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Career Assessment

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					           Onward Education & Training
                                       OneGreentreeCentre,Suite201
                                         Marlton,NewJersey 08053
                                    Phone: 800-830-1396 ▪ Fax: 856-596-8359




                        Career Assessment
                            Inventory


                   Creatingahighimpactresume. Findingthebestjobandcareeroptions

           Included in this packet are a career assessment, examples of resumes, resume checklist,
           resume action wordlist, commonly asked interview questions, job interview prep worksheet,
           phone call organizer, weekly goal worksheet and a job search log.



                                            Career Assessment for:

                              ________________________________________




           Date:

©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Instructions for Completing Your Career Assessment
       Careful and thorough completion of your Career Assessment lays in the groundwork for success
       in continuing your career or making a transition to another.

          Effective performance in interviews. Some people in search have formal interviews with a
           dozen or more organizations before receiving an offer. Others receive an offer on their first
           interview. Because there can be many reasons for rapid success in interviews – including
           good luck – preparation is a critical factor. The time to recall, organize and practice
           discussion information on your background is now, not when you are sitting in your first hard-
           won interview.

          Developing a high impact resume. Outstanding resumes are a brief distillation of a great
           deal of information, written to support a particular professional objective and speak to a
           particular target market. Because they are generally limited to two pages, what to include
           and what to leave out are important questions. Your want to include all of the most
           compelling facts about yourself.

          Finding the best job and career options. Some people want to find new work much like
           their past work. Others want very different or new kind of work. Before making a final choice,
           you need to be aware of the range of options.



       The first step is in attaining all of these benefits is gathering information. You are the only person
       who has the necessary information. At this moment, you may not remember it all, simply
       because you do not normally have reason to think about it. However, complete and well-
       organized information is essential to success in your search project.

       Recalling, thinking through and recording this information takes time and effort. This packet will
       help you organize that effort and make it more effective.




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Before you begin . . .

        please take a minute to consider two questions basic to your search project.



        1.   How quickly do you need to find new employment?

        Given your current financial situation (including any severance benefits and unemployment
        benefits) and your current spending plans, how many months could you be unemployed:

             And still be financially comfortable?                       __________ # months

             Before you ―felt the pinch‖?                                __________ # months

             Before your financial situation became a serious problem?   __________ # months




        2.   Would you relocate for new employment?

             [ ] Yes, I want to relocate to _______________

             [ ] Yes, but not more than 50 miles from my current address

             [ ] Yes, but only to _______________

             [ ] No, I prefer not to relocate, but I would consider relocation if necessary to obtain
                the right position

             [ ] No, I will not relocate under any circumstances

             [ ] It depends _______________




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Ten Accomplishments
       This is a classic career development exercise. Numerous variations of it have been used
       successfully by thousands of career experts with millions of clients over the past 50 years.

       An analysis of selected accomplishments is a useful tool in clarifying skills, interests and values.
       Past achievements often indicate talents, abilities and potential and can point the way to future
       achievements. Completing this exercise, therefore, can contribute to helping you make
       appropriate career choices.

       What do we mean by accomplishments? What we are looking for are the normal achievements
       within the scope of your normal activities, both in and out of work. These could be called
       achievements or successes.

       For this exercise, we define achievements as things you did particularly well and are proud of
       regardless of the opinion of others. These will also be instances where your motivation was high
       and where you enjoyed what you were doing.

       Using that definition of achievement, what are your 10 achievements that best fit this description?
       If possible, include some from your early life (even childhood) as well as from your adult life. You
       may use achievements at work or away from work. You may find it more useful to create a longer
       list and then narrow it down to 10. Record your achievements on the following page. Do not
       attempt a detailed description of them. Simply title each and mention the main thing you did and
       give the overall results.

       Examples:

       Introduced a new product: As a marketing manager, introduced a new frozen food product line
       and took it to $28 million in sales in the first year, more than double management‘s projection.

       Built our dream house: My husband and I designed, built and decorated our dream house. We
       love it and people admire it.

       Rebuilt a company: As a general manager, took profits of a software company from 4% to 32%
       in two years.

       Helped win the championship: Pitched six scoreless innings in Little League statewide
       championship game. We won.

       Reorganized the department: Inherited a department of 16 (downsized from 24). Reorganized
       work and trained people so we got it all done, usually in a 40-hour week. And they liked me.

       Threw a New Year’s Eve party for 50 without using a caterer: Six years later, people are still
       talking about how great it was and comparing other parties to it. (So far, no other party has come
       close.)




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
       Made money in real estate: Over the past 12 years, made nearly $100,000 in my real estate
       ―hobby.‖

       Started new charities: As President of my synagogue, got about 50 new people involved in
       three new charitable activities.

Your Ten Accomplishments

       List your ten selected accomplishments below:



       1. _________________________________________________________________



       2. _________________________________________________________________



       3. _________________________________________________________________



       4. _________________________________________________________________



       5. _________________________________________________________________



       6. _________________________________________________________________



       7. _________________________________________________________________



       8. _________________________________________________________________



       9. _________________________________________________________________



       10. __________________________________________________________________

©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Your Professional Objective
       What kind of work are you interested in finding at this point? Please describe your ideal job,
       the type of organization and the type of culture or environment you want to be in. Be as specific
       as you can, using descriptions of work tasks, type of work, what an organization does. Use job
       titles if possible.

       My Ideal Job would be:




       Describe the type of organization:




       Describe the culture or work environment you would like to be in:




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
       Homework Assignment 1 : Search the internet for job descriptions that are of interest to
       you. List them below:



       1. ________________________________________________________________________



       2. ________________________________________________________________________



       3. ________________________________________________________________________



       4. ________________________________________________________________________



       5. ________________________________________________________________________



       Homework Assignment 2 : Go to www.salary.com, type in your zip code and the job titles
       that are of interest to educate yourself on realistic wages/compensation. For each job
       description listed above, enter the compensation range.



       1. Compensation range:             $________          to       $ __________

       2. Compensation range:             $________          to       $ __________

       3. Compensation range:             $________          to       $ __________

       4. Compensation range:             $________          to       $ __________

       5. Compensation range:             $________          to       $ __________



       Based on this information, what would be your desired compensation?



           Desired compensation:          $________________




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Your Long-Term Objective

       Where do you want to go? Where do you want to be in 5, 10 or 15 years? Imagine yourself
       looking back. What is it that you want to see? Please list as clearly as you can at this point in
       your life your long-term objectives:


       15 years:




       10 years:




       5 years:




       Adverse Factors
       What are the adverse factors – or possible barriers – to attaining any of the long-term
       objectives you just listed? Please be completely honest and list anything that might interfere
       with your getting what you want.




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Employment History
       The following pages are a complete employment overview. Questions on these topics are
       always asked in employment interviews and applications. The listing will help in planning what to
       include and what to leave out of your resume, as well as what to cover in an interview, and how
       best to cover it.

       Please treat military service as a job or series of jobs. Extensive or prolonged volunteer work
       should be described as work experience, especially if you were not gainfully employed at the
       time. Part-time and summer jobs should be included. All of this will not end up on a resume, but
       it is important to an assessment.




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Employment History : Position # 1 (most recent)


       Organization:                   _____________________________________________________

       Dates with organization:        from _________________________ to______________________



       Job Title:                      _____________________________________________________

       Dates in this title:            from _________________________ to______________________



       Title of person you reported to (not the name): ______________________________________



       Compensation: $ _______________________ (label base salary, bonus and commissions)



Your Responsibilities

       Describe your responsibilities in this job, starting with the general functional area (i.e. legal,
       marketing, finance, operations). Exactly what did you do? List the duties of the job in order of
       importance – not as they appeared in the job description, but as they actually were. What results
       were you expected to produce? What resources did you have (people reporting to you, budgets,
       facilities)? What committees or task forces were you involved with? What skills did you develop
       for yourself? What quantifiable results did you obtain (e.g. accomplished sales, quotas of 110%
       over quota). The grid is only an organizational aid, feel free to write outside the box!

                                                                                              Skills
 Functional Area              Duties       Results      Resources        Committees
                                                                                            Developed




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Your Performance

       List all concrete evidence of satisfactory (or better) performance. Include salary increases,
       promotions, bonuses, performance ratings, goals exceeded, etc.




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Your Likes and Dislikes



                                                      Likes

                                      What did you like most about this job?

                          Please list at least three, even if you liked nothing very much.



       1. _______________________________________________________________________



       2. _______________________________________________________________________



       3. _______________________________________________________________________




                                                     Dislikes

                                      What did you like least about this job?

                      Please list at least three, even if you liked everything a great deal.



       1. _______________________________________________________________________



       2. _______________________________________________________________________



       3. _______________________________________________________________________




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Your Achievements (part 1)

       Organizational View: Please list below at least six of your most important achievements in this
       job from the organization‘s point of view, not yours. List them in order of importance, starting with
       the most important. If you have more than six to choose from, select a variety, representing
       abilities in different areas.

 Most Important

       1. _______________________________________________________________________



       2. _______________________________________________________________________



       3. _______________________________________________________________________



       4. _______________________________________________________________________



       5. _______________________________________________________________________



       6. _______________________________________________________________________



       7. _______________________________________________________________________



       8. _______________________________________________________________________



       9. _______________________________________________________________________



       10. _______________________________________________________________________

 Least Important




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Your Achievements (part 2)

       Your Point of View: Please list below your six most important achievements in this job from your
       point of view. List them in order of importance, starting with the most important.

       List your achievements even if you were not entirely satisfied with what you achieved. Small
       routine achievements are often just as important as large dramatic ones. If you have more than
       six to choose from, select a variety, representing abilities in different areas.

 Most Important

         1. _______________________________________________________________________



         2. _______________________________________________________________________



         3. _______________________________________________________________________



         4. _______________________________________________________________________



         5. _______________________________________________________________________



         6. _______________________________________________________________________



         7. _______________________________________________________________________



         8. _______________________________________________________________________



         9. _______________________________________________________________________



         10. _______________________________________________________________________

 Least Important



©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
 Your Reasons for Leaving this Job

       Why did you leave? If you were involuntarily terminated, say so and be frank about what you
       believe were the real reasons. Do not simply reply the ―official‖ story. What did you learn or
       accomplish because you left?




