REPEATS by rishabhmishra

VIEWS: 242 PAGES: 144

									) During the French Revolution, what or who were the TUMBRILS?

2) What is the capital of Liechtenstein?

3) The shoot for which film first brought Grace Kelly to Monaco?

4) Who is credited with inventing the sitar?

5) What is common to Salzburg, Bayreuth and Thiruvaiyaru?

6) Which was Shakespeare's last play?

7) Which scholar wrote a bhashya(commentary) on the Brahma Sutra and titled it as
Bhamati after his wife who was neglected during the decade(s) while he wrote it?

8) What branch of maths gets its name from an Arabic phrase for `reunification of
broken parts'?

9) Why are the ancient philosophers Thales, Anaximenes and Anaximander called the
Milesians?

10) In which country was distance by road once measured in versts ?


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Answers to Quiz #124

1) Carts which carried victims to the guillotine

2)Vaduz

3)To Catch a Thief

4)Ustad Amir Khusro

5) Birthplaces which commemorate with a famous festival the memory of
Mozart,Wagner and Thyagaraja respectively

6) The Tempest

7)Vachaspati Mishra

8) Algebra

9)From the isle of Miletus
10)Russia

. Those of you interested in occult arts must have heard of the Bell Witch case. Several
people tried to exorcise the witch from the family, one of whom was a lad from a nearby
farm. When he was travelling to the Bell's house, suddenly the carraige in which he was
travelling stopped for no reason at all and the horses started shying and going out of
control. An unearthly voice advised him to 'go home, as he had lots more things to do'.
On hearing these words the horses turned back. This lad went on to become a president of
the USA. Identify him. Hint: He became president after his predecessor was assasinated.

2. In Hindu mythology, Hanuman is supposed to have a son, what's his name?

3. Some of the charecters in this novel are Robin of Locksley (yes, Robin Hood), Cedric
of Rotherwood, Wamba the jester, Gurth the swineherd and Rebecca the Jewess (along
with her miserly father Isaac). What book is this?

4. What anachronism can be found in Shakespeare's 'Julius Caesar'?

5. This American company originally used to manufacture gunpowder and dynamite
(which it still manufactures) - but has now diversified into several fields - notably in
Chemicals, Plastics and Fiber based products. Name it.

6. In the Mahabharata, 5 people were supposed to have been born under the same
nakshatra (star of birth), and only one would survive of the 5, but they would die at the
hands of any one of themselves only - and once one of them was killed at the hands of
another then all the others would also die at the hands of the same person. Who?

7. When the Ram Janmabhoomi / Babri Masjid riots were at their peak, the Rajput
Regiment was asked to help bring the situation under control. The regiment
declined, citing a valid (but strange) reason. What was the reason?

8. In Hindu mythology, how did Sampati (Jatayu's brother) lose his capability of flying?

9. Phillip of Macedonia warned the citizens of this city that 'if he entered the city, he
would raze it to the ground'. To which the citizens just replied 'If'. This characteristic
brevity of words has given rise to what word in the English language?

10. He held various government positions - besides being a scientist, and was guillotined
during the french revolution. He is more remembered for isolating the major constituents
of air, disproving the phlogiston theory, establishing the role of oxygen in cumbustion,
classified compounds etc. Identify this pioneering chemist.


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Answers to Quiz #122

1. Andrew Johnson

2. Matsya Vallabha

3. Ivanhoe, by Sir Walter Scott

4. A 'clock' is mentioned in the text - and clocks were not invented then

5. du Pont

6. Bheema, Duryodhana, Keechaka, Jarasandha, Bakasura

7. The regiment felt that their war cry of 'Jai Siya Ram' (victory to Sita and Rama' would
be misinterpreted by the mob as a sign of support for the Hindus

8. Jatayu flew too close to the sun, whereupon Sampati shielded him from the sun's rays -
thus having his own wings burnt off.

9. Sparta (or Lakaedaemonia) - from which we get the word 'Laconic'

10. Antoine de Lavoisier

1. An aperitif is drunk before a meal. What is a drink taken after a meal called?

2. "The Last Man", a sci-fi novel written in 1826, was the first fictional work to
depict the human race being exterminated by a biological plague. Who was the
author, who has written another, far more famous sci-fi classic?

3. Like the Russians have caviar, the Japanese have a prized mushroom with a smoky oak
fragrance, which is added to some extremely expensive dishes. Name it.

4. The mummified bodies of Egyptian Pharoahs were all laid to rest in a certain manner.
What was this manner, and why?

5. In vehicles, one way of limiting the top speed is to install a governor. Even without
such a device, what phenomenon decides the maximum speed limit which a vehicle can
achieve?

6. This loose group of early 20th century painters (including Edward Hopper and Robert
Henri) specialized in painting scenes of city life. What was their genre called, after a
common feature of all their paintings?
7. Enzo Ferrari gifted a unique, black painted Ferrari to a famous person, as an
acknowledgement of a policy the person's father stuck to throughout his career. Whom
did he gift it to, and what was the reason?

8. In the 12th century AD, a Yadav king called Bhillama built a fort which was
recognized as a masterpiece of defensive engineering. The fort became notorious
after it was taken over by someone, whose actions made him the laughing stock of
India. Who?

9. What term correctly describes a soothing ointment for burns and sores?

10. Two words (both Food items) have come to English directly from Old Tamil. These
do not include British imports like Mulligatawny, this goes far farther in time (pre 10th
century Tamil). What are they?


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Answers to Quiz #101

1. Digestif

2. Mary Shelley (author of Frankenstein, wife of Percy Bysshe Shelley

3. Shitake

4. Facing east, so that their face would be turned to Ra, the Sun God

5. Aerodynamic drag resistance

6. The Ashcan School

7. Henry Ford II, in recognition of Henry Ford I's famous statement about the Model T
Ford - "They can have it any color they want, as long as it is black"

8. Daulatabad, which was later taken over by Muhammad Bin Tughlaq (and renamed
Tughlaqabad) in his disastrous move to shift his capital from Delhi.

9. Unguent

10. Rice (from Tamil Arisi - Latin Oryza) and Ginger (Tamil Inji, Greek Zingber)



Quiz #102
Dated - May 13, 2000
Sricharan
1. Nana was a gentle and faithful old dog which belonged to the Darling family.
Mr.Darling played a trick on Nana by making her drink an unpleasant medicine
which he himself had promised to drink - and this was not appreciated by his
family. An angry Mr.Darling then chained up Nana in the yard. As a consequence,
who entered the children's bedroom?

2. Euclid defined it as "that which has no parts", Playfair defined it as something
"which has position but not magnitude" and Legendre defined it as a "limit
terminating a line". What are they describing?

3. How did the Gladiolus flower get its name?

4. This genre of art was created in Western Europe and first appeared in Rome in the late
1500s. It became very popular because of three reasons - rebellion of European artists
against Renaissance art, the need felt by several rulers and noblemen for self-
aggrandizement and the "counter-reformation" which spread through western Europe like
a wildfire. What?

5. The genre mentioned in question 4 quickly degenerated into an over-elaborate, rigid
formalistic design, and was gradually replaced in the 1700s by a more relaxed and
intimate style. What was this called?

6. George Brown, firebrand Labour Party MP, called these people "the Gnomes of
Zurich". Who?

7. As a sign of respect, people from western / occidental cultures uncover their head (take
off their hat). People from several oriental races (the Siamese, Jews, Turks, etc) do
something else to signify respect. What?

8. Shagreen is a dried form of something which was once used as sandpaper. What?

9. He published a series of "almanacks" from 1732..1757, containing "maxims and
precepts on temperance, economy, cleanliness, chastity and other virtues". Who, and
what nickname did he use?

