.)
Exploration of philosophical, theoretical, and educationally applied models of cognitive
and language development that use bilingual education as a method of instruction
developed for English as a second language (ESL) skills in Pre-K through Grade 12
students.




                                              19
18-LTCY-868 Teaching and Assessing College ESL: Reading & Writing (3 cr.)
Examination of research, principles, and procedures of teaching and assessing college
and university ESL courses related to the development of ESL reading and writing.

18-LTCY-869 Teaching and Assessing College ESL: Oral Focus (3 cr.)
Examination of research, principles, and procedures of teaching and assessing college
and university ESL courses related to the development of ESL listening and speaking.

18-LTCY-870 Research in Computer Assisted Language Learning (3 cr.)
Examination of research and theory and their implications in computer assisted second
language teaching/learning.


Culminating Experience Options for the Master’s Degree
Students are strongly encouraged to choose their culminating experience in consultation
with their advisors. The decision is usually made based on students’ interests, needs, and
expertise. Further information about these experiences will be provided by advisors
and/or the Literacy/TESL Graduate Program upon request. Each culminating experience
is an individualized evaluation of the student. The evaluation is monitored by a
committee of at least two faculty members, one of whom must be from the student's
program area. At least one of the committee members must be of a graduate faculty.

Options
  A. Comprehensive Examination (no credit)
  B. Professional Portfolio (3 quarter credits), 18-LTCY-875
  C. Master’s Project (3-6 quarter credits), 18-LTCY-874
  D. Master’s Thesis (6-9 quarter credits), 18-LTCY-873

Guidelines
   A. Comprehensive Examination (No credit)
      There is an exam time scheduled by the CECH Graduate Program usually during
      the fifth week of every academic quarter (including summer). Students should
      sign up to take the exam with the Division of Teacher Education Graduate
      Program assistant in 5130.01 Edwards Center One.
          Procedures to Set Up the Exam Questions: The student’s advisor will be the
          chair of the two-faculty group that will develop and grade the Comprehensive
          Exam. The advisor will negotiate with the student four broad question areas
          that represent major coursework training, areas of interest, and fieldwork
          experience of the student. The advisor will also meet with the student to agree
          on a second or more faculty member(s) who will be invited to serve as
          question developer(s) and grader(s).

           Preparing for the Examination: According to the CECH policy, students will
           be given specific exam guidelines that contain sample questions, general
           topics or areas to be tested, a recommended bibliography or reading list, and
           the criteria that will be used in the grading of the responses. The actual
           questions will not be revealed to the student; rather, students will be provided
                                               20
with sample questions and the four main areas in which the actual questions
will be developed.

    Sample Questions (These questions will NOT be on your exam)
     a. Demonstrate Your Understanding of the Theories of SLA
         Second language learners acquire the target language at different
         rates. Some are "fast" learners, while others are "slow." Some
         become quite proficient, whereas others seem to fossilize at an early
         stage. Of the theories of second language acquisition that you have
         studied, which, in your opinion, best explains the factors that can
         influence individual learner differences in second language learning?
         In your answer, support your arguments referring to specific names,
         research work and studies as necessary. Be sure to discuss such
         factors as age, acculturation, motivation, learning situation, and the
         influence of the first language, among others.
     b. Demonstrate Your Understanding of Instruction
         Over the last century, the ESL field has experienced many different
         methods; so many, in fact, that H. Douglas Brown characterizes the
         nature of method in the ESL field as one of "changing winds and
         shifting sands." These methods include the Grammar Translation
         Method, the Series Method, the Direct Method, the Audiolingual
         Method, Cognitive Code Learning, Community Language Learning,
         Suggestopedia, the Silent Way, Total Physical Response, the Natural
         Approach, and Communicative Language Teaching. Describe two of
         these methods, focusing especially on how the method is realized in
         the classroom (how the method translates to classroom
         practice). Include in your descriptions the foundations of each
         method, strengths and weaknesses of each method, how and when
         each method gained and lost popularity in the ESL field, and other
         aspects that illuminate how and why each method was used.
     c. Demonstrate Your Understanding of Assessment of Second
        Language Learners
         You have been given the responsibility of evaluating ESL students to
         determine whether they a) qualify for your school’s ESL program,
         and b) are ready to be “mainstreamed.” Describe the testing and
         assessment procedures you would use for each purpose, providing
         reasons supported by the literature you have read.
     d. Demonstrate Your Understanding of Policies Related to Second
        Language Learners/Learning
         Bilingual Education has been a controversial issue in the United
         States for many years. Krashen, among others, hypothesized that
         much of the controversy is based on a misunderstanding of what
         bilingual education is and what it is designed to do. State your
         position toward bilingual education, making sure to define the
         concept clearly and supporting your response with evidence from
         current research.

                                21
       Exam Format and Procedures for Taking the Exam: Master’s students from all
       programs in the Division of Teacher Education and CECH take the exam
       together on the UC campus on the scheduled examination date. The exam has
       two main parts. Part I is administered in the morning and Part II is
       administered in the afternoon following a thirty-minute lunch break. Both parts
       are administered in two-hour blocks and consist of a minimum of two
       questions each, for a total of four questions minimum. In general, students have
       an hour to answer each of the questions in narrative form.

       Procedures for Grading the Exam: The exam is reviewed by the student’s
       two-member faculty committee and is graded on a pass/fail basis. Exams are
       not returned to students, but students are notified of their final grade within 30
       days of the examination date. A copy of the exam results will be placed in the
       student’s file.
           Criteria Readers will use to Assess your Responses:
                   1. Extent to which the answers are responsive to the questions
                   2. Extent to which the answers show accurate understanding of
                      the ideas of others (i.e., relevant professional literature), as
                      demonstrated by the use of appropriate terminology, source
                      references, and names
                   3. Extent to which the answers contain sufficient information
                      to show adequate depth of understanding of the topic being
                      addressed
                   4. Ability to integrate personal reflections into the discussion
                      of the ideas of others
                   5. Extent to which the paragraphs contribute logically to the
                      development of ideas being presented
                   6. Ability to write with reasonably correct grammar and
                      spelling




B. Professional Portfolio (3 quarter credits), 18-LTCY-875
   A professional portfolio is a collection of information and reflection of learning.
   In this collection and reflection, students are required to pick a theoretical and/or
   practical teaching model or approach (e.g., multiple intelligence model or the
   Cognitive Academic Language Learning Approach [CALLA]) and show what
   they learned about that model or approach, how they applied that model or
   approach in their teaching, and project how they will continue this learning
   experience in the future. A committee of two is required for this option. One of
   the committee members must be a TESL graduate faculty.



                                         22
C. Master’s Project (3-6 quarter credits), 18-LTCY-874
   A master’s project can be an instructional model, instructional curriculum design,
   or a critical literature review carried out by the student under the supervision of
   the project supervisor and the committee. A project committee of two is required
   for this option. One of the committee members must be a TESL graduate faculty.

   The Master’s Project option allows students/practitioners to use the culminating
   experience to demonstrate and improve their expertise in these critically important
   areas.

       Step 1: You should consult with your advisor well in advance of registration
       regarding your choice of a project as a culminating experience. You will need
       to have an initial discussion with your advisor to determine the general
       parameters of the project. Once your advisor has approved your project idea,
       you are eligible to register for a maximum of six graduate credits for the
       Master’s Project (18 LTCY 874). You may register for 3 hours in one quarter
       and 3 hours in another quarter. If you have a University Graduate Scholarship
       (UGS), you may not register for more than 3 project hours during summer
       quarter.

       Step 2: A Project Committee is comprised of at least two faculty members.
       After discussing your project idea with your advisor, select another faculty
       member from your program (in consultation with your advisor) to form your
       Master’s Project Committee. You will need to discuss the proposed project
       with the potential Committee member so that he or she can make an informed
       decision regarding Committee membership. Normally the student’s advisor
       chairs the Project Committee unless the Committee makes other
       arrangements.

       Step 3: Using any feedback you receive from your Committee members, and
       using the format outlined below, provide your Committee with a formal
       Master’s Project Proposal. Also develop a tentative calendar for project
       completion.

    The guide below describes the structure/parts of a project proposal.




                                        23
Introduction, Background, and Statement of the Focus of your Master’s Project:
Provide your readers with an introduction and some background information. Identify a specific
issue, problem, or concern you will address in your Master’s Project.

Theoretical Framework and Review of the Related Research:
(a) What will you use as a theoretical frame?
(b) Review rather than summarize the research literature related to the specific focus of your
Master’s Project. Be critical and be careful to relate this review of the related research literature
to the issue, problem, or concern you will address in your Master’s Project. Are you aware of any
research that is contradictory to this perspective?

Methods, Procedures & Timeline:
Describe the procedures you will follow to complete your Master’s Project. Outline what you
will do in some detail. Include information on the setting, subjects, procedures, timeline, data
sources, and any analysis you intend to complete. What is the setting for your project (district,
school, classroom)? Are students involved in your project? If so, explain who they are and why
you selected them. Will you conduct any interviews? Will you be collecting artifacts or
documents (curricula, unit or lesson plans, student/or other artifacts)? Specifically, what artifacts
will you collect and examine? Describe exactly how you will collect these documents. Discuss
all of the data that you will gather. How are the various artifacts and documents related? How
will each set of artifacts be analyzed? Help your reader understand how your project focus, data
sources, artifacts, subjects, and the nature of your analyses are linked.

Provide a timeline for the Master’s Project.

Using APA format, include a list of works cited.


Step 4: The Committee will hold a formal Master’s Project Proposal Hearing
to review your proposal. It is your responsibility, with assistance from your
advisor, to arrange for an appropriate time and place for this meeting. This
Master’s Project Proposal Hearing must be held and the proposal accepted no
later than the quarter before you graduate; in many cases, depending on the
nature of the project, the hearing is held two quarters before graduation. The
Committee decision on the proposal, including all modifications, must be
reported in writing and a copy of this decision must be placed in your program
file. Master’s Project Proposal Forms are available in Division of Teacher
Education Graduate Office, 4130A Edwards Center One.

Step 5: With your advisor, review the deadlines for application for graduation
and for defense of the project. Verify the deadline to have all grades (no
incompletes) and paperwork completed and turned in. When you receive a
packet of paperwork from the University Graduate School Dean’s office,
complete it and immediately return it to the Division of Teacher Education
Graduate Office 4130A in Edwards Center One. Failure to return this
packet/paper work will prevent graduation.

