MICHAEL ARKFELD, ESQ. TO TEACH ELECTRONIC DISCOVERY AND EVIDENCE

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MICHAEL ARKFELD, ESQ. TO TEACH ELECTRONIC DISCOVERY AND EVIDENCE Powered By Docstoc
					Media Release
                                                                                                    P.O. Box 8795
                                                                              Williamsburg, Virginia 23187-8795
                                                                             (757) 221-2494 • Fax: (757) 221-3708
                                                                                                ctrm21@wm.edu


   Media Contact:
   Tammi Flythe
   Ph: (757) 221-2494
   Fax: (757) 221-3708
   lsflyt@wm.edu                                                            FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

       MICHAEL ARKFELD, ESQ. TO TEACH ELECTRONIC DISCOVERY AND
          EVIDENCE DURING COURTROOM 21 SUMMER CLE TRAINING
   May 20, 2004, Williamsburg, VA – Practicing Attorney, Author and Electronic Discovery & Evidence Expert
   Michael R. Arkfeld, Esq. will instruct two courses with Courtroom 21 lawyers during the Courtroom 21 Project’s
   Summer Legal CLE Training scheduled July 12-16, 2004 at William & Mary Law School in Williamsburg, Virginia.

   The first course, held on July 12, 2004, is “Electronic Discovery and Evidence”. This course will investigate one of
   the most rapidly evolving procedural areas of litigation in modern history. Electronic Discovery touches practically
   all areas of litigation. Coordination between the trial lawyer, corporate counsel, and the client's IT/MIS department
   is imperative to deal with preservation, privilege, and production issues, to avoid sanctions from the judge or
   special master. All parties must understand the strategies and tactics involved in this very new, fruitful, sometimes
   invasive, potentially disruptive and often expensive form of discovery. The course is designed to take the
   participant through the subject matter and into the technology itself, including service companies, computer
   forensic experts, and software applications used for searching and document management. Discovery strategies
   will be discussed as well as evidentiary issues at trial. Finally, practical issues will include studies relating to
   corporate planning, costs, and document retention policies.

   The second one-day course with participation by Michael Arkfeld is “Deposition of the Technology Witness: A
   Course for Litigators, Systems Administrators and Forensic Experts” held on Friday, July 16, 2004. With over
   93% of information stored electronically, systems administrators and computer forensic experts are extremely
   useful to the discovery, admissibility, and persuasive weight of electronic evidence. Discovering where the
   electronic evidence may be located within an organization, as well as backup and archival policies, document
   retention policies and procedures, is a key to success. Systems Administrators testify about the computer system
   set-up, computer platforms, and policies. Effectively finding the relevant evidence is only the first step. Expert
   testimony is a key tool for convincing the judge that the production and extraction of the electronic data is
   complete and accurate. Ensuring that your expert witness is the most credible and persuasive is the goal.
   Participants will learn through lectures and demonstrations how to prepare, present, and question forensic expert
   witnesses at deposition and trial.

   In addition to the topics instructed by Arkfeld, Courtroom 21 Summer Training will offer courses in Courtroom
   Technology, Persuasive Courtroom Presentation Technology, and Electronic Discovery of E-mail. Continuing
   legal education credit is available for most states, including Virginia and New York. Detailed information on the
   Summer       Legal    Training    Courses     can     be    found     on   the   Courtroom    21    website     at
   www.courtroom21.net/summer_training.         Please contact Mollie Nichols for additional information and
   government/group discount information at (757) 221-3941 or mcnich@wm.edu.

   About Michael R. Arkfeld, Esq.

   Michael R. Arkfeld is a practicing attorney specializing in civil tort litigation. He has appeared before both federal
   and state appellate courts and has tried over 30 cases to a jury. In 1996-1997 he assisted in the information
   technology planning and implementation in the Winstar litigation that involved over 100 Department of Justice
   attorneys, 400 plaintiffs and over 60 of the major law firms in the country with potential liability of twenty billion
   dollars. He also provided litigation technology planning assistance in the A12 stealth fighter case involving a
breach of contract action against the federal government. He lectures frequently throughout North America and
internationally on the impact of technology to the practice of law, and on discovery and admission of electronic
evidence. Arkfeld is also the author of The DIGITAL PRACTICE OF LAW (5th Ed.): A PRACTICAL REFERENCE FOR
APPLYING TECHNOLOGY CONCEPTS TO THE PRACTICE OF LAW and most recently ELECTRONIC DISCOVERY AND
EVIDENCE (Law Partner Publishing 2003).


About Courtroom 21

The Courtroom 21 Project is an ongoing international demonstration and experimental effort that seeks to
determine how technology can best improve all components of the legal system. It includes, in the College of
William & Mary Law School’s McGlothlin Courtroom, the world's most technologically advanced trial and appellate
courtroom. A joint project of the Law School and the National Center for State Courts, the Courtroom 21 Project,
“The Courtroom of the 21st Century Today,” is a 1997 recipient of a Foundation for Improvement of Justice Award
for its efforts to improve the administration of justice through technology. The Project includes two Courtroom 21
Portable Courtrooms, full-size traveling high technology courtrooms now in great demand for professional
conferences. The Courtroom 21 Project provides education and training for judges and lawyers, consulting
services, and the Courtroom 21 Select Panel of Special Masters for Electronic Discovery Disputes. The Project is
also the hub of the Courtroom 21 Court Affiliates a growing network of state, federal, non-United States courts,
and federal agencies, currently in excess of 2000 judges and 2,500 courtrooms, interested in the efficient use of
courtroom and related technologies.




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