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					                                     POLICY DOCUMENT CONTROL PAGE

                      Title:   Staff Dress Code and Uniform Policy

                      Version: 2
  TITLE




                      Reference Number: HR24


                      Supersedes: Version 1
SUPERSEDES




                      Amendments: acceptable/non acceptable dress code for different staff groups
ORIGINATOR




                      Originated By: Human Resources

                      Designation:    People and Development Director
BOARD AND EXECUTIVE




                      Referred for approval by: Human Resources

                      Date of Referral: 31.07.08
     APROVAL




                      Approved by: IGEG

                      Approval Date: 31.07.08

                      Executive Director Lead: Director of Operations



                      Issue Date: 6.8.08
CIRCULATION




                      Circulated by: Corporate Governance

                      Issued to: Circulation list




                      Review Date: July 2009
REVIEW




                      Responsibility of: Human Resources

                      Designation: People and Development Director




                Staff Dress Code and Uniform Policy                                        Page 1 of 10
                       POLICY CONTROL PAGE (2) CIRCULATION
                                   DOCUMENT


Circulation :


An e-copy of this policy is sent to all wards and departments (Trust Policy Pack
Holders) who are responsible for updating their policy packs as required.

This policy is to be disseminated to all relevant staff.


This policy must be posted on the Intranet.

Date Posted: 6.8.08




      Staff Dress Code and Uniform Policy                        Page 2 of 10
                      Staff Dress Code and Uniform Policy

                                 Table of Contents

1.0 INTRODUCTION
       1.1 Scope

2.0 IMPLEMENTATION OF THE DRESS CODE POLICY

3.0 RESPONSIBILITIES
      3.1 Employees
      3.2 Managers

4.0 DRESS CODE
     4.1 Acceptable clothing
     4.2 Non-acceptable clothing – Staff working in the community
     4.3 Non-acceptable clothing – staff based in clinical and in patient
     areas
     4.4 Non-acceptable clothing – staff working in administrative
     functions with little or no patient/service user contact
     4.5 Non-acceptable accessories or appearance, which pose a
     cross Infection risk

5.0 COMPENSATION FOR DAMAGE TO PERSONAL CLOTHING ETC

6.0 PROTECTIVE CLOTHING AND EQUIPMENT

7.0 FOOTWEAR

8.0 TATTOOS

9.0 JEWELLERY AND PIERCING

10.0 HAIR

11.0 FACIAL COVERS

12.0 NAILS

13.0 TRUST CLINICAL UNIFORMS
      15.1 General Requirements

14.0 PROTECTIVE CLOTHING

15.0 ESTATES AND FACILITIES STAFF

16.0 POLICY REVIEW




Staff Dress Code and Uniform Policy                            Page 3 of 10
1.0 INTRODUCTION

This policy sets out the expectations of the Trust in relation to corporate
dress code and the wearing of Trust uniforms.

The Dress Code (& Uniform Policy) is necessary in order to: -
   • Convey a professional image of the Trust and individual
   • Give patients confidence
   • Support infection control
   • Have regard to health and safety considerations for staff

The Trust considers the way employees dress and their appearance is
of significant importance in portraying a professional image to all users
of its services, whether patients, visitors, clients or colleagues.

1.1 Scope

The policy applies to all clinical and non-clinical staff groups, including those
with honorary contracts, seconded, agency workers, bank workers, volunteers
and students when working on Trust premises.

2.0 IMPLEMENTATION OF THE DRESS CODE POLICY

The Dress/Uniform Code Policy is designed to guide managers
and employees on the Trust standards of dress and appearance. All
employees’ appearance must be professional at all times both within
the workplace and when representing the Trust.

The Policy is not exhaustive in defining acceptable and unacceptable
standards of dress and appearance and staff must use common sense
in adhering to the principles underpinning the policy.

The Trust recognises the diversity of cultures, religions and disabilities
of its employees and will take a sensitive approach when this affects
dress and uniform requirements. However, priority will be given to
health and safety, security and infection control considerations. Risk
assessment will take place as appropriate.

In very specific circumstances, local dress codes may be agreed for
specific staff groups/services to clarify the sensible applications of this
Trust Dress Code. This must be approved by the respective Executive
Director.

All employees are supplied with a Trust identity security badge that should be
worn and visible at all times and should only be removed for safety reasons.
Employees working within the community must carry their Trust ID badges
with them at all times. It is the responsibility of the employee to inform their
manager if their ID badge is lost/stolen.




Staff Dress Code and Uniform Policy                                     Page 4 of 10
A magnetic name badge should also be worn by all employees who have face
to face contact with clients at all times. Badges will be provided free of charge
to employees who meet this criteria, however, where a badge is lost/stolen on
two or more occasions, the employee must pay for a replacement. It is the
responsibility of the employee to inform their manager if their name badge is
lost/stolen.