Step 6: As you complete the Master’s Project, keep the Committee apprised of
your progress and request guidance as needed. Meet with your advisor on a
regular basis to report on your project and meet your deadline objectives. The
project must result in some document of record. The usual form of this
document is a written report but might be in the form of a computer program,
slide presentation, or other media. Your Committee determines the type of
written documentation that must be submitted.
                                  24
   Step 7: Present a draft of your Master’s Project to your Committee members
   for review and suggestions at least two weeks before the intended date of your
   defense. Revise your draft in accordance with their suggestions. Once an
   acceptable document has been generated, schedule a formal Master’s Project
   Defense. Master’s Project Defense Forms can be found in the Appendix
   section of this handbook. They are also available in Division of Teacher
   Education Graduate Office 4130A in Edwards Center One.

   Step 8: Make a public presentation of the project to the Committee and any
   invited guests. At the close of that formal defense, your Committee reports its
   decision, in writing, on the acceptability of your project. A final copy of the
   Master’s Project is submitted to the advisor and becomes part of the program
   archives. A copy of the approved Master’s Project Defense Form must be
   placed in your program file.

Examples of possible Master’s Project topics:

1. A complete set of ESL lesson plans that include on-going assessment, a set of
   rubrics through which children can self-assess, and a place for teacher
   reflections. Create a set of these lesson plans for a particular grade level that
   help meet the new state standards. On-going assessment may include
   anecdotal notes and suggestions for future teaching, running records,
   commercially produced assessments (such as provided by Rigby, the
   Woodcock, or others). Be sure that all assessments are developmentally
   appropriate and research grounded.

   Standards overlap; however, you should focus your project. Select a specific
   area of language arts on which to focus (e.g., reading comprehension, word
   study, fluency, spelling, literature response, critical literacy. This project
   would include a literature review, some historical background on standards, a
   perspective on how standards can be helpful if handled well, ideas about what
   not to do with standards, how to review standards/set of benchmarks, lessons
   to teach children what they need to know, how to avoid teaching to the test,
   and other relevant material.

2. A professional development project. Write a proposal as described above.
   Then, attend at least one national conference that has many sessions on
   professional development in the field identified (e.g., school restructuring,
   collaborating with administrators). The project may include interviewing
   specific experts in the field. Afterward, self-examine your instruction and
   assessment in the K-12 classroom using a teaching/learning instrument. Then,
   write a formal document describing the experience and demonstrating your
   learning and the self-examination. Conclude with a review of the literature on
   the professional development area in order to connect your experience with
   the field (e.g., find connections and any areas of disagreement). Create
   suggestions for future projects in the area of professional development.

3. A project on teaching English language learners’ reading and writing (include
   spelling) in the regular classroom. Review the literature on English language
                                     25
       learners at your grade level. Take care to ground the review in
       developmentally appropriate and research-based material. Create a set of
       lesson plans (that include on-going assessment and teacher reflection – see
       above) for the language diverse children you have, or will have in your
       classroom.

       Develop examples of daily schedules and classroom organization that
       facilitate teaching English language learners and native English speakers in
       the same classroom. Review materials for English language learners and
       include at least five examples of a typical day of teaching and assessing in
       your classroom. Include all children’s opportunities to self-assess and self-
       select reading/writing experiences and opportunities to work collaboratively.

   4. The curriculum for a community-based ESL program for adult, child, or
      multigenerational learners. Conduct a needs analysis to determine learners’
      needs and use the results of the analysis to develop a series of lessons to be
      used with an identified population of English language learners over a
      specified period of time. Identify community resources that can be used to
      supplement instruction or to serve as learning sites.

   5. A policy manual for the service of diverse (e.g., ESL) learners in your district.
      This type of project should be undertaken with the approval and support of
      your district administrators. Working with those administrators, develop a set
      of procedures and policies for the assessment, placement, and instruction of
      diverse learners across the schools in your district. You may need to consult
      with other stakeholders (classroom teachers, parents) as you develop the
      policies.

D. Master’s Thesis (6-9 quarter credits), 18-LTCY-873
   A master’s thesis is, usually, an empirical or document research study carried out
   by the student under the supervision of the thesis advisor and the thesis
   committee. A thesis committee of at least two is required for this option. One of
   the committee members must be a TESL graduate faculty and another one must
   be a graduate faculty.

   Step 1: The first step in completing a Master’s thesis is to have an initial
   conversation with your advisor to discuss your general ideas for the research and
   to establish a tentative calendar for completion.

   Step 2: The second step is to develop the research proposal. Students learn to
   write a formal research proposal in the course, Research in Second Language
   Acquisition (18-LTCY 701). As you work on your proposal, remember to include,
   as a minimum, the following four components (see CECH Policies for Master of
   Education Degrees on line):

           a) A statement of the problem: This section of the proposal introduces the
              reader to your study and makes the purpose of the research clear.
              Provide an overall statement of what you plan to do, why you think it’s
              important, and why you’re interested in it.
                                        26
       b) Justification for studying the problem, including relevant literature:
          Provide a rationale as to why you think your research is needed based
          on previous published work in the field. Explain the theory, research,
          and policy recommendations that have been developed on your topic.
       c) The questions motivating the research: What specific questions do you
          plan to answer with your research? (This will be a short but specific
          section.)
       d) Procedures to be employed: Describe the design of the study as well as
          the data collection and analysis procedures or methods. Include
          discussion of why you chose these methods, their strengths, and their
          limitations.

Step 3: After your advisor approves your proposal (i.e., agrees that your proposal
is complete and ready for review), you will select a committee. The committee
should be comprised of at least two faculty members. The chair of your
committee must be a Literacy/TESL faculty member. One of your committee
members must have University Graduate Faculty status. Normally, your advisor
chairs your committee, unless other arrangements are made by the committee (see
CECH Policies on line). Once the committee is chosen, you give each member a
copy of your proposal to read. Typically, committees are given two weeks to read
the proposal prior to the Proposal Hearing.

Step 4: The fourth step in this process is the Proposal Hearing. Your committee
will meet with you to discuss the proposal and make suggestions for revision, as
appropriate. It is your responsibility, in consultation with your advisor, to
schedule the date, time, and room for the meeting. Once the proposal is approved,
your committee members will sign the Division of Teacher Education’s Proposal
Hearing Form, which is placed in your program file. The proposal must be
approved at least two quarters in advance of your expected graduation date. (For
example, if you plan to graduate during spring quarter, your proposal must be
approved before the start of winter quarter. Many students in the Literacy/TESL
Graduate Program, however, have their proposals approved three to four quarters
in advance of graduation, depending on the nature of the research.)

Step 5: If your study involves human subjects, the proposal must then be
reviewed by the University’s Internal Review Board. (Your advisor will guide
you through this process; in fact, the advisor’s signature is required on the IRB
forms.) IRB materials are available in the CECH Research and Development
Office and online at: http://www.researchcompliance.uc.edu/irb/. The IRB
process may take several weeks, and in some cases may require substantial
revisions. Students who plan to conduct research with human subjects should
complete their proposals at least six months in advance of their expected
graduation dates.

Step 6: Register for graduate credit. You may earn up to 9 quarter credit hours
for the Master’s Thesis culminating option. Determine which quarters of the
academic year you will register for Thesis credit hours (18 LTCY 873). You
should discuss registration with your advisor, prior to registering. (Please keep in
mind that you must be registered for at least one hour of credit the quarter in
which you will graduate.)
                                    27
       Step 7: Conduct your research. You will need to meet regularly with your
       advisor as you collect and analyze your data.

       Step 8: Write your thesis. Typically, you will send your advisor a draft copy of
       each chapter of the thesis. Once your advisor approves your thesis, you will give a
       copy to each of your committee members for review. You’ll probably receive
       feedback, which you will need to incorporate in the final manuscript. The final
       version of the written thesis must conform to the guidelines in Instructions for the
       Preparation and Depositing of Master’s Theses and Doctoral Dissertations,
       which can be obtained from the Graduate School. For more information, visit
       http://www.grad.uc.edu/.

       Step 9: After your committee members have agreed that the thesis is acceptable
       and is in its final form, you’ll schedule a “Defense of Thesis,” which is your final
       meeting with your committee. At this time the thesis will be formally approved,
       although some revisions may still be required. Do not schedule the defense until
       your committee members tell you that the thesis is acceptable. You will need to
       see the Division of Teacher Education graduate secretary to fill out an
       “Application for Defense”. Please note that the University’s Graduate School has
       established dates by which a thesis must be defended in order to graduate in a
       particular quarter. It is your responsibility to determine that date and make sure
       your defense is scheduled in advance of it. Once you have successfully defended
       your thesis, your committee will sign two “face sheets,” which you obtain from
       the Graduate School. For more information, visit http://www.grad.uc.edu/.

       Step 10: The University requires students to submit a copy of their thesis
       electronically. Check with the Graduate School for the particulars. For more
       information, visit http://www.grad.uc.edu/. As a matter of courtesy, please also
       provide your committee members with a final copy of the thesis.


Admission Requirements
Applicants must possess a Baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university
with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.8 based on a 4.0 scale. Candidates
who are not accepted into a program may not apply again for at least one calendar year.
During that year, unsuccessful applicants may be encouraged by the program to which
they are applying to enroll in appropriate course work (no more than 9 quarter credit
hours) to demonstrate their potential for graduate level work. Completion of this course
work does not guarantee admission into the program. Candidates who are accepted but
fail to enroll for the quarter specified in the acceptance letter may invalidate their
admission. Failure to enroll within one academic year will automatically terminate the
student's admission.


Application Procedures
Admission to the Literacy/TESL Graduate Program is competitive and is completed
through the Literacy Program, of which TESL is a part. New applications are reviewed
on a rolling basis. Applicants must meet all minimum requirements established by the
                                            28
University of Cincinnati and the College of Education, Criminal Justice, and Human
Services (CECH). For additional college admission requirements and policies, please
refer to the Master’s of Education Degree Policies which can be found at
http://www.cech.uc.edu/. The following minimum requirements and submission of
documents are necessary for applying to the Literacy/TESL Graduate program:
       1. Transcripts: Provide official transcripts showing all undergraduate and
          graduate courses completed, including degrees granted and dates conferred.
          Transcripts must bear official seals from all institutions attended, and be in
          original, unopened envelopes. Applicants whose previous degrees were earned
          at the University of Cincinnati may substitute free “campus copy” transcripts.
          International applicants need to submit original transcripts of degrees earned
          plus official English translations of original transcripts. Please contact the
          International Student Service Office (ISSO) at UC to gather more specific
          information about translation of transcripts. For more information, visit ISSO
          at www.isso.uc.edu.

