Solid Waste

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					                                 Solid Waste
This section of the Catalog examines indicators related to solid waste. Indicators for
components of the Solid Waste issue are divided among categories such as volume
produced, recycling, landfills, and incineration.

Descriptions of the Indicator Categories

Solid Waste
It has been estimated that each American disposes of 4.4 pounds per person per day
of trash.1 Solid waste has normally been defined as materials that are discarded as
“trash” and handled as solids, as opposed to waste that is flushed down sewers and
handled as liquids. For the purposes of this report, solid waste will be distinguished as
domestic solid waste, industrial waste, agricultural waste, and sewage or municipal
wastes. Solid waste originating from a municipality is generally composed of paper,
plastics, glass, food wastes, ferrous metals, wood, rubber and leather, textiles,
aluminum, and other metals. During certain seasons of the year, grass clippings,
leaves, and other lawn and garden wastes can add to the solid waste load. Many of
these items can be recycled.

Disposal of solid waste in a manner that does not present negative environmental
impacts has often been difficult or expensive. Historically, large quantities of solid
waste were burned in open dumps, including materials that could be recycled. Mass
burning was discontinued due to public objections to smoke, odors, and health
problems. With passage of air pollution laws, landfills became more widely used. Now,
as space for disposing waste becomes limited, other options such as recycling, source
reduction, biodegradation, and controlled incineration are being practiced.

Landfills
In a sanitary landfill, a natural valley or ravine may be used to expedite excavation of a
hole in the ground that becomes the beginning of a landfill site. Over time, further
excavations are made and the excavated soil is used to cover the solid waste. Lime
may be spread over the waste to absorb and eliminate odors. Landfills are designed to
retain the waste they hold, but they almost always have leaching problems. For
additional discussion on landfill construction and potential problems, see the section of
the Catalog on Water issues and indicators.

Reducing, Reusing, and Recycling
Programs for recycling are becoming more common in communities, schools, and
workplaces. Reusing waste saves space in the landfill, reduces the amount of waste,
and conserves scarce resources. Paper can be repulped and made into new paper,

1
 Characterization of MSW in the US: 1994 Update, USEPA, Washington, DC, as reported in the
USEPA’s Municipal Solid Waste Factbook, Version 2.0, Steven Levy, Editor.
                             Catalog of Environmental Indicators
                       State Environmental Goals and Indicators Project
                            Florida Center for Public Management
                                         SW - 1
cardboard, or other paper products. Glass can be made into new containers. Metals
and aluminum can be remelted and used in new products. Food wastes can be used
as soil conditioners. Tires can be shredded and used in carpet processing or road
building. Shredded plastic beverage containers can be used in new fiber products.

Industry contributes a large proportion of the solid and hazardous wastes generated.
Many industries have developed waste minimization plans in their daily operations.
These plans include recycling on-site or off-site, recycling waste as a fuel or for heat
recovery, changing production processes or equipment, and substituting materials or
extending their use. Other efforts are targeted at changing inventory management,
reusing waste in other processes, additional employee training, waste concentration,
incineration, solvent recovery or distillation, and metal recovery or reclamation.

List of Indicators
Solid waste indicators are grouped according to the following categories:

Volume of Solid Waste
        Solid Waste Generation-Total
        Solid Waste Management
        Solid Waste Generation per capita
        Solid Waste Disposal
Solid Waste-Recycling
        Amount Recycled/Reduced
        Recycling and Source Reduction Programs
        Oil
        Tires
        White Goods
        Yard Waste/Compost
        Batteries
Landfills
        Number of Landfills
        Leaking Landfills
        Volume of Solid Waste to Landfills and Other Sites
        Landfill Management
Incineration

The list is summarized from state and federal environmental reports with the source for
each indicator given in parenthesis. The category listings are to facilitate ease of use
of the information. There will be numerous occasions where one indicator can fit into
another category in addition to the one in which it is listed.