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Employment History : Position # 2


       Organization:                   _____________________________________________________

       Dates with organization:        from _________________________ to______________________



       Job Title:                      _____________________________________________________

       Dates in this title:            from _________________________ to______________________



       Title of person you reported to (not the name): ______________________________________



       Compensation: $ _______________________ (label base salary, bonus and commissions)



Your Responsibilities

       Describe your responsibilities in this job, starting with the general functional area (i.e. legal,
       marketing, finance, operations). Exactly what did you do? List the duties of the job in order of
       importance – not as they appeared in the job description, but as they actually were. What results
       were you expected to produce? What resources did you have (people reporting to you, budgets,
       facilities)? What committees or task forces were you involved with? What skills did you develop
       for yourself? What quantifiable results did you obtain (e.g. accomplished sales, quotas of 110%
       over quota). The grid is only an organizational aid, feel free to write outside the box!

                                                                                              Skills
 Functional Area              Duties       Results      Resources        Committees
                                                                                            Developed




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Your Performance

       List all concrete evidence of satisfactory (or better) performance. Include salary increases,
       promotions, bonuses, performance ratings, goals exceeded, etc.




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Your Likes and Dislikes



                                                      Likes

                                      What did you like most about this job?

                          Please list at least three, even if you liked nothing very much.



       1. _______________________________________________________________________



       2. _______________________________________________________________________



       3. _______________________________________________________________________




                                                     Dislikes

                                      What did you like least about this job?

                      Please list at least three, even if you liked everything a great deal.



       1. _______________________________________________________________________



       2. _______________________________________________________________________



       3. _______________________________________________________________________




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Your Achievements (part 1)

       Organizational View: Please list below at least six of your most important achievements in this
       job from the organization‘s point of view, not yours. List them in order of importance, starting with
       the most important. If you have more than six to choose from, select a variety, representing
       abilities in different areas.

 Most Important

       1. _______________________________________________________________________



       2. _______________________________________________________________________



       3. _______________________________________________________________________



       4. _______________________________________________________________________



       5. _______________________________________________________________________



       6. _______________________________________________________________________



       7. _______________________________________________________________________



       8. _______________________________________________________________________



       9. _______________________________________________________________________



       10. _______________________________________________________________________

 Least Important




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Your Achievements (part 2)

       Your Point of View: Please list below your six most important achievements in this job from your
       point of view. List them in order of importance, starting with the most important.

       List your achievements even if you were not entirely satisfied with what you achieved. Small
       routine achievements are often just as important as large dramatic ones. If you have more than
       six to choose from, select a variety, representing abilities in different areas.

 Most Important

       1. _______________________________________________________________________



       2. _______________________________________________________________________



       3. _______________________________________________________________________



       4. _______________________________________________________________________



       5. _______________________________________________________________________



       6. _______________________________________________________________________



       7. _______________________________________________________________________



       8. _______________________________________________________________________



       9. _______________________________________________________________________



       10. _______________________________________________________________________

 Least Important



©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
 Your Reasons for Leaving this Job

       Why did you leave? If you were involuntarily terminated, say so and be frank about what you
       believe were the real reasons. Do not simply reply the ―official‖ story. What did you learn or
       accomplish because you left?




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Employment History : Position # 3


       Organization:                   _____________________________________________________

       Dates with organization:        from _________________________ to______________________



       Job Title:                      _____________________________________________________

       Dates in this title:            from _________________________ to______________________



       Title of person you reported to (not the name): ______________________________________



       Compensation: $ _______________________ (label base salary, bonus and commissions)



Your Responsibilities

       Describe your responsibilities in this job, starting with the general functional area (i.e. legal,
       marketing, finance, operations). Exactly what did you do? List the duties of the job in order of
       importance – not as they appeared in the job description, but as they actually were. What results
       were you expected to produce? What resources did you have (people reporting to you, budgets,
       facilities)? What committees or task forces were you involved with? What skills did you develop
       for yourself? What quantifiable results did you obtain (e.g. accomplished sales, quotas of 110%
       over quota). The grid is only an organizational aid, feel free to write outside the box!

                                                                                              Skills
 Functional Area              Duties       Results      Resources        Committees
                                                                                            Developed




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Your Performance

       List all concrete evidence of satisfactory (or better) performance. Include salary increases,
       promotions, bonuses, performance ratings, goals exceeded, etc.




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Your Likes and Dislikes



                                                      Likes

                                      What did you like most about this job?

                          Please list at least three, even if you liked nothing very much.



       1. _______________________________________________________________________



       2. _______________________________________________________________________



       3. _______________________________________________________________________




                                                     Dislikes

                                      What did you like least about this job?

                      Please list at least three, even if you liked everything a great deal.



       1. _______________________________________________________________________



       2. _______________________________________________________________________



       3. _______________________________________________________________________




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Your Achievements (part 1)

       Organizational View: Please list below at least six of your most important achievements in this
       job from the organization‘s point of view, not yours. List them in order of importance, starting with
       the most important. If you have more than six to choose from, select a variety, representing
       abilities in different areas.

 Most Important

       1. _______________________________________________________________________



       2. _______________________________________________________________________



       3. _______________________________________________________________________



       4. _______________________________________________________________________



       5. _______________________________________________________________________



       6. _______________________________________________________________________



       7. _______________________________________________________________________



       8. _______________________________________________________________________



       9. _______________________________________________________________________



       10. _______________________________________________________________________

 Least Important




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Your Achievements (part 2)

       Your Point of View: Please list below your six most important achievements in this job from your
       point of view. List them in order of importance, starting with the most important.

       List your achievements even if you were not entirely satisfied with what you achieved. Small
       routine achievements are often just as important as large dramatic ones. If you have more than
       six to choose from, select a variety, representing abilities in different areas.

 Most Important

       1. _______________________________________________________________________



       2. _______________________________________________________________________



       3. _______________________________________________________________________



       4. _______________________________________________________________________



       5. _______________________________________________________________________



       6. _______________________________________________________________________



       7. _______________________________________________________________________



       8. _______________________________________________________________________



       9. _______________________________________________________________________



       10. _______________________________________________________________________

 Least Important




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
 Your Reasons for Leaving this Job

       Why did you leave? If you were involuntarily terminated, say so and be frank about what you
       believe were the real reasons. Do not simply reply the ―official‖ story. What did you learn or
       accomplish because you left?




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Your Employers

       Employer # 1: Information on employers – especially recent ones – is sometimes asked at
       interviews. Even when not asked, it can be a useful addition. This page and the following two
       pages are designed to collect basic employer information.

       Organization:               _____________________________________________________

       Dates with organization:    from _________________________to______________________



       1. Industry or sector:




       2. Main competitors:




       3. What does the organization do? (products or services):




       4. Size of organization (# employees, annual revenue, budgets, # of units, etc.):




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
       5. Size and mission of your department or unit:




       6. If the organization as a whole did well during your employment, list any indications of how
          well (e.g. % profit increase, growth, comments by expert outsiders):




       7. If the organization is part of a larger one (e.g. a parent company or larger agency), provide
          the name of the larger organization and any additional information (industry, competitors,
          organization‘s products/services, size).




       8. Describe climate and/or culture. How were things done? How were people treated? What
          were the expectations?




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Your Employers

       Employer # 2: Information on employers – especially recent ones – is sometimes asked at
       interviews. Even when not asked, it can be a useful addition. This page and the following two
       pages are designed to collect basic employer information.

       Organization:               _____________________________________________________

       Dates with organization:    from _________________________ to______________________



       1. Industry or sector:




       2. Main competitors:




       3. What does the organization do? (products or services):




       4. Size of organization (# employees, annual revenue, budgets, # of units, etc.):




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
       5. Size and mission of your department or unit:




       6. If the organization as a whole did well during your employment, list any indications of how
          well (e.g. % profit increase, growth, comments by expert outsiders):




       7. If the organization is part of a larger one (e.g. a parent company or larger agency), provide
          the name of the larger organization and any additional information (industry, competitors,
          organization‘s products/services, size).




       8. Describe climate and/or culture. How were things done? How were people treated? What
          were the expectations?




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Your Employers

       Employer # 3: Information on employers – especially recent ones – is sometimes asked at
       interviews. Even when not asked, it can be a useful addition. This page and the following two
       pages are designed to collect basic employer information.

       Organization:               _____________________________________________________

       Dates with organization:    from _________________________ to______________________



       1. Industry or sector:




       2. Main competitors:




       3. What does the organization do? (products or services):




       4. Size of organization (# employees, annual revenue, budgets, # of units, etc.):




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
       5. Size and mission of your department or unit:




       6. If the organization as a whole did well during your employment, list any indications of how
          well (e.g. % profit increase, growth, comments by expert outsiders):




       7. If the organization is part of a larger one (e.g. a parent company or larger agency), provide
          the name of the larger organization and any additional information (industry, competitors,
          organization‘s products/services, size).




       8. Describe climate and/or culture. How were things done? How were people treated? What
          were the expectations?




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Education

       Please start with your most recent formal education and work back to the secondary level.

          Institution            Attendance Dates       Major or Concentration          GPA or Rank




       Please list your extracurricular activities at each of the above institutions.




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Additional Training

       Please list training programs of any kind you have completed, other than the formal
       education listed previously.

                                                          Principle Course
        Course Name                  Instructor                                         Dates
                                                              Content




       Please list any certifications or licenses (of any kind) you have obtained, other than the
       formal education listed previously.




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Business and Professional Activities

       Please list memberships in business or professional associations. Mention any offices you held
       or committees you served on. Include here (or attach) a list of publications, patents or copyrights.




       List the business or professional publications you read regularly.




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Non-work Activities

       List all religious, community, political and organized social activities. Include the names of
       any organizations you are (or were) a member of, and any offices you hold (or held) in any of
       them. Note whether they are past or present affiliations.

            Organization                         Office Held                      Affiliations


                                                                        [ ] Present        [ ] Past


                                                                        [ ] Present        [ ] Past


                                                                        [ ] Present        [ ] Past


                                                                        [ ] Present        [ ] Past


                                                                        [ ] Present        [ ] Past


                                                                        [ ] Present        [ ] Past


                                                                        [ ] Present        [ ] Past


                                                                        [ ] Present        [ ] Past




       List all of your current and past recreational activities. Note whether they are past or present
       affiliations.

