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Wickard v. Filburn Case Brief

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									Wickard v. Filburn 317 U.S. 111 (1942)
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Under the Agricultural Adjustment Act, the Secretary of Agriculture set a quota for wheat production. Under the quota, each grower was given an allotment. Filburn lived in Ohio and grew wheat and dairy. He grew more than his allotment and was fined. He proceeded to sue the Secretary of Agriculture. Trial Court found for Filburn and issued an injunction against collection of the fine. The injunction was appealed to the US Supreme Court. US Supreme Court reversed the injunction. o The Court noted that this Act extends federal regulation to production intended for consumption on the farm (Filburn fed the wheat to his cows). o However, Filburn's wheat competed with wheat sold in interstate commerce. The Court reasoned that if Filburn had not used home-grown wheat, he would have had to buy wheat on the open market. The Court held that Congress's power to regulate commerce was not limited to the supply side of commerce, but that it could regulate demand as well. The Court also held that Congress could regulate wholly intrastate, noncommercial activity if such activity, viewed in the aggregate, would have a substantial effect on interstate commerce, even if the individual effects are trivial. From the conservative point of view, this case represents the pinnacle of Congressional intervention into State affairs.

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