                            Catalog of Environmental Indicators
                      State Environmental Goals and Indicators Project
                           Florida Center for Public Management
                                        SW - 2
                      Volume of Solid Waste
Solid Waste Generation-Total
•   Total Solid Waste Generated in U.S. and Discarded in Municipal Waste Stream
    (KY92) Source: Franklin Associates, Ltd., 1988.
•   Solid Waste Diversion (TN96) Source: not given.
•   Materials in the Waste Stream and Where They Go (MA95) Source: State Solid
    Waste Management. Description: Waste is broken down between paper, yard
    waste, glass, metal, plastic, wood, food, and other. Where it goes is ranked by
    percentile between recycling and composting, export, landfills, and combustion.
•   Highway Litter (Bags Collected per Mile) (MN92) Source: State Department of
    Transportation.
•   Current and Projected Municipal Solid Wastes Discarded in the U.S. (KY92)
    Source: Franklin Associates, Ltd., 1988.       Description: Paper and yard wastes
    account for 58 percent of the municipal solid waste discarded.
•   Trends in Municipal Solid Waste Generation (EPA92) Source: EPA
    Characterization of Municipal Solid Waste in the United States, 1960 to 2010 (June
    1990 Update).
•   Solid Waste Generation by Source (TN94) Source: not given.        Description:
    Measures the percentage of solid waste generation from industrial, residential,
    other, special, and commercial entities.
•   Municipal Solid Waste Generation by Source (Industrial, Commercial, and
    Household/Yard Waste) (KY92) Source: State and National Solid Waste
    Association.
•   Tons of Municipal Solid Waste Generated (FL94) Source: State Solid Waste
    Management Annual Report.
•   Municipal Solid Waste Generated per Capita (FL94) Source: State Solid Waste
    Management Annual Report.
•   Municipal Solid Waste (Recycling, Incineration, Landfills) (NE95) Source:
    Biocycle.
•   The Changing Landscape of Solid Waste Management Efforts Since 1980
    (Landfills, Towns Served by Solid Waste Recycling Centers, Towns with
    Household Hazardous Waste Collection Services and Served by Solid Waste
    Recycling Centers) (VT94) Source: State Department of Environmental
    Conservation. Description: This indicator shows the changing landscape of
    Vermont’s solid waste management efforts.
       Analysis
       These indicators measure solid waste generation, and, in some cases, the
       trends in solid waste generation. The indicators will facilitate the assessment of
       trends in waste reduction programs, waste generation per capita, and whether
       waste management methods are adequate to handle the rate of generation.

                             Catalog of Environmental Indicators
                       State Environmental Goals and Indicators Project
                            Florida Center for Public Management
                                         SW - 3
Solid Waste Management
•   State Solid Waste Enforcement Activities (Inspections, Notice of Violations,
    Penalties Collected, and Cases) (KY92) Source: State Division of Waste
    Management.
•   Municipal Solid Waste Management Trends (DIIR95) Source: Characterization of
    Municipal Solid Waste in the United States: USEPA 1994 Update. Description: If
    progress is being made, trends should demonstrate technological advances and
    shifts to more environmentally benign management techniques.        Measures
    composting, recycling, combustion, and landfill.
•   Waste Management by Category (Million Tons) (OH95) Source: State EPA Solid
    Waste Facility Report.
•   Change in Municipal Solid Waste Composition (FL94) Source: State Solid Waste
    Management Annual Report. Description: Tracking the change in the composition
    of the solid waste stream gives insight into the disposal habits of the public and
    assists decisionmakers in assessing which areas require attention to achieve
    reduction and/or to encourage recycling.
•   How the Nation’s Waste is Managed (Recycling, Waste-to-Energy, Incineration,
    and Landfill) (KY92) Source: Franklin Associates, Ltd., 1990.
•   Solid Waste Planning Regions (TN94) Source: not given. Description: Measures
    single-county regions, multi-county regions, areas with one active landfill, and areas
    with more than one active landfill. An indicator of solid waste management efforts.
•   Management of Solid Waste (Number of Dumps and Landfills) (MN93) Source:
    State Pollution Control Agency.
•   Number of Construction and Demolition Debris Facilities by County (OH95)
    Source: State Division of Solid Waste Management.
•   Counties With Solid Waste Coordinators (KY94) Source: State Division of Waste
    Management.
•   Tons of Municipal Solid Waste Processed in Recycling, Landfill, and Waste-to-
    Energy Facilities (FL94) Source: State Solid Waste Management Annual Report.
•   Out-of-State Solid Waste Shipments into Kentucky (KY92) Source: State Division
    of Waste Management.
        Analysis
        These indicators measure efforts in solid waste management. Trends in the
        different management methods can be determined if the indicators are
        measured for a minimum of three years. The indicators can help to determine
        best management practices, whether management is maintaining pace with
        waste generation, and whether more source reduction efforts are needed.