10. In the ancient world, who (or what) was "Mistress of the World"?


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Answers to Quiz #102

1. Peter Pan

2. A point.
3. From the Gladius, the short sword carried by Roman Legionaries - its leaves are sword
shaped

4. Baroque

5. Rococo

6. The IMF and Swiss bankers

7. They take off their footwear - as presenting new footwear is a token of respect here

8. Sharkskin

9. Benjamin Franklin, writing as "Poor Richard"

10. Rome



Quiz #103
Dated - May 20, 2000
Raman
1. Born in 1896, he lost an arm in World War I. He became a first class umpire at the age
of 27 and stood in a record 48 tests between 1924 and 1955, noted as much for his
umpiring as for a wonderful sense of humour. Who?

2. He is famous for being the first man to lead an England eleven to Australia in an
attempt to regain the Ashes (this was in 1882-83). As Lord Darnley, he became chairman
of the MCC. After his death in 1927, his widow bequeathed the Ashes urn to the MCC.
Name him.

3. Name the only Indian musician (or rather, folk singer) with whom Bob Dylan cut
an album.

4. Where would you find a "dry bible"?

5. Born Frances Ethel Gumm in 1922, she died in London in 1969. Name this singer and
actress.

6. In 1959, eight footballers from this team died in an aircrash in West Germany, on the
way home from Yugoslavia after having drawn with Red Star Belgrade to qualify for the
semis of the European Cup. Among the popular dead were Roger Byrne and Duncan
Edwards. Their team manager (who was seriously injured) was Tommy Taylor. This
team was known as the "Busby Babes". Name the team.
7. What trend was set by the cross-channel Imperial Airways flight from London on
April 6, 1925?

8. Name the only opera composed by Beethoven.

9. Who scored the music for the Merchant-Ivory production "Shakespearewallah"?
He is a successful director in his own right, and has scored music for several of his
own movies as well.

10. Born in an orthodox Tamil Brahmin family, she was one of the first women from the
community to marry an Englishman. She spearheaded the movement to make
Bharatanatyam a respectable art form, instead of an art solely practiced by courtesans, as
it was percieved in those days. She founded the famous Kalakshetra institute in Madras.
Name her.


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Answers to Quiz #103

1. Frank Chester.

2. Ivo Bligh

3. Purandas Baul

4. It is one of the chambers of the heart in ruminants (cud-chewing animals)

5. Judy Garland

6. Manchester United

7. In-flight movies. The movie in this flight was First National's production of Sir Arthur
Conan Doyle's "The Lost World".

8. Fidelio

9. Satyajit Ray

10. Rukmini Devi Arundale



Quiz #104
Dated - May 26, 2000
Srinath
1. In the field of typography (fonts etc) what are Ligatures?

2. What was the major change introduced in the Le Mans race in 1969?

3. Peter Paul Mauser (1838 - 1917) invented something that is still widely used today and
named after him (not a brandname but a particular mechanism)

4. What is Tribology the study of?

5. 'A big greyish, rounded bulk, the size, perhaps of a bear, was rising slowly, and
painfully out of the cylinder …….. Two large dark-colored eyes were regarding me
steadfastly ……. There was a mouth under the eyes, lipless brim of which quivered and
panted and dropped saliva. What is being described here?

6. Johann Loschmidt estimated its value to within one percent based on Boltzmann's and
Maxwell's analyses of gas properties, while his namesake postulated it from his
hypothesis that equal volumes of gas under identical conditions (*) contain equal
numbers of molecules—name this large dimensionless quantity equal to the number of
molecules in a mole.

7. Pierre Boulle, the French author of "Bridge On the River Kwai" also wrote a SF
book (originally written in French) in 1963 that was made into a very successful
1968 film starring Charlton Heston. A number of sequels and and a television series
also followed. Name the book and film of the same name.

8. Leonard Nimoy is Spock on Star Trek. What is his autobiography titled?

9. Her first words to her future husband, spoken in 1929 after being discovered as a
stowaway, were "Aw, shut up, ya bilge rat." In February 1999 though, after a 70
year (yeah, 70 year) courtship, she finally said, "I do". Which cartoon character am
I talking about?

10. In 1950 an sf author submitted an article to John W. Campbell entitled "Dianetics:
The Evoulution of a Science" which was published in his magazine "Astounding" the
same year. This author acquired a major following and started Dianetics Foundation and
this led to the founding of a notorious cult. Name it, and the author.


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Answers to Quiz #104

1. Sets of letters such as "fl", "th", "ae" etc. which are printed as one character in fonts for
reasons of space and legibility.

2. The traditional Le Mans running start was abolished.
3. The bolt-action mechanism now used in most sporting rifles. Called Mauser action

4. Friction

5. The Martians from HG Wells' The War of the Worlds

6. Avogadro's Number

7. Planet of the Apes, (Fr. La planète des singes.)

8. I Am Not Spock

9. Olive Oyl - long time girlfriend and now the wife of Popeye the Sailor

10. Scientology - L.Ron Hubbard



Quiz #105
Dated - June 2, 2000
Ravikant Avva
1. Whose seven part work begins with "Swann's Way" and ends with "Time Regained" ?

2. Mythology: In the Nibelungenlied (Wagner drew upon this and "The Saga of the
Volsungs" for "The Ring of the Nibelung"), Kriemhild marries a barbarian chieftain
called Etzel so that she can avenge Siegfried. Etzel's lieutenant Hildebrand puts her to
death at the end. Who actually was the historical Etzel ? The name may provide a clue.

3. The world's first heavy metal festival was held in 1980 in Great Britain. Since
then, it has been an annual event, with AC/DC headlining the festival thrice and
Iron Maiden twice. What ?

4. Waldemar Fitzurse appears in "Ivanhoe" as Prince John's right-hand man. He's
banished for attempting to murder Richard Coeur de Lion. What deed did his father
successfully accomplish ?

5. Last words of a book "For the final consummation and for me to feel less lonely, my
last wish was that there should be a crowd of spectators at my execution and that they
should greet me with cries of hatred.". Which book ?

6. This author served in the Foreign legion for a while before entering the field of
education. He wrote many books such as "Cardboard Castle", "The Mammon of
Righteousness", "Beggars' Horses" etc. that were very popular in the 1930s. His
fame rests on a novel and even more so on a work of non-fiction. Name both.
7. A parley between George Bush and Bill Clinton during one of their debates ran
this way. Clinton said that the fact that someone was not able to get through to Bush
despite trying every night was an instance of the Bush administration's remoteness
and inaccessibility. Bush retorted that he would consult John Major and Boris
Yeltsin on foreign policy, while Clinton could always consult Boy George. Whose
attempts to reach Bush were being talked about ?

8. What is common to Jesus, St.John and Isaac Wolfson ?

9. The three oldest cities are supposedly Jericho, Catal Hoyuk and Lepenski Vir. Catal
Hoyuk has an unusual feature not found in any other city anywhere. This feature perhaps
explains why it was never conquered. What ?

10. Hiram Bingham, the american explorer and archaeologist, who discovered
Machu Picchu in 1912, inspired (other than further Andean exploration) a famous
fictional character. Who ?

11. Laetitia Casta's has been chosen as the face of Marianne, the emblem of the French
republic. Whose face was used as Marianne's face earlier ?

12. How better do we know Nessiteras Rhombopteryx and why the name ?

13. One of Milton's works is a passionate plea for free speech. He titled it after a pertinent
Athenian landmark. What is the work ?

14. William Hogarth painted two scenes of English life, one showing all that was good in
the England of the 1700s and the other showing all that was bad. He named them after
two drinks(liquors) that symbolized goodness and vice then. What ?

15. Whose collaboration started with "Thespis" and ended with "The Grand Duke" ?

16. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle wrote a Sherlock Holmes play called "The Stonor Case". He
later converted it to a short story. Which one?

17. Band name origin - When the members of this band were discussing possible
names, they had been deafened so much by their music that they kept asking for the
suggestions to be repeated. They got their final name because of this. Which band ?




