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                       The Little Book of Catherine of Dublin


Compiled by Don Mullan

12
NOT FOR THANKS
It is for God we serve the poor,
and not for thanks.
       Familiar Instructions of Rev. Mother McAuley. New and Revised Edition. St. Louis:
       Vincentian Press, 1927, p. 140



13
THE POOR
God knows I would rather be
cold and hungry
than the poor ... should be deprived
of any consolation
in our power to afford.
       Catherine McAuley to Mary Teresa White,
       November 1, 1838



14
THE POOR
It is better to relieve a hundred imposters
— if there be any such —
than to suffer one
really distressed person
to be sent away empty.
       Thoughts from the Spiritual Conference of Mother M. Catherine McAuley, Revered Foundress of
       the Sisters of Mercy, arranged for every day in the year. Dublin: M.H. Gill and Son, 1946. p.34



15
THE POOR
Sisters of Mercy should be
particularly kind —
the kindest people on earth,
with the tenderest pity and compassion
for the poor.
       Familiar Instructions, p. 137
16
THE PERSON OF THE POOR
What a consolation
to serve Jesus Christ Himself
in the person of the poor,
and to walk the very same path He trod!
       Familiar Instructions, P. 16



17
THE POOR
The Sisters whom God
has graciously called…
shall animate their zeal and fervour
by the example of their Divine Master
Jesus Christ,
who testified on all occasions
a tender love for the poor
and declared that He would consider
as done to Himself
whatever should be done unto them.
       Original Rule and Constitution of Sisters of Mercy: Chapter 1; article 2



18
CONTINUAL ACT OF PRAISE
Your whole life should be
a continual act of praise,
often in the day raising
your heart to God
and begging the grace to spend
that day, at least,
in His Service.
       Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
       Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. p.9



19
PRAISE
Now and again
bestow some praise.
       Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
       Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. p. 30
20
HUMBLE AND SINCERE
If we are humble and sincere,
God will finish in us the work
He has begun.
He never refuses His grace
to those who ask it.
        Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
        Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. p. 3



21
PURE AND GOOD
How silently and brilliantly
the lamp in the Sanctuary burns …
when the oil is pure and good;
it is only when it is otherwise
that it twinkles and makes noise.
        Limerick Manuscript, written by Vincent Harnett) 1911-1865), in Mary C. Sullivan, Catherine
        McAuley and the Tradition of Mercy. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 1995. p 174



22
THE PRACTICE OF VIRTUE
No one becomes perfect at once;
but as from little faults we fall into great,
so by the practice of lesser virtues
we ascend to the heroic.
        Thoughts from the Spiritual Conference of Mother M. Catherine McAuley, Revered Foundress of
        the Sisters of Mercy, arranged for every day in the year. Dublin: M.H. Gill and Son, 1946. p.15



23
CHARITY AND MERCY
How kind
and charitable
and merciful
ought not Sisters of Mercy to be?
        Limerick Manuscript, written by Vincent Harnett) 1911-1865), in Mary C. Sullivan, Catherine
        McAuley and the Tradition of Mercy. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 1995. p. 181



24
MORE THAN CHARITY
Mercy is more than Charity —
for it not only bestows benefits,
but it receives and pardons
again and again —
even the ungrateful.
        Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical e, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
        Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. p. 5 . Also on
        page 137
        Familiar Instructions of Rev. Mother McAuley. New and Revised Edition. St. Louis: Vincentian
        Press, 1927



25
CHARITY
Remember,
if there were a hundred regulations
to be observed,
the most important of these is Charity.
        Thoughts from the Spiritual Conference of Mother M. Catherine McAuley, Revered Foundress of
        the Sisters of Mercy, arranged for every day in the year. Dublin: M.H. Gill and Son, 1946. p. 24



26
CHARITY
Nothing will draw greater blessings on us
than strict attention to
every branch of charity.
Never command anything,
which you have not first
practiced yourself.
        Thoughts from the Spiritual Conference of Mother M. Catherine McAuley, Revered Foundress of
        the Sisters of Mercy, arranged for every day in the year. Dublin: M.H. Gill and Son, 1946. P.34-p.35



27
CHARITY
Our mutual respect and charity
is to be ‘cordial’;
now ‘cordial’ signifies something that
receives, invigorates, and warms:
such should be the effects of
our love for each other.
        Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
        Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. p.5