Solid Waste Generation per capita
•   Per capita Generation and Management of Municipal Waste (Amounts
    Generated, Amounts Landfilled, Incinerated, Recycled, etc.) (CCS95) Proposed.
•   Per capita Generation and Recovery of Municipal Solid Waste (DIIR95) Source:
    Characterization of Municipal Solid Waste in the United States: USEPA 1994
    Update.
                             Catalog of Environmental Indicators
                       State Environmental Goals and Indicators Project
                            Florida Center for Public Management
                                         SW - 4
•   Total and per capita Municipal Solid Waste Materials Recycled (FL94) Source:
    State Solid Waste Management Annual Report.              Description: This indicator
    highlights the trend in the amount of municipal solid waste (MSW) generated, which
    will indicate whether or not consumers are becoming conservation-conscious. Also,
    a knowledge of how much waste is being generated is necessary to understanding
    if the amount of material being recycled is rising. This indicator also reflects the
    amount of waste produced per person. It brings the problem down to the individual
    level, thus approaching the concept that solid waste is also an individual
    responsibility.
•   Average Resident’s Share of Municipal Solid Waste That Gets Buried in
    Landfills (CT94) Source: not given. Description: This indicator charts progress
    toward the goal of reducing reliance on landfills. Since 1986, five resource recovery
    plants have begun operation, collection of recyclables has risen to 21 percent of
    municipal waste, and some consumers have altered buying habits.
•   Pounds of Solid Waste Generated per Person per Day (WA95) Source: State
    Department of Ecology.
•   Annual Waste Rates, Pounds/Person/Year (CO95) Source: State Department of
    Public Health and Environment.
•   Number of Households Participating in Garbage Collection (KY94) Source:
    County Solid Waste Annual Report.
       Analysis
       These indicators measure solid waste generation per capita. If measured for a
       minimum of three years, the indicators can relate the changes in waste
       generation, the success of waste reduction programs, and the responsibility
       assumed at the individual level.

Solid Waste Disposal
•   Top 10 Counties in Municipal Solid Waste Disposal (NC95) Source: State Center
    for Health and Environmental Statistics.
•   Municipal Solid Waste Disposal, by County (in Tons) (NC95) Source: State
    Center for Health and Environmental Statistics.
•   Solid Waste Disposal (Disposal, Diversion, and the Diversion Goal) (CA95)
    Source: State Integrated Waste Management Board.
•   County Garbage Collection (Door to Door, Convenience Centers and Green
    Boxes) (KY92) Source: State Division of Waste Management.
•   Comparisons of Garbage Collection (TN94) Source: not given. Description:
    Measures growth in curbside garbage collection, convenience centers, and
    inadequate garbage collection, for all Tennessee counties from 1989 to 1996.
       Analysis
       These indicators measure trends in solid waste disposal other than per capita;
       for example, by county. If measured for a minimum of three years, the indicators
       can relate the changes in waste disposal or the results of waste reduction
       programs.


                             Catalog of Environmental Indicators
                       State Environmental Goals and Indicators Project
                            Florida Center for Public Management
                                         SW - 5
                      Solid Waste-Recycling
Amount Recycled/Reduced
•   Solid Waste Produced and Recycled (in Million Tons) (MN92) Source: State
    Pollution Control Agency and the Office of Waste Management.
•   Percent of Municipal Solid Waste Collected for Recycling (CT94) Source: not
    given. Description: The General Assembly established a goal of reducing and
    recycling 40 percent of Connecticut’s municipal solid waste stream by the year
    2000; the DEP has calculated that this would require 33 percent of the waste to be
    recycled.
•   Recycling Municipal Solid Waste (Materials Recovered)                (ME94) Source: not
    given.
•   Amount of Recyclables Collected and Their Corresponding Usage (Cat95)
    Proposed in the “Inventory of Indicators” and at the “National Goals Conference,
    1994”.
•   Waste Recovery for Recycling (EPA92) Source: USEPA Characterization of
    Municipal Solid Waste in the United States, 1960 to 2010 (June 1990 Update).
•   Total Tons of Material Recycled During Three Fiscal Years (NC95) Source: State
    Solid Waste Management.
•   Recyclable Materials Collected and Marketed (IL94) Source: Waste Generation
    and Management, Hazardous Waste Research and Information Center.
    Description: Reduced waste stream means reduced stress on the environment.
•   Percent Reduction in the Solid Waste Stream Due to Recycling (FL94) Source:
    Solid Waste Management Annual Report, Florida Department of Environmental
    Protection. Description: An indicator revealing the progress the state is making
    towards reducing the amount of MSW destined for the landfill.
•   Wisconsin Municipal Solid Waste Recovery Rates (Composted & Landspread,
    Discarded & Recycled) (WI95) Source: UW-Madison Recycling Economics Group
    in association with RecycleWorlds Consulting Corporation.
•   Tons of Recycled Materials, by Category (Paper, Glass, Metals, Plastics,
    Organics) (NC95) Source: State Solid Waste Management.
•   Percentage of Total Solid Waste Stream That Is Recycled or Avoided (CT95)
    Source: State Solid Waste Database.
•   Recycling Municipal Solid Waste (Paper, Metal, Glass, Demolition Debris/Other,
    Wood Waste, Composted, Plastics, and Textiles) Source: not given.
    Description: An indicator of reduction in solid waste flow and a change in society’s
    values regarding resources.
•   Tons of Municipal Solid Waste Processed in Recycling, Landfill, and Waste-to-
    Energy Facilities (FL94) Source: State Solid Waste Management Annual Report.
       Analysis
       These indicators measure the amount of waste reduced or recycled. Some
       indicators measure by category while others measure just the trends. The
                            Catalog of Environmental Indicators
                      State Environmental Goals and Indicators Project
                           Florida Center for Public Management
                                        SW - 6
indicators will measure declines or gains in the amount and variety of materials
recycled if measured for a minimum of three years.