                               Activity                                           Affiliations


                                                                        [ ] Present       [ ] Past


                                                                        [ ] Present       [ ] Past


                                                                        [ ] Present       [ ] Past




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Languages

       Please list any languages (other than English) that you speak, read, or write. Include your level
       of proficiency for each.


              Language                      Level                          Proficiency
                                         [ ] Read       [ ] Expert     [ ] Intermediate     [ ] Novice

                                         [ ] Write      [ ] Expert     [ ] Intermediate     [ ] Novice

                                         [ ] Speak      [ ] Expert     [ ] Intermediate     [ ] Novice

                                         [ ] Read       [ ] Expert     [ ] Intermediate     [ ] Novice

                                         [ ] Write      [ ] Expert     [ ] Intermediate     [ ] Novice

                                         [ ] Speak      [ ] Expert     [ ] Intermediate     [ ] Novice
                                         [ ] Read       [ ] Expert     [ ] Intermediate     [ ] Novice

                                         [ ] Write      [ ] Expert     [ ] Intermediate     [ ] Novice

                                         [ ] Speak      [ ] Expert     [ ] Intermediate     [ ] Novice



Your Professional or Managerial Assets and Liabilities

       A professional is someone who works with a clearly defined body of expertise. Marketing,
       accounting, sales, information technology, human resources and management are all examples.
       What are your areas of expertise?

       1.   _________________________________________________________________________

       2. _________________________________________________________________________

       3. _________________________________________________________________________



       A manager is someone who knows how to get things done – someone who develops
       strategy, establishes plans, uses control procedures, organizes people and resources and
       coordinates an overall effort. List examples, even if you have never held the title of manager, of
       when you performed as a manager.

       1. __________________________________________________________________________

       2. __________________________________________________________________________

       3. __________________________________________________________________________


©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
       Based on what you know about yourself or what others have said of you, what are some of
       your assets and liabilities as a manager or non-management professional? Please discuss
       them in the space provided below.




Career Progress Analysis

       Are you satisfied with your career progress? If not, why not? Career satisfaction can be
       more than an achieved level. Dissatisfaction can be of many kinds. If you are not satisfied with
       your career progress to date, explain in what way you are dissatisfied. Please relate your
       dissatisfaction to the particular circumstances of its occurrence and give an account of its causes.
       If you are satisfied, are there areas you feel you need improvement or steps you need to take to
       get to the next level?




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Possible References

       List references you might consider contacting as part of the employment process.

       Please complete the entire list of 12 even though you may not need all of them. You will decide
       later which ones you actually want to use, and you may use different references in different
       situations. Extra references often turn out to be useful in other ways.

       Include both work and personal references, and list their relationship to you (e.g. former boss, co-
       worker, personal friend, former teacher). List current organizations and title for every reference,
       even for personal friends.

               Name                            Organization/Title                   Relationship




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Self Assessment Summary

   Summarize the results of the information you have documented so far. This information will help
   define the kind of environment that suits you best, and will also help you brainstorm some possible
   job targets. Finally, it can be used as a checklist against job possibilities. When you are about to
   receive a job offer, use this list to help you analyze it objectively.

   1. What I need in my relationship with bosses:




   2. Job satisfiers/dissatifiers

        Satisfiers:




        Dissatisfiers:




   3.   Most important work related values:




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
   4.   Special Interests:




   5. The threads running through the Ten Stories analysis:

        Main Accomplishments




        Key motivators




        Enjoyed most; Did best:




        My role:




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
       The environment:




       The subject matter:




   6. Using the Skills Summary in Appendix A, list the top ten specialized skills:

       1. __________________________________________________________________________


       2. __________________________________________________________________________


       3. __________________________________________________________________________


       4. __________________________________________________________________________


       5. __________________________________________________________________________


       6. __________________________________________________________________________


       7. __________________________________________________________________________

       8. __________________________________________________________________________


       9. __________________________________________________________________________


       10. __________________________________________________________________________




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
     7. From the Long Term Career Objectives:


        Where I see myself in the long run:




        What I need to get there:




8.   My basic personality and the kinds of work cultures it will fit:




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   Skills Summary

       The numbers across the top represent each of your 10 accomplishment stories. Start with story #1
       and check off all of your specialized skills that appear in this story. When you‘ve checked off the
       skills for all ten-accomplishment stories, total them.

  Accomplishment #    1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   0   SUM     Accomplishment #    1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   0   SUM

Administration                                                      Operation Mgmt.
Advising/Consulting                                                 Org. Design/Devel.
Analytical Skills                                                   Ownership
Artistic Ability                                                    Perceptiveness
Budgetary Skills                                                    Perseverance
Client Relations                                                    Persuasiveness
Communication                                                       Planning
Community Rel.                                                      Policy-Making
Contract Neg.                                                       Practicality
Control                                                             Presentation Skills
Coordination                                                        Problem-Solving
Creativity                                                          Procedures Design
Decisiveness                                                        Production
Design                                                              Program Concept
Development                                                         Program Design
Financial Skills                                                    Project Mgmt.
Foresight                                                           Promotion
Frugality                                                           Public Relations
Fund Raising                                                        Public Speaking
Human Relations                                                     Quality Assessment
Information Mgmt.                                                   Research
Imagination                                                         Resourcefulness
Individualism                                                       Sales Ability
Initiative                                                          Service
Inventiveness                                                       Showmanship
Leadership                                                          Speaking Skills
Liaison                                                             Staff Dev./Mgmt.
Logic                                                               Strategic Planning
Management                                                          Stress Tolerance
Marketing                                                           Systems
Mathematical Skills                                                 Teamwork
Mechanical Skills                                                   Tenacity
Motivational Skills                                                 Training
Negotiation                                                         Travel
Observation                                                         Troubleshooting
Organization                                                        Writing
Other Talents                                                       Other Talents

       ** When you have identified the Top Ten Specialized Skills, according to which had the most check
       marks, list these on the Self Assessment Summary question # 6 **




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The Resume – 3 ways to sum yourself up

   "Give me a moment of your busy day! Listen to me, I've got something to say!‖

   That's what your resume must scream-in a suitably professional manner, of course. Not in the
   manner of the would-be retail-clothing executive who had his resume "hand-delivered" attached to the
   hand and arm of a store window mannequin.

   As it happened, that was only the first surprise in store for the personnel director who received the
   delivery: The envelope was hand-decorated in gothic script; the cover letter inside was equally
   decorative (and illegible); the resume writer had glued the four-page resume to fabric, and stitched
   the whole mess together like a child's book. The crowning glory, however, was yet to come: All the
   punctuation marks-commas, colons, periods, and the like - were small rhinestone settings. Yes, it got
   noticed, but its success had to depend entirely on the recipient's sense of humor-which in this case
   was most noticeable for its absence.

   Here's the point: trying to do something out of the ordinary with any aspect of your resume is risky
   business indeed. For every interview door it opens, at least two more may be slammed shut.

   The best (and most businesslike) bet is to present a logically displayed, eye-appealing resume that
   will get read That means grabbing the reader right away on that first page. And that's one big reason
   for short, power-packed resumes.

   We all have different backgrounds. Some of us have worked for one company only, some of us have
   worked for eleven companies in as many years. Some of us have changed careers once or twice,
   some of us have maintained a predictable career path. For some, diversity broadens our potential,
   and for some concentration deepens it. We each require different vehicles to put our work history in
   the most exciting fight. The goals, though, are constant:

   To show off achievements, attributes, and cumulation of expertise to the best advantage; to minimize
   any possible weaknesses.

   Resume experts acknowledge just three essential styles for presenting your credentials to a potential
   employer: Chronological, Functional, and Combination (Chrono-Functional). Your particular
   circumstances will determine the right format for you. Just three styles, you say? You will see resume
   books with up to fifteen varieties of resume style. Such volumes are, alas, merely filling up space; in
   the final analysis, each additional style such books mention is a tiny variation on the above three.




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The Chronological Resume

   This is the most common and readily accepted form of presentation. It's what most of us think of
   when we think of resumes - a chronological listing of job tides and responsibilities. It starts with the
   current or most recent employment, then works backward to your first job (or ten years into the past--
   whichever comes first).

   This format is good for demonstrating your growth in a single profession. It is suitable for anyone with
   practical work experience who hasn't suffered too many job changes or prolonged periods of
   unemployment. It is not suitable if you are just out of school or if you are changing careers. The
   format would then draw attention to your weaknesses (i.e., your lack of specific experience in a field)
   rather than your strengths.

   The exact content of every resume naturally varies depending on individual circumstances. A
   chronological resume usually incorporates six basic components.
        Contact Information
        A job Objective
        A Career Objective
        A Career Summary
        Education
        A Description of Work History

   This last item is the distinguishing characteristic of the chronological resume, because it ties your job
   responsibilities and achievements to specific employers, job tides, and dates.

   There are also some optional categories determined by the space available to you and the unique
   aspect of your background.




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The Functional Resume

   This format focuses on the professional skills you have developed over the years, rather than on
   when, where, or how you acquired them. It de-emphasizes dates, sometimes to the point of
   exclusion. By the same token, job titles and employers play a minor part with this type of resume. The
   attention is always focused on the skill rather than the context or time of its acquisition. It is a case
   not so much of what you say, but of how you say it.

   This functional format is suited to a number of different personal circumstances, specifically those of:

          Mature professionals with a storehouse of expertise and jobs
          Entry-level types whose track records do not justify a chronological resume
          Career changers who want to focus on skins rather than credentials
          People whose careers have been stagnant or in ebb, who want to give focus to the skills that
           can get a career under way again, rather than on the history in which it was becalmed in the
           first place
          Military personnel embarking on a civilian career
          Those returning to the workplace after a long absence
          People closer to retirement than to the onset of their careers

   The functional resume does present a major challenge for the writer. Because it focuses so strongly
   on skills and ability to contribute in a particular direction, you must have an employment objective
   clearly in mind. When this is achieved, such a resume can be very effective. Without this focus,
   however, or if you are looking for "a job, any job, " this format loses its direction and tends to drift
   without purpose.