       2. Graduate Record Examination (GRE): All sections of the General test are
          required. Scores should be submitted electronically to UC and the
          Literacy/TESL Graduate Program upon request from the candidate. The
          University of Cincinnati and the Literacy/TESL Graduate Program do not
          enforce cut-off scores. However, it recommends that Master’s applicants have
          a minimum GRE score of 500 for the Verbal section, 500 for the Quantitative
          section, 4.5 for the Writing section. The GRE must have been taken within the
          five-year period preceding admission. You can register to take the GRE at UC
          by calling the Testing Services at (513) 556-7173 or by dropping by at 100
          University Pavilion. For more information about optional preparation courses
          for the GRE, contact the Communiversity at (513) 556-6932 and/or ETS at
          http://www.ets.org/.
       3. TOEFL Scores: International students who do not currently hold degrees
          from an English-speaking college or university and whose native-language is
          not English, must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).
          The Literacy/TESL Program requires a minimum TOEFL score of 550 (paper
          test), 213 (computer-based test), or 79-80 (internet-based test); a minimum
          score on the Test of Written English (TWE) of 4.5; and a minimum score of
          50 on the Test of Spoken English. The TOEFL must have been taken within
          the two-year period preceding admission. Students who are unable to take the
          Test of Spoken English before applying for admission may be required to take
          the University of Cincinnati’s Oral English Proficiency Test. Scores should be
          submitted electronically to UC and the Literacy/TESL program upon request
          from the candidate. The TOEFL requirement may be waived for applicants
          with degrees (e.g., a Bachelor’s or a Master’s) earned in English from
          accredited universities and colleges in the US, Canada, England, Australia,
          New Zealand or other English-speaking countries. The TOEFL requirement
          may also be waived for applicants who earned at least a 6.5 on the
          International English Language Testing System (IELTS) exam or at least a B
          on the Cambridge CPE exam. Requests for a TOEFL waiver should be sent to
          the Senior Assistant University Dean of the Graduate School with appropriate
          documentation. For more information, visit http://www.grad.uc.edu/.

                                          29
    4. Resume or Curriculum Vitae: Provide a current resume with relevant
       personal, professional, and educational data. It should include your name,
       address, citizenship, colleges attended with degrees, dates conferred and grade
       point averages, employment history, professional experience, present
       employer, and names of references who are writing letters on your behalf.
    5. Goal Statement: Provide a one to three page description (double spaced) of
       your short-term and long-term academic and professional goals. Applicants
       need to explain how their goals and interests match the mission and goals of
       the Literacy/TESL Program, and how they can benefit from receiving training
       and advising from TESL faculty. The writing sample should be clearly written
       and well organized, as it will also serve as a sample of academic writing.
    6. Recommendations: At least three current letters of recommendation (written
       within the last 2-3 years), which address the applicant’s academic and/or
       professional background, must be provided. Ask your references to tell who
       they are, their relationship to you, what your professional and academic
       abilities are, and why they think you will prosper in the particular program to
       which you are applying. Submit business-sized envelopes to the persons
       writing these letters. Advise the writer to sign his/her name across the flap of
       the sealed envelope. Enclose these envelopes unopened.
    7. Application: Fill out an application on-line at http://www.grad.uc.edu/apply.
       Only on-line application forms are now accepted by UC.
    8. Application Fees: Write a check or money order in US funds to pay for the
       appropriate application fees.
    9. Notification of Receipt: Enclose a self-addressed, stamped envelope to
       acknowledge receipt of all completed documents.

                  Mail all of the above documents to:
                         Beverly Reese, Records Officer
                           4130A Edwards Center One
          College of Education, Criminal Justice, and Human Services
                                    ML 0022
                             45-51 Corry Boulevard
                              Cincinnati, OH 45221
                                          USA


NB: Although the Literacy/TESL Graduate Program does not have any deadlines
established for submitting applications, all students (including domestic and
international) should apply well in advance, allowing for processing time for the
application for admission. It is the responsibility of the applicant to ensure that all
materials listed above are received in the Division of Teacher Education. Incomplete
applications will not be processed and may not be returned. This includes, but is not
limited to, GRE and TOEFL scores, transcripts, and letters of recommendation.




                                         30
                              Additional Information

In addition, various policies may change at the university and/or college level.
The Literacy/TESL Graduate Program will do its best to update the information
provided in this document, but it is always the students’ responsibility to consult
their advisors and the division, college, and university policies for any possible
changes and additional information. An advisor is assigned to each student upon
admission. Important websites to check: http://www.grad.uc.edu and
http://www.cech.uc.edu/.




                                       31
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) in Literacy: Teaching English as a
                  Second Language (TESL)

Purpose and Mission
Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL) is a strand of the Literacy Program.
Therefore, it’s referred to as Literacy/TESL Graduate Program, which offers a doctorate
specializing in TESL. The Literacy/TESL Graduate Program is a community of scholars
and professionals committed to promoting research and academic excellence, delivering
student-centered teaching, and building relationships and partnerships with local,
regional, national, and international communities. It creates professional and scholarly
opportunities for students to become theoretically informed and practically equipped,
caring, committed, and competent educators and scholars. The Literacy/TESL program
also encourages individuality and creativity where faculty, students, and staff contribute
toward the common good of the program through expression of their views and their
work. The program aligns its mission with the UC|21, Ohio TESOL, and National
TESOL missions.

The Literacy/TESL doctoral program prepares future university and college professors,
researchers, and curriculum specialists in TESL and Teaching English as a Foreign
Language (TEFL) fields. It develops students’ expertise in second language acquisition
and socialization theories and research related to TESL and TEFL. The program
encourages and prepares students to conduct sociolinguistic and psycholinguistic research
on language teaching and learning as well as language policy development and
implementation in various educational and sociocultural contexts. Through strong theory
and research-based training, the program of study emphasizes the importance of
engendering social opportunity and educational access. It addresses the cognitive,
linguistic, social, cultural, political, and economic factors that impact English as a Second
Language (ESL) and English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teaching and learning at all
levels of development. Doctoral students engage in a variety of guided experiences that
blend theory, research, and instruction.


Overview of the Doctoral Program of Study
This section of the document shows a carefully planned course of study that helps
doctoral students fulfill the requirements of their doctoral studies in the Literacy/TESL
program. All the required and suggested courses are meant to prepare students for their
dissertation research and their growth as future professors and researchers. The
procedural information is meant to help students navigate during their studies. Students
are encouraged to work with their advisors closely in implementing this plan. Note that
all course credits are quarter credits. Specifics of the course of study are as follows:




                                             32
    Division of Teacher Education Professional Seminars (3 course sequence)             9 credits
    Research Apprenticeship: Mentored Research in Literacy (3 course sequence)          9 credits
    College Research Tools Sequence (3 course sequence)                                 9 credits
    Research Methods/Research Theories Courses                                          9 credits
    TESL Research Seminar Sequence (3 course sequence)                                  9 credits
    Advanced TESL Content Area Course Sequence (LTCY 865, 866, & 867)                   9 credits
    Other Content Area Coursework                                                       18 credits
    Dissertation Guidance                                                               45 credits
    Master’s Degree Credit (and/or electives)                                           18 credits
                                                                   Total: 135 quarter credit hours


                                                  Phase I
     Fall Quarter                               Winter Quarter                   Spring Quarter
18 CI 951: Professional Seminar           18 SPED 952: Professional               18 LTCY 953: Professional
TE I: Theories of Teaching and            Seminar TE II: Diversity of             Seminar TE III: Language and
Learning (3)                              Learners (3)                            Social Practice (3)

Research courses (3)                      Research courses (3)                    Research courses (3)

18 LTCY 921: Mentored Research            18 LTCY 922: Mentored Research          18 LTCY 923: Mentored Research
 in Literacy (3)*                          in Literacy (3)                         in Literacy (3)



LTCY 910: Foundations in Second           LTCY 911: Advanced Study of             LTCY 912: Focused Study
Language Acquisition (3)**                Second Language Acquisition (3)**        of Second Language Acquisition
                                                                                  (3)**

*The purpose of the mentored research experience is for the doctoral student to assist the faculty
member; the student is not required to do her or his own research project. The doctoral student is
apprenticed into a research culture by assisting the faculty member with her or his on-going work.
At the end of Phase I, the student will be asked to provide evidence of his or her participation in
these research activities. This evidence may take a variety of forms and is negotiated with the
Lead Mentor.
**Note that LTCY 910, 912, and 913 are subject to enrollment. That is, occasionally,
these courses maybe offered every other year. As a result, the above sequence of courses
may change. Students are strongly encouraged to consult their advisors in planning their
courses.
                                                                        Total= 36 quarter cr. hrs.

Forming the Doctoral Advisory Committee
•    The committee must have a minimum of three (and a maximum of six) members. The
     Chair of the committee must be a faculty member in the Literacy/TESL Graduate
     Program. One other member must also be from the graduate program in
     Literacy/TESL. One member of the committee must be from outside the
     Literacy/TESL Graduate Program.

                                                     33
Preliminary Hearing
•   The Preliminary Hearing is a meeting scheduled to allow the doctoral student to
    submit a Program of Study to the Doctoral Advisory Committee for approval. In
    addition to listing the required courses as specified in this advising guide, the
    Program of Study document makes explicit the student’s Content Area coursework
    (and Advanced Seminars, as appropriate), Research Tool(s) and courses, and courses
    brought in from the master’s degree. The document must also indicate during which
    phase of study (Phase I or II) the doctoral student will attend as a full-time student to
    fulfill the residency requirement. The Preliminary Hearing should take place as early
    as feasible in Phase I.

Phase I Qualifying Paper: A Review of the Literature*
•   At a minimum, the first qualifying paper is a critical review of the research literature
    in the area in which the student intends to do her or his research. The paper provides
    evidence of the student’s conceptual framework. The review should focus on the
    research problems and theoretical frameworks that guided the studies reviewed and
    how those theoretical orientations influenced both the methods and the findings of the
    research. The review should address how the research can be extended/augmented
    either from similar or different theoretical perspectives and methods. The Phase I
    Qualifying Paper provides evidence that the doctoral student is capable of discerning
    readings of complex theory and research literatures as well as thoughtful, well-written
    analyses. The student must be sole author of the Phase I Paper, but the topic may be
    developed in consultation with the Lead Mentor.

•   Due September 1, following the completion of all Phase I coursework and
    requirements.

    *Phase I paper is one of the two papers (the other one is Phase II paper) that students
    are required to write in lieu of the traditional comprehensive exam papers to qualify
    for doctoral candidacy.


Phase I Hearing: A Progress Review
•   At the end of Phase I, the student will participate in a progress review with the
    Doctoral Advisory Committee. This review will include:
       o Phase I Qualifying Paper
       o Outcome/Evidence of Mentored Research in Literacy (18 LTCY 921-923)
•   The Phase I Hearing must be held no later than September 30.
•   Revisions to the Phase I Qualifying Paper are due no later than December 15.
•   Students who do not successfully complete the Phase I Hearing will be terminated
    from the program.