                     Catalog of Environmental Indicators
               State Environmental Goals and Indicators Project
                    Florida Center for Public Management
                                 SW - 7
Recycling and Source Reduction Programs
•     Local Government Recycling Efforts (KY92) Source: Environmental Quality
      Commission, Local Environmental Issues Survey, 1990-1991. Description: This
      survey of Kentucky cities and counties identified 16 communities with curbside
      recyclables collection.
•     Counties With Commercial Recyclers (KY92) Source: State Division of Waste
      Management.
•     Local Governments with Source Reduction Programs (NC95) Source: State
      Solid Waste Management. Description: Source reduction reduces the amount of
      potential waste before it is generated and thereby decreases the amount of material
      which is collected, processed, and disposed.
•     Number of Local Government Recycling Programs (NC95, VT95) Source: State
      Division of Solid Waste Management.
•     Recycling Programs and Facilities (KY94) Source: State Division of Waste
      Management. Description: This indicator delineates changes in numbers of tire
      collection centers, tire recycling facilities, commercial recycling facilities, used oil
      collection centers, composting facilities, counties with door-to-door collection
      programs, and counties with drop-off centers.
          Analysis
          These indicators measure changes in the number of recycling and reduction
          programs. However, success of the programs should also consider measuring
          for a decrease in waste to landfills and other historical methods of waste
          management.

Oil
•     Gallons of Used Oil Collected (NC95) Source: State Solid Waste Management.
      Description: Used oil can be recycled for fuel and fuel supplements. Primary
      sources of recycled oil are service stations and fleet operations.
•     Amount of Usable Oil Collected (FL94) Source: Report to the Legislature, Florida’s
      Used Oil Recycling Program. Description: This indicator assesses how much oil is
      being removed from the waste stream and recycled for other purposes.
•     End Uses of Recycled Used Oil (Burners, Industrial Processors, Phosphate, &
      Other) (FL94) Source: Report to the Legislature, Florida’s Used Oil Recycling
      Program.
•     Percentage of Used Oil by Type (Automotive, Industrial, Mixed) (FL94) Source:
      Report to the Legislature, Florida’s Used Oil Recycling Program.
         Analysis
         These indicators measure the amount of used oil collected in recycling and
         reduction efforts. The indicators will measure declines or gains in the amount
         collected if measured for a minimum of three years. Additionally, it should be
         determined how much used oil is available that is not recycled every year.