28
CHARITY
Let charity then be
our badge of honour…
so that it may truly be said,
there is in us but one heart
and one soul
in God.
       Familiar Instructions of Rev. Mother McAuley. New and Revised Edition. St. Louis: Vincentian
       Press, 1927, p. 107



29
CHARITABLE TO ALL
Although want of health or capacity
may hinder a Sister
from taking part
in the active duties … of the Institute,
she is yet doing a great deal,
both for God and her community,
if she is kind and charitable to all.
       Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
       Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. p. 4



30
CHARITY
Our divine Saviour’s example
should always be before us
under all circumstances,
particularly in exercising charity
towards our neighbour,
and more especially towards
those who are united with us
in religion.
       Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
       Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. p. 4



31
IMPLANT YOUR LOVE
Lord Jesus,
implant your love in my heart.
It is all I desire in this world
or in the next!
       Retreat Instruction s, p. 178



32
LOVE OF GOD
How can we teach the love of God
if our own hearts are cold?
       Retreat Instructions, p.154
33
JESUS
It is not sufficient that
Jesus Christ be formed in us —
he must be recognized
in our conduct.
       Degnan, Mary Bertrand, ed.] Retreat Instructions of Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. Westminster,
       Maryland: Newman Press, 1952. p. 72



34
MAXIMS OF JESUS
If we do not form our minds
on the maxims of Jesus Christ,
we will never acquire His evangelical
spirit.
       Retreat Instructions, p. 88



35
THE SCIENCE OF SALVATION
Reduce to practice
one virtue after the manner of
Jesus Christ,
and then another ...
until you go through
the whole science of salvation.
       Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
       Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. p. 25



36
PRACTICE THE WORD
If His blessed words ought to be
reverenced by all,
with what loving devotion
should a Religious lay them up
in her heart,
and try to reduce them to practice.
       Limerick Manuscript, written by Vincent Harnett) 1911-1865), in Mary C. Sullivan, Catherine
       McAuley and the Tradition of Mercy. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 1995. p. 173



37
A FAITHFUL PROVIDER
The Lord and Master of
our House and Home
is a faithful Provider.
Let us never desire more
than enough —
He will give that and a blessing.
       Catherine McAuley to Mary Teresa Purcell, (Early 1841), in Sullivan, ed., Correspondence. P.366



38
JESUS
We find those who can enumerate
very particularly
all that Jesus Christ said and did,
but what does he care for that?
He said and did so,
not that we should recount it in words,
but show Him in our lives,
in our daily practice.
       Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
       Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. Page 25



39
JESUS
In order to study Jesus Christ,
you must render yourself familiar
with His meekness, patience,
forbearance,
charity in word and work,
contempt of all earthly distinction,
sincerity, obedience,
love of prayer,
humility,
conformity.
       Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
       Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868.p. 24



40
MERCY, THE PRINCIPAL PATH
Mercy,
the principal path pointed out
by Jesus Christ
to those who are desirous
of following Him ...
to instruct and comfort the sick
and dying poor,
as in them they regarded the person
of our divine Master ....
       Original Rule and Constitutions of the Sisters of Mercy,   Chapter 3 article 1
41
GOD’S MERCY
Our Divine Master said,
“Amen, I say to you,
as long as you did it to one of these
my least brethren,
you did it to Me.”
       Original Rule, in Sullivan Catherine McAuley and the Tradition of Mercy, p. 297



42
CAUSE AND EFFECT
If we love God,
we will undoubtedly love
our neighbour also;
they are as cause and effect.
       Degnan, Mary Bertrand, ed.] Retreat Instructions of Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. Westminster,
       Maryland: Newman Press, 1952.p.147



43
GOD’S BLESSING
May He bless and protect you,
and make you the instrument
of His glory.
       Catherine McAuley to Frances Warde, June 16, 1838



44
GOD’S HOLY WILL
God’s Holy Will be done in all things.
May He never leave the choice to us.
       Catherine McAuley to Frances Ward, March 2, 1840



45
LIKE GOD
Be always striving to make yourself
like Him —
you should try to resemble Him
in some one thing at least,
so that any person who sees you,
or speaks with you,
may be reminded of
His Blessed life on earth.
       Bermondsey Annals, 1841, written by Mary Clare Moore in Mary C. Sullivan, Catherine McAuley
       and the Tradition of Mercy. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 1995. p. 117
46
GOD ALONE
God and God alone
must be the principal motive of
all our actions —
it is this pure intention of pleasing God
that renders the good works
valuable and meritorious.
Without this
the most laborious duties
of the Institute,
the greatest austerities,
the most heroic actions and sacrifices
are of little value ....
       Original Rule and Constitutions of the Sisters of Mercy. Chapter 5, article 3