                                             34
                                               Phase II
        Fall Quarter                    Winter Quarter                     Spring Quarter
18 LTCY 868:                         18 LTCY 869:                          18 LTCY 779:
Teaching College ESL I (3)           Teaching College ESL II (3)           Sociolinguistics in L2 (3)

Research Tools (3)                   Research Tools (3)                    Research Tools (3)

18-LTCY 865                          18-LTCY 866                           18-LTCY 867
Content-based L2 Education:          Sociopolitical Issues in L2           Bilingual Education: Theory,
Theory, Research, Practice (3)*      Education: Theory and Research (3)*   Research, and Practice (3)*

Content Area elective (3)             Content area elective (3)            Content area elective (3)

*Depending on how LTCY 910, 911, and 912 are offered, the order of LTCY 865, 866, and 867
may change. That is, occasionally, students may take these three coursed during Phase I of their
study. Students are strongly encouraged to consult their advisors in planning their courses.
                                                                   Total= 72 quarter cr. hrs.

Phase II Qualifying Paper: A Report of Research*
•   The second Qualifying Paper is a research paper providing evidence that the doctoral
    student is capable of producing work of publishable quality based on research
    conducted with a mentoring faculty member or individually under the faculty
    member’s guidance. The doctoral student is expected to be the sole author of the
    Phase II Qualifying Paper, which must be written according to the genre and audience
    specifications of a respected local, regional, or national journal to which the paper
    will be submitted.
•   The Phase II qualifying paper is due to the Doctoral Advisory Committee one month
    prior to the Phase II Hearing.
    *Phase II paper is one of the two papers (the other one is Phase I paper) that students
    are required to write in lieu of the traditional comprehensive exam papers to qualify
    for doctoral candidacy.


Phase II Hearing: A Progress Review
•   At the end of Phase II, the student will participate in a second progress review with the
    Doctoral Advisory Committee. This review will include:
        o Phase II Qualifying Paper
        o Evidence of the student’s Independent Research Project (e.g., conference
          presentation)
•   The Phase II Hearing must be held no later than one (1) calendar year after the Phase
    II coursework is complete. Students should be aware that UGS is usually granted for
    3 years of full time study.


Advancement to Candidacy
•   Each student’s Doctoral Advisory Committee will review the evidence provided in
                                                35
    the Phase II Hearing and either
        o (a) recommend advancement to candidacy, or
        o (b) provide the student the opportunity to complete an additional plan for
          development and then resubmit the materials. If the student is judged to be
          unsuccessful following the second submission, the student will be terminated
          from the program.
•   Each student must also meet the requirements for candidacy as outlined in the
    Policies for Doctor of Education and Doctor of Philosophy Degree handbook.
Please note: Applicants may be admitted as part-time students for either, but not both, of
the first two phases of doctoral study. In their Program of Study document, students must
indicate which phase they plan to complete through full-time enrollment, and to suggest a
timeline for completion of the other phase. Students may not hold full-time employment
during the year of full-time study.


                                        Phase III
The Dissertation Phase will adhere to the policies already established by the College and
the University of Cincinnati (see Policies for Doctor of Education and Doctor of
Philosophy Degree handbook). After advancement to candidacy, the candidate has four
years to complete his or her dissertation.


Form the Doctoral Dissertation Committee
    •   The doctoral candidate will form a Dissertation Committee that will guide and
        support the inception, conduct, and completion of the dissertation topic selected
        for study. Students may invite members who served on the Doctoral Advisory
        Committee to also serve on the Dissertation Committee, although this is not
        obligatory. Each committee shall have a minimum of three (and a maximum of
        six) members. Each member of the committee should be chosen so that he or she
        can provide support to the over-all structure of the student’s dissertation. The
        Dissertation Chair and one other committee member must be Literacy/TESL
        Graduate Program faculty members. One member of the committee must be from
        outside the degree program. Students are strongly advised to form their
        committees in close consultation with their advisors.


Dissertation Proposal Hearing
    •   The candidate will write the dissertation proposal under the guidance of her or his
        Dissertation Chair.
    •   The final proposal document is submitted to the Dissertation Committee for
        approval during the Dissertation Proposal Hearing.




                                            36
18 LTCY 973 (15)                 18 LTCY 973 (15)                 18 LTCY 973 (15)
Dissertation Guidance            Dissertation Guidance            Dissertation Guidance


                                                              Total= 117 quarter cr. hrs.


Defense of the Dissertation
    •   Once the Dissertation Committee has judged the dissertation acceptable, the
        candidate, in consultation with the Dissertation Chair, will schedule a two-hour
        Dissertation Defense.


List Master’s hours (and/or elective hours) (18 quarter cr. hrs.) List courses & credit
hours and attach transcripts:

                                                              Total: 135 quarter cr. hrs.
Graduation
    •   The University of Cincinnati graduates students in December and June. However,
        there is only one doctoral hooding ceremony in June. Check the university
        Graduate School website for the latest information at: http://www.grad.uc.edu


Suggested Content Area Coursework
Content Area coursework will consist of at least 18 credit hours. These courses must
constitute a coherent, integrated program of study. A minimum of nine hours must be at
the 800/900 level (exclusive of dissertation). Students may only pursue study in a
designated Content Area. (If a student has an interest in an area of study, but there are not
two faculty members who are qualified to be a Lead Mentor in that area, the student
cannot pursue that line of study.)


The following TESL courses are recommended to fulfill content area requirements.
Selected courses may also be approved by the Lead Mentor for content area study:
LTCY 871        Individual Study in Literacy/TESL
LTCY 868        Teaching and Assessing College ESL: Reading/Writing
LTCY 869        Teaching and Assessing College ESL: Listening/Speaking
LTCY 870        Research in Computer Assisted Language Learning
LTCY 779        Sociolinguistics in L2
LTCY 701        Research Methods and Procedures in SLA
LTCY 730        Discourse Analysis
LTCY 673        Phonetics & L2 Education
LTCY 674        Grammar & L2 Education




                                              37
Educational Foundations Research Methods Courses
The first required course in research methodologies for doctoral students is Modes of
Inquiry (18-EDFN-800). This course covers the breadth of research methods used in
education and is a prerequisite for the research sequences. The introductory (18-EDFN-
710) and intermediate (18-EDFN-711) statistics courses also are appropriate for
beginning doctoral students.

After taking Modes of Inquiry, doctoral students may enroll in one of three sequences in
qualitative research, quantitative research, or action research.


Qualitative Research Tools Sequence
18-EDFN-802         Introduction to Field Methods
18-EDFN-812         Intermediate Field Methods
18-EDFN-822         Advanced Field Methods

Action Research Tools Sequence
18-EDFN-850         Action Research I
18-EDFN-851         Action Research II
18-EDFN-852         Action Research III


Quantitative Research Tools Sequence
18-EDFN-855        Quantitative Research Methods I: Research Design
18-EDFN-856        Quantitative Research Methods II: Data Collection
18-EDFN-857        Quantitative Research Methods III: Data Analysis & Report Writing

Doctoral students may take other, more specialized research courses that meet their
individual interests or program needs:

   Specialized Courses
   18-EDFN-721               Measurement and Assessment
   18-EDFN-750               Classroom-based Action Research and Reflective Practice
   18-EDFN-848               Oral History
   18-EDFN-878               Multivariate Analysis of Differences
   18-EDFN-879               Multivariate Analysis of Relationships
   18-EDFN-880               Advanced Multivariate Analysis
   18-EDFN-882               Quantitative Research Synthesis (meta analysis)
   18-EDFN-886               Experimental Research


Application Procedures
Prior to applying for admission, prospective students should contact the Literacy/TESL
Graduate Program Chair to discuss their interests and whether those interests are
compatible with the program’s offerings. After contacting the program chair, prospective
students should apply online to the University of Cincinnati at
http://www.grad.uc.edu/apply. They should then apply to the doctoral program in

                                           38
Literacy, specialization in Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL), by mailing
the following documents to:



                           Beverly Reese, Records Officer
                             4130A Edwards Center One
              College of Education, Criminal Justice and Human Services
                                       ML 0022
                               45-51 Corry Boulevard
                                Cincinnati, OH 45221
                                             USA


Send the following documents:
    1. A cover letter clearly stating that application is being made to the Literacy
       doctoral program, specialization in Teaching English as a Second Language
       (TESL).
    2. A statement identifying academic and professional goals, reason for pursuing a
       doctorate, potential research interests, and relevant background information and
       experience (including how previous degrees have prepared the applicant for
       doctoral study). This writing sample will also be used as one of the criteria for
       evaluating the application. Explain specifically what areas you would like to
       study so that a proper advisor may be assigned to you. (2-3 pages)
    3. A résumé or curriculum vitae (CV) with relevant academic and professional
       data. This should include name; address; phone; email; citizenship; colleges
       attended with degrees, dates conferred, and grade point average; employment
       history; professional experience; present employer; and names of references.
    4. Three letters of recommendation from people familiar with the applicant’s
       academic and professional abilities; if possible, at least one letter should be from
       a faculty member in higher education. Those writing letters should explain who
       they are, their relationship to the applicant, what they know of the applicant’s
       academic and professional abilities, and why they think the applicant will
       prosper in a doctoral program. Submit business-size envelopes to the persons
       writing the letters. Advise the writer to sign his/her name across the flap of the
       sealed envelope. Enclose these envelopes unopened.
    5. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Scores: Provide an original copy of
       scores taken within the five year period preceding admission. All sections of the
       General Tests are required. The University of Cincinnati and the TESL program
       do not enforce cut-off scores. However, the Literacy/TESL Graduate Program
       recommends that doctoral applicants have a minimum GRE score of 525 for the
       Verbal section, 550 for the Quantitative section, and 5.0 for the Writing section.
       Provide both the college of Education, Criminal Justice, and Human Services
       and the Division of Teacher Education with scores or we will not receive the
       scores. You must allow at least six weeks for GRE scores to reach our office.
       Applications will not be processed without GRE scores. Computer administered
       versions of the GRE are available at UC Monday-Saturday. For information on
                                            39
        the procedures for taking the Graduate Record Examination via computer, call
        the Testing Services at (513) 556-7173 or go to 100 University Pavilion. You
        may also visit ETS at: http://www.ets.org for more information.

    6. TOEFL Scores: International students whose native language is not English
       must submit evidence of a minimum TOEFL score of 550 (paper test), 213
       (computer-based test), or 79-80 (internet-based test); a minimum score on the
       Test of Written English (TWE) of 5; and a minimum score of 50 on the Test of
       Spoken English. The TOEFL must have been taken within the two-year period
       preceding admission. Students who are unable to take the Test of Spoken English
       before applying for admission may be required to take the University of
       Cincinnati’s Oral English Proficiency Test. The TOEFL requirement may be
       waived for applicants with degrees (e.g., a Bachelor’s or a Master’s) earned in
       English from accredited universities and colleges in the US, Canada, England,
       Australia, New Zealand or other English-speaking countries. The TOEFL
       requirement may also be waived for applicants who earned at least a 6.5 on the
       International English Language Testing System (IELTS) exam or at least a B on
       the Cambridge CPE exam. Requests for a TOEFL waiver should be sent to the
       Senior Assistant University Dean of the Graduate School with appropriate
       documentation. For more information, visit http://www.grad.uc.edu/.