3.0 RESPONSIBILITIES

3.1 Employees

Employees are individually responsible for their general presentation,
appearance and personal hygiene and have a responsibility to consider
how their appearance may be perceived by others. This means that staff
should wear clothing which :
   • Is appropriate to their role
   • Is not likely to be viewed as offensive, revealing, or sexually
      provocative
   • Does not distract, cause embarrassment or give rise to
      misunderstanding
   • Is absent of any political or otherwise contentious slogans
   • Is not considered to be discriminatory and is culturally sensitive
   • Does not place themselves or others at risk

Employees are responsible for following the standards of uniform/dress
and appearance laid down in this policy and must understand how this
policy relates to their working environment, health and safety, infection
control, particular role and duties and contact with others during the
course of their employment.

3.2 Managers

Managers are responsible for ensuring the Policy and Dress Code is
adhered to at all times in respect of the employees they manage.
Managers must also ensure that all new employees are aware of the
required standards of this policy during the induction process.
Failure to adhere to the Trust’s standards of dress and appearance
may constitute misconduct and result in formal disciplinary
proceedings.

4.0 DRESS CODE

4.1    Acceptable clothing

For staff not required to wear uniform, examples of acceptable
clothing, include a combination of:

Skirts, blouses, smart T-shirts, jumpers, jackets, dresses, culottes, business
suits, jackets, trousers, polo shirts, shirts (with collars – long or short sleeve).



Staff Dress Code and Uniform Policy                                      Page 5 of 10
4.2       Non-acceptable clothing – Staff Working in the Community

For staff who are non-uniform wearers, the following items of clothing
are examples of unacceptable clothing, either on the grounds of health
and safety or for the Trust’s public image:

      •   Miniskirts
      •   Lycra cycling shorts or leggings
      •   Leisure shorts
      •   Camouflage clothing
      •   Transparent or “see-through” blouses, dresses or shirts
      •   Tracksuits
      •   Clothing with tears, holes and rips
      •   Low-cut T shirts or blouses
      •   Spaghetti/shoestring strapped tops
      •   Crop-tops
      •   Badges or emblems which may cause offense
      •   Items of clothing bearing logos, slogans or graphics, which could
          cause offence
      •   Baseball caps/hats
      •   High heeled or open toed, open backed types of shoes
      •   Clothes which restrict movement during manual handling
          manoeuvres
      •   Clothes which can easily snag on equipment during manual
          handling maneuvers e.g. cardigans, loose pockets
      •   Neck ties, necklaces, scarves or metal chains if a dangerous
          situation occurs or is likely.

4.3       Non-acceptable clothing – Staff Based in Clinical and In-patient
          Areas

      •   Miniskirts
      •   Lycra cycling shorts or leggings
      •   Leisure shorts
      •   Combat/camouflage clothing
      •   Transparent or “see-through” blouses, dresses or shirts
      •   Tracksuits
      •   Clothing with tears, holes and rips
      •   Low-cut T shirts or blouses
      •   Spaghetti/shoestring strapped tops
      •   Crop-tops
      •   Badges or emblems which may cause offense
      •   Items of clothing bearing logos, slogans or graphics, which could
          cause offence
      •   Baseball caps/hats
      •   Denim Jeans
      •   High heeled or open toed, open backed types of shoes
      •   Clothes which restrict movement during manual handling


Staff Dress Code and Uniform Policy                                    Page 6 of 10
          manoeuvres
      •   Clothes which can easily snag on equipment during manual
          handling maneuvers e.g. cardigans, loose pockets
      •   Neck ties, necklaces, scarves or metal chains if a dangerous
          situation occurs or is likely.

 4.4 Non-acceptable clothing – Staff Working in Administrative
     Functions with Little or no Patient/Service User Contact

      •   Miniskirts
      •   Lycra cycling shorts or leggings
      •   Leisure shorts
      •   Combat/camouflage clothing
      •   Transparent or “see-through” blouses, dresses or shirts
      •   Tracksuits
      •   Clothing with tears, holes and rips
      •   Low-cut T shirts or blouses
      •   Spaghetti/shoestring strapped tops
      •   Crop-tops
      •   Badges or emblems which may cause offense
      •   Items of clothing bearing logos, slogans or graphics, which could
          cause offence
      •   Baseball caps/hats
      •   Denim Jeans

4.5       Non-acceptable Accessories or Appearance, Which Pose a Cross
          Infection Risk

      •   Long and varnished fingernails or false nails when carrying out
          clinical procedures.
      •   The wearing of hand and wrist jewellery/wrist watches whilst hand-
          washing before and after a clinical procedure or preparing/serving food.
      •   Long hair, if not tied back, during clinical procedures or preparing/
          serving food.