                               Catalog of Environmental Indicators
                         State Environmental Goals and Indicators Project
                              Florida Center for Public Management
                                           SW - 8
Tires
•   Disposition      of     Scrap      Tires       Collected     (Landfilled,     Recycled,
    Reused/Miscellaneous, Unknown) (NC95) Source: State Solid Waste
    Management.        Description: In 1993, North Carolina increased the scrap tire
    disposal tax from 1 percent to 2 percent to provide funding for the cleanup of
    nuisance tire sites. The state has also become more proactive in working with
    counties to divert scrap tires from landfills to some type of recycling or reuse.
•   Number of Tires Collected (MN93) Source: State Pollution Control Agency.
    Description: Disposal bans keep problem wastes out of landfills. Yard wastes, tires,
    household appliances, and car batteries may no longer be disposed in landfills.
    Reducing the piles of tires in tire dumps has been an important effort for several
    years, and the 1992 MPCA’s Waste Tire Program received a national innovation
    award from the Council of State Governments.
       Analysis
       These indicators measure the amount of tires collected for recycling. Tires can
       be a source for products made with fiber construction. A rate of change in the
       number of tires collected can be established if the indicator is measured for a
       minimum of three years. Additionally, it should be determined how many tires
       are available annually that can be recycled.

White Goods
•   Tons of White Goods Collected (Refrigerators, Stoves, and Other Appliances)
    (NC95) Source: State Solid Waste Management.
       Analysis
       This indicator measures the amount of white goods collected for recycling and
       diverted from landfill space. A trend can be established if measured for a
       minimum of three years. Additionally, the tonnage of white goods thrown away
       annually should be determined. This will allow for the indicator to be used in
       measuring progress toward recovering a higher percentage of the white goods
       available annually.

Yard Waste/Compost
•   Growth in Community Composting (Number of Programs) (MA95) Source: State
    Solid Waste Management.
•   Amount of Yard Trash Composted (FL94) Source: State DEP and the “Solid
    Waste Management Annual Report”. Description: Yard trash is a significant part
    of the waste stream.
        Analysis
        These indicators measure composting as an indicator of reduced additions to
        the waste stream. A trend in the amount of composting can be determined if
        the indicator is measured for a minimum of three years.




                             Catalog of Environmental Indicators
                       State Environmental Goals and Indicators Project
                            Florida Center for Public Management
                                         SW - 9
Batteries
•   Used Batteries Collected (NC95) Source: State Solid Waste Management.
    Description: State law requires retailers who sell batteries to accept old batteries in
    return. The lead component of lead-acid batteries can be recovered.
        Analysis
        This indicator measures the number of batteries collected; hence, a reduction to
        the waste stream. It should be determined how many batteries are thrown out
        annually. This will allow for the indicator to be used in measuring progress
        toward recovering disposed batteries.




                             Catalog of Environmental Indicators
                       State Environmental Goals and Indicators Project
                            Florida Center for Public Management
                                         SW - 10
                                    Landfills
Number of Landfills
•   Status of Municipal Landfills (Existing Residential Landfills, Residential
    Landfills to Remain Open to 1995, Proposed Landfills) (KY92) Source: State
    Division of Waste Management. Description: This indicator shows the growth of
    landfills and the need to find alternatives.
•   Number of Landfills (NC95, KY94, NE95, FL94)              Source: State Solid Waste
    Management Divisions.
•   Status of Open Dumps (Cleaned Up or Awaiting Cleanup) (KY94) Source: State
    Division of Waste Management.
•   Inactive Landfills (Solid Waste and Sludgefarming Operations) (KY92) Source:
    State Division of Waste Management.
       Analysis
       These indicators measure the status and number of landfills. The number of
       landfills available for waste is diminishing, causing a severe problem in waste
       management and highlighting the need for waste reduction and recycling.
       These indicators will relate trends in the status and number of landfills if
       measured for a minimum of three years.

Leaking Landfills
•   Amount of Solid Waste-Related Contamination of Air, Soil, and Water (Cat95)
    Proposed for the “Goals Project,” in the “Inventory of Indicators,” and at the
    “National Goals Conference, 1994.”
•   Status of Groundwater Monitoring at Municipal Solid Waste Landfills (KY92)
    Source: State Division of Waste Management.        Description: This indicators
    demonstrates the number of landfills with no groundwater monitoring plan, with
    groundwater monitoring and no contamination detected, and groundwater
    monitoring and contamination detected.
•   Type of Contamination Detected at Municipal Landfills With Groundwater
    Monitoring (KY92) Source: State Division of Waste Management.
•   Use of Lined Landfills for Disposal of Municipal Solid Waste (MN93) Source:
    State Pollution Control Agency. Description: Landfill liners are used to prevent
    groundwater contamination.
       Analysis
       These indicators measure the problems associated with using landfills to hold
       solid waste, and are also indicators of the potential threat to groundwater. The
       indicators can track progress in reducing problems such as leaking landfills if
       measured for a minimum of three years.