47
GOD ASKS FOR OUR HEARTS
God asks for our heart ...
Do we offer it generously to God,
or do we rather seek to shelter it
from whatever might afflict it?
       Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
       Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. P.16-17



48
WORKING HEARTS
... What advantage are works to God?
But our working hearts He longs for,
and He vouchsafes to plead for them
with touching earnestness.
       Familiar Instructions of Rev. Mother McAuley. New and Revised Edition. St. Louis: Vincentian
       Press, 1927. p. 89



49
CONFIDENCE IN GOD
While we place all our confidence
in God,
we must act as if all depended
on our exertion.
       Catherine McAuley to Frances Warde , November 24, 1840
50
PEACE OF MIND
Never let anything cause you
trouble or anxiety
which is not an offence against God.
        Bermondsey Annals, 1841, written by Mary Clare Moore in Mary C. Sullivan, Catherine McAuley
        and the Tradition of Mercy. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 1995. p.111



51
CENTRED IN GOD
We have one solid comfort
amidst this little tripping about,
our hearts can always
be in the same place,
centred in God,
for whom alone we go forward
or stay back.
        Catherine McAuley to Mary de Sales White, December 20, 1840



52
AS THE COMPASS
[We should be] as the compass
that goes round its circle
without stirring from its centre.
Our centre is God,
from whom all our actions
should spring as from their source.
        Degnan, Mary Bertrand, ed.] Retreat Instructions of Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. Westminster,
        Maryland: Newman Press, 1952.



53
THE GREAT GOD
See how quietly the Great God works!
Darkness is spread over the earth
and light comes again at dawn,
yet there is never a sound of curtains
being drawn
or shutters being closed.
        Limerick Manuscript, written by Vincent Harnett) 1911-1865), in Mary C. Sullivan, Catherine
        McAuley and the Tradition of Mercy. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 1995. P.174. or Moore, Mary
        Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered Foundress,
        Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868.p 2
54
GOD — A DEAR FRIEND
We may address God
as we would a dear friend
to whom we owed a great deal ....
        Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
        Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. p.10



55
PRAYER
Prayer is a plant,
the seed of which is sown
in the heart of every Christian.
If it is well cultivated and nourished,
it will produce abundant fruit,
but if it is neglected
it will wither and die.
        Degnan, Mary Bertrand, ed.] Retreat Instructions of Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. Westminster,
        Maryland: Newman Press, 1952.p. 108-109



56
BE RECOLLECTED
A religious
should never allege as excuse
for saying what might give pain,
even unintentionally,
“I did not recollect”;
she should be always recollected ....
        Limerick Manuscript, written by Vincent Harnett) 1911-1865), in Mary C. Sullivan, Catherine
        McAuley and the Tradition of Mercy. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 1995. p. 173



57
LOVE OF SILENCE
To obtain recollection,
we must entertain
a great love for silence.
        Retreat Instruction, p. 187



58
THE WAYS OF GOD
You should now enter
on the ways of God ....
You should then endeavour
to know what are His ways.
        [Degnan, Mary Bertrand, ed.] Retreat Instructions of Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. Westminster,
        Maryland: Newman Press, 1952. p. 25



59
PRAYER
Prayer will do more
[to solve our difficulties] ...
than all the money
in the Bank of Ireland.
Let us pray well
and never grow weary.
        Catherine McAuley to Aloysius Scott, July 20, 1841



60
PRAYER
... Of all other gifts,
prayer must come from God:
hence, we must beg it continually,
with a profound humility
and untiring patience.
        Familiar Instructions, p. 52



61
THE PRESENCE OF GOD
The practice of the presence of God
is one-half of holiness.
        Familiar Instructions, p. 36



62
PRAYER
Pray for your portion of Easter Grace,
before the extra Treasury is closed.
Pray fervently and constantly,
do not give up until all is given you.
        Catherine McAuley to Mary de Sales White, April 19, 1841



