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									        Appalachian State University




Family and Consumer Sciences
      Graduate Student
         Handbook




                               Boone, NC 28608
                               Phone: 828-262-3120
                               FAX: 828-265-8620



0
               Compiled by
    Diane Butterworth, DrPH, RD, LDN
        Graduate Program Director
                1996, 1998




               Revised by
      Sammie G. Garner, PhD, CFCS
        Graduate Program Director
                  2007




1
                           FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES
                             GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK
                                 TABLE OF CONTENTS


Introduction…………………………………………………………………….                                                                       3
History………………………………………………………………………….                                                                          3
Goals for Students Enrolled in the MA in Family and Consumer Sciences ..                                      3
University Resources…………………………………………………………...                                                                 4

Department Resources………………………………………………………….                                                                   4
      Duplication……………………………………………………………...                                                                   5
      Lockers………………………………………………………………….                                                                       5
      Work/Study Areas………………………………………………………                                                                   5
      Computer Lab…………………………………………………………..                                                                    5
      Graduate Program Bulletin Board………………………………………                                                          5
      Student Organizations…………………………………………………...                                                             5

Funding Sources and Avenues of Support…………………………………...                                                        6
      Graduate Assistantships…………………………………………………                                                              6
      In and Out-of State Tuition………………………………………………                                                           7

Major Steps in Graduate Program…………………………………………..                                                             8
      Program Advisor………………………………………………………..                                                                  8
      Selection of Program Committee………………………………………..                                                         8
      Program of Study………………………………………………………..                                                                 8
      Admission to Candidacy………………………………………………..                                                              9
      Independent/Individual Study………………………………………….                                                         10
      Internships……………………………………………………………….                                                                  10
      Graduate Research Registration ……………………………………….                                                       10
      Non-Thesis Project………………………………………………………                                                               11
      Thesis…………………………………………………………………….                                                                     11
              1. Securing a Thesis Chair and Committee ……………………                                             11
              2. Writing a Prospectus…………………………………………..                                                     12
              3. Prospectus Meeting……………………………………………                                                         12
              4. Data Collection……………………………………………….                                                         12
              5. Thesis Defense………………………………………………..                                                         13
              6. Thesis Submission/Binding/Final Grade …………………….                                            13
      Application for Graduation………………………………………………                                                          13
      Comprehensive Examination Guidelines……………………………….                                                      13
      Portfolio Review ………………………………………………………...                                                             16
      Product of Learning ……………………………………………………..                                                            16
      Language Proficiency …………………………………………………..                                                            16
      Commencement …..……………………………………………………..                                                                16

Publication Authorship ...................................................................................... 17
Graduate Program Checklist……………………………………………..…… 18


2
                       FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES
                        GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK


 Introduction
         Welcome to the graduate program at Appalachian State University and to the
 Department of Family and Consumer Sciences! Our faculty and graduate students are
 delighted that you have chosen to study with us. This handbook is designed to assist you
 in completing your Master of Arts degree in the Family and Consumer Sciences graduate
 program with optimum scholarly accomplishment and professional development.

 History
         Our Master of Arts was approved in Fall 1990 and graduated its first student in
 Summer 1991. In Fall 1995, the Department of Home Economics adopted the name
 Family and Consumer Sciences to better reflect our position in society and academia and
 to identify with the name adopted by our national accrediting body. We currently offer
 three MA graduate degrees:
         (1) Master of Arts in Family and Consumer Sciences, a non-certification program
         with three concentrations – child and family studies, foods and nutrition (with
         ADA internship) and general;
         (2) Master of Arts in Family and Consumer Sciences, Education, which leads to
         advanced teacher licensure,
         (3) Master of Arts in Child Development, Birth through Kindergarten: with three
         concentrations, teaching, allied professions, and administrative.

 We support graduate studies in three content areas: Child Development, Foods and
 Nutrition, and Family and Consumer Sciences Education. The Foods and Nutrition area
 houses a graduate Dietetic Internship accredited by The American Dietetic Association.

Goals for Students Enrolled in the Master of Arts in Family and Consumer Sciences
        1. Gain a critical understanding of the discipline of Family and Consumer
        Sciences, its methodology, and theoretical framework.
        2. Acquire an advanced knowledge of the discipline of Family and Consumer
        Sciences and one of its sub disciplines (Child Development, Foods and Nutrition,
        or Family and Consumer Sciences Education) to facilitate professional
        advancement.
        3. Develop the ability to analyze and synthesize knowledge and methodology
        within the field.
        4. Develop the skills, knowledge and graduate experience necessary for
        appropriate professional employment, professional development, and/or further
        graduate study within Family and Consumer Sciences.
        5. Develop a commitment to the Family and Consumer Sciences profession, to
        ethical thought and behavior, and to high standards of professional practice.
        6. Develop leadership and administrative knowledge and skills to facilitate



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       professional advancement.
       7. Develop research skills and competencies.
       8. Develop intellectually and creatively through association with Family and
       Consumer Sciences professionals as mentors.
       9. Gain advanced content knowledge and competency to facilitate graduate level
       credentialing appropriate to the student’s respective program of study.