   Though a functional resume is a bit more free form than a chronological one, there are certain
   essentials that make it work. In addition to contact information and a job and/or career objective,
   these include the elements that follow.

      A Functional Summary. Different skills are needed for different jobs, so the functional summary
       is where you make the tough decisions to determine what goes in and what stays out. Consider
       the case of an executive sales secretary bored with her job but challenged by the excitement and
       money the sales force is enjoying. She will want to emphasize those abilities that lead to success
       in sales, such as written and verbal communication skills, and time management. On the other
       hand, she will almost certainly leave out references to her typing and shorthand abilities, because
       these skills don't contribute to her new goals.

      Dates. Strictly speaking, a functional resume needn't give dates. Up until a couple of years ago,
       you could still sometimes get away with omitting them. That is no longer the case. Today, a
       resume without dates waves a big red flag at every employer in the land. So, what if your
       employment history doesn't have all the stability it might? The functional resume is perfect for
       you, because dates can be de-emphasized by their placement. You put them at the end of the
       resume, or perhaps on a second page, for example, in a small block type; and you use year dates
       omitting the details of day, week, and month. The idea is to force the reader's attention to your
       skills, not your history.

      Education. The inclusion of education and other optional categories is determined by the space
       available to you and the unique aspects of your background.



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The Combination Chrono-Functional Resume

   For the upwardly mobile professional with a track record, this is becoming the resume of choice. It
   has all the flexibility and strength that come from combining both the chronological and functional
   formats. If you have a performance record, and are on a career track and want to pursue it, then this
   is the strongest resume tool available. This format, in addition to contact information and a job
   objective, incorporates a number of identifying factors, outlined below.

      A Career Summary. The combination resume, more often than not, has some kind of career
       summary. Here you spotlight a professional with a clear sense of self, a past of solid
       contributions, and a clear focus on future career growth. The career summary, as you might
       expect, will include a power-packed description of skills, achievements, and personal traits that
       fairly scream "Success!"

      A Description of Functional Skills. This is where the combination of styles comes into play.
       Following the summary, the combination resume starts out like functional resume and highlights
       achievements in different categories relevant to the job/career goals, without any reference to
       employers.

      A Chronological History. Then it switches to the chronological approach and names companies,
       dates, titles, duties, and responsibilities. This section can also include further evidence of
       achievements or special contributions.

      Education. Then come the optional categories determined by the space available to you and the
       unique aspects of your background.



                            One of these styles is perfect for you. Pick one!




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Scannable Resume

   Leading businesses and organizations are using electronic applicant tracking. Resumes are
   scanned into the computer as an image. Then artificial intelligence "reads" the text and extracts
   important information about you such as your name, address, phone number, work history, years
   of experience, education and skills. Internal applicant tracking systems have become an integral
   part of the way employers do business. Many employers will state in the job ad to send a
   scannable resume. Many mid-sized to large employers are using this system; and smaller
   employers are buying time on systems operated by commercial firms. Be alert for this information
   in the ad and don't hesitate to inquire if a scannable resume is needed.

   Recruiters and managers access a resume database in many ways, searching for your resume
   specifically or searching for applicants with specific experience. When searching for specific
   experience, they'll search for key words, usually nouns such as "writer", "BA", "marketing", "C++",
   "Society of Technical Communications", "Spanish" (language fluency), "San Diego", etc. So make
   sure you describe your experience with concrete words rather than vague descriptions.


   NOTE:
   The computer system will extract words and information from your statements; you can write your
   resume as usual.


   To read more about this topic, please access http://career.utk.edu/alumni/skills/resscan.asp.




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Chronological
                                              Jane Swift
                                           9 Central Avenue
                                           Quincy, MA 02169
                                            (617) 555-1212

SUMMARY:         Ten years of increasing responsibilities in the employment services industry.
                 Concentration in the high technology markets.


EXPERIENCE;      Howard Systems International, Inc.      1995-Present
                   Management Consulting Firm
                   Personnel Manager
                   Responsible for recruiting and managing consulting staff of five. Set up office and
                 organized the recruitment, selection, and hiring of consultants. Recruited all levels of
                 MIS staff from financial to manufacturing markets.
                   Additional responsibilities.
                  Coordinated with outside advertising agencies.
                  Developed P.R. with industry periodicals - placement with over 20 magazines and
                   newsletters.
                  Developed effective referral programs -- referrals increased 32%.

EXPERIENCE:      Technical Aid Corporation                                             1988-1995
                 National Consulting Firm. MICROITEMPS Division
                 Division Manager                                                      1993-1995
                 Area Manager                                                          1990-1993
                 Branch Manager                                                        1988-1990

                 As Division Manager, opened additional West Coast offices. Staffed and trained all
                 offices with appropriate personnel. Created and implemented all divisional operational
                 policies responsible for P & L. Sales increased to $20 million dollars, from $0 in 1984.
                  Achieved and maintained 30% annual growth over 7-year period.
                  Maintained sales staff turnover at 14%.

                As Area Manager, opened additional offices, hiring staff, setting up office policies, and
                training sales and recruiting personnel.

                 Additional responsibilities:
                  Supervised offices in two states.
                  Developed business relationships with accounts - 75% of clients were regular
                   customers.
                  Client base increased 28% per year.
                  Generated over $200.000 worth of tree trade-journal publicity

                 As Branch Manager, hired to establish the new MICRO/TEMPS operation. Recruited
                 and managed consultants. Hired internal staff. Sold service to clients.

EDUCATION:      Boston University
                B.S. Public Relations, 1987.




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Functional

                                             Jane Swift
                                          9 Central Avenue
                                          Quincy, MA 02169
                                           (617) 555-1212


OBJECTIVE:         A position in Employment Services where my management, sales, and recruiting
                   talents can be effectively utilized to improve operations and contribute to company
                   profits.

SUMMARY:           Over ten years of Human Resources ex i experience. Extensive responsibility for
                   multiple branch offices and an internal staff of 40+ employees and 250 consultants.

SALES:             Sold high-technology consulting services with consistently profitable margins
                   throughout the United States. Grew sales from $0 to over $20 million a year. Created
                   training programs and trained salespeople in six metropolitan markets.

RECRUITING:        Developed recruiting sourcing methods for multiple branch offices. Recruited over
                   25,000 internal and external consultants in the high-technology professions.

MANAGEMENT:        Managed up to 40 people in sales, customer service, recruiting, and administration.
                   Turnover maintained below 14% in a "turnover business."

FINANCIAL:         Prepared quarterly and yearly forecasts. Presented, reviewed, and defended these
                   forecasts to the Board of Directors. Responsible for P & L of $20 million sales
                   operation.

PRODUCTION:        Responsible for opening multiple offices and accountable for growth and profitability.
                   100% success and maintained 30% growth over seven-year period in 10 offices.



WORK
EXPERIENCE:

1995 to Present    HOWARD SYSTEMS INTERNATIONAL, Boston, MA
                   National Consulting Firm Personnel Manager
1988-1995          TECHNICAL AID CORPORATION, Needham, MA
                   National Consulting & Search Firm Division Manager

EDUCATION:         BS, 1987, Boston University

REFERENCES:        Available upon request.




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Combination
                                                    Jane Swift
                                                 9 Central Avenue
                                                 Quincy, MA 92169
                                                  (617) 555-1212

OBJECTIVE :        Employment Services Management


SUMMARY:           Ten years of increasing responsibilities in the employment services marketplace.
                   Concentration in the high-technology markets.


SALES:             Sold high technology consulting services with consistently profitable margins
                   throughout the United States. Grew sales from $0 to over $20 million a year.


PRODUCTION:        Responsible for opening multiple offices and accountable for growth and profitability
                   100% success and maintained 30% growth over seven-year period in 10 offices.


MANAGEMENT:        Managed up to 40 people in sales, customers service, recruiting. and administration.
                   Turnover maintained below 14% in a "turnover business." Hired branch managers
                   and sales and recruiting staff throughout the United States.


FINANCIAL:         Prepared quarterly and yearly forecasts. Presented, reviewed, and defended these
                   forecasts to the Board of Directors. Responsible for P & L of $20 million sales
                   operation.


MARKETING          Performed numerous market studies for multiple branch opening. Resolved feasibility
                   of combining two different sales offices. Study resulted in savings of over $5,000 per
                   month in operating expenses.


EXPERIENCE         Howard Systems International, Inc. 1995-Present,
                   Management Consulting Firm
                   Personnel Manager
                   Responsible for recruiting and managing consulting staff of five. Set up office and
                   organized the recruitment, selection, and hiring of consultants. Recruited all levels of
                   MIS staff from financial to manufacturing markets.

                   Additional responsibilities:
                    developed P.R. with industry periodicals-placement with over 20 magazines and
                     newsletters.
                    developed effective referral programs-referrals increased 320%.




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   Jane Swift                                                                                  p. 2 of 2



                   Technical Aid Corporation                                     1988-1995
                   National Consulting Firm. MICRO/TEMPS Division
                   Division Manager                                              1993-1995
                   Area Manager                                                  1990-1993
                   Branch Manager                                                1988-1990

                   As Division Manager, opened additional West Coast offices. Staffed and trained all
                   offices with appropriate personnel. Created and implemented all divisional
                   operational policies. Responsibilities for P & L Sales increased to S20 million dollars,
                   from $0 to 1984.

                    Achieved and maintained 30% annual growth over seven-year period.
                    Maintained sales staff turnover at 14%.

                   As Area Manager, opened additional offices. hiring staff. setting up office policies,
                   and training sales and recruiting personnel.

                   Additional responsibilities:

                    Supervised offices in two states.
                    Developed business relationships with accounts - 75% of clients were regular
                     customers.
                    Client base increased 28% per year.
                    Generated over $200,000 worth of tree trade journal publicity.

                As Branch Manager, hired to establish the new MICRO/TEIVIPS operation. Recruited
                and managed consultants. Hired internal staff. Sold service to clients.



EDUCATION:         B.S., 1987, Boston University




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                                         James R. Smith
                                        123 Any Street Drive
                                      Some Town, State USA-ZIP
                                         Phone/FAX/E-mail


                                               Objective

Create a strong brief opening objective using tools in Resume Checklist and Action Word List.