63
THE CROSS
In vain can we hope
to be united to God
in any other way
than by the cross.
        Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
        Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. p.17
64
THE CROSS
When and how do we expect
to take up our Cross and follow Christ,
if we are not to meet with it
in those with whom we are associated?
        Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
        Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. p.17



65
THE CROSS
We seem to forget
that God calls upon us
to take our cross,
and that this cross
must be composed of something;
that He requires of us
constant watchfulness
over our thoughts and words.
        Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
        Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. P14



66
THE CROSS
Let us fly often to the foot of the cross
and repose in the wounds of Jesus.
He has written us on His hands.
Shall not we then write His wounds
in our minds and hearts?
        Familiar Instructions, pp.72-73



67
THE CROSS
Thus we go on ... flourishing
in the very midst of the Cross,
more than a common share of which
has latterly fallen to my lot ....
I humbly trust it is the Cross of Christ.
I endeavour to make it
in some way like his,
by silence.
        Catherine McAuley to Frances Warde, May 15, 1838
68
THE CROSS
Without the Cross
the real Crown cannot come.
Some great things
which He designs to accomplish
would have been too much
without a little bitter in the cup.
        Catherine McAuley to Elizabeth Moore, March 2, 1840



69
LOVE
Our love ought to be so firm,
so cordial and so solid
that we should never refuse
to do or to suffer
anything for the good of our Sisters.
        Familiar Instructions, p. 106



70
THE GREATEST BLESSING
It is by being united to Jesus Christ
that we will be united with each other.
The spirit of union
is the greatest blessing Almighty God
can bestow on a community ....
        Degnan, Mary Bertrand, ed.] Retreat Instructions of Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. Westminster,
        Maryland: Newman Press, 1952. p.61



71
LOVE ONE ANOTHER
If a sister appears to receive your
attention with coldness
and not with that affection
you would wish,
you should show her
by every means in your power
that you feel nothing toward her
but the most cordial
and affectionate charity.
A sister who acts otherwise ... is far
from obeying the command of Christ,
“Love one another as I have loved you.”
       Degnan, Mary Bertrand, ed.] Retreat Instructions of Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. Westminster,
       Maryland: Newman Press, 1952. p.60



72
CHARITY AT HOME
Our exercises of Charity
performed abroad
will have no value before God
if there be not established at home
a solid foundation of this virtue.
       Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
       Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. p.4



73
HEAVEN ON EARTH
If every one would mind their
own business,
the Convent would be
a Heaven upon earth.
       Bermondsey Annals, 1841, written by Mary Clare Moore in Mary C. Sullivan, Catherine McAuley
       and the Tradition of Mercy. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 1995. p.111



74
CHEERFULNESS
A Religious should endeavour always
to have a cheerful countenance
and a manner equally free
from restraint and levity.
       Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
       Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. P 12



75
OUR ADVANCEMENT
The prosperity or advancement
of the Institute
does not depend on
nor is it to be attributed to
the good reader, writer or the highly
accomplished Religious ...
but to the humble, cordial, affectionate,
obliging, complying Sister.
       Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
       Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. p.3
76
THE SPIRIT OF YOUR VOCATION
You cannot be otherwise than happy
while the spirit of your vocation
animates your actions.
       Thoughts from the Spiritual Conference of Mother M. Catherine McAuley, Revered Foundress of
       the Sisters of Mercy, arranged for every day in the year. Dublin: M.H. Gill and Son, 1946



77
THE SPIRIT OF UNITY
The blessing of unity
still dwells amongst us
and oh what a blessing,
it should make all else
pass into nothing ....
This is the spirit of the Order,
indeed the true spirit of Mercy
flowing on us ....
       Catherine McAuley to Elizabeth, Easter Monday, 1841



78
NEVER TOO OLD
The adage
— never too old to learn —
is a great comfort to me.
       Catherine McAuley to Frances Warde, September 27, 1839



79
DIVINE PROVIDENCE
We have ever confided largely
in Divine Providence
and shall continue to do so.
       Catherine McAuley to Mary Ann Doyle, September 24, 1841



80
ONE THING AT A TIME
Attend to one thing at a time —
you’ve 15 hours
from 6 to 9 ....
       Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
       Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. p.30



81
TODAY
The perfection of the religious soul
depends, not so much on doing
extraordinarily actions,
as on doing extraordinarily well
the ordinary actions and exercises
of every day.
       Rule and Constitutions of the Sisters of Mercy (Catherine McAuley’s manuscript), in Mary Sullivan,
       Catherine McAuley and the Tradition of Mercy. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 1995. Chapter 3, Article
       1