Refer also to the University mission statement and to the goals of the University Graduate
Studies program http://www.graduate.appstate.edu/gradstudies/facultystaff/mission.html.

University Resources
        Graduate Studies oversees the process of graduate education at Appalachian from
admissions to commencement. The staff is well qualified to answer questions about
policies and procedures for graduate students and offer several training opportunities
such as orientation for graduate students, training for teaching assistants, and thesis
workshops. Graduate Studies publishes information about the University and its graduate
education resources on the Cratis D. Williams Graduate Studies webpage at
http://www.graduate.appstate.edu/.

 The Cratis D. Williams Graduate Student Handbook is available on-line at
http://www.graduate.appstate.edu/gradstudies/forms_graduate/td_studenthdbk.pdf
and is designed to introduce you to the graduate school staff, resources, and policies, as
well as assist you in completing your graduate studies with a minimum of effort.

The Appalachian Graduate Bulletin describes specific degree programs requirements,
course offerings, and academic policies and procedures that must be followed to obtain
your graduate degree, as well as other detail regarding financial, computer, library, and
faculty. Refer to http://www.graduate.appstate.edu/gradstudies/bulletin/index.html.

Off-campus students should also refer to the Extension and Distance Education webpage
at http://www.ext-dl.appstate.edu/ for a wealth of information and services designed to
make your graduate education smooth and seamless.

        We encourage you to consult with your advisor regularly to plan a successful path
to the completion of your graduate degree. The official position of the University is that
the sole responsibility for a graduate student’s adherence to academic policy and
fulfillment of requirements toward a degree rests with the student.

Department Resources
       The Department of Family and Consumer Sciences has friendly and caring
students and faculty who welcome you to a meaningful and challenging graduate study
experience. The department is located in L.S. Dougherty Hall and is open to all students
Monday through Friday 8:00AM – 5:00 PM. The department office is located in room
101.




4
       Students are permitted to work in laboratories after 5:00 PM or on Saturday and
Sunday by instructor’s approval only. Approval must be written for the Security Officer
to check. The department administrative assistant will provide you with approval forms.
Procedures relating to use of laboratories after hours are:
       1. A student receives signed approval form from a course instructor.
       2. A student checks out classroom/lab key from secretary.
       3. A student calls Security Office (extension 2150) to unlock building.
       4. The student is responsible for use and maintenance of lab/building space
           during such access.

Duplication
       Access to the copier in the department office is available to Family and Consumer
Sciences faculty, staff, and trained graduate assistants working on approved FCS
materials. The copier and other office materials are not for personal use.

Lockers
       Lockers are located on the second floor and are available on a first come, first
serve basis to graduate and undergraduate students in Family and Consumer Sciences.
Students wishing to use a locker should pick one and supply their own lock and
combination. When a student has identified a locker, he or she should sign the locker
assignment sheet posted at the end of the lockers. This process must be renewed each
semester.

Work/Study Areas
      Graduate students may study or work in room 209.

Computer Lab
       Computer labs are provided by the University for student use. In addition, a
department computer lab is open in L.S. Dougherty Hall, room 202 for Family and
Consumer Sciences majors. Hours vary and are posted on the door. Graduate students
may request use of this lab at additional times.

Graduate Program Bulletin Board
        Located on the first floor, west end, the Graduate Program Bulletin Board is used
to post memorandums, articles, job offerings, advising deadlines, presentation
announcements, and course listings pertaining to graduate students. You may use this
board if you have pertinent information you would like to share related to graduate
students in your field. Contact the Graduate Program Director if you have questions.

Student Organizations
        There are two campus wide organizations specifically for graduate students: the
Graduate Student Association Senate and the Social Order of Graduate Students. Refer
to http://www.graduate.appstate.edu/gradstudies/current/studentgroups.php
for details. This site also includes the Graduate Student Association Handbook
http://www.sogs.appstate.edu/index.php?module=pagemaster&PAGE_user_op=view_pa
ge&PAGE_id=66&MMN_position=180:180



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If you have interest in being an elected representative of our FCS graduate program to
these organizations, please let the FCS Graduate Program Director know.

       Students are also encouraged to become actively involved in professional
organizations. The following student organizations pertinent to the Family and
Consumer Sciences discipline have been established.

       SAFCS - The Student Association of Family and Consumer Sciences is open to
       all Family and Consumer Sciences majors. Membership dues are paid to the
       American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences.