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Answers to Quiz #105

1. Marcel Proust
2. Attilla the Hun

3. The Castle Donnington Monsters of Rock festival

4. His father led the group of nobles who killed Thomas a'Becket

5. Albert Camus' "The Outsider"

6. P.C.Wren - who wrote "Beau Geste" and co-authored the famous "Wren and Martin"
High School English Grammar book

7. Bono of U2

8. Only three people to have colleges named after them in both Oxford and Cambridge

9. Catal Huyuk had no roads - the entire city was one big building, a maze of twisty
corridors.

10. Indiana Jones

11. Catherine Denueve

12. The Loch Ness Monster, which was recognized as an endangered species, and
therefore had to be assigned a formal Linnean name

13. Areopagitica

14. Beer Street (the good) and Gin Lane (the bad)

15. Gilbert and Sullivan

16. The Speckled Band

17. The Who. For every name that was suggested, someone or the other kept asking "The
Who?????"



Quiz #106
Dated - June 8, 2000
Vivek Reddy
1. In the 1930s, the American film industry began to dominate world cinema.
Shortly thereafter, the first British film studio was set up. Name it.
2. When this hit movie was screened in Toronto, some theaters suggested that people
with motion sickness sit in the aisle seats. Which movie and why?

3. Where did the British pop group T'Pau get its name from?

4. Michael Jackson's "Thriller" marked its 37th week atop the Billboard Top 200
on this day (June 8) in 1984 - longer than any contemporary rock or pop album.
Only one other album had a longer run (54 weeks at the top). Which was this?

5. One of the more popular folk painting traditions in India has emerged in south
Aurangabad district in Maharashtra (in the western part of the Deccan plateau). The
painting style is also called "Chitrakathi" after the caste of the artists who specialize in
this sort of work. What is it more commonly known as?

6. The traditional Indian calendar revolves around a cycle of sixty years - name the first
and last years in this cycle.

7. Each of the four Vedas is divided into three sections or "Kandas". Name them.

8. Who coined the term "Non Aligned" to describe countries that, during the cold war,
aligned neither with the United States nor with the Soviet Union?

9. What is the currency of Gautemala, named after a bird sacred to the ancient Mayan
Indians?

10. Though it's not known exactly, this fictional character was based either on
Yugoslavian double agent Dusan 'Dusko' Popov or British naval intelligence officer
Patrick Dalzell-Job. Who?




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Answers to Quiz #106

1. Pinewood Studios

2. The Blair Witch Project (shot with hand held cameras - so a lot of jerky movement in
the movie)

3. From the classic Star Trek episode "Arnok Time" (the one in which Spock returns
home to get married)

4. West Side Story
5. Paithani (after the city of Paithan - called Pratishthana in ancient times)

6. Prabhava and Akshaya

7. Karma Kanda (rituals), Upasana Kanda (worship and meditation), Jnana Kanda
(enlightenment)

8. V.K.Krishna Menon. The Non Aligned Movement was, of course, founded by Nehru
(India), Tito (Yugoslavia) and Nasser (Egypt).

9. The Quetzal

10. James Bond



Quiz #107
Dated - June 16, 2000
Srihari Adoorty
1. When Lalloo Prasad Yadav became the Chief Minister of Bihar, he claimed that his
first objective was to remove 'BHURE BAAL' (literally "Brown Hair" from the Bihar
administration. What was he talking about? He did not shave anyone - not even his
trademark buffaloes

2. Originally, this word originates from a pungent chinese fish sauce, by way of the
Malay language. Later on, after its arrival in Europe and later America, it lost its
stink and is today a rather popular part of a person's diet - worldwide. What?

3. During and after the Great Depression, homeless people lived in huge slums all over
America, which sprung up on wasteland, and were full of rickety shacks built with
everything from old planks to cardboard boxes. These homeless people took to calling
their shantytowns after the man they blamed as the root cause of the depression. What
were they called?

4. What came into existence after the 1947 National Security Act? (_not_ an Indian
question, by the way)

5. Known in his native land as Cristobal Colon, what do we know him better as?

6. This book was based on the sinking of a whaleship called Essex, and features
three "savages" - Daggoo, Tashtego and Queequeg. Just name the book and the ship
which was based on the Essex.

7. During the 1993 Somalian crisis, Gen. Mohamed Farrah Aidid the notorious warlord
died of gunshot wounds, after which his son Hussein Mohamed Farrah became the
faction leader. The USA had a hope that he would help them ending the faction feuds.
Why?

8. His father, an ardent Socialist, was a blacksmith; his mother was a teacher. He
too taught for a while and lived (1902-04) in Switzerland to avoid military service.
He achieved national prominence for his opposition to the Libyan War (1911-12)
and, as leader of the revolutionary left of the Socialist party, became editor of the
Socialist daily Avanti (1913). When he came to power, he launched a crackdown on
the very socialists who pushed him to power. Who is this man, who believed strongly
in "a bundle of sticks"?

9. Although the term originated in Corsica, the custom has also been practiced in
other parts of Italy, in other European countries, and among the Arabs. It generally
reflects a society where the family is the only social unit with authority or where
there is no centralized government to compel order. So, any revenge or punishment
for wrongs done is meted out by the family itself. What word?

10. Last but not the least how did TATA SUMO get the name Sumo?




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Answers to Quiz #107

1. He was referring to the four upper castes of who were, he felt, then in control of the
state government. BH- Bhumiar, Re-Rajputs, BAA - Brahmins, L- Lalas

2. Ketchup (from chinese Ke-Tsiap and )

3. Hooverville - after President Hoover. Even the newspaper they used to wrap
themselves up became known as Hoover Blankets. This hatred for Hoover was largely
responsible for FDR to come to power.

4. The CIA

5. Christopher Colombus

6. Herman Melville's Moby Dick - the ship was the Pequod

7. Hussain Aideed was educated in the USA and had served in the US Army

8. Benito Mussolini of the Fascist party (Fascia - A bundle of wood)

9. Vendetta
10. From long time Tata executive and TELCO CEO Sumant 'Sumo' Moolgavkar



Quiz #108
Dated - June 25, 2000
Pratap Reddy
KQA 17th Anniversary Open Quiz - Prelims
1. Name the first Indian to win the Commonwealth Prize for Literature (she was closely
related to Pandit Nehru)

2. Which French newspaper recently landed itself in a controversy after calling Indian
President K.R.Narayanan an "untouchable"?

3. Which capital city is at the confluence of the Blue and the White Nile?

4. Which group of people had the motto Pikes Peak or Bust?

5. Which Indian king had a galaxy of luminaries called the Ashta Diggajas?

6. Which relegious cult was founded by a businessman called Lala Lekhraj in Hyderabad,
Sind?

7. A golden oldie - Where in the body would you find the Islets of Langerhans?

8. Name the American essayist famous for his Breakfast Table Discourses

9. Who made her debut in the movie Aap Ki Seva Mein?

10. Which vitamin is essential for clotting of the blood?

11. Which South American currency is named after a bird?

12. Name the only nation in the world to have a single-colored flag

13. Which actress was popularly called America's Sweetheart?

14. In Sir James Barrie's Peter Pan, to which world are the children taken?

15. What sarcastic term was coined by Rudyard Kipling to describe the admirers of Jane
Austen?

16. Name the saint-composer of Karnataka, who is supposed to be the father of Carnatic
music (and composed the song 'Lambodara Lakumikara' which is the first song
traditionally taught to students of Carnatic music).
17. What are the bright points of light you can see during a solar eclipse called?