                                          Career Summary

Create a brief summary of experience throughout your career.

                                       Professional Summary

     Since 1996               Company Name, Corporate Location                      Any town, USA
Title, Department
Create a brief summary of responsibilities and highlight specifics with bullet information below.
 Use bullets to concisely convey measurable achievement, or defined activity
 Avoid using terms such as ―responsibilities included‖ or ―responsible for‖ and select words from the
   Action Word List.
 Generate a positive image of your activities, responsibilities and achievements.

     1994 - 1996              Company Name, Corporate Location                      Any town, USA
Title, Department
Create a brief summary of responsibilities and highlight specifics with bullet information below.
 Use bullets to concisely convey measurable achievement, or defined activity
 Avoid using terms such as ―responsibilities included‖ or ―responsible for‖ and select words from the
   Action Word List.
 Generate a positive image of your activities, responsibilities and achievements.

    1990 - 1994               Company Name, Corporate Location                      Any town, USA
 Title, Department
Create a brief summary of responsibilities and highlight specifics with bullet information below.
 Use bullets to concisely convey measurable achievement, or defined activity
 Avoid using terms such as ―responsibilities included‖ or ―responsible for‖ and select words from the
   Action Word List.
 Generate a positive image of your activities, responsibilities and achievements.



                                              Education
                         University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts
                                      Degree and Courses Studied

                                          University, London
                                      Degree and Courses Studied


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                              Professional & Community Affiliations
                              Name of Affiliation, Title held within the group
                              Name of Affiliation, Title held within the group
                                                   Name
                                                 Address
                                                   Phone


                                           QUALIFICATIONS

Extensive experience providing high quality customer service, including:
     Applying strong communications skills and analytical abilities to identify and resolve customer
        problems, and providing efficient troubleshooting support over the phone.
     Training new employees and customers in the use of complex systems.
     Consistently demonstrating thoroughness, efficiency, accuracy and attention to detail.
     Ability to learn new systems and procedures with a genuine desire to learn new skills.
     Utilizing IBM mainframes and PC‘s as well as Macintosh computers and applications.
     Working well independently and as a team member; skilled at establishing rapport with individuals
        at all organizational levels with diverse backgrounds.


                                             EXPERIENCE

    WATANABEE CORPORATION, Salisbury, SD                                            1975 – Present

Customer Service Representative
Assist more than 300 agents in processing their business on the corporate mainframe system.
Provide support over the telephone, utilizing communication skills to identify, troubleshoot and resolve
problems. Schedule conference calls. Verify agency user ID‘s for security purposes.

Business Systems Specialist
Identifies and resolved customer problems. Assisted in training of staff and customers in effective use of
new products. Supported staff and customers with concerns regarding multiple systems. Participated in
quality and ensure system accuracy. Worked well with co-workers and supervisors.

Assistant Underwriter
Provided Customer Service support to agents and insureds, in person, in writing and over the phone.
Underwrote all Personal Lines coverages. Utilized knowledge of State regulations and Underwriting
guidelines with authority to $600,000. Maintained detailed and accurate records.

Rater Coder
Provided premium quotes for Underwriters and agents. Performed data entry for Homeowners and PAK
II policies. Prepared and rated policies. Trained new employees in area operations. Provided
information to Agents and Insureds. Generated ideas that increased area efficiency.




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
                             EDUCATION AND TRAINING


High School Diploma

Stress Management

Basic DOS Classes

Career & Life Planning

Microsoft Windows Class

Service Excellence Class




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Writing an Objective

           An Objective is generally used when a Job seeker has limited experience or is changing
           careers. The point of an Objective is to create a specific psychological response in the mind
           of the reader. The objective has two purposes:

           1. The Objective tells an employer what position you are seeking. The objective refers just
              to the very next immediate step you hope will be on your career path.
           2. It indicates whether or not you are clear about what opportunities are available with a
              particular employer. If you are unclear about what position you are seeking, and/or what
              positions an employer has available, it may be preferable to omit the objective.

           Career changers or entry-level job seekers will want the employer to immediately focus on
           where they are going, rather than where they have been. If you are looking for another job in
           your present field, it is more important to stress your qualities, achievements and abilities
           first.

           For example, the objective "To utilize my skills in a challenging position that will afford
           advancement and professional growth" tells the employer nothing unique about the
           candidate.

           Is there anyone for whom this objective would not be appropriate? Rather than include an
           objective, which is empty "fluff", make the effort to write an objective that conveys useful
           information about you, and demonstrates that you know what they are looking for.

           If you choose to include an objective, here are some guidelines, which can help you. An
           objective can contain up to four parts. An objective does not have to contain all four parts;
           just include as many parts as you know. It is best to have completed an Assessment first,
           which will provide the skills, qualities, abilities and achievements, needed to complete the
           Objective Statement.

           First is the "level" of the position. Examples of position levels would be "internship", "co-op",
           "part-time", "fulltime", "entry level", "experienced", "supervisory" and "executive". If you know
           what level of position you are seeking, select one of the above terms, or create one of your
           own. For some folks, position level is not an important piece of an objective, and can be left
           off.

           Part two is the skills you hope to use in that position. Refer to the Assessment Skills
           Inventory to help you identify what skills you like and/or have experience using. For example,
           you may be seeking "A position in consulting, software design, development and support".
           For some individuals, the skills are the only piece of the objective they know. An objective
           including only the skills you want to use is respectable because it still conveys information
           that the employer will want.

           Part three is the position function, also sometimes called position title. If you are responding
           to a job posting, the position function can often be found in the employer's Ad text. Examples
           of functions are "chemist", ―administrative assistant", "process engineer", "accountant",
           "project manager", "consultant" and "grant writer". For those with broad skill sets, many
           position titles may apply. Find out what a specific employer calls this function within their
           organization during your informational interview or from an acquaintance who works in that


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           field. You may also choose to invent a title that is broad enough to encompass your unique
           vision.

           Finally, part four is the field or industry, in which you hope to work. Examples of fields or
           industries include "telecommunications", "higher education", "banking", "pharmaceuticals",
           "social services", "event planning" and "resort/travel industry". Your particular position may
           well be found in a variety of fields or industries. For example, accountants work in all of the
           above industries. If your career vision is not field or industry specific, you may wish to omit
           this part of the objective. Integrating all four parts into a cohesive whole is easy. The
           following objective contains all four parts. See if you can identify them.

           "A full-time engineering position in the computer industry, utilizing my ability to work as a
           team member and contribute to marketing, support, design and testing of products and
           services."

           Final Note:

           Employers expect that an applicant will customize his/her objective to each employer and
           each position for which a resume is submitted. The text of your resume may also need to be
           modified, in both structure and content, to support the various objectives.




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Resume Summary

           The "summary" or "summary of qualifications" consists of several concise statements that
           focus the reader's attention on the most important qualities, achievements and abilities you
           have to offer. Those qualities should be the most compelling demonstrations of why they
           should hire you instead of the other candidates. It gives you a brief opportunity to telegraph a
           few of your most sterling qualities. It is your one and only chance to attract and hold their
           attention, to get across what is most important, and to entice the employer to keep reading.

           This is the spiciest part of the resume. This may be the only section fully read by the
           employer, so it should be very strong and convincing.

           The summary is the one place to include professional characteristics (extremely energetic, a
           gift for solving complex problems in a fast-paced environment, a natural salesman,
           exceptional interpersonal skills, committed to excellence, etc.), which may be helpful in
           winning the interview. Gear every word in the summary to your targeted goal.

           It can be expressed in one short paragraph or in bullet format. Experts recommend you limit
           this to approximately six sentences or bullet statements.

           The Summary statement is especially useful when making a career change and you want to
           immediately call an employer's attention to all the skills you have, not just those obvious in a
           job description.

           The process of thinking through your summary statement starts with your Assessment, which
           leads to the summary of Skills. This is where you must think about your abilities, skills,
           likes/dislikes, achievements, character and vision. This process forces you to clarify the
           sales pitch you are presenting to the employer through the resume and ultimately in the
           interview. The bottom line is that you want the employer to see you in the position that is
           open and possibly in other positions that may be available in the future. No matter what, the
           steps are the same:




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Steps to Write a Summary

           1. Determine what skills and qualities your prospective employer wants. What would make
              the ideal candidate?

           2. Search your background to see where you have demonstrated skills and qualities that
              would apply.

           3.   Write a summary at the top of your resume to position yourself.

           4.   Use the same summary to sell yourself in an interview

How to Write a Summary

           Go back to your Summary of the Assessment and the lists that answer the question, what
           would make someone the ideal candidate? Look for the qualities the employer will care about
           most. Then look at what you wrote about why you are the perfect person to fill their need.
           Pick the stuff that best demonstrates why they should hire you.

           The most common ingredients of a well-written summary are as follows. Of course, you
           would not use all these ingredients in one "Summary." Use the ones that highlight you best:

           1. A short phrase describing your profession
           2. Followed by a statement of broad or specialized expertise Followed by two or three
              additional statements related to any of the following:
               Breadth or depth of skills
               Unique mix of skills
               Range of environments in which you have experience
           3. A special or well-documented accomplishment
           4. A history of awards, promotions, or superior performance commendations
           5. One or more professional or appropriate personal characteristics
           6. A sentence describing professional objective or interest.

           Notice that the examples below show how to include your objective in the "summary" section.
           If you are making a career change, your summary section should show how what you have
           done in the past prepares you to do what you seek to do in the future. If you are entry level,
           new to the job, your "summary" will be based more on ability than experience.

           Over 10 years as an organizational catalyst/training design consultant with a track record of
           producing extraordinary results for more than 20 national and community based
           organizations. A commitment to human development and community service. Energetic self-
           starter with excellent analytical, organizational, and creative skills.

           Financial Management Executive with nearly ten years of experience in banking and
           international trade, finance, investments and economic policy. Innovative in structuring credit
           enhancement for corporate and municipal financing. Skilled negotiator with strong
           management, sales and marketing background. Areas of expertise include (a bulleted list
           would follow this paragraph.)