                            Catalog of Environmental Indicators
                      State Environmental Goals and Indicators Project
                           Florida Center for Public Management
                                        SW - 11
Volume of Solid Waste to Landfills and Other Sites
•   Projected Amount/Years to Capacity for Landfills by Type of Waste (Cat95)
    Proposed in the “Inventory of Indicators” and at the “National Goals Conference,
    1994.”
•   Tonnage Received by Landfills and Solid Waste Incinerators (NC95) Source:
    State Solid Waste Management.
•   Status of Municipal Solid Waste Landfills (KY94) Source: State Division of Waste
    Management.      Description: This indicator shows the existing landfills without
    applications pending to operate past 1995, exiting landfills meeting 1995
    containment standards, existing landfills with expansion or modification permits
    pending to meet 1995 standards, and new solid waste landfills with permits pending
    to meet 1995 standards.
•   Existing and Proposed Capacity for Regional Municipal Solid Waste Landfills
    Compared to Projected Disposal Needs (KY94) Source: State Division of Waste
    Management.
•   Solid Waste Disposal at Municipal Solid Waste Landfills (Tons) (KY94) Source:
    State Division of Waste Management.
•   Number of Active Permitted Solid Waste Facilities, Other than Landfills or
    Incinerators (Yard Waste Composting Facilities, Mixed Waste Processing
    Facilities, Transfer Facilities, and Scrap Tire Collection Sites) (NC95) Source:
    State Solid Waste Management.
•   Total Identified Waste Sites (Cleanup Underway and Cleanup Completed)
    (VT95) Source: not given .
•   Number of Municipal and Industrial Solid Waste Landfills (KY92) Source: State
    Division of Waste Management.
•   Number of Publicly Available Landfills (OH95) Source: State Environmental
    Protection Agency Solid Waste Facility Report.
•   Municipal Waste Landfills Permitted to Accept Wastes with Toxic Constituents
    (KY92) Source: State Division of Waste Management.
•   Number of Solid Waste Facilities (CO95) Source: State Department of Public
    Health and Environment.
•   Number of Licensed Solid Waste Disposal Facilities (OH95) Source: State EPA
    Solid Waste Facility Report.
•   Locations of Solid Waste Facilities (NC95) Source: State Center for Health and
    Environmental Statistics.     Description: An indicator of the number of public
    municipal landfills, private municipal landfills, private industrial landfills, scrap tire
    monofills, and incinerators.
•   Number of Active Landfills and Average Tons Buried Daily (TN94) Source: not
    given. Description: An indicator of solid waste disposal growth.
       Analysis
       These indicators measure the volume of solid waste entering landfills, and the
       number of landfills and sites available to handle waste generation. They are
       also indirect measures of the success of waste reduction and recycling
                              Catalog of Environmental Indicators
                        State Environmental Goals and Indicators Project
                             Florida Center for Public Management
                                          SW - 12
       programs. Progress in reducing landfill holdings can be determined if the
       indicators are measured for a minimum of three years.

Landfill Management
•   States and Territories With Approved Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Programs
    (DIIR95) Source: USEPA, RCRA Information System.
        Analysis
        This indicator measures the number of landfill programs. Tracking progress with
        this indicator will depend on what the goal is, i.e., whether to reduce or increase
        the number of landfills or reduce the need for landfills.




                             Catalog of Environmental Indicators
                       State Environmental Goals and Indicators Project
                            Florida Center for Public Management
                                         SW - 13
                                Incineration
•   Pounds of Municipal Solid Waste Landfilled or Incinerated per capita per Year
    (OR92) Source: State Department of Environmental Quality, Hazardous and Solid
    Waste Division. Description: Measures the extent to which Oregon reduces
    municipal solid waste through recycling, product packaging requirements, or other
    means.
•   Percentage of State Solid Waste That Was Incinerated in 1992 (OH95) Source:
    State EPA Solid Waste Facility Report.
•   Number of Incinerators (NC95) Source: State Solid Waste Management.
    Description: Municipal, medical, and industrial incinerators.
       Analysis
       These indicators measure the growth and use of incinerators. Tracking
       progress with these indicators will depend on the stated goal (i.e., whether to
       reduce or increase the number of incinerators, or reduce the need for
       incinerators).




                            Catalog of Environmental Indicators
                      State Environmental Goals and Indicators Project
                           Florida Center for Public Management
                                        SW - 14

				
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