How to install a Wireless network

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					How to install a Wireless network
There's no doubt: wireless computing is alluring. Sharing Internet access among your home
computers or accessing your printer from any PC makes life easier. The absence of wires means
more freedom to answer your email on the couch. Browse the Internet and shop from your bed, or
pay your bills online at the kitchen table.
With wireless, there's no need to isolate yourself in your home office if you'd rather be in the family
room or on the porch. Yet, despite the clear benefits of wireless, many of us have held off making
the move due to concerns about the complexity, expense, and security associated with "going
wireless."
Fear no more. We'll spell out how easy it is to install a wireless network in your household.
What You Need to Purchase
Switching to wireless entails no more than buying a wireless access point, known as a router, and a
Wi-Fi adapter card for each of your laptops.
•   Wireless Access Points or Routers:These small pieces of hardware connect to your broadband
    modem and range between $50 and $100. They can be up and running quickly with only minor
    configuration work on your part.
•   Wi-Fi Adapter Cards: These cards simply plug into an available expansion slot in your system and
    cost less than $50. All new laptops come standard with Wi-Fi adapter cards, so you might even
    already have one.
Learn about 802.11 Wireless LAN Standards
Wi-Fi stands for "wireless fidelity" and in the technical world is known by its wireless local-area
network specifications referred to as 802.11. Yet with technologies changing quickly, you'll find
various forms of this standard available, namely: 802.11a, 802.11b, and 802.11g.
•   As each of these three main standards has different abilities and tradeoffs in terms of signal
    range, performance, and compatibility, you will want to be sure what you're getting is compatible
    with the computers on your network.
•   Experts recommend 802.11g as it is has been supported by wireless networks since 2002,
    maintains compatibility with older products, and combines the high speed of 802.11a with the
    greater signal range of 802.11b.
Don't Skimp on Wireless Security
Because it's so easy to set up a wireless network, many people connect their wireless router, install
their Wi-Fi adapter card and "go", without thinking about setting up proper security for their new
wireless networks.
Without taking basic security precautions, your new wireless network is vulnerable to attacks from
hackers, attempts from scammers to steal your personal information, and also to neighbors looking
to "piggyback" for free on your Internet connection. So take steps to protect your privacy.
•   Step One:   Protect your privacy on your new wireless network by changing the default password
    settings that come with your router. Instructions for how to do this can be found in the router
    installation manual.
•   Step Two: Leverage your router's built-in encryption. Older wireless routers feature Wired
    Equivalent Privacy (WEP). Newer Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) and WPA2 protocols provide
    stronger and more reliable encryption. You can easily activate the encryption by following the
    simple administrative steps outlined in the router installation manual and selecting a random
    password.

                                         Link to Whitepaper: http://www.symantec.com/clubsymantec/wi-fi-network/article.html
•   Step Three: Invest in personal firewalls or virtual private network (VPN)* capabilities, along with
    virus protection and Internet security tools. Products like Norton Internet Security 2007 and Norton 360
    can go a long way in securing your wireless network.
* VPNs are password-protected software programs that use the Internet using 128-bit encryption,
which is virtually unbreakable, and unreadable without an encryption key.
Conclusion
Setting up a wireless network at home is easy to do and not expensive to initiate. The "expensive"
part could come only if you choose not to take necessary security precautions and find that you have
hackers and other uninvited guests using your wireless network for their personal gains.
Discover the freedom you've been missing out on. Install your own Wi-Fi network at home. Only
don't forget to protect your new wireless network with passwords, encryption, firewalls, Internet
security software, and an anti-virus program.
For more information about wireless security products, visit the Symantec Home and Office Product
Showcase online. Also, be sure to visit ClubSymantec and Symantec Security Response regularly to
get the latest Internet security information.
Top Tips
1. Change the default password settings that come with your router and leverage your router's
   built-in encryption to protect against hackers and "piggy-backers".
2. Install strong personal firewall and virus protection to protect your laptop from intruders and
   malicious code.
3. To protect your privacy and security, use strong passwords and change them frequently.
4. Turn off your wireless card when you're not using it. If your wireless card is set to automatically
   join the nearest network, change that configuration to manual selection.
5. Use secure sites to send and receive personal information. Look for a closed padlock or an
   unbroken key on the bottom of your browser or your computer task bar.