82
TODAY
Each day is a step we take
towards eternity
and we shall continue thus to step
from day to day
until we take the last step
which will bring us
into the presence
of God.
       Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
       Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868 p.23



83
TODAY
The simplest
and most practical lesson I know ...
is to resolve to be good today,
but better tomorrow.
Let us take one day only in hand,
at a time,
merely making a resolve for tomorrow.
Thus we may hope to get on,
taking short, careful steps,
not great strides.
       Catherine McAuley to Mary de Sales White, February 28, 1841



84
BLESSED DAYS
How rapidly the days,
weeks, and months are passing.
Another month ended,
that seemed but a few days begun.
If we have not forfeited the friendship
of almighty God,
but have been trying to love Him
more and more,
and to serve Him faithfully,
then they were blessed days for us.
       Catherine McAuley to Mary de Sales White,, February 28, 1841



85
UNENDING SERVICE
We have scarcely put on our clothes
in the morning,
when night comes,
and we have to take them off again
and then so soon to resume
the same task.
Oh! How nice it would be
if we could make some contrivance
only to dress and undress
once a month!
       Bermondsey Annals, 1841, written by Mary Clare Moore in Mary C. Sullivan, Catherine McAuley
       and the Tradition of Mercy. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 1995. 116-117



86
AT ALL TIMES
Try to act at all times and places,
that if our Divine Lord
were to appear on earth again,
He might not be ashamed
to point you out
as one intimately united with Him.
       Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
       Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. p.16



87
FOR ALL ETERNITY
My God,
I am thine for all eternity.
Teach me to cast my whole self
into the arms of thy providence
with the most lively,
unlimited confidence
in thy compassionate,
tender pity ....
       Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
       Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. p.32
88
OUR CONDUCT
It is not sufficient that Jesus Christ
be formed in us;
He must be recognized
in our conduct.
        Retreat Instructions, p. 72



89
THE CHARITY OF GOD
The Charity of God
would not avail us,
if His Mercy
did not come to our assistance.
        Bermondsey Annals, 1841, written by Mary Clare Moore in Mary C. Sullivan, Catherine McAuley
        and the Tradition of Mercy. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 1995. p.117



90
GRATITUDE OF THE HEART
... the most acceptable return
a benefactor can receive
is a countenance testifying the gratitude
of the heart.
How acceptable must it be to God
when we make Him this return,
showing to all by our cheerful happy
countenance, the gratitude with which
our hearts overflow towards Him,
for His many favours in this life,
and His great promises
for the life to come.
        Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
        Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868.p.14



91
THANKS AND PRAISE
Thousands of thanks and praises
to His Holy Name.
        Catherine McAuley to Elizabeth Moore, Easter Monday, 1841
92
BY GOD ALONE
We are formed by God
for Himself alone,
to be united with Him here,
by love and fidelity
and hereafter by enjoyment
and beatitude.
        Familiar Instructions, p. 103



93
THE HOLY FAMILY
Our Blessed Lord,
His Holy Mother and St. Joseph,
Were in want of temporal comforts,
and yet were always full of peace and joy.
        Thoughts from the Spiritual Conference of Mother M. Catherine McAuley, Revered Foundress of
        the Sisters of Mercy, arranged for every day in the year. Dublin: M.H. Gill and Son, 1946. p.19



94
HOLY INSPIRATIONS
Let us attend carefully
to holy inspirations,
saying fervently that petition:
“From the neglect of Thy holy
inspirations,
Jesus, deliver us.”
        Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
        Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. p. 23



95
A LIVELY FAITH
We may perceive
from all our instructions
that a strong and lively faith
is the solid foundation of all virtue.
        Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
        Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. p. 23



96
IN GOD’S SERVICE
When we are truly holy,
our days are consumed
gently, noiselessly
in God’s service.
       Thoughts from the Spiritual Conference of Mother M. Catherine McAuley, Revered Foundress of
       the Sisters of Mercy, arranged for every day in the year. Dublin: M.H. Gill and Son, 1946. p.9



97
THE BLESSED MOTHER
We ought to reflect
on the manner in which
the Blessed Virgin
practiced the different virtues ...
thinking how she replied to the Angel
when he announced the mystery
of the Incarnation.
She says no unnecessary word,
asks no useless questions.
       Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
       Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. p.20