    7. Transcripts: Provide one copy of final and interim transcripts bearing official
        seals from all institutions attended; transcripts should show courses, grades, all
        degrees and dates of attendance. Keep transcripts in the original, unopened
        envelopes from the respective colleges. Applicants whose previous degrees were
        earned at the University of Cincinnati may substitute "on-campus" transcripts.
        International students should submit official, translated and notarized transcripts.
        Contact the International Student Service Office (ISSO) at UC to gather more
        specific information about translation of transcripts. For more information, visit
        ISSO at www.isso.uc.edu.

NB: INCOMPLETE APPLICATIONS WILL NOT BE PROCESSED AND MAY NOT BE
RETURNED. THIS INCLUDES, BUT IS NOT LIMITED TO, GRE AND TOEFL
SCORES, TRANSCRIPTS, AND RECOMMENDATION LETTERS.


International Students
If you are an international student, you will find the services of the International Student
Services Office helpful. This office is in charge of issuing the Certificate of Eligibility
and is available to assist all international students with their general welfare and guide
them in their relation with the university. Contact this office at (513) 556-4278 or visit
the website at http://www.isso.uc.edu/.




                                             40
                         Additional Information

In addition, various policies may change at the university and/or college level.
The Literacy/TESL Graduate Program will do its best to update the information
provided in this document, but it is always the students’ responsibility to check
with their advisors, the college and the university and follow the most current
policies. An advisor is assigned to each student upon admission. Important
websites to check: http://www.grad.uc.edu and http://www.cech.uc.edu/.




                                      41
          Section 4: Financial Aid & Scholarship
                       Opportunities

                 Types of Awards……………………...………..p. 42-43
                 Criteria for Termination of Financial Aid…...…p. 43




Types of Awards
The Graduate School awards University Graduate Scholarships, Graduate Assistantships
and several special scholarships and fellowships to graduate students each year. Many of
our graduate students receive significant financial aid in the form of stipends and tuition
scholarships. For more detailed information about financial aid and scholarships, please
visit the UC Graduate School website at
http://www.grad.uc.edu/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.FinancialAid.
On a limited basis, two types of financial awards are available to Literacy/TESL graduate
students through the Division of Teacher Education. Applications are available by calling
or visiting the Division office at (513)-556-3600. The application deadline for financial
aid is February 15.


University Graduate Scholarships (UGS)
The UGS offers tuition scholarship and is available to both full and part-time students
during the academic year and summer. These scholarships are competitive, dependent on
availability of funds, and are awarded on a year to year basis. Master’s students are
eligible to apply for up to 2 years and doctoral students are eligible to apply for up to 3
years of UGS coverage.


Graduate Assistantships (GA)
The GA award provides full tuition and a monthly stipend. GA positions are limited and
highly competitive. Awards are based on merit and are offered to full-time students at
advanced levels of doctoral and master’s study. Master’s students are eligible to apply for
and receive up to 2 years UGS coverage, with up to 3 years for doctoral students. UGS
application forms are available at the division graduate office. For more information,
contact Beverly Reese in 4130A Edwards Center One.

   TESL GA Appointments
   •   Teaching Assistants: The Center for ESL provides several Graduate Teaching
       Assistantships. TESL Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) generally teach two
       ESL courses per quarter and are responsible for syllabus design, course materials,
       classroom teaching and management, and assessment. In addition, they may be
       assigned other responsibilities within the Center for ESL, for a total of up to 20
       hours of work per week.
                                            42
   •   Graduate Assistants: The Oral English Proficiency Test (OEPT) Office provides
       GA positions. OEPT GAs are responsible for staffing the OEPT office during the
       academic year as well as organizing and overseeing the administration of the
       examination, which is given three times a year.


Criteria for the Termination of Financial Aid
According to University policy, termination of financial aid may be justified for
substandard academic performance. In the Division of Teacher Education, substandard
academic performance is defined as follows:
   1. More than three I’s, IP’s, and N’s on a transcript. Students who have more than
      three such grades will have to provide the reasons in writing.
   2. Any grade below a C.
   3. A grade point average below 3.0 by the end of the academic year prior to their
      application for financial aid.




                                          43
             Section 5: Graduation Information
Students may graduate at the end of any of the four academic quarters provided they meet
the necessary degree requirements and all Department and University deadlines. Students
should confer closely with their advisors regarding graduation as they approach the
completion of their degree requirements. The initial step in the graduation process
consists of a formal application for graduation. This must be done by the announced
deadline (usually during the quarter prior to the quarter of anticipated graduation) and is
completed online at https://www.grad.uc.edu/graduation/.

A complete list of important deadlines and responsibilities that must be met prior to
graduation, as well as further instructions and guidelines for completing the application
for graduation can be found at
http://www.grad.uc.edu/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.gradguidelines.

If you are a doctoral student who will graduate in summer, autumn, or winter, you will be
invited by the Graduate School to participate in the University's prestigious Doctoral
Hooding Ceremony held in the spring. This is a joyous occasion where you can celebrate
with friends and family, be recognized by faculty and administrators, and receive your
doctoral hood. You must notify the Graduate School by the appropriate deadline if you
wish to attend this ceremony. For information, visit https://www.grad.uc.edu/graduation/.




                                            44
                 Section 6: The Center for ESL

                    About the Center for ESL………...……………p. 45
                    Oral English Proficiency Testing Office………p. 45
                    Courses for ESL Courses at UC….…………....p. 45
                    English Language Institute…………..………...p. 46



About the Center for ESL
The Center for English as a Second Language (CESL) is affiliated with the
Literacy/TESL Graduate Program at the University of Cincinnati. CESL consists of three
units: Oral English Proficiency Testing (OEPT) Office, English as a Second Language
(ESL) Credit Course Unit, and the English Language Institute.


Oral English Proficiency Testing (OEPT) Office
The Oral English Proficiency Test (OEPT) is required of all international Teaching
Assistants. In accordance with the Ohio Revised Code 3345.281, all teaching assistants
whose native language is not English must have their oral English assessed. For more
information about OEPT, test times, and registration information, visit:
http://www.uc.edu/cesl/


The Center for ESL Courses at UC
The Center for English as a Second Language (CESL) is the academic unit which
provides high-quality English language courses that include:

   •   18-ESL-601     Conversational Management
   •   18-ESL-602     Speaking & Listening Skills
   •   18-ESL-604     Oral Presentation Skills
   •   18-ESL-605     Improving Pronunciation
   •   18-ESL-607     Strategies for Academic Success
   •   18-ESL-608     Editing Skills for ESL Writers
   •   18-ESL-609     Introduction to Academic Writing
   •   18-ESL-610     Academic Writing for International Students
   •   18-ESL-710     Teaching Skills for International TAs

The ESL Learning Center provides TESL students opportunities to tutor and interact with
the University’s international and domestic ESL students. For more information about the
center and its services, please visit: http://www.uc.edu/cesl/




                                           45
English Language Institute
The Center for ESL also sponsors non-credit courses through the English Language
Institute (ELI). For information about these courses, visit: http://www.uc.edu/cesl/




                                           46
       Section 7: Other Academic Opportunities in
                         TESL

                     Individualized Field Experience Opportunities……p. 47
                     International Practicum……………………………p. 47
                     Academic & Professional Organizations…………..p. 47-49




Individualized Field Experience Opportunities
In consultation with their advisors, students can have access to individualized field
experience opportunities at organizations such as:
   •   Cincinnati/Hamilton County Public Library (513) 369 6900
   •   Great Oaks ESOL                               (513) 612-5791
   •   Hughes Center (sponsored by ABLE)             (513) 357-4510
   •   International Family Resource Center          (513) 721-7660
   •   Kenton County Adult Education                 (513) 442-1611
   •   Lower Price Hill Community School             (513) 244-2214
   •   Su Casa Hispanic Center of Cincinnati         (513) 761-1588


International Practicum
Through partnerships with universities in Colombia, the Czech Republic, and other
countries, the Literacy/TESL Graduate Program offers students opportunities to
participate in international study abroad, practicum, and research projects. Information
about these opportunities can be obtained by contacting Dr. Mary Benedetti at (513) 556-
2817 or mary.benedetti@uc.edu.

Academic and Professional Organizations
Literacy/TESL Students are encouraged to be active in the academic community through
participation in related professional and academic organizations. Such organizations offer
opportunities for professional development, build community, and encourage scholarly
inquiry and dissemination of research findings through publications, conferences,
workshops, and other projects. Participation in these types of organizations can also
provide students with valuable opportunities for networking within their academic and
professional pursuits. The following is a list of some the most important professional
organizations related to the field of TESL.




                                            47
American Association of Applied Linguistics (AAAL)
http://www.aaal.org/
AAAL is a professional organization of scholars interested in and actively
contributing to the multi-disciplinary field of applied linguistics. Its members
promote principled approaches to language-related concerns, including language
education, acquisition and loss, bilingualism, discourse analysis, literacy, rhetoric and
stylistics, language for special purposes, psycholinguistics, second and foreign
language pedagogy, language assessment, and language policy and planning.

American Educational Research Association (AERA)
http://aera.net/
AERA is concerned with improving the educational process by encouraging scholarly
inquiry related to education and by promoting the dissemination and practical
application of research results.

Center for Applied Linguistics (CAL)
http://www.cal.org/
CAL is a group of scholars and educators who use linguistics and related sciences in
identifying and addressing language-related problems. CAL carries out a wide range
of activities including research, teacher education, analysis and dissemination of
information, design and development of instructional materials, technical assistance,
conference planning, program evaluation, and policy analysis.

Computer Assisted Language Instruction Consortium (CALICO)
http://calico.org/
CALICO is a professional organization that serves a membership involved in both
education and technology. CALICO has an emphasis on modern language teaching
and learning, but reaches out to all areas that employ the languages of the world to
instruct and to learn.

National Association for Bilingual Education (NABE)
http://www.nabe.org/
NABE is a national membership organization founded in 1975 to address the
educational needs of language-minority students in the U.S. and to advance the
language competencies and multicultural understanding of all Americans.

Ohio Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (OTESOL)
http://www.ohiotesol.org/
OhioTESOL, an association of teachers of English to speakers of other languages,
provides professional representation, resources, and expertise in support of
institutions and individuals dedicated to the education of learners for whom English is
a non-native language.