5.0       COMPENSATION FOR DAMAGE TO PERSONAL CLOTHING ETC

Staff are required to adopt a common sense approach with regard to
the clothing, jewellery, glasses etc that they wear to work in terms of
expense. Staff must ensure that articles are appropriate to the type of
work that they carry out and also be mindful of any potential for
damage to/loss of personal property which may arise as a result of
carrying out their duties. The Trust discourages staff from coming to
work in overly expensive or ‘designer’ items and where employees
choose to do so and subsequently make a claim for damage to/loss of
such items, the Trust reserves the right to impose an upper limit of the
amount of compensation it re-imburses.

6.0       PROTECTIVE CLOTHING AND EQUIPMENT


Staff Dress Code and Uniform Policy                                      Page 7 of 10
The provision of personal protective equipment is the responsibility of
the Pennine Care NHS Foundation Trust. Each manager must ensure
that personal protective clothing and equipment is available to the
employee in accordance with the Provision of Personal Protective Equipment
Regulations 1992.

Staff in roles that require protective clothing, e.g. plastic aprons,
protective gloves, are required to wear this whilst carrying out their
duties in accordance with health and safety or infection control
requirements. If individuals are unsure about such requirements they
must discuss this with their manager.


7.0 FOOTWEAR

Footwear must be safe, sensible, in good order, smart and clean and
have regard to health and safety considerations. Employees must be able to
respond to any emergency situation without placing themselves at risk,
therefore the wearing of opened toed or open backed types of footwear, high
heeled shoes and flip flops should be avoided.

Certain jobs require staff to wear protective footwear. These staff must
wear the correct footwear for undertaking their work and if staff are
uncertain they must check with their line manager.

8.0    TATTOOS

Visible tattoos are to be discouraged and where present must not be
offensive to others. Where they are deemed to be offensive they must
be appropriately covered.

9.0    JEWELLERY AND PIERCING

Jewellery/piercings must be discreet and appropriate and must not be a
health and safety hazard. Jewellery/piercings must be removed before going
on duty where they are a risk to health and safety.

If in a clinical environment, any items of jewellery that creates the potential for
an act of violence or the possibility for entanglement (e.g. large hoops in
earlobes, large rings, necklaces, tongue piercing) must be removed whilst on
duty. Rings, which protrude from the finger, should not be worn as they may
cause harm to a patient when in situations involving restraint or when
assisting a patient with activity of daily living.

10.0   HAIR

Hair and beards should not compromise health and safety. Long hair should
be tied back when handling food, or when undertaking physical interventions



Staff Dress Code and Uniform Policy                                     Page 8 of 10
with patients. Beards must be neatly trimmed, unless this reflects the
individual’s religion where it must be tidy.

Headgear worn for religious purposes are permitted. The Hijaab must be
worn in a way that the wearer’s face remain visible. The Hijaab should be
fixed in such a way that it allows quick release. The use of press-studs or
Velcro will assist in achieving this.

11.0   FACIAL COVERS

Staff who wear facial coverings for religious reasons are expected to
remove them whilst on duty. This will ensure that the member of staff
is identifiable.

12.0   NAILS

Nail varnish including clear nail varnish, nail decorations and false nails are
not permitted in clinical areas or food preparation/serving areas. Nails must be
sufficiently short to ensure safe patient contact.

13.0   TRUST CLINICAL UNIFORMS

13.1       General Requirements

Some staff groups are required to wear uniform provided by the Trust.
Where uniforms are issued by the Trust they remain the property of the
Trust and staff must take responsibility to insure good care is taken of
them.

Staff must ensure they return any uniforms issued to them on
termination of their employment with the Trust.

Uniforms must always be worn in a clean and presentable fashion and
all staff must have a spare uniform with them in case one becomes
soiled during the shift.

The uniforms issued must not be altered or added to by the individual.
Maternity clothing will be provided.

All staff must be encouraged to change their uniform where facilities are
provided before going off duty. If this is not possible staff are permitted
to travel between home and work in their uniform as long as it is fully
covered by a coat.

The Trust does not provide a laundry service. For Infection control
purposes it is recommended that uniforms are changed every day.
Uniforms must be washed separately at 60-65C (or at the hottest
temperature shown on the Manufacturers’ label) and exposed to heat
by drying in direct sunlight or tumble dried or ironed when dry with a hot
iron.


Staff Dress Code and Uniform Policy                                   Page 9 of 10
14.0   PROTECTIVE CLOTHING

A number of clinical and non-clinical staff groups are required to wear
protective clothing as part of their individual role. The principles are
based upon the need for: -
   • Patient safety
   • Personal safety
   • Statutory regulatory requirements
   • Work environment
   • Health and safety requirements
   • Infection control requirements

15.0   ESTATES AND FACILITIES STAFF

Some staff within this service have specific clothing requirements
and will be provided with the items as appropriate based upon the need
for:
     • Personal safety
     • Hygiene
     • Statutory regulatory requirements
     • Work environment (including outside working)
     • Infection control


16.0   POLICY REVIEW

The policy will be reviewed in 2 years time.




Staff Dress Code and Uniform Policy                                  Page 10 of 10

				
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