       KON - Kappa Omicron Nu is the honor organization for Family and Consumer
       Sciences and Human Sciences majors . Requirements for membership are based
       on academics, leadership, and dedication to the profession.

       HACDA - Highland Association for Child Development and Advocacy, an
       organization whose membership consists mainly of child development majors. Its
       purpose is to provide for leadership and professional development and to further
       the student’s education and interests in the child development major.

       SADA - Student Appalachian Dietetic Association is an organization whose
       membership consists mainly of General Dietetic students. Its purpose is to
       provide for leadership and professional development opportunities in Foods and
       Nutrition.

Funding Sources and Avenues of Support
        There are several ways to finance your graduate education, including loans,
fellowships, scholarships, and assistantships. To be considered for financial aid, fill out
the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which is available at the
Financial Aid Office. Refer to http://financialaid.appstate.edu/. Applications for
fellowships, scholarships, and assistantships are available online from the Office of
Graduate Studies and Research, John Thomas Student Support Building JET Building
(828-262-2130). Refer to http://www.graduate.appstate.edu . For questions regarding
tuition status, refer to http://www.registrar.appstate.edu/residency/ . The graduate
assistantship application is also available through AdmissionPro.

         Support for graduate student research is available through the Graduate Studies
Office. Refer to http://www.graduate.appstate.edu/ and the Office of Student Research
http://www.osr.appstate.edu/ for details.

Graduate Assistantships
        As a Graduate assistant at Appalachian State University, you are offered the
opportunity to function both as a student and as a professional. FCS graduate
assistantships are available in Nutrition, Child Development, and Research in half-time
(10 hours/week) or full-time (20 hours/week) workloads. Information regarding graduate
assistantships in other university programs is available through the Graduate Studies



6
office. A standard full-time assistantship carries a stipend of ~$7,000 (2007 amount) per
year before taxes. Some assistantships pay more. During any semester that a graduate
student receives a stipend, he or she must be enrolled in a minimum of 9 and a maximum
of 12 semester hours. A summer assistantship requires enrollment in at least one course
during the summer. Graduate assistants are expected to maintain a minimum 3.0 grade
point average and comply with regulations and policies applicable to graduate assistant
personnel and the Graduate School. Graduate assistantships are made according to the
following procedures:
        1. Applicants must file an application with the Graduate School. Applications
           are available on-line from the Graduate School Office located in the John E.
           Thomas Student Support Building (JET).
        2. Applicants must be accepted for admission to the Graduate School.
           Incomplete admission applications are held in the Graduate School until
           approved and then forwarded to the appropriate department or area.
        3. Upon recommendation by the department chairperson, the
           Dean of Graduate School offers assistantship contracts to selected recipients.
        3. Each graduate assistant will receive an e-mail contract letter which will
           specify the type of assistantship, the number of hours per week to be worked,
           and the amount of the stipend, and the academic terms for which the contract
           is valid.

The student will be asked to respond to an online form for setting up the signing process
for the assistantship. Refer to the Graduate Studies webpage
http://www.graduate.appstate.edu/gradstudies/current/contractsigning.php.

        Specific job descriptions will be defined by the area supervisor and the
department chairperson and are identified in the work system. You are expected to be
familiar with and abide by the policies outlined in The Cratis D. Williams Graduate
Student Handbook as well as those in your employment area, available on line at
http://www.graduate.appstate.edu/
        Before the first day of classes, assistantship recipients are required to report to the
Graduate School Office in the John E. Thomas Administration Building to sign
appropriate forms and tax documents. To complete these forms, you will need two of the
three following items: official identification (valid driver’s license or military ID),
original Social Security Card, and /or birth certificate or passport.

In and Out-of-State Tuition Scholarships
       Out-of-State tuition scholarships are awarded to a very limited number of
exceptionally qualified assistantship recipients. Funds for tuition scholarships are funded
by The University of North Carolina Board of Governors. You should contact your
Graduate Program Director, Program Advisor, or Department Chair for a
recommendation and further instructions. Recipients must meet the following guidelines:
       1. The student must be approved for admission.
       2. The student must register for a minimum of nine hours to maintain full-time
           status and the tuition scholarship privilege.
       3. The student must hold a graduate assistantship.



7
North Carolina Residency Status for Tuition Purposes
        If you need information regarding North Carolina residency in order to qualify for
in-state tuition rates, refer to the Registrar’s Office webpage
http://www.registrar.appstate.edu/residency/index.html.

Major Steps in Graduate Program
        It is the graduate student’s responsibility to meet all requirements for successfully
completing his or her program of study in a timely manner. As you read this section,
refer to the Graduate Program Checklist on page 18 to help you anticipate and plan
each step. Track and date each step as it is completed.