                                         48
Teaching English as a Second Language in Canada (TESL Canada)
http://www.tesl.ca/
TESL Canada is the national federation of English as a Second Language teachers,
learners and learner advocates. They are dedicated to advancing communication and
coordinating awareness of issues for those concerned with English as a Second
Language and English skills development.

Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages, Inc. (TESOL)
http://www.tesol.org/
TESOL is a global education association with approximately 13,000 members in over
120 countries. Its mission is to ensure excellence in English language teaching to
speakers of other languages. TESOL values professionalism in language education;
individual language rights; accessible, high quality education; collaboration in a
global community; interaction of research and reflective practice for educational
improvement; and respect for diversity and multiculturalism.




                                      49
       Section 8: Important Contact Information

For further information about the Literacy/TESL Graduate program,
contact:

       Carol Frazier
       Center for ESL
       4130 Edwards Center One
       College of Education, Criminal Justice and Human Services
       ML 0022, 45-51 Corry Boulevard
       Cincinnati, OH 45221, USA.
       Tel: (513) 556-3590
       Email: ESL1@email.uc.edu

Important University of Cincinnati departments:

Graduate & Family Housing                         UC International Student Services
2921 Scioto Lane                                  3134 Edwards One
Cincinnati, OH 45219                              PO Box 210640
Phone: (513) 556-0682; Fax (513) 556-2324         Cincinnati, OH 45221-0640
Email: ucgradfa@uc.edu                            Tel: (513) 556-4278
http://www.uc.edu/gradfamilyhousing               Email: International.students@uc.edu
                                                  http://www.isso.uc.edu
The Graduate School
110 Van Wormer Hall                               Office of Admissions
PO Box 210627                                     340 University Pavilion
Cincinnati, OH 45221-0627                         PO Box 210091
Mail Location: ML0627                             Cincinnati, OH 45221-0091
Phone: 513-556-4335; Fax: 513-556-0128            Tel: (513) 556-1100; Fax: (513) 556-1105
Email: grad.info@uc.edu.                          Website: http://www.admission.uc.edu/
http://www.grad.uc.edu
                                                  Office of Housing and Food Services
Graduate Student Governance Association           101 West Daniels Street
683 Steger Student Life Center                    Cincinnati OH 45219
P.O. Box 210193                                   Tel: (513) 556-6461; Fax: (513)-861-6816
Cincinnati, OH 45221-0193                         Email: uchousing@uc.edu
Phone: (513) 556-6101                             http://www.uc.edu/housing
Website: http://www.uc.edu/gsga/

Career Development Center
140 University Pavilion
University of Cincinnati
PO Box 0104
Cincinnati, Ohio
45221-0104
Phone: 513-556-3471
http://www.uc.edu/career/All/staff.htm

                                         50
Office of Judicial Affairs                                         Office of the Board of Trustees
Department of Student Life                                         614 University Pavilion
Joseph A. Steger Student Life Center, Suite                        PO Box 210062
745                                                                Cincinnati, OH 45221-0062
PO Box 210193                                                      Mail Location: ML0062
Cincinnati, OH 45221-0193                                          Phone: 513-556-3233; Fax: 513-556-
Mail Location: ML0193                                              6680
Phone: 513-556-6814; Fax: 513-556-1458                             Web Address: www.uc.edu/trustees/rules
Web Address:                                                       Reason to Contact: University Rules
www.uc.edu/conduct/Code_of_conduct.html
Reason to Contact: Code of Conduct

Student Services
CECH
1110 Edwards One
PO Box 210014
Cincinnati, OH 45221-0014
Mail Location: ML0014
Phone: 513-556-2336; Fax: 513-556-3020
Web Address:
www.cech.uc.edu/students.php?s=current&p=student_services_center
Reason to Contact: Undergraduate Advising,
Praxis Information




                                                           51
                                     Local School Districts

Boone County Board of Education                     Campbell County Schools
8330 US 42                                          101 Orchard Lane
Florence, KY 41042                                  Alexandria KY 41001
Boone County Board of Education                     Campbell County Schools
Phone: 859-283-1003                                 Phone: 859-635-2173
Fax: 589-282-2376                                   www.campbell.k12.ky.us
www.boonecountyboe.org                              Contacts:
Contacts:                                           Diana Heidelberg, Associate
Cathy Reutman, Executive Direcotr of                Superintendent
Student Services

Cincinnati Public Schools                           Dayton Public Schools
2651 Burnett Avenue                                 115 South Ludlow Street
Cincinnati, OH 45219                                Dayton, OH 45402
Cincinnati Public Schools                           Dayton Public Schools
Phone: 513-363-0000                                 Phone: 937-542-4010
www.cps-k12.org                                     Fax: 937-542-4034
Contacts:                                           www.dps.k12.oh.us
Rosa Blackwell, Superintendent                      Contacts:
Human Resources                                     Ed Sweetnich, Executive Director
                                                    of Human Resources
                                                    esweetni@dps.k12.oh.us

Fairfield City Schools                              Finneytown Local School District
211 Donald Drive                                    8916 Fontainebleau Terrace
Fairfield, OH 45014                                 Cincinnati, OH 45231
Fairfield City Schools                              Finneytown Local School District
Phone: 513-829-6330                                 Phone: 513-728-3700
www.fairfieldcityschools.com                        Fax: 513-931-0986
Contacts:                                           www.finneytown.org
Robert Farrell, Superintendent                      Contacts:
farrell_r@fairfield-city.k12.oh.us                  Randy Parsons, Superintendent
                                                    rparsons@finneytown.org

Forest Hills Local School District                  Lebanon City Schools
7550 Forest Road                                    700 Holbrook Avenue
Cincinnati, OH 45255                                Lebanon, OH 45036
Forest Hills Local School District                  Lebanon City Schools
Phone: 513-231-3600                                 Phone: 513-934-5770
Fax: 513-231-3830                                   Fax:
www.foresthills.edu                                 www.lebanon.k12.oh.us
Contacts:                                           Contacts:
Gene Hutzelman, Director of Human                   Becky Hill, Director of Human
Resouces                                            Resources
Gene.hutzelman@foresthills.edu                      Hill.becky@lebanon.k12.oh.us
                                                    Kathi McComb, ESL Coordinator
                                                    mccomb.kathi@lebanon.k12.oh.us

                                           52
Lockland City Schools                         Maderia City Schools
210 North Cooper Avenue                       7465 Loannes Drive
Lockland, OH 45215                            Cincinnati, OH 45243
Lockland City Schools                         Maderia City Schools
Phone: 513-563-5000                           Phone: 513-985-6077
Fax:                                          Fax: 513-985-6072
www.locklandschools.org                       http://madeira.hccanet.org/
Contacts:                                     Contacts:
Donna Hubbard, Superintendent                 Steve Kramer, Superintendent
                                              skramer@maderiacityschools.org

Mason City Schools                            Middletown City Schools
211 North East Street                         1515 Girard Avenue
Mason, OH 45040                               Middletown, OH 45044
Mason City Schools                            Middletown City Schools
Phone: 513-398-0474                           Phone: 513-423-0781
www.mason.k12.oh.us                           www.middletownschools.com
Contacts:                                     Contacts:
Craig Ullery, Assistant Superintendent        Brenda Long, Director of Human
ulleryc@mason.k12.oh.us                       Resources
Amy Spicher, Assistant Superintendent         blong@middletownschools.com
for C & I                                     Susan Combs, Director of Student
spichera@mason.k12.oh.us                      Services
                                              scombs@middletownschools.com

Mount Healthy Schools                         Northwest Local School District
7615 Harrison Avenue                          3240 Banning Road
Mt Healthy, OH 45231                          Cincinnati, OH 45239
Mount Healthy Schools                         Northwest Local School District
Phone: 513-729-0777                           Phone: 513-923-1000
www.mthcs.org                                 Fax: 513-923-3644
Contacts:                                     www.nwlsd.org
Lorie Handler, Executive Director of          Contacts:
Personnel                                     Diane C Brunsman, Director of
lhandler@mthcs.org                            Human Resources
Susan Heitner, Coordinator of Special         Grace Serukamp, Supervisor
Education                                     seurgr@nwlsd.org
sheitner@mthcs.org




                                         53
Norwood City Schools                           Oak Hills Local School District
2132 Williams Avenue                           6325 Rapid Run Road
Cincinnati, OH 45212                           Cincinnati, OH 45233
Norwood City Schools                           Oak Hills Local School District
Phone: 513-924-2500                            Phone: 513-574-3200
Fax:                                           Fax: 513-598-2940
www.norwoodschools.org                         www.oakhills.k12.oh.us
                                               Contacts:
Contacts:                                      Patricia Brenneman,
Kristina Chesson, Director of                  Superintendent
Curriculum                                     Sharon Wood, Director of Human
chesson.k@norwoodschools.org                   Resources and Technology

Princeton City Schools                         Reading Community Schools
25 West Sharon Road                            1301 Bonnell Avenue
Cincinnati, OH 45246                           Reading, OH 45215
Princeton City Schools                         Reading Community Schools
Phone: 513-771-8560                            Phone: 513-554-1800
Fax: 513-771-3454                              http://reading.hccanet.org/
www.princeton.k12.oh.us                        Contacts:
Contacts:                                      Scott Inskeep, Superintendent
Mari Phillips, Assistant Superintendent        sinskeep@readingschools.org
for Human Resources                            Bob Stark, Coordinator of Special
mphillips@princeton.k12.oh.us                  Services
Robin Bobbitt, Human Resources                 bstark@readingschools.org
Coordinator
rbobbitt@princeton.k12.oh.us


St. Rita School for the Deaf                   Sycamore Community School District
1720 Glendale-Milford Road                     4881 Cooper Road
Cincinnati, OH 45215                           Blue Ash, OH 45242
St. Rita School for the Deaf                   Sycamore Community School District
Phone: 513-771-7600                            Phone: 513-686-1700
Fax: 513-326-8264                              Fax: 513-791-4873
www.srsdeaf.org                                www.sycamoreschools.org
Contacts:                                      Contacts:
Principal                                      Laurie Frank, Assistant Director of
                                               Student Services
                                               frankl@sycamoreschools.org




                                          54
Talawanda Board of Education                  Wyoming City Schools
131 West Chestnut Street                      420 Springfield Pike
Oxford, OH 45056                              Wyoming, OH 45215
Talawanda Board of Education                  Wyoming City Schools
Phone: 513-523-4716                           Phone: 513-772-2343
www.talawanda.net                             Fax: 513-672-3355
Contacts:                                     www.wyomingcityschools.org
Phil Cagwin, Suprenintendent                  Contacts:
cagwinp@talawanda.org                         Gail Kist-Kline, Superintendent
Rita Lykins, Personnel Department             kistklineg@wyomingcityshools.org
                                              Leslie Ostendor
                                              ostendorl@wyomingcityschools.org

