PROPOSED FALL, 2008 COURSE MEETING SCHEDULE

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PROPOSED FALL, 2008 COURSE MEETING SCHEDULE Powered By Docstoc
					                      UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA FAIRBANKS
                    College of Rural and Community Development
                               Rural Nutrition Services
                                      Interior – Aleutians Campus
           Harper Building, P.O. Box 756720 (4280 Geist Road) Fairbanks, Alaska 99775-6720

                SAMPLE COURSE SYLLABUS - 1 CREDIT VERSION
                           RNS 250 – Fall, 2010


I. COURSE INFORMATION

Title: Current Topics in Rural Nutrition Services: Traditional Foods for Health
Number: RNS 250
Semester/Yr: Fall 2010                           Credit Hours:        1

Prerequisites: None.

Course Location: Morris Thompson Cultural Center

Meeting Times: October – November, 2010 (to total seven 120-minute
sessions over seven weeks)
            5:30 – 7:30 PM

II. INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION
Instructor: Joy Shockley, B.A.
Office Location: Morris Thompson Cultural Center
Office Hours:     2:00 PM to 4:00 PM T & Th, or by appointment.
Office Phone:     452-8251
Fax:              474-5208 (IAC) Please include cover sheet
E-mail:           joy.shockley@tananachiefs.org

III. COURSE READING MATERIALS
REQUIRED:
   1. Denakkanaaga Elders Cookbook
   2. DeCourtney, Christine et al., The Traditional Food Guide for Alaska
      Native Cancer Survivors, ANTHC Cancer Program, 2008.

IV. COURSE DESCRIPTION
Various topics of current interest to students studying rural Alaskan community-based
nutrition, behavioral health and health services. Topics announced prior to each
offering and course may be repeated for unlimited credit under different topics.
Course focuses on the current topic of traditional and customary Alaska Native foods,
acquisition, nutritional value, traditional uses, and health benefits. Demonstrations of
food preparation, and safe handling. Course addresses topics related to traditional
foods, such as cancer survival, cultural role of foods, cultural protocols, and food
sovereignty.
                       T r aditional Foods for Health, Fall 2010
V. COURSE GOAL & STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students will learn core concepts of traditional and customary Alaska Native foods as
they relate to health and culture. This class establishes knowledge, attitude, and skills
to promote safe and healthy use of traditional foods.


On completion of the course the student should:
Student will be able to:                    Evaluated by:
1) Identify techniques and skills for       Group discussions, & Sharing Traditional
   acquisition of traditional foods.        food info assignment
2) Describe safe traditional food           Sharing Traditional food info assignment
   preparation, preservation and handling. and/or Elder Interview report
3) Describe protocols for respecting the    Elder Interview report
   food source.
4) Identify healthful nutrients found in    Nutrient identification assignment
   traditional foods and health benefits.
5) Describe changes caused by “Standard Denaakanaaga recipe report
   American Diet” preparation of
   traditional foods, including healthy
   makeovers.
6) Demonstrate an introductory              Group discussions, class activities, Final
   awareness of current issues related to   oral or written discussion of learning,
   traditional foods, such as food security including lessons learned from readings,
   and food sovereignty.                    guest speakers & homework assignments.

VI. INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS

Teaching techniques will include food demonstrations and lecture, large and small
group discussion, guest speakers, hands on activities and related audio-visual
materials. Class sessions emphasize learning through experience with awareness of
varied learning styles. Class sessions are interactive with high level of student
participation and demonstration by instructor and guest cooks.

VII. COURSE CALENDAR
                            Tentative Calendar
 (Schedule is subject to change responsive to student learning needs, and
                    additional learning opportunities)

Session 1: Give thanks for food and cook.
           Guest cook: Howard Luke, cooking muskrat
           Discussion of how, when, where to get food source
           Protocols for respecting the food source
           Traditional uses of food source, stories about this food
           Safe preparation, preservation, and handling of this food
           Rez Robics
           Guest speaker: Rita Osborne, R.D., “Traditional Foods for Childhood
           Obesity Prevention”
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                      T r aditional Foods for Health, Fall 2010
            Both required readings (see above) are assigned, student may read at
            your own pace, with completion of both due by Session 6.