18. Which ancient work is known as the Vedas of the Tamil Land?

19. Which chemical compound (often used in Chinese cuisine) causes an allergy
called Kwok's Disease?

20. Who created the fictional detective Lord Peter Wimsey and his valet / sidekick
Bunter?

21. Who devised the Binomial Nomenclature to classify and name animals? (for example,
Canis Familiaris is a dog)

22. ABS is a compound commonly used in the automotive industry. What does it stand
for?

23. What is measured with the Torro Scale?

24. With which art movement would you associate the Cabaret Voltaire?

25. In theater, from which part of the stage is scenery controlled?

26. From which tree was the flavoring agent Liqourice first obtained?

27. What is the aroma of a wine called?

28. Which bird lays the smallest egg?

29. Which game was originally known as Gossimer?

30. Which popular snack food gets its name from the phrase 'Baked Twice'?

31. Name the athlete who was called the Ebony Express

32. What was called 'Operation Polo' by the Indian army?

33. Connect Nut, Set, Mutt, Nun and Bast

34. In Buddhist mythology, who is the next Buddha?

35. In Hindu mythology, who was the first person to die?


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Answers to Quiz #108

1. Nayantara Sehgal

2. Le Figaro

3. Khartoum, Sudan

4. The 1849 Gold Rush participants

5. Krishnadeva Raya of the Vijayanagara Empire

6. The Brahmakumaris

7. The Pancreas

8. Oliver Wendell Holmes - one of his most famous is 'Autocrat at the breakfast table

9. Lata Mangeshkar

10. Vitamin K

11. Quetzal - the currency of Gautemala

12. Libya - whose flag is a field of green

13. Mary Pickford

14. Never-Never Land

15. Janeite

16. Purandara Dasa

17. Baileys Beads

18. Tirukural (the words of Tiruvalluvar)

19. Monosodium Glutamate (Aji-no-moto)

20. Dorothy L Sayers

21. Carolus Linnaeus (Karl von Linne)

22. Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene
23. Tornadoes

24. Dadaism

25. The Flies

26. Sarasparilla

27. The bouquet

28. The Bee Hummingbird (which happens to be the smallest bird)

29. Table Tennis

30. Biscuit

31. Jesse Owens

32. The police action against the Nizam of Hyderabad, to unite the old Hyderabad state
with the Republic of India

33. Minor Egyptian deities

34. Maitreya

35. Yama - the God of death



Quiz #109
Dated - June 30, 2000
G.V.S. Sreedhar
1. In 1888, Cesar Ritz was invited by Rupert d'Oyly Carte to manage the new Savoy hotel
in London. The hotel became an instant success - for which a lot of credit goes to its
brilliant chef. Who was this chef?

2. What first in the history of air travel was set by President Woodrow Wilson on
May 6, 1919?

3. What did Talleyrand describe as "Black as the devil, hot as hell, pure as an angel and
sweet as love?

4. After whom did Seigel and Schuster model Superman's face?

5. In humans, the sex of a child is determined by a combination of chromosomes.
How is the sex of a baby crocodile determined?
6. In a sword's blade, the end nearer to the hilt is the strongest - so what is it called?
(etymology of an english word)

7. From midway through Augustus Caesar's reign, the Roman army never had any 70th,
80th and 90th legions. Why was this?

8. Till a few hundred years ago, vast parts of south asia were ruled by kings of Indian
descent, and had Indian names. If Kamboja was the ancient name for Kampuchea /
Cambodia, what was knwon in ancient times as Sri Vijaya?

9. Marvel Comics had a hero called the 'Black Panther'. Which real life hunter,
adventurer and novelist was nicknamed 'The Black Panther'? He's noted for his
translation of the Arabian Nights, for instance.

10. Rabindranath Tagore wrote an essay called 'My interpretation of Indian History',
which he later turned into which famous song?


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Answers to Quiz #109

1. Auguste Escoffier

2. He became the first person to take out flight insurance

3. A perfect cup of coffee

4. Douglas Fairbanks Sr. Superman's alter ego Clark Kent was named for Clark Gable
and Kent Taylor, and his city Metropolis was named for Fritz Lang's movie of the same
name.

5. By the temperature at which the eggs are hatched. Anything above 30 degrees celsius
produces a male croc.

6. Forte - and the lower part of a sword - the weaker part - is the Foible - again a word for
weakness.

7. These three legions - led by the general Varus were massacred by german barbarians.
Their loss so shocked Caesar that his last words were "Varus, Give me back my legions".
Since then, the Roman army did not have legions bearing these numbers.

8. Sumatra (in Indonesia)

9. Sir Richard Burton
10. Jana Gana Mana - the Indian national anthem



Quiz #110
Dated - July 7, 2000
Mohit Menon
1. In his book 'Idols', cricketer Sunil Gavaskar lists among his idols two cricketers
who never quite made it to the Indian team, but were quite prominent in Ranji
Trophy matches. Name them.

2. Woody Allen once commented that "It immediately doubles your chances of getting a
date on a saturday night". What?

3. In Australian cricket slang, what is a 'Roughie'?

4. The President of the United States of America lives in the White House. Who lives in
the Blue house?

5. Whose epitaph reads 'In memory of an once fluid man crammed and distorted by a
classical mess'?

6. The Hawaiian word for 'Jumping Flea' has lent its name to a musical instrument that
was originally Portuguese but is now closely associated with Hawaiian music. What?

7. The Archon (or magistrates) of ancient Greece signified that they stood for election to
various posts by wearing a white cloak. What english word comes from this cloak's
name, and denotes someone standing for office?

8. Several top actresses like Bette Davis, Claudette Colbert, Lana Turner, Katharine
Hepburn and Paulette Goddard were considered for this role, but it was bagged by
a rank newcomer fresh from India. Who, and what role (and in which all-time hit
film)?

9. This 1887 graduate from MacGill University was a top rugby and lacrosse player in
Canada, before becoming a Physical Education instructor at Kansas State University.
Something he thought up there to keep his students occupied when they were snowbound
made him famous.

10. In the Bible, Satan is also referred to as Lucifer - the name he bore as an angel before
he fell. What does Lucifer mean?


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Answers to Quiz #110

1. Padmakar Shivalkar and Rajinder Goel

2. Being bisexual

3. A bad umpiring decision

4. The president of South Korea

5. Bruce Lee

6. Ukulele

7. Candidate - from Candidus

8. Vivien Leigh as Scarlett O'Hara in Gone With The Wind

9. James Naismith, Basketball

10. The Light Bearer

. In Provence, around the 12th century AD, a dance called the Farandola became
popular - perhaps because it was the first to feature dancing in pairs. In this dance,
people formed themselves into long lines, split into couples and danced off in every
direction - frequently changing partners as they went. What change in architecture
was introduced because of this, and persists to this day?

2. Which common item takes its name from the Latin word for a "lentil"?

3. Although the art of button making dates back to prehistoric times, it was not till the
13th century AD that buttons became practical and essential in garments. Why?

4. The festival of Lupercalia in ancient Rome featured youths with thongs made
from the hides of sacrificial goats, who would run through the streets flapping
barren women (see Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar" for an instance of this). To what
has this flogging ritual lent its name?

5. This was introduced by a French army surgeon, Baron Dominique-Jean Lassey in
1792. Originally, it was a light, fast, horse drawn carriage filled with medical
equipment and portable litters for bearing away wounded soldiers. What did he call
these mobile field hospitals?

6. Name the only speaker of the British House of Commons to have been canonized.
7. Which character from Alice In Wonderland sings "Soup of the evening, beautiful
soup"?

8. It is said that Hannibal invented the tactic of encircling enemies by allowing the center
to fall back and closing in the wings to trap an enemy. He first used this at the battle of
Cannae. However, this tactic was used (accidentally) in a much earlier battle, when the
center broke and retreated, but the wings advanced - trapping the enemy. Which battle
was this?

9. Who travelled in the Cervennes with a donkey called Modestine?

10. Which famous book is otherwise known as "The Phaedo"?


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Answers to Quiz #91

1. The fireplace was moved from the center to the sides of a room.

2. Lens, because the first (biconvex) lenses were compared to lentil grains in shape

3. Some unknown genius invented the buttonhole

4. February, from "Februum"

5. Ambulance Volantes - from where we get the word Ambulance

6. Sir Thomas More (author of Utopia)

7. The Mock Turtle (and there's a mock turtle soup) :)

8. The battle of Marathon, where Leonidas' handful of Spartans defeated a huge Persian
army

9. Robert Louis Stevenson - read his "Travels with a Donkey"

10. The Dialogues of Plato


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Quiz #92
Dated - March 3, 2000
KC Junior Open Semifinals
1. In Formula I racing, who rode shotgun for Eddie Erskine after Schumacher's
accident, till his return, for Ferrari in 1999?