West Clermont Local School District           Winton Woods City Schools
4350 Aicholtz Road, Suite 220                 8 Enfield Street
Cincinnati, OH 45245                          Cincinnati, OH 45218
West Clermont Local School District           Winton Woods City Schools
Phone: 513-935-5000                           Phone: 513-619-2380
Fax: 513-752-6158                             Fax: 513-619-2339
www.westcler.k12.oh.us                        www.wintonwoods.org
Contacts:                                     Contacts:
Al Delgado, Assistant Superintendent          Thomas A. Hausterman, Associate
Pupil Personnell and Special Education        Superintendent
delgado_a@westcler.k12.oh.us                  hausterman.tom@wintonwoods.org
Nina L. Johnson                               Gary Giblin, Teacher on Special
johnson_l@westcler.k12.oh.us                  Assignment
                                              giblin.gary@wintonwoods.org

Yavneh Day School
8401 Montgomery Road
Cincinnati, OH 45236
Yavneh Day School
Phone: 513-984-3770
Fax:
www.yavneh.org
Contacts:
Hazel Bolnick, Head
halbolnick@yavneh.org




                                         55
                Section 9: Appendixes

Transfer of Graduate Credit Form………………………………..p. 57
Recommendation for Advanced Standing Form………………….p. 58
Results of Master’s Project Proposal Hearing Form………….…..p. 59-60
Results of Master’s Project Hearing Form………………………..p. 61-62
Results of Master’s Thesis Proposal Hearing Form……….……...p. 63-64
Results of Master’s Thesis Hearing Form………………………...p. 65-66
Results of Preliminary Hearing Form…………………………......p. 67
Outcome and Evaluation of Phase I Hearing Form ………………p. 68
Outcome and Evaluation of Phase II Hearing Form………………p. 69
Application for Admission to Doctoral Candidacy Form…………p. 70
Outcome and Evaluation of Dissertation Proposal Hearing Form...p. 71
Outcome and Evaluation of Dissertation Hearing Form…………..p. 72
Phases I & II paper, and proposal evaluation rubrics……………...p. 73-75




                                 56
                                        GRADUATE SCHOOL
                               TRANSFER OF UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI
                                        GRADUATE CREDIT
FROM:      _____________________________________________________

           _____________________________________________________
                                 College

           _____________________________________________________
                                 Department

Faculty Advisor Making Recommendation: _____________________________

Graduate Program Director Approval: __________________________________                 ________________
                                                  Signature                                  Date

After review of the official transcripts of his/her academic record, this department recommends the following Student:

STUDENT’S FULL NAME:                        _____________________________________

SOCIAL SECURITY / ID NUMBER:                _________________________________
                                            ________________Program Admit Date


Be granted ________________ graduate quarter credit hours of transfer.

Please attach a copy of transcript(s) and list below the course number, title and credit hours for each Course to be
transferred and for each course being credited.

                        Quarter         UC Course #     UC Course Title Quarter Credits          Quarter
                                                                                               Hours Credited




Send to the Graduate School ML 0627




                                                      57
                                       GRADUATE SCHOOL
                              RECOMMENDATION FOR ADVANCED STANDING

FROM: _____________________________________________________

        _____________________________________________________
                        College

         _____________________________________________________
                       Department

Faculty Advisor Making Recommendation: _____________________________

Graduate Program Director Approval: _________________________________                 ________________
                                                       Signature                                   Date

After review of the official transcripts of his/her academic record, this department recommends the following Student:

STUDENT’S FULL NAME: _________________________________________
SOCIAL SECURITY / ID NUMBER: _________________________________
                              ________________Program Admit Date


Be granted ________________ graduate quarter credit hours of transfer.

UNIVERSITY ATTENDED:            _______________________________________________

DATES OF ATTENDANCE:             _______________________________________________

Please attach a copy of transcript(s) and list below the course number, title and credit hours for each Course to be
transferred and for each course being credited.

                               Quarter       UC Course #       UC Course Title Quarter Credits        Quarter
                                                                                                    Hours Credited




Send to the Graduate School ML 0627



                                                             58
         RESULTS OF MASTER’S PROJECT PROPOSAL HEARING

               Literacy/TESL GRADUATE PROGRAM
               DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION
 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, CRIMINAL JUSTICE, AND HUMAN SERVICES

NAME                                        SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER


PROPOSED TITLE




PROPOSAL ACCEPTED                                           DATE
UNCONDITIONALLY
COMMENTS


CONDITIONALLY WITH THE FOLLOWING SUGGESTIONS




PROPOSAL NOT ACCEPTED                                       DATE
COMMENTS




MASTER’S COMMITTEE:

               NAME                                         DEPARTMENT/AREA
(1)
       Chairperson

(2)
       Area of Concentration

(3)
       Area of Concentration

(4)
       Area of Concentration



                               Please read the next page.




                                          59
Two of three committee members must approve for the project proposal to be acceptable; larger
committees must approve the project proposal with no more than one dissenting vote. Acceptance of the
proposal implies acceptance of both the concept of the study and the method of conducting it.

PLEASE RETURN COMPLETED AND SIGNED FORM TO 4130A Edwards Center One.




                                                  60
                     RESULTS OF MASTER’S PROJECT HEARING

               Literacy/TESL GRADUATE PROGRAM
               DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION
 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, CRIMINAL JUSTICE, AND HUMAN SERVICES


NAME                                        SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER


PROJECT TITLE




ACCEPTED                                            DATE
COMMENTS




ACCEPTED CONDITIONALLY                              DATE
CONDITIONS TO BE MET




MASTER’S COMMITTEE:

       NAME                                         DEPARTMENT/AREA


(1)
       Chairperson

(2)
       Area of Concentration

(3)
       Area of Concentration

(4)
       Area of Concentration




                               Please read the next page.




                                          61
Two of three committee members must approve the project to be acceptable; larger committees must
approve the project with no more than one dissenting vote.

A copy of the project must be provided to each committee member two (2) weeks prior to the scheduling of
the oral defense.

A copy of the project abstract must accompany this form.

THIS FORM MUST BE RETURNED TO 4130A Edwards Center One WITH SIGNATURES OF
ALL COMMITTEE MEMBERS.




                                                   62
            RESULTS OF MASTER’S THESIS PROPOSAL HEARING

               Literacy/TESL GRADUATE PROGRAM
               DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION
 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, CRIMINAL JUSTICE, AND HUMAN SERVICES


NAME                                        SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER


PROPOSED TITLE




PROPOSAL ACCEPTED                                           DATE
UNCONDITIONALLY
COMMENTS


CONDITIONALLY WITH THE FOLLOWING SUGGESTIONS




PROPOSAL NOT ACCEPTED                                       DATE
COMMENTS




MASTER’S COMMITTEE:

               NAME                                         DEPARTMENT/AREA
(1)
       Chairperson

(2)
       Area of Concentration

(3)
       Area of Concentration

(4)
       Area of Concentration



                               Please read the next page.



                                          63
Two of three committee members must approve the thesis proposal to be acceptable; larger committees
must approve the proposal with no more than one dissenting vote. Acceptance of the proposal implies
acceptance of both the concept of the study and the method of conducting it.

The thesis proposal hearing is not considered to be complete until the proposal has been reviewed and
approved by the PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS COMMITTEE. For the review procedure, visit
the IRB website at: http://www.researchcompliance.uc.edu/irb/.

PLEASE RETURN COMPLETED AND SIGNED FORM TO 4130A Edwards Center One.




                                                  64
                     RESULTS OF MASTER’S THESIS HEARING

               Literacy/TESL GRADUATE PROGRAM
               DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION
 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, CRIMINAL JUSTICE, AND HUMAN SERVICES

NAME                                        SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER


THESIS TITLE




ACCEPTED                                            DATE
COMMENTS




ACCEPTED CONDITIONALLY                              DATE
CONDITIONS TO BE MET




MASTER’S COMMITTEE:

       NAME                                         DEPARTMENT/AREA


(1)
       Chairperson

(2)
       Area of Concentration

(3)
       Area of Concentration

(4)
       Area of Concentration




                               Please read the next page.




                                          65
Two of three committee members must approve the thesis to be acceptable; larger committees must
approve the project proposal with no more than one dissenting vote.

All acceptable thesis must be delivered to the committee and a satisfactory defense thereof must be made.

A copy of the thesis must be provided to each committee member two (2) weeks prior to the scheduling of
the oral defense.

A copy of the thesis abstract must accompany this form.

THIS FORM MUST BE RETURNED TO 4130A Edwards Center One WITH SIGNATURES OF
ALL COMMITTEE MEMBERS.




                                                    66
                      RESULTS OF PRELIMINARY HEARING


              Literacy/TESL DOCTORAL PROGRAM
              DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, CRIMINAL JUSTICE, AND HUMAN SERVICES


NAME                                                               DATE

SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER

SPECIALIZATION

PROGRAM FOCUS

INTRO. RESEARCH COURSES            1)                   2)                   3)

ADVANCED RESEARCH SEQUENCE

RESEARCH INDUCTION PLAN



           NAME                                                      COMMENTS

(1)
       Chair

(2)
       Teacher Education Faculty

(3)
       Teacher Education Faculty or other Committee Member

(4)
       Teacher Education Faculty or other Committee Member

(5)
       Teacher Education Faculty or other Committee Member

(6)
       Teacher Education Faculty or other Committee Member


DECISION

       All program requirements met

       Minor discrepancies to be resolved with guidance of committee chair

       New program plan and preliminary hearing required

               Return the completed form to the division Graduate Program Director



                                                67
               OUTCOME AND EVALUATION OF PHASE I HEARING

               Literacy/TESL DOCTORAL PROGRAM
               DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION
 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, CRIMINAL JUSTICE, AND HUMAN SERVICES


NAME                                                                 DATE

SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER

SPECIALIZATION

PROGRAM FOCUS

PHASE I PAPER TOPIC



OVERALL SCORE (SEE SCORING GUIDELINES)

           NAME                                                        COMMENTS

(1)
       Chair

(2)
       Teacher Education Faculty

(3)
       Teacher Education Faculty or other Committee Member

(4)
       Teacher Education Faculty or other Committee Member

(5)
       Teacher Education Faculty or other Committee Member

(6)
       Teacher Education Faculty or other Committee Member


DECISION

       Paper and hearing are acceptable; student admitted to Phase II of doctoral program

       Paper to be revised; student admitted to Phase II on chair’s approval
                                                                          (signature and date of approval)
       New Phase I hearing required

                Return the completed form to the division Graduate Program Director




                                                  68
        OUTCOME AND EVALUATION OF PHASE II HEARING
               Literacy/TESL DOCTORAL PROGRAM
               DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION
 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, CRIMINAL JUSTICE, AND HUMAN SERVICES


