Final Lit Group Roles

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					Name____________________________________#_____                    Date_________________________

Book:                                                             Chapters: ______-______

                                             Final CONNECTOR

 Your job is to find one significant text-to-self, text-to-text, or text-to-world connection that helps you to
derive personal meaning from today’s reading. Cite this meaningful passage from the text, and tell
what your personal connections are for this citation. When your group comes together, read the
passage that you selected to your group. Elicit connections from your group members. Be sure to share
your personal connections with your group. Use the back of the sheet if necessary.
  Selected passage from text:
  Page #_________      Paragraph #_________
  First and last words of passage chosen:             “____________________ …. ____________________”


 What type of connection does this have for you?   text-to-self          text-to-text   text-to-world
 Explain what comes to mind when you read this passage:




 Describe other connections made by your group, and determine the category of each additional
 connection. Continue on the back of this sheet, as necessary.

 [Type:                              ] Description:




 [Type:                              ] Description:




 [Type:                              ] Description:




 [Type:                              ] Description:
Name____________________________________#_____                          Date_________________________

Book:                                                                   Chapters: ______-______

                                    Final DISCUSSION DIRECTOR
                                            (a.k.a. facilitator/task master)

     Your job is to develop questions that will create discussion among your groupmates about the
section of reading you have completed. Questions that have a correct answer such as “What did Johnny
do after he killed Bob?” don’t create much discussion. Questions like “Why do you think Johnny went
to see Dally?” or “Do you think Johnny’s actions would be considered self-defense?” don’t have correct
answers. Every student might answer these questions differently and this could create some interesting
discussion in your group.
     It is also important to ask questions of the author as you read. Even if you don’t get the chance to
actually ask the author your questions and get an answer (which you usually don’t), it still helps you to
understand the text because you can make inferences or hypotheses about the answer to your questions.
You should come up with two questions for the author and as a group you should give some possible
answers and why you think so.
     As a discussion director, you are also responsible for making sure that each member of your group
has an opportunity to share the job that they did. You may lead the discussion however you would like,
and you may call on the connector, investigator, etc. when you think it would be the most helpful for
the discussion. If a member of your group doesn’t seem to be contributing, try to get them involved!
     When discussion has finished, fill out the sheet to grade yourself and your groupmates. You may
take the input of your teammates in doing so if you like.

  Passage that you read (include pages):


  Questions for discussion (put a star next to the one that causes the most/best discussion):
  1.
  2.
  3.
  4.
  5.
  6.


  Questions for the author:

  1.


        Possible answers:

  2.


        Possible answers:
Name____________________________________#_____                 Date_________________________

Book:                                                          Chapters: ______-______


                                          Final ILLUSTRATOR

     Of the many reading strategies that we all use, one of the most important is to create a mental
 image of what is being described in the text. By creating a mental image, we are better able to
 comprehend and remember what we are reading about. The more detailed our image, the better our
 understanding. Your job is to choose a scene from the book that you will illustrate. As you are
 drawing the image that you have created in your mind, write down words, sentences, sentence
 fragments that contributed to your mental image. These may include direct descriptions like “the red
 and white striped couch,” or “the old radio,” but it might also include descriptive words like, “Greg
 stared longingly…,” or “eerie,” or “Melanie pouted.” As you share your illustration with your group,
 also share with them the citations from the text that helped you to create your image.
     For example, if you are reading a scene containing two characters that is set in their living room,
 include the details about what they might be wearing or how the living room might be decorated.
 You may feel as if you are making much of it up, but you aren’t exactly. You are relying on some
 clues that the author has given you and adding in your own experience, imagination and creativity.

 Scene that you have chosen (include pages):


  Words, phrases, sentences, or sentence fragments that helped you to create your mental image
  (include the page numbers):




  How did the mental images of other group members differ from yours?