2. During World War II, this place in Britain was taken over as the headquarters of
the Red Cross, the National Air Raid Precaution and Fire Service Departments.
Where?

3. This notoriously cruel man's actual name was Bonatien Alphonse François, and in his
will, he is reported to have said "I hope my memory will be erased from the mind of
man". Who?

4. Farokh Engineer was the first Indian cricketer to model for an ad. Which product did
he model for?

5. Alfred Lord Tennyson wrote "Every moment there dies a man, every moment one is
born". A famous inventor wrote him a letter saying "In that case, the population of the
world would be exactly zero".

6. Which cosmetics brand gets its name from a latin word meaning "White as
snow"?

7. Seeing a cricketer miss a loose delivery which he should have easily thumped for a six,
Geoff Boycott once commented "My grandmom could have hit that one". Whom did he
say was playing worse than his grandmother?

8. According to legend, when the bridge to Lanka was being built, a squirrel tried to
help by bringing small pebbles in its mouth. So, what was the result of this?

9. Sir Walter Raleigh was a court favorite of Queen Elizabeth I. So, when he
acquired land in America, he named it after her. What did he call this colony?

10. This king of Cyprus fell in love with a statue he had sculpted. So, Aphrodite gave the
statue life. Name the king and the statue.


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Answers to Quiz #92

1. Mika Salo

2. Wimbledon

3. The Marquis de Sade

4. Brylcreem
5. Charles Babbage

6. Nivea (from the J.L.Morrison Company)

7. Salim Malik

8. Lord Rama caressed the squirrel's back, so squirrels have three white stripes across
their back till this day.

9. Virginia - Elizabeth was known as the "Virgin Queen"

10. Pygmalion and Galatea.


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Quiz #93
Dated - March 10, 2000
GVS Sreedhar
1. Who is supposed to have originally said "The customer is king"?

2. David McConnell founded the California Perfume Company, which later became
Avon. Why did he change the name?

3. What would you call the shortest distance between any two points on a spherical
surface - such as the Earth?

4. In the gem trade, what are known as "fancies"?

5. In 1672, a young New England born clerk arrived in India and took up a job as a factor
(clerk / merchant) with the British East India Company. Over the years, he made a
fortune in the pepper trade, a lot of it gained by defrauding his employers. He is,
however, still remembered for a small amount of money he donated. Who?

6. What is the Greek word for "A ring of animals"?

7. Two songwriters have been credited with the lyrics of Sinatra's "My Way". One of
them was Claude François, and the other was a famous singer and composer of the 1970s,
with several hits to his credit. Name him.

8. Which contemporary philosopher and mathematician did Voltaire satirize, modeling
Dr.Pangloss in "Candide" on him?

9. According to Thomas Carlyle, who was the "Sea Green Incorruptible"?
10. To whom did Alexander the Great bequeath his empire?


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Answers to Quiz #93

1. Marshall Field, the pioneer in Departmental stores

2. He was originally a bookseller and specialized in Shakespeare's books. As these were
not selling well, he decided to distribute perfume as a freebie. He soon found that the
perfume was more popular than the books, and so switched over to direct marketing of
perfumes and cosmetics.

3. Geodesic

4. Diamonds which have a strong cast / tinge of colour. For example, the Hope diamond
has a blue tint.

5. Elihu Yale, who bailed out Yale, which was then on the brink of bankruptcy.

6. Zodiac

7. Paul Anka

8. Gottfried Leibnitz

9. Maximilian Robespierre, the tyrant of the French revolution

10. "The Strongest"


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Quiz #94
Dated - March 17, 2000
Anil
1. Abu Jaffer Mohammed Ibn Musa was a resident of the Uzbek city of Khiva in
medieval times. A book he wrote, and his surname (which was also the earlier name
of his city) have contributed two extremely well known words to English. Name
them.

2. Inspired by their Professor Fred Terman, two people started a small electronics
company in an old garage on Jan 1, 1939. Their first product was an audio oscillator
which Walt Disney used to produce sound effects in his movie "Fantasia". The
name of this company was decided by the toss of a coin. Just name the company.
3. Its official title is the "Collegiate Church of St.Peter". What is it better known as?

4. These are the opening lines of which famous novel -


Early one evening, during an exceptional heat wave in the beginning of July, a young
man walked out into the street from the closetlike room he rented in Stoliarny Place.

5. Australian cricketer Belinda Clarke is currently the only cricketer in the world to
achieve a landmark - which no cricketer (in either mens or womens cricket has yet
achieved. What?

6. He was a policeman in Southampton, has written books like "Crime and Punishment"
(no, not Dostoviesky) and "English Cheeses of the South and West". His gravestone
quotes his own poem "So clear you see these timely things // That like a bird, the vision
sings". He's far more famous for his long association with cricket. Name him.

7. According to him, "I could have become a doctor, but instead I became the
biggest quack in history". Big hint in the question - just name him, and what he did
to become so famous as a quack.

8. Plato described them as "The most perfect musical instruments". One was the flute, the
second was the lyre. What was the third?

9. Name the celebrity owners of the football clubs Fulham and Watford.

10. He invented soda water, and coined the name "rubber" because he found that it
could erase pencil marks. He's best known for a "Life Producing" discovery. Name
him, and his discovery.


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Answers to Quiz #94

1. Algebra (from Al Jabr) and Algorithm (from his surname / hometown Al Khwarizm)

2. Hewlett Packard, founded by Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard

3. Westminster Abbey

4. Crime and Punishment - by Dostoviesky

5. A double century in One Day Internationals
6. John Arlott

7. Clarence Nash (the voice of Donald Duck)

8. The Human Voice

9. Fulham - Mohammed Al-Fayed (father of Dodi) and Watford - Elton John

10. Joseph Priestly, the discoverer of Oxygen


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Quiz #95
Dated - March 25, 2000
Josyula Krishnamurthy
1. Where would you find Patience and Fortitude standing guard, and what are they?

2. Which city is well known for "Christ the Redeemer"?

3. Who were deposed by Col. Muammar Gaddafi of Libya and Fidel Castro of Cuba
when they assumed power?

4. In 1931 in Paris, a British novelist called Arnold Bennett tried to prove something he
believed, and died trying. What did he want to prove?

5. In fencing, this term refers to the lower part of a sword's blade - traditionally regarded
as a weak spot by fencers. This gives its name to which English word meaning
"weakness"?

6. In Geography, what is an island mountain (that is, a mountain totally surrounded
by the sea) called?

7. REM's "Man on the Moon" has a reference to which (then) popular comedian?

8. This actor is often called the "Fresh Prince of Bel Air". Who?

9. What is a "Roo Bar" in Australian slang?

10. Who was the lead guitarist for Michael Jackson's "Beat It"?


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Answers to Quiz #95
1. They are the two lion statues standing guard outside the New York Public Library

2. Rio de Janiero

3. Gaddaffi deposed King Edris III and Castro kicked out the previous dictator -
Fulgencio Batista

4. He tried to prove that the water of the river Seine was fit to drink, drank it and died of
Typhoid as a result

5. Foible

6. Inselberg

7. Andy Kaufman - check out the 1999 Jim Carrey movie of the same name

8. Will Smith

9. A protective bar fitted in front of Australian vehicles - to minimize damage caused by
collisions with Kangaroo

10. Eddie van Halen


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Quiz #96
Dated - April 2, 2000
Jagannath Surampudi
1. How do we know 'Gordon Sumner' Better as?

2. At the St. Louis World's Fair in 1904, Richard Blechyden, an Englishman, had a tea
concession. On a very hot day, none of the fairgoers were interested in drinking hot tea.
This incident led to the invention of what? (very workable)

3. Which was the first sport to be filmed? And what was the incident or who were the
players who were filmed? And an extra point for the guy who filmed it.

4. Give me the origin of the name flash light?

5. This is for all you Tom & Jerry watchers. In few of the cartoons Jerry is
accompanied by a friend. A grey mouse, with a big mouth, and is normally in
diapers. What is the name of this mouse?