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           Health Care Professional experienced in management, program development and policy
           making in the United States as well as in several developing countries. Expertise in
           emergency medical services. A talent for analyzing problems, developing and simplifying
           procedures, and finding innovative solutions. Proven ability to motivate and work effectively
           with persons from other cultures and all walks of life. Skilled in working within a foreign
           environment with limited resources.

           Highly motivated, creative and versatile real estate executive with seven years of experience
           in property acquisition, development and construction, as well as the management of large
           apartment complexes. Especially skilled at building effective, productive working relationships
           with clients and staff. Excellent management, negotiation and public relations skills. Seeking
           a challenging management position in the real estate field that offers extensive contact with
           the public.

Sample Summary Statements

SUMMARY:           Significant hands-on experience as a leveraged capital executive. Successfully
                   analyze business operations, risks and financial performance; and competitive
                   strategy in financing structure.

                   Highly successful in deal origination in the $25-100MM middle market and portfolio
                   management including strategic positioning of refinancing and workouts.


SUMMARY:           Administrative Assistant with more than twenty years experience in the
                   pharmaceutical and banking industries. A self-starter with exceptional computer skills
                   in
                       Desktop Publishing
                       Data Management Systems
                       Graphics

                   Commended on performance review for consistent work excellence.

SUMMARY:           Two and a half years of diversified administrative experience in the Health Care
                   industry. Demonstrated effectiveness handling complex projects, developing strong
                   internal and external customer relations, and responding to department needs on
                   short notice.

SUMMARY:           Unique Telecommunications and MIS background. Demonstrated excellence using
                   technical skills to build internal and external customer satisfaction. Record of
                   "no-downtime" over a three-year period while solely supporting 1,100 employees.

                   Nicknamed by management as "Steady Dave."

SUMMARY:           Senior marketing executive with 12 years experience in cosmetics and packaged
                   goods industry in the U.S. and France. Unique combination of analytical and strategic
                   approach with creative ability and intuition for business moves. Track record of
                   developing and implementing successful strategies and programs resulting in
                   opening new market segments.


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SUMMARY:           Extensive experience in credit policy and risk management. Establishing guidelines
                   and reaching decisions quickly in a transaction-oriented atmosphere. Proven
                   experience managing credit approval in five departments experiencing difficulties,
                   reducing loan losses by an average of 50%.

SUMMARY:           Financial executive with expertise in managing staff and operations including internal
                   controls, policies and procedures. Consistently able to implement cost efficiencies
                   and streamline operations, even during acquisitions and divestitures.

SUMMARY:           Eight years experience as a Senior Computer Operator and Inventory Reconciliation
                   Specialist with one of the largest cable manufacturers in the United States.
                   Developed inventory control system, formatting information, entering data, and
                   performing on-line computer functions that resulted in a saving of $60,000.

SUMMARY:           Extensive Transportation Management experience responsible for $50 million in rail
                   costs. Demonstrated effectiveness in:
                    negotiating rail transportation contract rates that ensured competitive advantage
                       in U.S. flour markets.
                    streamlining transportation operations and payment systems to reduce costs.
                    building internal and external customer loyalty through personal integrity and
                       extensive knowledge of transportation operations.

Examples

Expertise:

               An administrator with 15 years in sales and marketing. Extensive background in
               business operations including developing computer systems for new markets.

               How much do you know?

               Heavy experience in all phases of marketing and sales of electronic Equipment.




Expertise

               An experienced sales and marketing executive with success in generating profitable
               business projections and plans for the Computer software industry.

               How does the world see him/her?

               Recommended by industry consultants as a ' go getter' In getting things done.




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Strengths

                Recommended for meeting schedules and complying with standards Such as:
                   HVAC systems
                 Fire sprinkler systems
                 Drainage systems

                How does the world see you?

                An efficient manager trained in all facets of construction and Supervision of all types of
                building structures including physical Plant maintenance.

Full Summary

                Extensive management experience in human relations dealing with fast paced, rapidly
                expanding companies. Expertise includes employment law, recruiting, employee and
                labor relations and Affirmative action. Analytical decision-maker with excellent
                problem-solving skills. Recognized For ability to develop employee‘s professional growth
                and increase their productivity

Accomplishments

   If you stated in your objective or summary that you have a track record of success, then you should
   be able to prove it. In other words, its your time to step up to the plate and deliver. The managers are
   looking for potential winners and this is your opportunity to prove to them that you can deliver.

Examples of weak and strong accomplishments

Weak        Initiated process that reduced production costs at manufacturing plant saving company
            money.

Strong      Initiated process that produced production costs at manufacturing plant saving $8500
            annually.

Weak        Repaired outdated boiler system from the 1930s that saved company costly new heating
            systems.

Strong      Repaired outdated boiler system from the 1930s that saved company $40,000 for new
            heating system.

Weak        Strategically planned and marketed state-of -art recording studio that generates. yearly
            revenues and has successfully competed for market share.

Strong      Strategically planned and marketed state-of-the-art-recording studio that generates $350,000
            in yearly revenue and has successfully competed for 30% of market share.

Weak        Developed process for re-engineering 200 person division that cut costs.

Strong      Developed process for re-engineering 200 person division that saved $ 5.2 million annually.


©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Mistakes to Avoid


   (1)    SALARY--- Do not mention past or desired salaries.

   (2)    REASONS FOR CHANGES IN YOUR EMPLOYMENT--- Be prepared to answer especially
          during the interview.

   (3)    DATES --- Do not list dates as to your education. Its quite obvious why because the employer
          or manager can determine how old you are.

   (4)    JOB OBJECTIVE --- It maybe optional on your resume. However, if you submit a cover letter
          that may suffice. Remember that the cover letter must be very brief and to the point.

   (5)    PERSONAL INFORMATION --- Omit any personal data such as height, weight, hobbies, age,
          religion and etc. No "Is" "

   (6)    REFERENCES --- Do not include "references available on request" on your resume. It is not
          necessary.

   (7)    EDUCATION --- Never lie about your education especially about your degrees earned.

   (8)    SUMMARY OF QUALIFICATIONS ---- It must be included on your resume.

   (9)    FORMAT --- Very important for your resume presentation. No long flowing sentences --- Make
          it brief ... for example "Managed $14million budget" or "Taught four individual computer
          courses".

   (10) JOB HOPPING --- Include only jobs that last one year or better ---- 3 months or even 6 months
        may hurt you.

   (11) OVERQUALIFIED --- This is a sensitive situation. However, you should target your resume to
        meet the actual needs of the job. Be prepared to take less salary if you wish to remain in the
        same area. Another fact is that 85% of all positions are never advertised. The odds are
        extremely high when using the internet or the classified.

   (12) COVER LETTER --- Most employers would like to see evidence of your writing ability. So be
        careful in your composition and ask some one to review it. Remember your writing and style
        could make an impression. No long cover letters .... the shorter the better.

   (13)   NO NEGATIVES--- For example ... my company went bankrupt.

   (14)   PERFECT RESUME FORMULA:

            1.   STRONG ACTIONS=RESULTS
            2.   ONE PAGE (if it is possible)
            3.   PROFESSIONAL LAYOUT
            4.   EASY TO READ
            5.   QUANTITY SKILLS AND ACTIONS

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Resume Component Check List

   Resume Lead-in (objective or profile)

        Does it use business language that is action oriented?

        You need to have a specific job title that you are seeking (resumes must be tailored to each
         recipient, particularly if you are sending a resume for a specific position).

        Show your most prominent strengths.

        Indicate the type of responsibility that you can hold.

        Show how your contributions will specifically benefit the employer.

   Professional Qualifications

        Does this section highlight each of your major strengths?

        Are all the qualifications/achievements related to the career objective?

        Is there appropriate usage of key action words that connote your sense of urgency?

        Have you described each in such a way that the reader clearly understands the benefits of
         your achievements?

   Experience

        For each job listed, have you listed the Job title, Function and Employer‘s name?

        Have you updated the language of your resume to include updated jargon that is widely used
         in your targeted industry?

        Will the reader understand the level of responsibility that you had from reading the
         information?

        Does this section talk about accomplishments and not about responsibility? Do you try to
         quantify your accomplishments?

        Don‘t be timid about listing non-paid accomplishments that you may have achieved for an
         organization.

   Education

        Does the section begin with the highest academic achievement and work?

        Did you include other training (even if it is non-academic) that might be relevant?

        Have you listed credits that might be irrelevant?


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   Professional Organizations and Community Activities

        List only those items that have specific relevance to your career objective.

        Does it list any organizations that don‘t present a professional image?

        Does it highlight organizations that will give your prospective employer an advantage with
         your contacts and business relationships?

        Does it refrain from personal information?

   Overall

        Does the resume look great? Have you highlighted or boldfaced titles, subtitles and other
         important information?

        Is there enough white space – does the text flow for ‗easy reading‘?

        Has the resume been checked by you and at least two others for spelling, punctuation,
         syntax and grammar? Have you checked it at least 10 times?

        Does the body of the resume complement the career objective?

        Does the resume focus on what the employer wants to see?

        Does the resume use the word ―I‖ – it shouldn‘t.

        Don‘t include references on the resume.

        Would you consider this resume to be an excellent sales tool for your performance and past
         accomplishments?




   When you are ready . . .
       Print it as needed on a laser printer if you have one. Avoid paper colors other than white or ivory.
       Modify the resume for a position that you are keenly interested to personalize your specific
       advantages.




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Tips and Techniques

           It‘s All She Wrote: A resume should never be longer than two pages. It’s your job to get
            noticed not the interviewers to find out what matters on your resume.

           Industrial Strength: If you have worked for Blue Ribbon companies use a resume format that
            highlights employers. If you had interesting assignments, then highlight experience with
            resume format.

           Power Statement: Replace job objectives with a power statement that describes your area of
            expertise (e.g. “Organizational Design Specialist” not “Human Resources Generalist”),
            demonstrate what you do (e.g. “align HR systems with organization strategy “not” design and
            develop...”) and how you do it (e.g. “value-added consultant style”)




Resume Impact Checklist : How Good is Your Resume?

1. Positioning:

      If I spend just 10 seconds glancing at my resume, what are the ideas/words that pop out?
       (specific job titles, my degree, specific company names):
      This is how I am ―positioned‖ by my resume. Is this how I want to be positioned for this target
       area? Or is this positioning a handicap for the area I am targeting?