                                         Link to Whitepaper: http://www.symantec.com/clubsymantec/wi-fi-network/article.html
Securing Wi-Fi Networks
The whole world is going wireless! And why not? The absence of wires means you have more
freedom to answer your emails on the couch or to browse the internet from your bed. It also makes it
easy to share internet access as well as your printer with all the computers in the house. And for all
24-7 workaholics, it also means an end to long hours spent alone in your home office answering
work emails, you can now do that anywhere once you cross your doorstep.
Yet despite the clear benefits of wireless technology, many of us have held off making the move due
to concerns about its associated complexity, expense, and security. But let’s put an end to those
fears. We’ll spell out just how easy it is to install and secure a wireless network in your household.
What you need
There are two parts to a wireless network: a "Wi-Fi access point" – which is a gateway to the
Internet in the same way that your broadband or cable modem is – and a Wi-Fi receiver (Wi-Fi
adapter card) that connects your computer to the access point via radio signals. Let's see what they
are and how to get them.
Wireless access points or routers: These are small pieces of hardware that connect to your
broadband modem and cost between $50 and $100. They can be up and running very quickly with
only minor configuration work on your part. You can also buy an all-in-one Wi-Fi broadband modem
that will integrate everything for you.
Wi-Fi adapter cards: These cards simply plug into an available expansion slot in your system and
cost less than $50. All new laptops come with Wi-Fi adapter cards as standard, so you might even
already have one.
The different standards
For most of us, it's called Wi-Fi and it stands for “wireless fidelity”. But in the technical world it is
referred to as 802.11, which is simply its name as a technical standard. Yet with technologies
changing quickly, you’ll find various forms of this standard available, such as: 802.11a, 802.11b, and
802.11g.
These three main standards refer to the same Wi-Fi we all know, but each has different abilities and
there are tradeoffs between them in terms of range, performance and compatibility. So you need to
be sure every piece of your network (access points and adapter cards) are compatible with each
other.
Experts recommend 802.11g as it is has been supported by wireless networks since 2002,
maintains compatibility with older products, and combines the high speed of 802.11a with the
greater signal range of 802.11b. And it should also be noted that 802.11g nowadays is not any more
expensive than older a or b equipments.




                                        Link to Whitepaper: http://www.symantec.com/clubsymantec/wi-fi-network/article.html
Security first
It’s so easy to set up a wireless network that many people just connect their wireless router, install
their Wi-Fi adapter card and get cracking straight away. They don't even stop to consider the
security implications of using Wi-Fi. Unfortunately, your new (unsecured) wireless network is
vulnerable to hackers snooping in on what you get up to on the internet (and “sniffing away” at your
confidential data) as well as neighbors looking to “piggyback” for free on your internet connection.
So you need to take some simple steps to protect your Wi-Fi network.
Step One: Lock your network! You can (and must!) change the default password settings that come
with your router or access point. Instructions for how to do this can be found in the router installation
manual. If you don’t undertake this step, people can identify what brand of router or access point
you're using and quite easily find the default Master password on the internet to take control of it.
Step Two: Encrypt your data! Every Wi-Fi router or access point can transparently encrypt
everything it transmits. Older wireless routers feature Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) while newer
routers offer Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) and WPA2 protocols. The later WPA protocols provide
stronger and more reliable encryption, so if you have the choice, avoid using WEP. You can easily
activate the encryption by following the simple administrative steps outlined in the router installation
manual and selecting a random password. Once it's done, you don't have to change anything else
on your computers, and you won't notice any difference in your internet browsing experience.
Step Three: Invest in a personal firewall, along with virus protection and internet security tools.
Products like Norton Internet Security 2007 and Norton 360 can go a long way to secure your
wireless network.
Conclusion
A home wireless network is cheap and easy to install. It could become expensive though if you
choose not to take the necessary security precautions and find that you have hackers or other
uninvited guests using your wireless network for their personal gain. Don't miss out any longer on
the freedom that your own Wi-Fi network can bring you and your family. But just make sure you
don’t forget to protect your new wireless network with passwords and the encryption systems that
come with it. And of course, don't forget to install firewalls, internet security software, and anti-virus
programs on all of your computers!