NAME                                                                 DATE

SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER

SPECIALIZATION                                     PROGRAM FOCUS

PHASE II PAPER TOPIC



OVERALL SCORE (SEE SCORING GUIDELINES)

REMOVAL OF ALL I, IP, NG, AND F GRADES                               YES                        NO

GRADE POINT AVERAGE OF AT LEAST 3.25                                 YES                        NO

RESIDENCY REQUIREMENT MET                                            YES                        NO

           NAME                                                          COMMENTS

(1)
       Chair

(2)
       Teacher Education Faculty

(3)
       Teacher Education Faculty or other Committee Member

(4)
       Teacher Education Faculty or other Committee Member

(5)
       Teacher Education Faculty or other Committee Member

(6)
       Teacher Education Faculty or other Committee Member


DECISION

       Paper and hearing are acceptable; student admitted to candidacy

       Paper to be revised; student admitted to candidacy on chair’s approval
                                                                         (signature and date of approval)
       New Phase II hearing required

                Return the completed form to the division Graduate Program Director



                                                 69
                             GRADUATE SCHOOL
             APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION TO DOCTORAL CANDIDACY
        (To be completed by the department and returned to the Graduate School, ML 627)

From: College_________________ Department_________________

___________________________________________, Graduate Program Director

This is to certify that ______________________________________________________

Social Security / ID Number ________________________________________________

Has satisfactorily passed the comprehensive examination required for admission to

candidacy for the degree of _________________________________________________

DISSERTATION COMMITTEE MEMBERS:

________________________________ _________________________, CHAIR
Print Name                                                        Signature

________________________________ _________________________
Print Name                                                       Signature

________________________________ _________________________
Print Name                                                       Signature

________________________________ _________________________
Print Name                                                       Signature

________________________________ _________________________
Print Name                                                        Signature

________________________________ _________________________
Print Name                                                        Signature


The Committee has not been selected _____

Examination Date ___________________________

         _________________________________                      _____________
              Graduate Program Director                           Signature Date


                                          ___________________________________
                                              OFFICIAL CANDIDACY DATE




                                                     70
 OUTCOME AND EVALUATION OF DISSERTATION PROPOSAL HEARING

               Literacy/TESL DOCTORAL PROGRAM
               DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION
 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, CRIMINAL JUSTICE, AND HUMAN SERVICES


NAME                                                                    DATE

SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER

SPECIALIZATION

PROGRAM FOCUS

DISSERTATION TOPIC



OVERALL SCORE (SEE SCORING GUIDELINES)



             NAME                                                        COMMENTS

(1)
        Chair

(2)
        Teacher Education Faculty

(3)
        Teacher Education Faculty or other Committee Member

(4)
        Teacher Education Faculty or other Committee Member

(5)
        Teacher Education Faculty or other Committee Member

(6)
        Teacher Education Faculty or other Committee Member


DECISION (Note: IRB approval is also necessary for any research involving human subjects)

         Proposal acceptable; student may begin dissertation research

         Proposal to be revised; student may begin research upon chair’s approval
                                                                           (signature and date of approval)
         New proposal hearing required

                 Return the completed form to the division Graduate Program Director.




                                                   71
        OUTCOME AND EVALUATION OF DISSERTATION HEARING

               Literacy/TESL DOCTORAL PROGRAM
               DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION
 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, CRIMINAL JUSTICE, AND HUMAN SERVICES


NAME                                                             DATE

SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER

SPECIALIZATION

PROGRAM FOCUS

DISSERTATION TOPIC



OVERALL SCORE (SEE SCORING GUIDELINES)

           NAME                                                    COMMENTS

(1)
       Chair

(2)
       Teacher Education Faculty

(3)
       Teacher Education Faculty or other Committee Member

(4)
       Teacher Education Faculty or other Committee Member

(5)
       Teacher Education Faculty or other Committee Member

(6)
       Teacher Education Faculty or other Committee Member


DECISION

       Dissertation acceptable

       Dissertation unacceptable




                   Return the completed form to the division Graduate Program Director




                                               72
                                Rubric for Evaluating Phase I Papers


             1                             2                          3                           4


      Unacceptable                   Acceptable                    Good                      Excellent

•   Does not show                •   Shows adequate         •   Shows good             •   Shows thorough
    familiarity with                 familiarity with           familiarity with           command of
    existing literature; an          existing literature;       existing literature;       existing literature
    inadequate quantity,             sufficient quantity,       appropriate                in multiple areas;
    poor quality, or                 quality, and focus         current literature         literature in
    inappropriately                  of literature is           is cited, as well as       analyzed and
    focused literature base          presented in the           foundational               synthesized to
    is presented                     review                     research or that           highlight its
                                                                which gave rise to         importance to our
•   Makes no                                                    recent trends              current knowledge
    contribution to              •   Attempts to                                           base.
    scholarly knowledge;             contribute to          •   Makes a
    a purpose for the                scholarly                  contribution to        •   Makes a significant
    review is not given              knowledge; a               scholarly                  contribution to
    and/or supported, nor            knowledge gap is           knowledge; a               scholarly
    is the identification of         presented and              clear knowledge            knowledge; the
    an outcome presented.            linked to the              gap is identified          knowledge gap
                                     outcome of the             and the literature         identified is clearly
•   Disorganized; lacks              review, although           review is                  established through
    an organizing                    the support for the        discussed in terms         a unique synthesis
    argument or structure            gap and outcome            of how this gap            of literature that
    that guides the reader           could be                   has arisen and             leads to new areas
    to understand reasons            strengthened               what needs to be           of research.
    for citing the literature                                   addressed in
    used.                        •   Adequate                   future research        •   Clear organization
                                     organization; an                                      contributes to
•   Numerous mistakes in             argument is            •   Clearly                    overall readability;
    surface features,                identified for the         organized; a               a coherent
    including tables,                reader and                 coherent                   argument is clearly
    charts, and citation             supported in most          argument is                developed and
    style                            instances by the           introduced and             presented in an
                                     organization of the        developed                  elegant style.
                                     review                     logically
                                                                throughout             •   Complete
                                 •   Few mistakes in                                       command of
                                     surface features,      •   No mistakes in             surface features,
                                     including tables,          surface features,          including tables,
                                     charts, and citation       including tables,          charts, and citation
                                     style                      charts, and                style; written with
                                                                citation style             style and grace




                                                       73
                    Rubric for Evaluating Phase II Papers and Dissertations



            1                           2                           3                           4


     Unacceptable                 Acceptable                      Good                      Excellent

•   Does not show             •   Shows adequate          •   Shows good             •   Shows thorough
    familiarity with              familiarity with            familiarity with           command of
    existing literature; an       existing literature;        existing literature;       existing literature in
    inadequate quantity,          sufficient quantity,        appropriate current        multiple areas;
    poor quality, or              quality, and focus          literature is cited,       literature in
    inappropriately               of literature is            as well as                 analyzed and
    focused literature            presented in the            foundational               synthesized to
    base is presented             review                      research or that           highlight its
                                                              which gave rise to         importance to our
•   Makes no                  •   Attempts to                 recent trends              current knowledge
    contribution to               contribute to                                          base
    scholarly knowledge;          scholarly               •   Makes a
    extremely weak                knowledge;                  contribution to        •   Makes a significant
    research project and          acceptable                  scholarly                  contribution to
    insufficient command          research project            knowledge; strong          scholarly
    of research                   and reasonable              research project           knowledge; strong,
    methodologies                 command of                  and good mastery           highly original re-
                                  research                    of research                search project with
                                  methodologies               methodologies              exceptional
•   Disorganized; lacks                                                                  mastery of
    an organizing             •   Adequate                                               appropriate
    argument or structure         organization; an        •   Clearly organized;         research
    that guides the reader        argument is                 a coherent                 methodologies.
    to understand the stu-        identified for the          argument is
    dents’ reasons for            reader and                  introduced and         •   Clear organization
    citing the literature         supported in most           developed                  contributes to
    used                          instances by the            logically                  overall readability;
                                  organization of the         throughout                 a coherent
•   Numerous mistakes             review                                                 argument is clearly
    in surface features,                                  •   No mistakes in             developed and
    including tables,                                         surface features,          presented in an
    charts, and citation      •   Few mistakes in             including tables,          elegant style.
    style                         surface features,           charts, and citation
                                  including tables,           style
                                  charts, and citation                               •   Complete
                                  style                                                  command of
                                                                                         surface features,
                                                                                         including tables,
                                                                                         charts, and citation
                                                                                         style; written with
                                                                                         style and grace




                                                     74
                              Rubric for Evaluating Dissertation Proposals



            1                               2                          3                           4


     Unacceptable                      Acceptable                    Good                      Excellent

•   Does not show                 •   Shows adequate         •   Shows good             •   Shows thorough
    familiarity with                  familiarity with           familiarity with           command of
    existing literature; an           existing literature;       existing literature;       existing literature in
    inadequate quantity,              sufficient quantity,       appropriate current        multiple areas;
    poor quality, or                  quality, and focus         literature is cited,       literature in
    inappropriately                   of literature is           as well as                 analyzed and
    focused literature                presented in the           foundational               synthesized to
    base is presented                 review                     research or that           highlight its
                                                                 which gave rise to         importance to our
•   Little potential for                                         recent trends              current knowledge
    contributing to               •   Some potential for                                    base
    scholarly knowledge;              contributing to        •   Likely to
    extremely weak                    scholarly                  contribute to          •   Likely to make a
    research project and              knowledge;                 scholarly                  significant
    insufficient command              acceptable                 knowledge; strong          contribution to
    of research                       research project           research project           scholarly
    methodologies                     and reasonable             and good mastery           knowledge; strong,
                                      command of                 of research                highly original re-
                                      research                   methodologies              search project with
•   Disorganized; lacks               methodologies                                         exceptional mastery
    an organizing                                                                           of appropriate
    argument or structure                                    •   Clearly organized;         research
    that guides the reader        •   Adequate                   a coherent                 methodologies.
    to understand the stu-            organization; an           argument is
    dents’ reasons for                argument is                introduced and         •   Clear organization
    citing the literature             identified for the         developed                  contributes to
    used                              reader and                 logically                  overall readability;
                                      supported in most          throughout                 a coherent
•   Numerous mistakes                 instances by the                                      argument is clearly
    in surface features,              organization of the                                   developed and
    including tables,                 review                 •   No mistakes in             presented in an
    charts, and citation                                         surface features,          elegant style.
    style                         •   Few mistakes in            including tables,
                                      surface features,          charts, and citation   •   Complete
                                      including tables,          style                      command of
                                      charts, and citation                                  surface features,
                                      style                                                 including tables,
                                                                                            charts, and citation
                                                                                            style; written with
                                                                                            style and grace




                                                        75

								
To top