6. By whom were the first computer programs published and for what purpose?(Purpose
very workable)
7. The "black box" that houses an airplane's voice recorder is orange? Why?(workable)

8. What did Melitta Bentz invent in 1908 in Germany by piercing holes in a tin
vessel and a few other alterations?(workable)

9. In 1881, Procter & Gamble's Harley Procter started a new way of marketing its
product the 'Ivory' soap. This was a marketing trend and is practised till this day.
What was it?


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Answers to Quiz #96

1. Sting

2. Iced Tea

3. Boxing was the first sport to be filmed. Thomas A. Edison filmed a boxing match
between Jack Cushing and Mike Leonard in 1894

4. Early hand-held lights used carbon-zinc batteries that did not last very long. To keep
the light burning required yhat the user turn it on for a short time and then turn it off to
allow the battery to recover. That's how they became known as a "flashlight."

5. The mouse actually had 2 names. It was initially Nibbles (in the earlier cartoons it was
always after food) and later on was called Tuffy(The tough one)

6. In 1843, mathematician Ada Augusta Lovelace published the first computer programs.
She based them on Jacquard's punch-card idea. Her programs were for the first general-
purpose mechanical digital computer that had just been invented by Charles Babbage.


7. The "black box" that houses an airplane's voice recorder is orange so it can be more
easily detected amid the debris of a plane crash.

8. The coffee filter was invented by Melitta Bentz, in Germany in 1908. She pierced
holes in a tin container, put a circular piece of absorbent paper in the bottom of it and put
her creation over a coffee pot.

9. In 1881, Procter & Gamble's Harley Procter decided that adding the word "pure" to his
Ivory soap would give its sales a necessary shot in the arm. Analysis proved that Ivory
was almost 100 percent pure fatty acids and alkali, the stuff that most soap is made of.
Ivory's impurities were limited to 0.56-0.11 percent uncombined alkali, 0.28 percent
carbonates, and 0.17 percent mineral matter. Harley marked his soap "99 and 44/100
percent pure," deciding that using the exact number sounded more credible than rounding
up to 100 percent.


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Quiz #97
Dated - April 7, 2000
Vivek Reddy
1. What was inspired by a real-life incident during WW2 when some secretaries at a
British embassy in the Middle East, for fun, invented a nonexistent agent and
successfully tricked the Germans into looking for him?

2. Born in Chicago in December 1928. [Middle name was Kindred]. Moved to Berkeley,
California soon thereafter. Became a published author in 1952. Wrote and sold nearly a
hundred short stories and two dozen novels in the 50s and 60s. He experimented with
drugs and was married 5 times. He claimed to have a visitation from God in 1974. His
final novels all deal with this, especially "Valis", in which the title character is an
extraterrestrial God-like machine that chooses to make contact with a schizophrenic drug-
addled and mixed-up science fiction writer (that was himself). Who ?

3. Rum Rebellion is the name usually given to events that took place in Sydney on Jan.
26, 1808, when the New South Wales Corps illegally arrested and deposed the Governor.
Shortage of coins prevented farmers from selling their crops for money. Instead, they had
to barter their grain for other commodities, including rum. Many of the military officers
were rum traders, making enormous profits from dealing in liquor. To help the farmers,
the Governor issued an order prohibiting this sort of trading in spirits which led to the
rebellion. Who was the governor ?

4. During WW2, America had to use film sparingly and there was pressure on directors to
complete films quickly. Edward Dimitryk used what was known as "broadbrush
lighting"- lighting the figure in the foreground and letting shadows fall across everything
else- because it was cheaper and quicker. How was this process immortalised ?

5. In May 1992, this great actress was buried in Berlin, the city where she was born 93
years before. At the funeral, a small but vociferous group of Germans protested because
they considered her a traitor. Who?

6. Pauline Kael writing in I lost it at the movies, wrote about this movie, I was
exasperated by the defects of _____________, when I saw it. Now, a month later, I
realize I will never forget it. Which movie was she referring to.

7. In Issac Asimov's classic SF Foundation Series, what is the name of the home planet of
the emperors, and the administrative center of the galaxy?
8. It was the worst aviation disaster in history. On this date in 1977, two Boeing 747s
collided and exploded in flames on a foggy runway. A total of 577 people were killed
- including everyone aboard the KLM jumbo jet. Amazing, some people on the Pan
Am airliner survived and were able to climb out of the wreckage to safety. Where
did this tragedy take place?

9. How did Eric Clapton earn the nickname "Slowhand"?

10. Who was the last man on the moon


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Answers to Quiz #97

1. The film North By Northwest

2. Phillip K. Dick

3. William Bligh (later captain of HMS Bounty - whose crew mutinied

4. Film Noir

5. Marlene Dietrich

6. Satyajit Rays "Jalsaghar" - one of the few movies to have music by Ustad Vilayat
Khan.

7. Trantor

8. Tenerife Islands

9. Clapton's powerful guitar-playing regularly broke strings on his guitar. He would
change the strings onstage, as the audience slowly clapped their hands.

10. Gene Cernan, on Apollo 17 (Dec 1972)


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Quiz #98
Dated - April 15, 2000
Ravinder Rao
1. Which was the first commercial organization to purchase and use a computer?
2. Which was the first company to have assets in excess of US$ 1 billion, and nearly
attracted anti-trust litigation as a result?

3. In ancient Rome, it was believed that the Goddess Juno protected the Romans by
warning them of impending danger. Therefore, the Romans dedicated something to
her and made her priests the sole producers of this necessity. We still use it, and call
it after a name given to Juno. What?

4. Which yesteryears cricketer wrote an autobiography called "Balls of Fire"?

5. This financial instrument is said to have been devised by Evan Galbraith, a director of
Bankers Trust International in London (and later American ambassador to Paris), while
watching a rubber duck floating in his bath. What?

6. What line from Ethel Merman's hit song in "Annie Get Your Gun" has become a
Hollywood catchphrase?

7. Which was the first LP record to sell over a million copies?

8. Which comic strip hero was created inspired by a character in Philip Wylie's
1930 sci-fi book "Gladiators"?

9. When Italy was formed from a group of scattered provinces, which Italian province's
dialect was adopted as the "official" Italian?

10. Early choices for its name were "Facts", "Briefs", "Destiny" and "Chance".
What is it known as today?


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Answers to Quiz #98

1. General Electric, which installed a Univac Mark 1 built by Rand Corp.

2. US Steel

3. Money - after Juno Moneta

4. Fred Trueman

5. The floating rate note

6. There's no business like show business

7. Calypso by Harry Belafonte
8. Superman, by Jerry Siegel and Joe Schuster

9. Tuscany

10. TIME magazine


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Quiz #98
Dated - April 15, 2000
Ravinder Rao
1. Which was the first commercial organization to purchase and use a computer?

2. Which was the first company to have assets in excess of US$ 1 billion, and nearly
attracted anti-trust litigation as a result?

3. In ancient Rome, it was believed that the Goddess Juno protected the Romans by
warning them of impending danger. Therefore, the Romans dedicated something to her
and made her priests the sole producers of this necessity. We still use it, and call it after a
name given to Juno. What?

4. Which yesteryears cricketer wrote an autobiography called "Balls of Fire"?

5. This financial instrument is said to have been devised by Evan Galbraith, a director of
Bankers Trust International in London (and later American ambassador to Paris), while
watching a rubber duck floating in his bath. What?

6. What line from Ethel Merman's hit song in "Annie Get Your Gun" has become a
Hollywood catchphrase?

7. Which was the first LP record to sell over a million copies?

8. Which comic strip hero was created inspired by a character in Philip Wylie's 1930 sci-
fi book "Gladiators"?

9. When Italy was formed from a group of scattered provinces, which Italian province's
dialect was adopted as the "official" Italian?