2. Level:

      What level do I appear to be at? Is it easy for the reader to guess in 10 seconds what my level
       is? (For example, if I say I ―install computer systems,‖ I could be making anywhere from $15,000
       a year to $200,000 a year.)


3. Summary Statement:

      If I have no summary statement, I am being positioned by the most recent job on my resume. Is
       that how I want to be positioned?
      If I have a summery, does the very first line position me for the kind of job I want next?
       a) Does a statement that elaborates follow this first statement?
       b) Do statements that prove how good I am or differentiate me from my likely competitors follow
             this statement?
       c) Have I included a statement or two that give the reader an indication of my personality or my
             approach to my job?




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4. Accomplishments:

      Within each job, did I merely list historically what I had done, or did I state my accomplishments
       with an eye to what would interest the reader in my target area?

      Are the accomplishments easy to read?
       a) Bulleted rather than long paragraphs.
       b) No extraneous words.
       c) Action oriented.
       d) Measurable and specific.
       e) Relevant. Would be of interest to the readers in my target area. Either the accomplishment
           is something they would want me to do for them, or shows the breath of my experience.


5. Overall Appearance:

      Is there plenty of white space? Or is the information squeezed so I can get it on one or two
       pages?
      Is it laid out nicely so it can serve as my marketing brochure?



6. Miscellaneous:

      Length: is the resume as short as it can be while still being readable?
      Writing style: can the reader understand the point I am trying to make in each statement?
      Clarity: am I just hoping the reader will draw the right conclusion from what I‘ve said? Or do I
       take the trouble to state things so clearly that there is no doubt that the reader will come away
       with the right message?
      Completeness: is all-important information included? Have all dates been accounted for?
      Typos: is my resume error-free?




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Resume Action Word List

   accelerated                         bargained                  confirmed
   accepted                            began                      conserved
   accompanied                         bolstered                  consolidated
   accomplished                        briefed                    constructed
   accounted for                       broadcast                  consulted
   achieved                            brought                    contracted
   acquired                            budgeted                   continued
   acted                               built                      contracted
   addressed                           calculated                 contributed
   adjusted                            caste                      controlled
   administered                        cataloged                  converted
   adopted                             caste                      conveyed
   advanced                            cataloged                  convinced
   advertised                          caught                     cooperated
   advised                             caused                     co-opted
   aided                               chaired                    con
   allocated                           changed                    coordinated
   allotted                            charted                    copied
   alphabetized                        checked                    copyrighted
   altered                             chose                      corrected
   amended                             clarified                  corresponded
   amplified                           classified                 counseled
   appointed                           cleared                    counted
   appraised                           cleared up                 crafted
   approved                            closed                     created
   arbitraged                          coached                    critiqued
   arbitrated                          collaborated               dealt
   argued                              collected                  debated
   arranged                            combined                   debugged
   articulated                         commended                  decided
   assembled                           communicated               decreased
   assessed                            compared                   defined
   assigned                            compensated                delegated
   assisted                            competed                   delivered
   assumed                             compiled                   demonstrated
   assured                             completed                  described
   attained                            composed                   designed
   attended                            conceived                  detailed
   audited                             conceptualized             detected
   auditioned                          concluded                  determined
   authored                            condensed                  developed
   authorized                          conditioned                devised
   awarded                             conducted                  diagnosed
   balanced                            conferred                  diagrammed

©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
   digested                            exploited                  improved
   diminished                          explored                   improvised
   directed                            expressed                  incepted
   disciplined                         extinguished               included
   discovered                          extracted                  incorporated
   discussed                           facilitated                increased
   displayed                           familiarized               indicated
   distributed                         filed                      individualized
   documented                          financed                   influenced
   downsized                           fixed                      informed
   drafted                             focused                    initiated
   dramatized                          forecast                   innovated
   drew up                             foresaw                    inspected
   dropped                             forged                     inspired
   earned                              formulated                 installed
   edited                              fortified                  instilled
   educated                            forwarded                  instituted
   effected                            fostered                   instructed
   elaborated                          found                      insured
   elicited                            founded                    integrated
   eliminated                          freelanced                 interacted
   emphasized                          furnished                  interpreted
   employed                            furthered                  intervened
   encouraged                          gained                     interviewed
   energized                           gathered                   introduced
   enforced                            gave                       invented
   engineered                          generated                  inventoried
   enhanced                            governed                   investigated
   enjoyed                             graded                     involved
   enlarged                            greeted                    issued
   enlisted                            grossed                    jointed
   ensured                             guided                     kept
   entered                             handled                    labored
   entertained                         harmonized                 launched
   established                         hastened                   learned
   estimated                           heightened                 lectured
   evaluated                           helped                     led
   examined                            highlighted                licensed
   exceeded                            hiked                      listened
   excelled                            hired                      litigated
   executed                            hosted                     lobbied
   exercised                           housed                     located
   expanded                            hunted                     looked
   expedited                           identified                 made
   experimented                        illustrated                maintained
   explained                           implemented                managed

©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
   mapped out                          practiced                  reported
   marketed                            predicted                  represented
   mastered                            prepared                   rescued
   maximized                           presented                  researched
   measured                            presided                   reserved
   mediated                            prevailed                  resized
   memorized                           prevented                  resolved
   mentored                            processed                  responded
   met                                 produced                   re-staffed
   modeled                             programmed                 restored
   modified                            projected                  restructured
   monitored                           promoted                   resulted in
   motivated                           pronounced                 retained
   moved                               proofed                    returned
   named                               proofread                  revamped
   narrated                            proposed                   revealed
   negotiated                          proved                     reviewed
   netted                              provided                   revised
   observed                            publicized                 revitalized
   obtained                            published                  rewarded
   offered                             purchased                  rotated
   opened                              put                        said
   operated                            qualified                  sampled
   ordered                             quickened                  satisfied
   organized                           ran                        saved
   originated                          realized                   saw
   outlined                            received                   served
   overcame                            recharged                  set
   overhauled                          recommended                set up
   oversaw                             reconciled                 settled
   paid                                recorded                   shaped
   painted                             recruited                  shared
   participated                        rectified                  shipped
   perceived                           reduced                    stored up
   performed                           referred                   showed
   permitted                           registered                 sifted
   persuaded                           regulated                  simplified
   photographed                        rehabilitated              smoothed
   pinpointed                          reinforced                 sold
   pioneered                           related                    solved
   placed                              rendered                   sorted
   planed                              renewed                    sought
   planned                             renovated                  spearheaded
   played                              reorganized                specialized
   policed                             repaired                   specified
   portrayed                           replaced                   spoke

©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
   standardized                        surpassed                  translated
   stated                              surveyed                   transmitted
   stopped                             systematized               traveled
   straightened                        tabulated                  treated
   streamlined                         tackled                    tutored
   strengthened                        targeted                   typed
   stripped                            taught                     uncovered
   structured                          tested                     underscored
   studied                             tightened                  unearthed
   submitted                           took over                  updated
   suggested                           totaled                    upped
   summarized                          toured                     utilized
   supervised                          tracked                    welcomed
   supplied                            trained                    worked
   supported                           transferred                wrote
   surmounted                          transformed




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Job Interview Preparation
    Preparing for your interview . . .

       Review all of the information you have about the position.
       If you are working with a headhunter or recruiter, ask all the questions you want before you arrive.

       Learn all you can about potential employer.

        Get a copy of the company‘s annual report and read it.

        Visit the company‘s web-site on your PC or at your public library. This will be your most up to
         date view of the company.

        Be prepared to discuss the company‘s competitive environment; if possible get copies of the
         competition‘s company material as well.

        Assess what the company‘s major challenges are and how you can help them.

        Contact anyone that may have an ―insider‘s‖ view of the company to glean more about the
         company‘s personality.

        Read as much about the company‘s products as possible.

       Identify the qualifications that the company is seeking with this job hire.

        Understand the functions of the specific job.

        Attempt to speak with someone who might have a similar position.

        Be prepared to show how your background has prepared you for these specific requirements.

        Prepare illustrative stories to highlight your strengths.

        Tie these anecdotal stories to what is on your resume and how they apply to the job
         responsibility.

        Be prepared to discuss your management style and personal style.

        Anticipate the questions you are likely to be asked (review the most common questions
         checklist).

        Wear clothing in which you feel comfortable and confident.

        Ensure that you leave plenty of time to get to your appointment.

        Check your appearance.

        Bring additional copies of your resume.

        Pen and notepad (for post interview review)


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       During the interview

        Many questions seem like they might require simple yes or no answers. Avoid using a yes or
         no response. Explain your response.

        Emphasize the positive side of a potential weakness.

        Concentrate on the complementary skills that you have that match the job requirements.

              Detail how you contributed to increase efficiency/profits.
              Use terms that show you know the field.
              Ask questions that reveal you studied up on the company.
              Demonstrate your interest by making practical suggestions.

        Speak ill of no one in an interview; especially your current or former employers.

        Avoid discussion of salary until you have established a solid base of your qualifications.

              Don‘t hesitate to ask for more than you are currently making or expect to receive.
              Attempt to understand the role of other important benefits – see compensation and
               benefits checklist.

        Be enthusiastic during the interview; even if the job is not a match, you may be referred to
         another area if you leave a good impression.

        Glean what the negative aspects of the job/organization might be.

       Ask questions that will help you determine if this is the right job:
           What are the possibilities for growth/advancement?
           Why (and where) did the person who held the job go?
           How many people would have to okay decisions made by you?
           What is the official job classification?
           What is the policy on salary review?
           What are the fringe benefits?
           Who would you report to and what is this person‘s position?

        Leave extra copies of your resume with interviewer.



       After the interview

        Write down everything you can remember about the interview.

        Send a follow-up letter.

              Restate what went well.
              Correct what did not go well, if possible.

        Telephone to see if any decision has been made. (Wait a week)



©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Tips and Techniques

          Friends at First Sight: When you are first greeted – smile, make eye contact and talk.

          Fear Knows No Friends: Your first thought should be “I am really delighted to meet you” and
           then say it like you mean it.

          The Longest Mile: Use time on the walk from the reception area to compliment the company,
           office, staff (i.e. receptionist). Be sincere.