Graduate advisors will maintain the Graduate Program Checklist filed in the FCS
department office by verifying the completion and date of completion of each
component listed. This form is attached to the inside cover of each student’s program
file. Note that admission information is available through AdmissionPro. The academic
information of admitted and continuing students is available through the Banner/ student
system. This process is also monitored by the FCS graduate program director.

Program Advisor
        Students admitted to a program of graduate study at Appalachian State University
are assigned an academic advisor from that department offering the degree. The FCS
chairperson assigns an advisor to each FCS graduate student following admission.
Students are expected to meet with their advisor prior to registering for each term
for the purpose of developing and implementing their program. Changes in this
program may be made only with the approval of the student’s advisor, graduate
committee, and the department chairperson (refer to the Graduate Studies webpage for
this form). The program of study form is available online and is completed for
submission in the second semester of study after completing at least 8 semester hours of
graduate credit. Course work taken without advisor and committee approval will not
automatically be applicable toward the degree.

Selection of Program Committee
        A student will determine a program committee after consultation with his or her
advisor. The committee will be responsible for the approval of the program of study
and will participate in the comprehensive examination process at the completion of
the student’s program. This is a formal process that involves completion of the program
of study form (available on-line) and signed approval as indicated.

Program of Study
         After completing 8 semester hours of graduate course credits, you are expected
to file a proposed Program of Study (forms online) with your. The Program of Study
is a typed list of the courses you intend to take that meet the requirements of your degree
program (see http://www.graduate.appstate.edu.) As you develop your Program of
Study, consider which semester you intend to take each class. A final copy of this form
should be completed, approved by your committee, and submitted to the Registrar’s
Office during your second semester of study and after completing 8 semester hours of



8
study. This will serve as a good way for you to double check the department’s schedule
of future classes. The Program of Study also serves as a degree contract between you,
your department, and the Graduate School. Changes in your program of study require
approval by your graduate committee. Refer to see change authorization form on-line.

        The maximum course load during the regular academic year is 15 hours per
semester for students without assistantships and 9-12 hours for those holding
assistantships. With special permission, some graduate assistants may carry fewer than 9
hours. With prior approval by the academic advisor and the Dean of the Graduate School,
some students may take more than the recommended course load. For the summer
session the course load maximum is 6 semester hours for a 5-week term. Graduate
Students may not earn more than 12 hours for the entire summer.

Admission to Candidacy
       The purpose of the Admission to Candidacy Interview is to provide an
opportunity early in the student’s graduate program to assess the student’s initial progress
toward completion of the Master’s degree. The interview should occur after the student
has completed eight semester hours of class work, usually in the second semester of
graduate study. In addition, the student must have a grade point average of at least 3.0.

        The graduate student and his or her graduate committee chairperson assume the
responsibility for scheduling the interview. The graduate student and his or her full
graduate committee should be present at the interview. In special situations, the
interview may be conducted in the form of a conference call.

         The student’s graduate committee chairperson assumes the responsibility for
facilitating the actual interview. The chairperson and other committee members may
then ask the graduate student various questions leading to discussion which will enable
those present to assess the student’s progress toward completing the Master’s degree.
Questions such as the following may be included:

       1. What are your career goals?
       2. How are your career goals reflected in your graduate program of study?
       3. What challenges you to excel in your course work?
       4. Share one or two of the most meaningful concepts or insights you have gained
          or learned at this point during your Master’s program.
       5. What frustrations have you faced?
       6. What options are you considering for the thesis/non-thesis research project?
       7. What obstacles, if any, might hinder the completion of your graduate program?

The student should also be provided the opportunity to ask questions and/or offer
comments regarding his or her graduate program and progress to date.

       Upon completion of the interview, the graduate committee will excuse the
candidate from the room and confer to determine its recommendation regarding the
graduate student’s admission to candidacy for a graduate degree. If the recommendation



9
is positive, the Admission to Candidacy Form (available online) will be completed and
available for committee member signatures. The student will be recalled to the meeting
room and given oral feedback regarding the decision of the committee. This information
form is submitted to Graduate Studies.

       The admission to candidacy interview, the signing of the admission to candidacy
form, and the signing of the program of study form can all be completed in a single
committee meeting scheduled in the second semester of your graduate study and after the
completion of 8 semester hours.

Independent/Individual Study
        No independent/individual study, internship, or thesis hours may be taken prior to
completion and filing of both the Program of Study and the Admission to Candidacy
forms. Only six hours of Independent Study may be included in your graduate program
and only 25% of your degree program may include combined Independent and Selected
Topics Study. When students wish to study a subject listed in the catalog but not offered
that particular semester, an Individual Study can sometimes be arranged. Students
wishing to study selected topics in their major fields may sometimes arrange an
Independent Study. If you wish to do an Independent or Individual Study, contact your
program advisor, who can help you find an appropriate supervisor. In addition, you must
complete the Special Course Form (see appendix) available from the Family and
Consumer Sciences Department Office and obtain signatures of approval before you can
register for an Independent Study or an Individual Study.