10. Early choices for its name were "Facts", "Briefs", "Destiny" and "Chance". What is it
known as today?


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Answers to Quiz #98

1. General Electric, which installed a Univac Mark 1 built by Rand Corp.

2. US Steel

3. Money - after Juno Moneta

4. Fred Trueman

5. The floating rate note

6. There's no business like show business

7. Calypso by Harry Belafonte

8. Superman, by Jerry Siegel and Joe Schuster

9. Tuscany

10. TIME magazine


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Quiz #99
Dated - April 23, 2000
Suresh
1. As a child in school, Gandhiji's class was visited by a school inspector, who
wanted to test the students. He asked them just one thing, the spelling of a certain
word. Only Gandhiji couldn't spell it - and refused to listen to his teacher, who tried
to prompt him, saying that he could not cheat. Now, (and you are going to kick me
for this, I fear), What was the word Gandhiji would not spell?

2. In South Africa, as a young lawyer, one of Gandhiji's first civil disobedience
movements was against the South African government's decision to force colored (i.e.
asian) and black races to carry a pass (which soon came to be called the "Dompas" or
"Damned Pass"). Gandhiji was imprisoned, but later released, and managed to secure
significant concessions from the South African goverment. As a parting gift, he gave this
South African soldier and statesman a pair of shoes which he had made while in prison.
Who?

3. Gandhiji involved himself in the struggle against oppressive indigo planters in
Champaran, Bihar, and the peasants there gave him a loving nickname. What?
4. There's a scene in Attenborough's "Gandhi" where a group of Satyagrahis
(during the salt satyagraha) go forward, batch by batch, to raid the Government
Salt Works. Each batch is systematically beaten to pulp by British cops, and their
place is taken by the next batch, which again gets beaten up (over 700 satyagrahis
volunteered to get beaten up that day - May 21, 1930). This incident was filmed by
the foreign press, shocking the world. Just name the town (a few km from Dandi)
where this took place.

On Jan 26, 1931, Gandhiji was invited for talks (which led to the Gandhi - Irwin Pact) by
the Viceroy, Lord Irwin. At the Viceregal Lodge (it's now Rashtrapathi Bhavan), Lord
Irwin served him tea, to which Gandhiji added a spoonful of salt. Why did he do this?

After retiring from active politics in the mid 1930s, Gandhiji built himself a small
ashram (more of a rural community) in a village called Segaon, modeled, like his
earlier communities (Phoenix Farm etc), after John Ruskin's ideas. This soon
became a major hub in the Indian freedom struggle. What did Gandhiji rename the
ashram?

7. In 1941, Sir Stafford Cripps came to India with a proposal to grant freedom after the
war, along with a constitution drafted by Indians. It however gave states and provinces
the permission to opt out of this. How did Gandhiji describe this proposal? [memorable
phrase]

8. In 1946, following Jinnah's call for a "Direct Action Day", Hindu- Muslim riots
broke out all over the country. Thanks to the inaction of H.S.Suhrawardy's Muslim
League cabinet in Bengal, the riots were especially vicious there. Gandhiji spent
four months in a remote district of Bengal trying to keep the peace. Name this place.

9. Now for the last part - the assasination. Where was Gandhiji staying when he was
assasinated?


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Answers to quiz #99

1. Kettle

2. Field Marshal Jan Christiaan Smuts. Smuts later said that "he was not fit to stand in
those shoes".

3. Bapu (or Father)

4. Dharasana
5. In his own words - "Thank you. I will add some salt to it to remind us of the Boston
Tea Party"

6. Sevagram (near Wardha in Maharashtra)

7. "A post dated cheque on a crashing bank"

8. Noakhali (which is now in Bangladesh). For what it's worth, Gandhiji later (in late
1946) saved Suhrawardy from an angry mob, calming the crowd down.

9. Birla House, Delhi, which was put at his disposal by one of his close associates - the
industrialist Ghanshyam Das (G.D) Birla.


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Quiz #100
Dated - April 29, 2000
Sushil Chandani
Visual Quiz
1. Identify this object (of which this is a cross-section).

The wing of a stealth bomber


2. Identify the man of letters caricatured here

Gabriel Garcia Marquez


3. Whose self portrait is this?

Norman Rockwell (famous for his cover illustrations in the Saturday Evening Post


4. Identify both these people

George Lucas & Steven Spielberg


5. What's famous about the platform in the foreground?

At Fatehpur Sikri: Tansen's singing platform.


6. Identify this well known Indian woman.
Malavika Sarukkai.


7. In whose honor is this cartoon?

Jerry Garcia


8. What is this type of cloud called?

The Table cloth. It is wrapped around a mountain, is stationary and may linger for weeks.
btw, this place is Mount Ararat (where Noah's ark is supposed to have landed)


9. Identify this popular 'destination'

Dubai


10. What is this dish called?

The Japanese Rice Dish, Sushi.




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

. In Provence, around the 12th century AD, a dance called the Farandola became popular
- perhaps because it was the first to feature dancing in pairs. In this dance, people formed
themselves into long lines, split into couples and danced off in every direction -
frequently changing partners as they went. What change in architecture was introduced
because of this, and persists to this day?

2. Which common item takes its name from the Latin word for a "lentil"?

3. Although the art of button making dates back to prehistoric times, it was not till the
13th century AD that buttons became practical and essential in garments. Why?

4. The festival of Lupercalia in ancient Rome featured youths with thongs made from the
hides of sacrificial goats, who would run through the streets flapping barren women (see
Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar" for an instance of this). To what has this flogging ritual
lent its name?
5. This was introduced by a French army surgeon, Baron Dominique-Jean Lassey in
1792. Originally, it was a light, fast, horse drawn carriage filled with medical equipment
and portable litters for bearing away wounded soldiers. What did he call these mobile
field hospitals?

6. Name the only speaker of the British House of Commons to have been canonized.

7. Which character from Alice In Wonderland sings "Soup of the evening, beautiful
soup"?

8. It is said that Hannibal invented the tactic of encircling enemies by allowing the center
to fall back and closing in the wings to trap an enemy. He first used this at the battle of
Cannae. However, this tactic was used (accidentally) in a much earlier battle, when the
center broke and retreated, but the wings advanced - trapping the enemy. Which battle
was this?

9. Who travelled in the Cervennes with a donkey called Modestine?

10. Which famous book is otherwise known as "The Phaedo"?


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Answers to Quiz #91

1. The fireplace was moved from the center to the sides of a room.

2. Lens, because the first (biconvex) lenses were compared to lentil grains in shape

3. Some unknown genius invented the buttonhole

4. February, from "Februum"

5. Ambulance Volantes - from where we get the word Ambulance

6. Sir Thomas More (author of Utopia)

7. The Mock Turtle (and there's a mock turtle soup) :)

8. The battle of Marathon, where Leonidas' handful of Spartans defeated a huge Persian
army

9. Robert Louis Stevenson - read his "Travels with a Donkey"

10. The Dialogues of Plato
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Quiz #92
Dated - March 3, 2000
KC Junior Open Semifinals
1. In Formula I racing, who rode shotgun for Eddie Erskine after Schumacher's accident,
till his return, for Ferrari in 1999?

2. During World War II, this place in Britain was taken over as the headquarters of the
Red Cross, the National Air Raid Precaution and Fire Service Departments. Where?

3. This notoriously cruel man's actual name was Bonatien Alphonse François, and in his
will, he is reported to have said "I hope my memory will be erased from the mind of
man". Who?

4. Farokh Engineer was the first Indian cricketer to model for an ad. Which product did
he model for?

5. Alfred Lord Tennyson wrote "Every moment there dies a man, every moment one is
born". A famous inventor wrote him a letter saying "In that case, the population of the
world would be exactly zero".

6. Which cosmetics brand gets its name from a latin word meaning "White as snow"?

7. Seeing a cricketer miss a loose delivery which he should have easily thumped for a six,
Geoff Boycott once commented "My grandmom could have hit that one". Whom did he
say was playing worse than his grandmother?

8. According to legend, when the bridge to Lanka was being built, a squirrel tried to help
by bringing small pebbles in its mouth. So, what was the result of this?