                                        Link to Whitepaper: http://www.symantec.com/clubsymantec/wi-fi-network/article.html
Getting Strict with Password Security
How many passwords do you have? These days, it seems a username and password or PIN are
needed just about everywhere online. Dealing with passwords can seem to be a real hassle, but if
hackers or scammers were to "get" or "guess" your passwords, your personal information, such as
your financial information, health data, private documents, and more, would be at risk. Identity
thieves could exploit access to your personal information to open credit card accounts in your name,
apply for a mortgage, or pose as you in online transactions.
Do you need to improve your password security? Here are some techniques for creating stronger
passwords and some best practices to increase your online security.
Creating Strong Passwords
It's easy to forget passwords, so people often use simple words, like a pet's name, or dates that are
easy to remember, like a wedding anniversary. A hacker will try your name, children's names,
birthdates, and pets' names as passwords to get access to your computer. When they get lucky,
your ID, privacy, and financial security are all up for grabs.
To create a secure password that is easy to remember, follow these steps:
•   Do not use personal information: It is strongly recommended NOT to include any words
    related to your name or names of family members or pets. Also, don't include easily recognizable
    numbers like your address, phone number, or birthday.
•   Do not use real words: Password cracking tools are very effective at helping attackers guess
    your password. These programs can process every word in the dictionary, plus letter and
    number combinations until a match is found. Steer clear of using "real" words from the dictionary
    or proper nouns or names.
•   Mix character types: By combining uppercase letters with lowercase letters, numbers, and
    special characters such as "&" or "$", you increase the complexity of your password and
    decrease the chances of someone hacking into your system.
•   Longer is better: It is generally recommended that passwords be at least eight characters in
    length. Probability dictates that longer passwords are harder to crack.
•   Phrases are easier to remember: One tip is to think up a pass-phrase, like a line from a song,
    and then use the first letter from each word, substituting numbers for some of the letters. For
    example: "100 Bottles of Beer on the Wall" could become "10oB@b0tW".
Storing Your Passwords
Keeping a list of passwords on your computer is like keeping the keys to your house on your front
porch. But how will you ever remember all your various passwords and phrases?
•   Don't write them down: Resist the temptation to hide passwords under your keyboard or post
    them on your monitor. Stories about hackers getting passwords by dumpster-diving and
    "shoulder-surfing" are absolutely real.
•   Use a password management tool: One way to store and remember passwords securely is to
    use a tool that stores your list of user names and passwords in encrypted form. Some of these
    tools will even help you out by automatically filling in the information for you on certain Web sites.




                                Link to Whitepaper: http://www.symantec.com/clubsymantec/strict-password-security/article.html
Using Passwords Safely
Once you know how to create strong passwords, here are several tips for how to use them
effectively to increase your level of security.
•   Change passwords on a regular basis: Online financial accounts should be changed every
    month or two, while you may choose to change your computer logon password every quarter.
•   Use different passwords on different accounts: Don't use the same password on more than
    one account. If a hacker discovers it, then all of the information protected by that password could
    also be compromised.
•   Do not type passwords on computers you do not control: When using your laptop in a Wi-Fi
    Hot Spot or a computer in an Internet café, you want to avoid any actions that require a user
    name and password (like doing banking or online shopping) because your data could be
    intercepted over the wireless network or with keystroke logging devices.
Top Tips
1. Don't use the same password on more than one account. If a hacker discovers it, then all of the
   information protected by that password could also be compromised.
2. Change your passwords frequently and don't re-use discarded passwords.
3. Learn how to create strong passwords or pass phrases to increase your level of security.
4. Never write down your user names and passwords; and never enter your passwords in e-mail.
5. Don't use public computers or unprotected Wi-Fi accounts for accessing banking accounts or
   any other personal data you want to protect from public view.
Conclusion
Passwords are just one piece of the protection puzzle. To create a safer environment online, you will
also want to use a firewall and other security products that help keep hackers out of your system
and protect your identity online.




                               Link to Whitepaper: http://www.symantec.com/clubsymantec/strict-password-security/article.html