Internships
        An Internship is a structured field experience, paid or unpaid, in an area related to
the program and supervised by department faculty. A proposal must be submitted to the
graduate advisor and be approved for participation the semester prior to beginning the
experience. No credit will be given for experience that is not previously approved. The
student must complete 15 semester hours credit and have an approved proposal before he
or she can register for FCS 5900 Internship.
        A Dietetic Internship Handbook is available for students in the Graduate Dietetic
Internship program. Students in this program will be issued a copy of the Dietetic
Internship Handbook after completion of their first year of the graduate program. The
Handbook is specifically designed to help students understand the steps and procedures
required of the internship. Further questions about the Dietetic Internship or the
Handbook can be answered by the Dietetic Internship Director.

Graduate Research Activity
       Registration Master’s degrees in Family and Consumer Sciences graduate
programs require that the student complete a thesis or a non thesis research project.

       Graduate students involved in the thesis or non thesis research requirement must
be continuously enrolled in one of the following until completion:
FCS 5901. Research Project (1-3 SH)
FCS 5989. Graduate Research (1-9 SH)
FCS 5999. Thesis (1-4 SH).



10
Non-Thesis Project
        The non-thesis option requires the completion of a minimum of thirty-six
semester hours which will include a professional paper or special project. Early attention
should be given to required approval for human or animal subjects research procedures.
The professional paper or special project which demonstrates knowledge of the research
process may be prepared in conjunction with a course, independent study, or internship
approved by the student’s committee. The paper or project will terminate in a written
and/or verbal presentation which demonstrates the student’s ability to prepare a
bibliography, gather data, use original source material, critically analyze problems, draw
conclusions, and present the material or project in a form which shows adequate
command of the English language and knowledge of the student’s profession.
        When the student and the student’s advisor believe a satisfactory beginning has
been made in the investigation of the paper or project, the student will ask for a
committee meeting for approval of the paper or project and file a Non-thesis Committee
Membership Form (see appendix) with the Program Advisor.
        Upon completion of the paper or project the student will seek the approval of his
or her advisor for a final committee meeting. At this meeting the student will present the
paper or project for acceptance by the committee. A Non-thesis Project Completion
Form will be signed by committee members and filed with the Program Advisor and the
Graduate Coordinator (see appendix).

Thesis
        The purpose of the thesis is to demonstrate a student’s competence to investigate
an original research topic and to report the findings in an acceptable manner. Early
attention should be given to required approval for human or animal subjects research
procedures. If you elect to write a thesis, you should try to attend one of the
thesis/dissertation workshops sponsored by the Graduate School every semester. These
workshops provide information on writing the thesis and give you the opportunity to ask
questions. You will also need to purchase and review in great detail The Handbook for
Thesis Preparation from the Graduate Studies webpage
http://www.graduate.appstate.edu/gradstudies/forms_graduate/td_thesishdbk.pdf
Compliance with the procedures is mandatory. In this section several aspects of the
thesis process are highlighted for your consideration.
        Keep in mind that prior to the beginning of the semester in which you write your
thesis, you must file a Thesis Committee Membership Form and a thesis proposal with
the Graduate School. You must also fill out a Special Course Form through the
Registrar’s Office to register for thesis hours. The steps for completing the thesis follow:

         1. Securing a Thesis Chair and thesis committee: Refer to procedures in the
         Graduate Thesis Handbook. To secure a thesis chair, the student may begin
         discussion with his or her graduate advisor. After the chairperson of the
         committee has been selected, the thesis chairperson and the student will suggest
         two other committee members to the Program Advisor.

         The Graduate Program Director keeps a record of all committees and the current
         assignment of all faculty members. Generally, faculty chair no more than two


11
     theses committees and serve on no more than three active thesis committees per
     year. Since faculty involvement with theses is limited, you should secure your
     committee as soon as the topic has been decided.

     2. Writing a Prospectus: The Handbook for Thesis Preparation should be
     secured from the bookstore and used as a guide for preparation and submission of
     the manuscript. The prospectus includes the Abstract, Introduction (including the
     Statement of the Problem), Method (including the proposed data analysis), and
     Reference sections of the paper. The style, format, and content of the paper to be
     presented in the Prospectus should be consistent with that required for final thesis
     defense. The thesis chair is primarily responsible for the supervision of this
     process with the student; however, the Prospectus can also be completed in
     conjunction with requirements for FCS 5002 Research Methods.