          Arm and Arm: Never walk behind the interviewer unless you must. Walk together as
           colleagues.

Commonly Asked Interview Questions

       Be prepared to answer even the most challenging questions you may be asked during an
       interview. In this section we have included strategies and techniques for providing good
       responses to the most commonly asked interview questions—ranging from career to sensitive
       issues.

       Each situation is different, so use what is here as an opportunity to practice. Think through how
       you would answer the question and then check our suggestions on responding.

Questions with Suggested Responses

       Your Career

       Tell me about yourself. Talk about skills, traits, accomplishments and interests. Focus on what
       you know this employer needs and select the most relevant material you have. Be sure this is
       concise and of reasonable length.

       Tell me about your last job. Discuss what you have done, stressing accomplishments, results
       and benefits to the organization. This is another opportunity to point out accomplishments. In
       selecting material, pick the items most relevant to the needs of the employer who asked the
       questions.

       Are you satisfied with your career progress? If you are not satisfied with your career
       progress, the person to talk to is your career consultant, not your interviewer. This is an excellent
       opportunity to discuss how the position at hand is an appropriate and logical next step for you. It
       is also an opportunity to discuss what you have learned in your career in the past which may
       apply to the job at hand.

       Where do you see yourself in your career over the next five years? Ten years? The
       interviewer is looking to see if your aspirations fit the realities of the organization. This question
       can also be a way of gauging your level of ambition. Some organizations would like to hear you
       say that you plan to be their president in 10 years. Others would immediately screen you out for
       the same answer. If possible, suggest career paths that you know are realistic and reasonable
       for the organization. You can also turn this question around, asking your interviewer: What kind
       of career progress is possible, assuming that I do well in the immediate position.


©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
       Your Current (or last) Position

       Why are you leaving (or did you leave) your present employer? This question is usually
       asked to determine whether you have some problems or flaws that led to your leaving your last
       position. You need to reassure your interviewer that there are no such problems. Your
       confidence and tone are nearly as important as your words. This is a predictable question. It is
       almost always asked. If your departure was performance or personality related, you need to
       rehearse and make sure your references will support your explanation.

       What size budget have you been responsible for managing? Answer the question, possibly
       with more than one example from various positions. Ask immediately (possibly before answering)
       how big is the budget you will need to manage in the position at hand.

       This question could be asked to get a feeling for the scope of your previous responsibilities or the
       size of your paycheck. It could also be asked because your interviewer suspects that you are not
       qualified for the position at hand.

       What kind of person is/was your immediate supervisor? This is an excellent opportunity to
       discuss some of the things you most admire about your last supervisor or that person's
       accomplishments. If you criticize your last supervisor at a job interview, you have just signaled
       your willingness to criticize your next supervisor behind his or her back as well.

       Furthermore, any indication of problems with your last supervisor may be taken as a sign that you
       are unable to get along with supervisors. Remember, you are talking to a person who does not
       know you and you do not have time to explain all the details. If you have ever had problems with
       supervisors, be sure to prepare carefully for this kind of question

       What responsibilities do you enjoy most in your current position? If the responsibilities are
       identical to those in the job at hand, you become a better candidate. If they have nothing to do
       with the job at hand, you might be seen as less of a candidate. If your last job and your next job
       are significantly different, find honest ways to bridge the gap. This response is one that needs to
       be thought through in advance if you are looking at jobs significantly different than your last one.

       What is your current compensation? Delay discussions of compensation as long as possible.
       You are the seller here and the interviewer is the buyer. Early discussions of price are always to
       the seller's disadvantage. Once the buyer has made a firm decision to buy, price negotiations are
       much easier for the seller.

       Your initial strategy needs to be to convince the interviewer that you are the number one
       candidate. Once you have established yourself as the number one candidate (i.e., you have an
       offer), the question becomes: How much extra is this organization willing to pay to get their first
       choice?

       Your strongest argument is that your last job and the job at hand are different and salary
       comparisons are therefore not relevant. Furthermore, you need to have more information on the
       job at hand in order to get a clear understanding of what fair compensation would be. Therefore,
       you need to discuss the job before discussing compensation further.




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       What this amounts to is changing the subject, which is exactly what you want to do. If your
       interviewer will not let you get away with that, you really have no alternative but to answer. You
       may, however, be able to respond with what you want to be paid rather than what you were paid.
       The line is: I am looking for...

       Once you have given your last salary, the general assumption is that your next one will be a slight
       increase above it. If your last salary was higher than the job for which you are interviewing, this
       question presents a different dilemma. Naming a higher salary is likely to get you tagged as
       overqualified. The fear here is that you will accept the position at hand only as a stopgap
       measure and will leave as soon as you find something better.

       Your Background, Skills and Experience

       How would you describe your leadership style? This question is a way of getting you to
       describe your management and leadership style. It is a predictable question and people seeking
       management roles should be prepared to answer it.

       As with most questions, a carefully thought out honest answer is the best approach. If your
       management or leadership style differs significantly from the organization's, you probably do not
       want to work there.

       Like many other questions this one can be turned around: What kind of leadership and
       management styles predominate in this organization? What is top management's style.

       What are your strengths? What are your weaknesses? Again, the question about your
       strengths represents an opportunity to present your skills and achievements. Make them as
       relevant as possible. This question is nearly always a lead-in or set-up for the next question.

       "What are your weaknesses?" is a predictable and often asked question. If you name
       weaknesses, which are both relevant to the job at hand and significant, you have practically
       guaranteed that you will be screened out.

       There are two classic answers to this question. The first is providing a weakness which from the
       company's point of view is not really a weakness. An example is: My spouse says I work too
       hard. Or, for a mid-level financial manager: Some people say that I am too rigid about accuracy
       and deadlines. And I must admit that I am extremely fussy about both of them.

       Or, for a salesperson: I have been criticized sometimes for pressing too hard to close the sale.
       And I must admit I sometimes do press pretty hard.
       The other classic answer is: From what I know about this position so far, I can honestly say that I
       have no weaknesses which would prevent me from doing the job very well. It looks exactly like
       the kind of job I want. It involves doing what I do best.




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       Your Educational Background

       What formal education or training have you had? This question is a concern for a more
       experienced person only if they do not have the level of formal education normally associated
       with the job. In that case, have an answer ready.

       A recent graduate needs a well-prepared presentation on the specifics of the education, which fits
       with the job.

       What prepares you to do this job? Did you receive any awards, honors or scholarships?
       This is an opportunity for someone with little or no formal work experience to elaborate on
       whatever relevant experience they do have, and to discuss their education. If you are at the entry
       level, remember that most candidates do not have very much experience. Therefore, your ability
       to elaborate on whatever experience you do have is a significant advantage.

       Your Current Search Efforts

       Have you searched for suitable positions within your present company, and if not, why
       not? For employed people, searching their own organizations before considering a move is a rule
       of thumb. Explain why there are no adequate possibilities.

       Did you prepare your own resume? Most effective people get the best advice they can get and
       then make their own decisions. You should have written and/or approved every word in your
       resume.

       How would you rate the position at this company with others you might be considering? A
       possible answer: It is certainly one of the best. Until I've had an offer from you, I can't tell whether
       it's the best. You should decline any invitations to discuss details of any of your other offers or
       discussions.

       Your Prospective Employer

       What do you know about this company, and where did you find this information? If you
       have had time to do effective preparation, the best answer is that you have significant information
       about the company and that it comes from a number of different sources: directory entries,
       reading company literature and talking to both current and former employees. Your research prior
       to interviewing is extremely important, even if this question is never asked. If the question is
       asked, you score double.

       Sensitive Issues

       Do you think that you might be overqualified for this position?

       Overqualified is nearly always a code word for ―We are not planning to pay what you have been
       making.― Therefore, we believe you are likely to find a better job than this and will quit this one as
       soon as you do.




©copyright Onward Education & Training 2007 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
       One possible approach to this question is to ask the interviewer to identify the real concerns.
       Common sense suggests that they would want the most overqualified person they could possibly
       get. Who would want an underqualified person? So what is the real issue?

       You might ask: Are you concerned that I don't plan to stay with this company for the long term?
       Then you would need to provide credible reassurance.

       It is also possible that they have a misunderstanding of your past compensation.

       Has your work ever been criticized? What was said?

       Everyone's work is criticized from time to time. If the criticism is not overly frequent or overly
       severe people usually do not remember the specifics. This could be an opportunity to talk about
       your proven ability to use criticism as an opportunity to improve.

       Do you object to taking psychological tests? This is usually a prelude to scheduling them. Any
       objection could be taken as a sign that you expect to fail them. The good news is that it is nearly
       always a sign that you are a serious candidate. Most of these tests are impossible to fake or
       finesse. So, if you are interested in this company, relax and go ahead.




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Phone Call Organizer

1. Contact Name


2. What materials are needed?


3. Purpose of call


4. Who referred you?


5. Beginning statement


6. Comments to create common interests; reason for your interest


7. Questions you have about the company / position / contact


8. Confirm what you agreed to and clearly understand any steps


9. Thank You




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Weekly Goals and Objectives

For the Week of: ____________________________

                                                                   Daily Activities

              Monday                    Tuesday                     Wednesday                     Thursday                     Friday

1.                              1.                           1.                          1.                          1.

2.                              2.                           2.                          2.                          2.

3.                              3.                           3.                          3.                          3.

4.                              4.                           4.                          4.                          4.

5.                              5.                           5.                          5.                          5.

6.                              6.                           6.                          6.                          6.

7.                              7.                           7.                          7.                          7.

8.                              8.                           8.                          8.                          8.

9.                              9.                           9.                          9.                          9.

10.                             10.                          10.                         10.                         10.

     Goals:                                                                 Results:

     Number of Meetings: ____ (network contacts)                            Number of Job Leads Obtained: _____ (from all sources)
     Number of Telephone Calls: ____ (follow-up calls, set appointments)    Number of Interviews Set: _____ (appointments made this week)
     Letters: ____ (ad responses, job leads, etc.)



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Job Search Log

   Date Complete          Company Name            Contact Person    Contact (Letter,   Result   Follow-up / Next
                                                                   Phone, Interview)                 Steps




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