98
THE BLESSED MOTHER
The Sisters shall always have
the warmest and most affectionate
devotion to her,
regarding her in a special manner
as their Mother
and the great model
they are obliged to imitate.
       Original Rule and Constitutions of the “Religious Sisters of Mercy”. Chapter 16, article 1



99
THE MOTHER OF GOD
Her dignity is expressed
in one title —
Mother of God.
       Familiar Instructions of Rev. Mother McAuley. New and Revised Edition. St. Louis: Vincentian
       Press, 1927. p.83



100
MOTHER CATHERINE
She used often to say that common sense
was one of the most necessary qualities
for a Sister of our Institute.
       Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
       Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. p.27
101
MOTHER CATHERINE
“But,” she would add,
“it is the most uncommon of all things.”
       Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
       Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co. P. 27



102
THE GOOD OF SOCIETY
The Sisters shall feel convinced
that no work of charity
can be more productive
of good to society,
or more conducive
to the happiness of the poor
than the careful instruction of women,
since whatever be the station
they are destined to fill,
their example and advice will always
possess influence ....
       Original Rule and Constitutions of the “Religious Sisters of Mercy” Chapter 2, article 5



103
IMPERFECTIONS
Let us not feel distressed
that others know our faults,
we all have our imperfections
and shall have them till our death.
       Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
       Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co.p.3



104
YIELD
Every place has its own particular
ideas and feelings
which must be yielded to
when possible.
       Catherine McAuley to Frances Warde, November 17, 1838



105
IN EXPECTATION
It is not every one,
even of those who are benefited,
that feels thankful.
If you work in expectation,
you will often be disappointed.
       Moore, “Memoir”, in Sullivan, Catherine McAuley, p.210



106
TOO MANY LAWS
Be careful never to make too many laws,
for if you draw the string too tight
it will break.
       Bermondsey Annals, 1841, written by Mary Clare Moore in Mary C. Sullivan, Catherine McAuley
       and the Tradition of Mercy. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 1995.p.115



107
PASSING EVENTS
Try to view passing events
as you will in a year hence,
or as if they had happened a year ago.
       Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
       Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. p. 15



108
TODAY
The Poor need help today,
not next week.
       Bourke, M. Carmel. A Woman Sings of Mercy: Reflections on the Life and Spirit of Mother
       Catherine McAuley, Foundress of the Sisters of Mercy. Sydney, Australia: E J Dwyer, 1987. p. 43
       Familiar Instruction, p. 140



109
NEVER ENOUGH
We can never say,
“it is enough.”
       Familiar Instructions of Rev. Mother McAuley. New and Revised Edition. St. Louis: Vincentian
       Press, 1927. p. 2



110
TO KNOW YOU ARE HAPPY
It comforts me exceedingly
to hear you are happy.
       Catherine McAuley to Chantal McCann, March, 1835
111
DO NOT FEAR
Do not fear offending anyone.
Speak as your mind directs
and always act with more courage
when the “mammon of unrighteousness”
is in question.
       Catherine McAuley to Mary Ann Doyle, July 24, 1841



112
SLOW TO CONDEMN
Be ever ready to praise,
to encourage,
to stimulate,
but slow to censure,
and still more slow to condemn.
       Familiar Instructions, p. 141



113
WATER
Water is free beverage.
       Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
       Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. P.28



114
REJOICE IN GOOD
Let us rejoice when good is done,
no matter by whom
it may be accomplished.
       Familiar Instructions of Rev. Mother McAuley. New and Revised Edition. St. Louis: Vincentian
       Press, 1927



115
GOD’S GREATEST DESIGNS
God wonderfully assists the humble,
and makes use of them
for his greatest designs,
as they never subtract from His glory,
by attributing their success
to themselves.
       Thoughts from the Spiritual Conference of Mother M. Catherine McAuley, Revered Foundress of
       the Sisters of Mercy, arranged for every day in the year. Dublin: M.H. Gill and Son, 1946. p. 63
116
THE LOVE OF GOD
If the love of God really reigns
in your heart,
it will quickly show itself in the exterior.
        Retreat Instructions, p. 145



117
OUR DIVINE REDEEMER
It is said of our divine Redeemer
that He was always pleasing to behold
and never sad or troublesome.
        Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
        Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. p. 12