     3.      Prospectus Meeting: The thesis committee must approve the Prospectus
     for the thesis before the student may register for thesis credit and before the
     student begins collecting data. After the prospectus is approved, a Graduate
     School Thesis Committee Membership Form (see on-line form) must be
     submitted to the Program Advisor and the Graduate Program Director, along with
     a copy of the Prospectus. After confirmation by the thesis committee, the form is
     filed with the Graduate Studies Office and you may register for thesis credit.

     4. Data Collection: During this phase, the student should confer at least weekly
     with the Thesis Chair regarding progress and especially if problems arise relative
     to data collection. The student should fine-tune the Introduction and Methods
     sections of the report and share that progress with the Thesis Chair. Finally,
     drafts of the Results and Discussion sections of the report are reviewed by the
     Thesis Chair and revised by the student. The student and student advisor should
     be attentive to informing and meeting with the student’s thesis committee during
     the thesis development and implementation process.

     5. Thesis Defense: Refer to thesis handbook. At least twenty (20) working days
     before the defense of the thesis, a preliminary copy of the thesis must be
     presented to each member of the committee and both the Graduate Coordinator
     and the Department Chair. It should be complete, computer generated, and in the
     correct Appalachian format. APA style is preferred. Within ten (10) working
     days, the committee members will return the draft with written criticisms and a
     statement of conditional approval to the thesis committee chairperson.

     If there is general agreement of conditional approval of the draft, the chairperson
     schedules the time and place of the defense. This should be held no later than ten
     (10) working days before the last day of the semester. A prudent student will
     arrange for a thesis defense well before the end of the semester to reduce the
     stress of commitments at the end of the semester.




12
       The chairperson and the student send an invitation to the defense, to Family and
       Consumer Sciences graduate faculty members, the department chairperson, the
       program coordinator, the dean of the college, the dean of the graduate school, and
       other graduate students in the Family and Consumer Sciences department.
       Invitations are to contain copies of the abstract and should also be posted on the
       Graduate Student Bulletin Board.

       6. Thesis Submission/Binding or electronic submission/Final Grade: Refer to
          thesis handbook.

            Immediately after the candidate successfully defends the thesis, the committee
       and the department chairperson or graduate program coordinator sign in ink all
       five copies of the approval page (refer to thesis handbook). When all
       recommended changes have been made, the student takes two corrected copies of
       the thesis and the five original copies of the signature page to the Graduate School
       at least ten (10) working days prior to the end of the semester. Noting any
       corrections by the Graduate School, five official copies of the thesis must be taken
       to the bindery in the library, along with the fee for binding. Personal copies
       require additional costs. The Thesis Chair will submit a thesis grade when the
       receipt for binding is received. Theses may also be submitted electronically.
       Check with Graduate Studies for details.

Application for Graduation
        You should file for graduation during the first week of the semester in which you
intend to graduate. Applications are available in the Graduate Studies forms webpage.

Comprehensive Examination Guidelines
       A comprehensive exam is required of FCS graduate students completing the
Master of Arts in Family and Consumer Sciences with the three concentrations.

       (Majors in Family and Consumer Science graduate teacher education master’s
degree and the Child Development/Birth Kindergarten Teaching Concentration must
complete the portfolio review as an alternative to the comprehensive exam.)

All child development/birth kindergarten degree candidates will complete either a written
comprehensive examination administered by the student’s advisory committee or an oral
presentation of a performance-based portfolio. Candidates selecting the TEACHING
concentration must complete the portfolio; those selecting the ADMINISTRATION or
ALLIED PERSONNEL concentrations may choose either option. The portfolio must be
presented to the graduate committee and (for students in the TEACHING concentration,
to practitioners from the public school system). An oral defense of the thesis is required
when selecting the thesis option.

        The Comprehensive Examination is developed by the respective student’s three-
member graduate committee. The committee Chairperson assumes the responsibility for
overall organization of the examination process. Included among these responsibilities



13
are: establishing the exam dates; advising the committee members of the status of the
current exam in order to maintain the flow of appropriate information; directing the exam
meetings (written and/or oral defense); assuring the supervision of the exam; notifying
the student of the exam policies and procedures as well as his or her
satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U) status; and completing all forms required by the
graduate school.

         Comprehensive examinations for students in the Department of Family and
Consumer Sciences are administered on the first Friday in March for spring semester and
the first Friday in October for fall semester. The FCS Graduate Program Director
coordinates this process. Students use the FCS computer lab resources for writing their
comprehensives.