                       DRAW YOUR ILLUSTRATION ON THE BACK.
Name____________________________________#_____                 Date_________________________

Book:                                                          Chapters: ______-______

                                            Final SUMMARIZER

   Your job is to prepare a brief summary of today’s reading and to pull out those themes and ideas that
YOU believe are most important.
   Select several key citations from the text that support what you believe to be the essence of today’s
reading.
   With your group, lead a discussion around what you believe to be the “big idea” of today’s reading.
Record the results of your group’s discussion. With which ideas did your group agree or disagree?
Record any new ideas that your group discusses that may also communicate the “big idea” of the
reading for today. Then, as a group, create a title for today’s reading.

  Summary:




  The “big idea”:




  Citations to support or explain the “big idea”:




  Agreements, disagreements, and new ideas from group discussion:




  Our group’s title for today’s reading:
Name____________________________________#_____                  Date_________________________

Book:                                                           Chapters: ______-______


                                           Final VIEWSHIFTER

      As you know, many different characters can perceive the same event in very different way. For
 instance, the way Luke Skywalker might describe Jedis from Star Wars differently from Darth Vader.
 Your job is to choose a scene from the passage that you read which contains more than one character.
 Describe the way that one of the other characters might describe the same scene. Pay attention to the
 way that the character you have chosen might feel and how the scene may have been told differently
 from that character’s point of view.
      Since you don’t know how that other character might perceive the events, you need to rely on
 what you do know about that character from the way the author has characterized them. Share you
 retelling with your group. Record anything that your groupmates would add to the retelling.

  Scene that you have chosen (include page numbers):

  Character whose viewpoint you’re switch to:


  What traits, qualities, or characteristics do we know about this character?




  How do we know that this character has these traits or qualities? (Cite specific examples from the
  book!)




 Retell the scene from this character’s perspective. Make sure that we understand the emotions or
 feelings of the character:




  Is there anything that your group would add or change about the retelling:
Name____________________________________#_____                  Date_________________________

Book:                                                           Chapters: ______-______


                                            Final PSYCHOLOGIST

     Your job is to scour the pages of your reading for passages that allow you to make inferences
 about your characters’ lives. This is a task that requires you to “read between the lines” to get at the
 deeper meanings that the author chooses to show through action rather than tell you through
 narration. For example, if a character is angry over a particular situation, what previous life
 experiences of that character might have occurred that led to this angry moment? If a character is shy,
 what clues does that give you about his or her past? Share these inferences with your group. Elicit
 any additional inferences they may be able to form. Use the back of this sheet, if necessary.

  Inference about a character:




  Citation(s) from text that back up this inference:


  Page: _______________, paragraph_______________.


  First and last words of passage chosen:          “____________________ ….____________________”

  Other inferences or supporting citations from group members:




  Inference about a character:




  Citation(s) from text that back up this inference:


  Page: _______________, paragraph_______________.


  First and last words of passage chosen:          “____________________ ….____________________”

  Other inferences or supporting citations from group members:
Name____________________________________#_____                  Date_________________________

Book:                                                           Assignment pages: ______-______


                                               Final INVESTIGATOR

      Sometimes when we are reading, we come across things that we are not very familiar with. The
 book may give us some information that allows us to make some inferences. However, having some
 additional knowledge might allow us to gain a deeper understanding of the character, setting, or
 action that the author is describing. Your job is to choose an idea, place or historical reference from
 the section you have read to do some additional research about. For instance, in a passage from The
 Outsiders that mentions Mustangs, you might choose to research about the car and try to get some
 insight as to why a soc would drive one. You might also choose to find out more about the author or
 the town or city where the book is set.
      Take notes from the Internet, encyclopedia or other resources, and if possible, find a picture that
 you can bring in. Share your findings with your classmates and explain how this information has
 changed, improved or supported your understanding of a character, the setting or the action from
 your reading. Record how this new information has changed, improved or supported your
 understanding of a character, the setting or the action from your reading. Record how this new
 information has changed or supported groupmates’ understanding.

   The idea you have chosen to research:


   I found my information here (give the title of the book, website or encyclopedia entry):



   Notes:




   How does this new information change or support your understanding of this section of text or book
   as a whole?




   How does this information change or support other group members’ understanding of this section of
   text or book as a whole?

				
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