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MANF9420 Operations and Supply Chain Management in by pzp12248

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UNSW Course Outline


1. Location of the Course

     Faculty of Engineering – School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering
     Master of Engineering Science
     MANF9420 Operations and Supply Chain Management
     in Engineering
     Semester 2, 2009

2. Table of Contents

        Staff Contact Details ...................................................................................      p1
        Course Details .............................................................................................    2
        Learning Objectives ....................................................................................        2
        Generic Skills/Graduate Attributes ...............................................................              3
        Teaching and Learning Approach ................................................................                 3
        Program of Study .........................................................................................      4
        Assessment..................................................................................................    4
        Academic Honesty and Plagiarism .............................................................                   4
        Equity and Diversity .....................................................................................      5


3. Staff Contact Details

                                                                                          Availability;
       Position                 Name                            Email                      times and                   Phone 
                                                                                            location 

     Course             Dr Farhad                   f.shafaghi@unsw.edu.au              by emailing or          02 – 92094209
     Convener/          Shafaghi                                                        phone
     Lecturer




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UNSW MANF9420 Supply Chain Course Outline  ‐ July 2009 
                                                                                                        

4. Course Details
    This Operations & Supply Chain Management course aims to provide both the strategic vision
    required to be effective as an operations and supply chain manager and enough detail to allow
    you to learn about and apply the analytic tools and systems which support the vision. While
    some of the units cover topics common to other courses in the master program, you will find the
    ideas often described in terms of systems, processes, and customer focus. You will be provided
    by an abundance of cases and examples to illustrate the concepts and demonstrate you that
    what you learn is not just theory but important perspectives on real world manufacturing supply
    chain practices.
    To succeed in the global marketplace for now and in the future, organisations will have to
    operate according to the emerging developments in manufacturing supply chain management
    area by considering:

    a) A total commitment to continually increasing value for customers, investors, and employees.
    b) A firm understanding that market driven means that quality is defined by customers, not the
       value chain.
    c) A commitment to leading an entire chain with a bias for continuous improvement and
       communication
    d) A recognition that sustained growth requires the simultaneous achievement of customer
       satisfaction, cost leadership, effective human resources, flexibility and integration of the
       entire supplier base.
    e) A commitment to fundamental improvement through knowledge, skills, problem solving and
       trust throughout the entire chain of supply.
    The supply chains that develop these characteristics will be those that fully implement the
    principles of manufacturing and supply management through simultaneously improving both
    quality and productivity on a continual basis.
    The course is designed to help you to learn how to take a broad managerial perspective
    emphasising the strategic impact of decisions and the interfaces between operations and the
    other functional areas of the supply chain. It is aimed at providing the students with an
    opportunity to apply their engineering knowledge in a real industry environment. Students will
    work in small teams on specific tasks including technical as well as organisational aspects that
    manufacturing supply chains have to deal with.

5. Learning Objectives
    The primary objectives of the course are:

    1. To develop an understanding of the strategic importance of manufacturing supply chains and
       how operations can provide a competitive advantage in the market place.
    2. To understand the relationship between manufacturing and related service providers and
       other business functions such as human resources, purchasing, marketing, finance etc.
    3. To understand the new demands of the globally competitive business environment that
       supply chain managers face today.
    4. To emphasise the importance of “change”, “facilitation of learning”, “cross-functional
       teamwork”, “knowledge capture”, and “analysis” in manufacturing organisations.
    5. To develop knowledge of the issues related to designing and managing manufacturing
       operations so that prosperity in today’s job market is achieved.


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UNSW MANF9420 Supply Chain Course Outline  ‐ July 2009 
                                                                                                          
    6. To develop knowledge of the information technology tools necessary for manufacturing an
       integrated supply chain.
    At the end of the course, each student should:
    1. Understand why organisations are considered as part of an integrated supply chain system
    2. Be able to explain why and how integrative approach is to be carried out in managing
       manufacturing supply chain operations.
    3. Understand, explain and discuss the concepts and methods covered in order to build a
       knowledge.
    4. Be an active learner, not just passive recipients of information.
    5. Increase their abilities to integrate several manufacturing and supply chain management
       related issues they have learned in this course and other courses through individual and
       team learning which would lead to an increase in confidence and mastery of application.
    6. Enhance problem-solving, communication and team work skills.
    7. Be thinking critically about the issues and ideas that they just read about. These “thinking
       critically” approaches require students to consider and apply these ideas in light of their
       experiences.
    8. Understand the role of information management in smooth running of a manufacturing
       supply chain.

6. Generic Skills/Graduate Attributes
    Students are expected to enhance several of their graduate attributes during this course and
    should consult with their lecturer if not clear as to how this subject achieves this. The graduate
    attributes which relate to this course are designed graduates who are:
        capable in their chosen professional careers
        entrepreneurial
        adaptable and manage change
        aware of different environments, cultures and ethics of work and community situations.