        The respective student’s committee members assume the responsibility for
developing and reviewing the exam questions and serving as reviewers to determine the
outcome of the exam (S/U). The student responsibility includes: meeting with his or her
graduate advisor and being informed about the policies and procedures for the
comprehensive exam, providing the names and departments of all faculty who are
eligible to submit questions for the exam, assuring that all deadlines and test dates have
been met, being prepared to sit for the written comprehensive exam, and defending those
written answers during the oral comprehensive portion of the exam.

       The comprehensive exam process includes the following steps:

       1. The committee chairperson is responsible for soliciting and editing the exam
       questions and will request that questions be submitted from each Appalachian
       State University faculty member who has taught the student in a course that is on
       the student’s approved program of study. Some faculty may submit more than
       one question if they have had the student in more than one class. Only current
       Appalachian State University faculty should be consulted. While all students
       must demonstrate statistical proficiency, these principles may be incorporated into
       another comprehensive examination question rather than having a separate
       question on statistics. The committee chair will use judgment in examining the
       content of the accumulated questions and in choosing 3-5 questions for the
       comprehensive exam. The committee chair will discuss any editing of questions
       with the faculty member concerned. The committee chair will then submit the
       comprehensive examination to the entire committee for approval prior to the
       exam date.

       2. The examination dates are scheduled for the first Friday in March and first
       Friday in October by the Family and Consumer Sciences graduate program
       director. The exam will be scheduled for a maximum of five hours on either a
       week day or weekend day. Usually the students writes for two hours in the
       morning (10:00-noon) and two more hours in the afternoon (1:30-3:30 p.m.) and
       occurs in the computer lab to facilitate computer access. The exam will be
       scheduled after the completion of at least 18 credit hours, preferably in the



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     student’s final semester. It must be completed at least one month prior to the date
     set for graduation.

     3.    On the examination day, a faculty member will supervise the exam. The FCs
          computer lab or comparable environment will be scheduled in advance for the
          exam. The exam supervisor will time the exam questions. The student must
          bring a calculator and writing materials for the exam. The student may elect
          to bring a dictionary and discretionary snacks. The student may use a
          department computer to write the exam. The committee chair should be
          notified of such intent prior to the scheduled exam date. A blank formatted
          disk will be provided for saving the written exam file. The computer files will
          be checked before and after the comprehensive exam. No other materials are
          allowed unless approved by the committee chair. The student may take
          personal breaks as needed, and planned breaks will be scheduled by the exam
          supervisor.

     4. Following the completion of the written exam, the committee chair will copy
     the exam questions; send originals to the appropriate faculty members for
     evaluation; establish a time frame for completing that evaluation and giving
     feedback to the chair; and establish a meeting time for the oral defense for the
     comprehensive exam. The Chair will meet with the student to report the results of
     the written comprehensive exam and to provide direction for the oral defense.

     5. A meeting for the oral defense will be scheduled within one month after the
     completion of the written comprehensive examination. During the oral defense,
     the student will be given the opportunity to demonstrate his or her breadth of
     understanding at the Master’s level and to provide additional information which
     may be necessary in order to achieve a passing evaluation on the written
     comprehensive exam. After the oral defense has been completed, the committee
     will ask the student to step out of the room, as they deliberate. Immediately after
     the deliberation, results of the comprehensive exam/oral defense will be shared
     with the student by the Chair. Results of the Comprehensive exam are sent to the
     Registrar’s Office via the Report of Comprehensive Examination for the Master’s
     of Arts Form (on-line form).

             Graduate level performance is expected on the comprehensive
     examination. Each question on the written comprehensive exam will be evaluated
     by its originator. The question may be evaluated as
                     satisfactory,
                     satisfactory with clarification at the oral exam,
                     unsatisfactory – rewrite(all or part of the exam,
                     or unsatisfactory-fail.

     In order to receive a satisfactory evaluation, the student must demonstrate the
     following characteristics in his or her answer to all questions: clear
     communication, effective organization, accurate and complete answers,



15
       transitions between thoughts, sufficient depth, arguments fully justified, and
       demonstration of higher level thinking skills such as analysis, synthesis and
       integration.

               All faculty members who have written questions for a student’s
       comprehensive exam may attend the oral defense. The three program of study
       committee members must attend the oral defense. In addition, any faculty
       member evaluating the student’s work as unsatisfactory must attend the oral
       defense to allow the student to clarify his or her response. The entire committee
       will deliberate after the oral defense, but only the three Program of Study
       committee members will determine whether the student has passed or failed the
       exam, or requires remediation. Remediation might include a rewrite of all or a
       portion of the exam, additional course work, or other work. Remediation will be
       determined at the committee’s discretion. A student will be allowed to rewrite the
       exam only once.

Portfolio review
        Majors in the Child Development: birth/kindergarten with the teaching
concentration master’s degrees must complete the portfolio review as an alternative to the
comprehensive exam. Those in the Allied Professions or Administration concentrations
may choose to complete either the portfolio review or comprehensive exam to meet this
degree requirement.