118
HUMILITY
Pray fervently to God
to take all bitterness from me.
I can scarcely think of
what has been done to me
without resentment.
May God forgive me
and make me humble
before he calls me into His Presence.
        Catherine McAuley to Frances Warde, June 16, 1838



119
WE BELONG TO GOD
We belong to God, —
all in us is His.
        Familiar Instructions of Rev. Mother McAuley. New and Revised Edition. St. Louis: Vincentian
        Press, 1927. p.37



120
ALL TO GOD
You have given all to God
without any reserve.
Nothing can happen to you
which He does not appoint.
        Catherine McAuley to Frances Warde, February 17, 1838
121
PEACE
Don’t let crosses vex or tease —
Try to meet all with peace and ease.
       Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Pra yers of our Revered
       Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. p.30



122
NEVER WITH CONTEMPT
Never speak with contempt
of any nation,
profession,
or class of people…
       Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
       Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. p.19



123
LIBERTY OF CHOOSING
[On her death bed,
the last day of her life,
being asked to name the Sister whom she
would like to succeed her,
she answered]
The constitutions give the Sisters liberty
of choosing for themselves,
and I will not interfere.
       Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our Revered
       Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine McAuley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co., 1868. p. 29



124
GOD’S WORK
The Order is God’s work — not mine.
It will do just as well without me.
       Familiar Instructions of Rev. Mother McAuley. New and Revised Edition. St. Louis: Vincentian
       Press, 1927. p. 136



125
THE KIND WORD
There are things that the poor prize
more highly than gold,
tho’ they cost the donor nothing;
among these are the kind word,
the gentle, compassionate look,
and the patient hearing of their sorrows.
        Familiar Instructions of Rev. Mother McAuley. New and Revised Edition. St. Louis: Vincentian
        Press, 1927. p. 138



126
A GOOD CUP OF TEA
Will you tell the Sisters to get
a good cup of tea…
when I am gone
and to comfort one another.
        Letter of Mary Vincent Whitty to Cecilia Marmion in Sullivan, Catherine McAuley and the tradition of
        Mercy, p. 243



127
LEGACY OF CHARITY
My legacy to the Institute is charity:
If you preserve the peace and union
which has never been violated among us,
you will feel, even in this world,
a happiness that will surprise you
and be to you a foretaste of the bliss
prepared for every one of you
in heaven!
        Quoted in Carroll, The Life of Catherine McAuley, p. 435
Sources used in the book:

Bermondsey Annals, 1841, written by Mary Clare Moore in Mary C. Sullivan, Catherine
Mc Auley and the Tradition of Mercy. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 1995. 99-129

[Degnan, Mary Bertrand, ed.] Retreat Instructions of Mother Mary Catherine Mc Auley.
Westminster, Maryland: Newman Press, 1952.

Familiar Instructions of Rev. Mother Mc Auley. New and Revised Edition. St. Louis:
Vincentian Press, 1927

[Goettemoeller, Doris et al, eds.]. Praying in the Spirit of Catherine Mc Auley: A
collection of Prayers written and compiled by the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas.
Silver Spring, Maryland: Institute of the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas, 1999.

Letters of Catherine Mc Auley: Those cited in this booklet are taken from The
Correspondence of Catherine Mc Auley, 1818-1841, edited by Mary C. Sullivan. Dublin:
Four Courts Press, 2004; Washington: Catholic University of America Press, 2004

Limerick Manuscript, written by Vincent Harnett) 1911-1865), in Mary C. Sullivan,
Catherine Mc Auley and the Tradition of Mercy. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 1995.139-
192

Moore, Mary Clare, ed. A Little Book of Practical Sayings, Advices and Prayers of our
Revered Foundress, Mother Mary Catherine Mc Auley. London: Burns, Oates, + Co.,
1868.

Moore, Mary Clare Augustine, “Memoir of the Foundress,” in Mary C. Sullivan,
Catherine Mc Auley and the Tradition of Mercy. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 1995. 198-
216

Rule and Constitutions of the Sisters of Mercy (Catherine Mc Auley’s manuscript), in
Mary Sullivan, Catherine Mc Auley and the Tradition of Mercy. Dublin: Four Courts
Press, 1995.

Thoughts from the Spiritual Conference of Mother M. Catherine Mc Auley, Revered
Foundress of the Sisters of Mercy, arranged for every day in the year. Dublin: M.H. Gill
and Son, 1946.

				
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