7. Teaching and Learning Approach
    An informal, participative teaching and learning approach is adopted. Comprehensive
    understanding of the concepts is followed by numerous real-life case study analysis and
    discussions. Teamwork is essential and “thinking loud” is encouraged in the class. Students
    need to cover the chapters and case studies assigned for each week prior to coming to classes
    so that the full advantage of “scenario” or “case-based” discussions, presentations and learning
    will be achieved. Several real-life manufacturing and service industries based videos will be
    shown to support the materials covered.

    Several case studies, critical thinking activities, group discussions and presentations,
    discussion assignments which will be assigned as individual and/or teamwork aim to encourage
    review, stimulate additional thought, promote discussion and facilitate additional research.




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UNSW MANF9420 Supply Chain Course Outline  ‐ July 2009 
                                                                                                         

8. Program of Study – Semester 2, 2009 commences Monday, 20 July
        Week         Topics                                                Chapters*
          1         Introduction                                               1
          2         Supply Chain Performance                                   2
          3         Supply Chain Drivers and Metrics                            3
         4,5        Design Distribution Networks                              4,5
          6         Demand Forecasting                                         7
          7         Aggregate Planning in Supply Chain                         8
          8         Transportation in SC                                       13
          9         Managing Cross-Functional Drivers in Supply                14
                    Chain
         10         MID-SESSION EXAM
         11         Information Technology in SC                                16
         12         Coordination in SC                                          17
         13         Review week

Textbook:

    Chopra S., Meindl, P., Supply Chain Management, International edition (2nd edition), Prentice
    Hill, 2007.

9. Assessment

                       Assignment 1                                      25%
                       Mid-semester exam                                 25%
                       Final Examination                                 50%


    Several case studies, critical thinking activities, group discussions, presentations and
    discussion assignments which will be assigned as individual and/or teamwork aim to encourage
    review, stimulate additional thought, promote discussion and facilitate additional research.
    Regular class exercises cover exercises of the text and discussion of case studies.

10. Academic Honesty and Plagiarism
    Plagiarism is the presentation of the thoughts or work of another as one’s own.*
    Examples include:

        direct duplication of the thoughts or work of another, including by copying work, or
         knowingly permitting it to be copied. This includes copying material, ideas or concepts from
         a book, article, report or other written document (whether published or unpublished),
         composition, artwork, design, drawing, circuitry, computer program or software, web site,
         Internet, other electronic resource, or another person’s assignment without appropriate
         acknowledgement;
        paraphrasing another person’s work with very minor changes keeping the meaning, form

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UNSW MANF9420 Supply Chain Course Outline  ‐ July 2009 
                                                                                                                        
         and/or progression of ideas of the original;
        piecing together sections of the work of others into a new whole;
        presenting an assessment item as independent work when it has been produced in whole
         or part in collusion with other people, for example, another student or a tutor; and,
        claiming credit for a proportion a work contributed to a group assessment item that is
         greater than that actually contributed.†

    Submitting an assessment item that has already been submitted for academic credit elsewhere
    may also be considered plagiarism.

    The inclusion of the thoughts or work of another with attribution appropriate to the academic
    discipline does not amount to plagiarism.

    Students are reminded of their Rights and Responsibilities in respect of plagiarism, as set out in
    the University Undergraduate and Postgraduate Handbooks, and are encouraged to seek
    advice from academic staff whenever necessary to ensure they avoid plagiarism in all its forms.

    The Learning Centre website is the central University online resource for staff and student
    information on plagiarism and academic honesty. It can be located at:
    www.lc.unsw.edu.au/plagiarism

    The Learning Centre also provides substantial educational written materials, workshops, and
    tutorials to aid students, for example, in:

        correct referencing practices;
        paraphrasing, summarising, essay writing, and time management;
        appropriate use of, and attribution for, a range of materials including text, images, formulae
         and concepts.

    Individual assistance is available on request from The Learning Centre.
    Students are also reminded that careful time management is an important part of study and
    one of the identified causes of plagiarism is poor time management. Students should allow
    sufficient time for research, drafting, and the proper referencing of sources in preparing all
    assessment items.

    * Based on that proposed to the University of Newcastle by the St James Ethics Centre. Used with kind permission
        from the University of Newcastle.
    † Adapted with kind permission from the University of Melbourne.

11. Equity and diversity
    Students who have a disability that requires some adjustment in their teaching or learning
    environment are encouraged to discuss their study needs with the course convener prior to, or
    at the commencement of, their course, or with the Equity Officer (Disability) in the Student
    Equity and Diversities Unit (9385 4734 or
                         www.studentequity.unsw.edu.au/content/default.cfm?ss=0).
    Issues to be discussed may include access to materials, signers or note-takers, the provision of
    services and additional exam and assessment arrangements. Early notification is essential to
    enable any necessary adjustments to be made.


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UNSW MANF9420 Supply Chain Course Outline  ‐ July 2009 

								
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