Product of Learning
        Both the Birth/kindergarten with the teaching concentration and the Family and
Consumer Sciences education programs require a product of learning. The product of
learning is intended as the culminating experience of the advanced master’s degree
experience. As such, it permits the student to develop a product of learning that will serve
both to encapsulate the accumulated programmatic reflections developed by the student
over time and to demonstrate to the profession the increased knowledge and
competencies the student acquired from his/her program of studies. Detailed information
about the product of learning requirement is available from the student’s advisor. Refer
also the Graduate Bulletin.

Language Proficiency
        The language proficiency is satisfied by the completion of a statistics course.
Refer to the Graduate Bulletin for details specific to your degree program.
http://www.graduate.appstate.edu/gradstudies/bulletin

Commencement
       The Graduate School holds Commencement ceremonies in May and December.
Families and guests are invited.




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Publication Authorship


      FCS Graduate Program Academic Standards for Writing and
                          Presentations
             Department of Family and Consumer Sciences, October 13, 2006

Scholarship FCS graduate students and faculty have the responsibility to be current in
their knowledge of the scholarship of others in their respective field and to engage in
their own research, publications and presentations. They are committed to intellectual
honesty and openness in scholarly pursuits and in their relationships with colleagues and
students.

FCS graduate students and faculty are careful to acknowledge the scholarly work of
others through appropriate documentation. They take credit only for work they have
actually done or to which they have contributed in a recognizable and substantial way.
Minor contributors may be acknowledged in footnotes or in an introductory comment.

Authorship FCS graduate students and faculty follow the criteria for authorship outlined
by the publication source and/or the APA guidelines. Authorship should be accorded to
those who contribute both actively and meaningfully to the study and writing process.
Authorship expectations should be determined in the early development of the scholarly
work and should be in writing. Faculty advisors will discuss these matters early in the
research process with graduate and undergraduate students and before data is collected.
This expectation is for a continual process of dialogue and applies to both graduate and
undergraduate research collaboration. In general, the person doing the research will be
first author of resulting publication(s) and first presenter listed for presentations. In cases
where the student is not the major contributor to the research and the writing (ex., large
studies or projects), alternative agreements may be developed and agreed upon in writing.
Any such agreement may be adapted if any party to the agreement fails to follow through
with his/her respective responsibilities in a timely manner.

Authors will refrain from multiple submissions of research studies and other publications
except where negotiated with the publisher.

Research protocol FCS graduate students and faculty will refrain from any
misrepresentation of information in a study, publication or presentation. They will be
attentive to getting prior human subjects review approval, to reporting any funding source
related to a study or project, and to full accounting of methodology.

FCS faculty will follow all state and federal regulations that apply to their research and
will minimize any risk to the health and safety of participants and the research
environment. They will respect matters of confidentiality.

(Presented to faculty on October 13, 2006. Revision included.)



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                  GRADUATE PROGRAM CHECKLIST
           DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES


Date/Initials           Degree Requirement

________         1. Acceptance into the Graduate School.
________         2. Consultation with department advisor – before registering.
________         3. Program of study- At the completion of the first semester. Usually
                   done at the beginning of the second semester.
________         4. Admission to candidacy- After completing 8 semester hours and
                    before completing 18 semester hours. (Note that the Admission to
                   Candidacy interview, the Admission to candidacy form, and the Program
                   of Study form can usually all be completed in the same graduate
                   committee meeting scheduled early in the second semester of study.)
________        5. Independent Study- After admission to candidacy. Requires approval
                   of advisor, Department Chairperson, Dean of the College, and Dean of
                   the Graduate School. Special form and proposal required before
                   registration.
________         6. Internship- After admission to candidacy and completion of 15
                    semester hours. Internship proposal and special form required before
                    registration.
________         7. Non-thesis committee membership form- Professional paper or
                    project that may be completed as part of a course, internship, or
                    independent study. Review policy with advisor.
________         8. Thesis committee membership form- If applicable, file the semester
                     before registering for FCS 5999 Thesis. Advisor in consultation with
                     student.
________         9. Clearance and application for degree- Obtain necessary forms and
                     instruction from the Graduate Office. If an internship is involved,
                     internship fees must be paid before clearance is given.
________        10. Comprehensive Examination- Consult advisor and policy. Complete
                    the last semester. Advisor files completion form.
________        11. Non-Thesis completion form and presentation.
________        12. Completion and defense of thesis- Immediately after approval of
                    thesis committee and acceptance by the Dean of Graduate Studies and
                    Research. Consult the Manual for Thesis Preparation prepared by the
                    Graduate School.
________        13. Conferring of degree- commencement.



Student __________________________            Advisor ____________________________




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