Session 2: Give thanks for food and cook.
           Guest cook: Marjie Attla, cooking porcupine
           Discussion of how, when, where to get food source
           Protocols for respecting the food source
           Traditional uses of food source, stories about this food
           Safe preparation, preservation, and handling of this food
           Fiddle dancing
           Guest speaker: Adrienne Stanley, R.D., “Traditional Foods for Diabetes
           Prevention”
           Sharing Traditional recipes from your culture

Session 3: Give thanks for food and cook.
           Guest cook: Liza Mack, fish head soup
           Discussion of how, when, where to get food source
           Protocols for respecting the food source
           Traditional uses of food source, stories about this food
           Safe preparation, preservation, and handling of this food
           Chair activity (Bingo-robics, Chair Mushing)
           Guest speaker: Cindy Salmon, R.D., “Traditional nutrients and Physical
           Activity”
           Review Denakkanaaga cookbook, report on two recipes you would use

Session 4: Give thanks for food and cook.
           Guest cook: Marilyn (Chase) Jones cooking moose nose
           Discussion of how, when, where to get food source
           Protocols for respecting the food source
           Traditional uses of food source, stories about this food
           Safe preparation, preservation, and handling of this food
           Getting Healthy dance
           Guest speaker: Yvonne Howard, CHP, “Traditional Foods for Cancer
           Survival”

Session 5: Give thanks for food and cook.
           Guest cook: Lee DeWilde cooking beaver
           Discussion of how, when, where to get food source
           Protocols for respecting the food source
           Traditional uses of food source, stories about this food
           Safe preparation, preservation, and handling of this food
           Rez Robics
           Guest speaker: Randy Mayo, Stevens Village Bison Reserve, “Food
           Security”
           Traditional Foods Guide: Share nutrition information on five traditional
           foods


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                      T r aditional Foods for Health, Fall 2010
Session 6: Give thanks for food and cook.
          Guest cook: Sonny Luke cooking rabbit
          Discussion of how, when, where to get food source
          Protocols for respecting the food source
          Traditional uses of food source, stories about this food
          Safe preparation, preservation, and handling of this food
          Athabascan dancing
          Guest Speaker: Steve Becker, Tribal Management faculty, “Food
          Sovereignty”
          Share Elder Interviews

Session 7: Give thanks for food and cook.
          Guest cook: Elizabeth Fleagle cooking caribou
          Discussion of how, when, where to get food source
          Protocols for respecting the food source
          Traditional uses of food source, stories about this food
          Safe preparation, preservation, and handling of this food
          Student led traditional activity
          Guest Speaker: Susan Runyan, R.D. “Traditional Foods for Healthy
          Weight”
          Final: Brief written or oral report on student learning and personal health
          change.

 VIII. COURSE POLICIES & REQUIREMENTS
1. Attendance is required at all class time. In the event of an emergency, please
contact the instructor – an equivalent make up assignment may be possible.
2. Students are expected to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct (2009 –
2010 UAF Catalog) and to follow it. Also available at:
http://www.uaf.edu/catalog/catalog_09-10/academics/regs3.html#Student_Conduct
3. Turn off your cell phones during class time.

IX. EVALUATION
Grading Policy: Letter grade A-F, absolute scores:

                                    % of       Grade
                                    Total
                                   100 – 90     A
                                    89 – 80     B
                                    79 – 70     C
                                    69 – 60     D
                                      < 60      F

Evaluation:
Class participation as evidenced by engaging in class discussions and        10%
activities such as “Getting Healthy Dance” and “Chair Activity”
Sharing Traditional recipes from your culture, oral report                   15%
Denaakanaaga recipe, written report                                          15%
Nutrient identification on five traditional foods, written report            20%
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                       T r aditional Foods for Health, Fall 2010
Elder Interview, oral report                                                   20%
Final: Brief oral or written discussion of student learning                    20%
about traditional foods and personal health changes

If you have concerns about your grade please discuss with instructor before final
grade is submitted to Registrar.

SUPPORT SERVICES: Instructor will be available for help at class as time permits.
Instructor is available by telephone, email, or fax, if students need help completing
their take home assignment. Students are expected to inform Instructor of any special
needs at the first class session. Additional support services are available through
Interior-Aleutians Campus, 1-888-474-5207. Further support services may be
available through Math Hotline, Writing Center, and Library Services, with detailed
information available from instructor if needed.
DISABILITY SERVICES: The Office of Disability Services implements the Americans
with Disabilities Act (ADA), and insures that UAF students have equal access to the
campus and course materials. Instructor will work with the Office of Disabilities
Services (203 WHIT, 474-7043) to provide reasonable accommodation to students
with disabilities.
UAF Disability Services for Distance Students
a. UAF has a Disability Services office that operates in conjunction with the College of
  Rural and Community Development campuses and UAF’s Center for Distance
  Education (CDE). Disability Services, a part of UAF’s Center for Health and
  Counseling, provides academic accommodations to enrolled students who are
  identified as being eligible for these services.
b. If you believe you are eligible, please visit http://www.uaf.edu/chc/disability.html
on the web or contact a student affairs staff person at your nearest local campus. You
can also contact Disability Services on the Fairbanks Campus at (907) 474-7043,
fydso@uaf.edu




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