9. Sir Walter Raleigh was a court favorite of Queen Elizabeth I. So, when he acquired
land in America, he named it after her. What did he call this colony?

10. This king of Cyprus fell in love with a statue he had sculpted. So, Aphrodite gave the
statue life. Name the king and the statue.


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Answers to Quiz #92

1. Mika Salo

2. Wimbledon
3. The Marquis de Sade

4. Brylcreem

5. Charles Babbage

6. Nivea (from the J.L.Morrison Company)

7. Salim Malik

8. Lord Rama caressed the squirrel's back, so squirrels have three white stripes across
their back till this day.

9. Virginia - Elizabeth was known as the "Virgin Queen"

10. Pygmalion and Galatea.


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Quiz #93
Dated - March 10, 2000
GVS Sreedhar
1. Who is supposed to have originally said "The customer is king"?

2. David McConnell founded the California Perfume Company, which later became
Avon. Why did he change the name?

3. What would you call the shortest distance between any two points on a spherical
surface - such as the Earth?

4. In the gem trade, what are known as "fancies"?

5. In 1672, a young New England born clerk arrived in India and took up a job as a factor
(clerk / merchant) with the British East India Company. Over the years, he made a
fortune in the pepper trade, a lot of it gained by defrauding his employers. He is,
however, still remembered for a small amount of money he donated. Who?

6. What is the Greek word for "A ring of animals"?

7. Two songwriters have been credited with the lyrics of Sinatra's "My Way". One of
them was Claude François, and the other was a famous singer and composer of the 1970s,
with several hits to his credit. Name him.
8. Which contemporary philosopher and mathematician did Voltaire satirize, modeling
Dr.Pangloss in "Candide" on him?

9. According to Thomas Carlyle, who was the "Sea Green Incorruptible"?

10. To whom did Alexander the Great bequeath his empire?


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Answers to Quiz #93

1. Marshall Field, the pioneer in Departmental stores

2. He was originally a bookseller and specialized in Shakespeare's books. As these were
not selling well, he decided to distribute perfume as a freebie. He soon found that the
perfume was more popular than the books, and so switched over to direct marketing of
perfumes and cosmetics.

3. Geodesic

4. Diamonds which have a strong cast / tinge of colour. For example, the Hope diamond
has a blue tint.

5. Elihu Yale, who bailed out Yale, which was then on the brink of bankruptcy.

6. Zodiac

7. Paul Anka

8. Gottfried Leibnitz

9. Maximilian Robespierre, the tyrant of the French revolution

10. "The Strongest"


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Quiz #94
Dated - March 17, 2000
Anil
1. Abu Jaffer Mohammed Ibn Musa was a resident of the Uzbek city of Khiva in
medieval times. A book he wrote, and his surname (which was also the earlier name of
his city) have contributed two extremely well known words to English. Name them.
2. Inspired by their Professor Fred Terman, two people started a small electronics
company in an old garage on Jan 1, 1939. Their first product was an audio oscillator
which Walt Disney used to produce sound effects in his movie "Fantasia". The name of
this company was decided by the toss of a coin. Just name the company.

3. Its official title is the "Collegiate Church of St.Peter". What is it better known as?

4. These are the opening lines of which famous novel -


Early one evening, during an exceptional heat wave in the beginning of July, a young
man walked out into the street from the closetlike room he rented in Stoliarny Place.

5. Australian cricketer Belinda Clarke is currently the only cricketer in the world to
achieve a landmark - which no cricketer (in either mens or womens cricket has yet
achieved. What?

6. He was a policeman in Southampton, has written books like "Crime and Punishment"
(no, not Dostoviesky) and "English Cheeses of the South and West". His gravestone
quotes his own poem "So clear you see these timely things // That like a bird, the vision
sings". He's far more famous for his long association with cricket. Name him.

7. According to him, "I could have become a doctor, but instead I became the biggest
quack in history". Big hint in the question - just name him, and what he did to become so
famous as a quack.

8. Plato described them as "The most perfect musical instruments". One was the flute, the
second was the lyre. What was the third?

9. Name the celebrity owners of the football clubs Fulham and Watford.

10. He invented soda water, and coined the name "rubber" because he found that it could
erase pencil marks. He's best known for a "Life Producing" discovery. Name him, and his
discovery.


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Answers to Quiz #94

1. Algebra (from Al Jabr) and Algorithm (from his surname / hometown Al Khwarizm)

2. Hewlett Packard, founded by Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard

3. Westminster Abbey
4. Crime and Punishment - by Dostoviesky

5. A double century in One Day Internationals

6. John Arlott

7. Clarence Nash (the voice of Donald Duck)

8. The Human Voice

9. Fulham - Mohammed Al-Fayed (father of Dodi) and Watford - Elton John

10. Joseph Priestly, the discoverer of Oxygen


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Quiz #95
Dated - March 25, 2000
Josyula Krishnamurthy
1. Where would you find Patience and Fortitude standing guard, and what are they?

2. Which city is well known for "Christ the Redeemer"?

3. Who were deposed by Col. Muammar Gaddafi of Libya and Fidel Castro of Cuba
when they assumed power?

4. In 1931 in Paris, a British novelist called Arnold Bennett tried to prove something he
believed, and died trying. What did he want to prove?

5. In fencing, this term refers to the lower part of a sword's blade - traditionally regarded
as a weak spot by fencers. This gives its name to which English word meaning
"weakness"?

6. In Geography, what is an island mountain (that is, a mountain totally surrounded by the
sea) called?

7. REM's "Man on the Moon" has a reference to which (then) popular comedian?

8. This actor is often called the "Fresh Prince of Bel Air". Who?

9. What is a "Roo Bar" in Australian slang?

10. Who was the lead guitarist for Michael Jackson's "Beat It"?
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Answers to Quiz #95

1. They are the two lion statues standing guard outside the New York Public Library

2. Rio de Janiero

3. Gaddaffi deposed King Edris III and Castro kicked out the previous dictator -
Fulgencio Batista

4. He tried to prove that the water of the river Seine was fit to drink, drank it and died of
Typhoid as a result

5. Foible

6. Inselberg

7. Andy Kaufman - check out the 1999 Jim Carrey movie of the same name

8. Will Smith

9. A protective bar fitted in front of Australian vehicles - to minimize damage caused by
collisions with Kangaroo

10. Eddie van Halen


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Quiz #96
Dated - April 2, 2000
Jagannath Surampudi
1. How do we know 'Gordon Sumner' Better as?

2. At the St. Louis World's Fair in 1904, Richard Blechyden, an Englishman, had a tea
concession. On a very hot day, none of the fairgoers were interested in drinking hot tea.
This incident led to the invention of what? (very workable)

3. Which was the first sport to be filmed? And what was the incident or who were the
players who were filmed? And an extra point for the guy who filmed it.

4. Give me the origin of the name flash light?
5. This is for all you Tom & Jerry watchers. In few of the cartoons Jerry is accompanied
by a friend. A grey mouse, with a big mouth, and is normally in diapers. What is the
name of this mouse?

6. By whom were the first computer programs published and for what purpose?(Purpose
very workable)

7. The "black box" that houses an airplane's voice recorder is orange? Why?(workable)

8. What did Melitta Bentz invent in 1908 in Germany by piercing holes in a tin vessel and
a few other alterations?(workable)

9. In 1881, Procter & Gamble's Harley Procter started a new way of marketing its product
the 'Ivory' soap. This was a marketing trend and is practised till this day. What was it?


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Answers to Quiz #96

1. Sting

2. Iced Tea

3. Boxing was the first sport to be filmed. Thomas A. Edison filmed a boxing match
between Jack Cushing and Mike Leonard in 1894

4. Early hand-held lights used carbon-zinc batteries that did not last very long. To keep
the light burning required yhat the user turn it on for a short time and then turn it off to
allow the battery to recover. That's how they became known as a "flashlight."

5. The mouse actually had 2 names. It was initially Nibbles (in the earlier cartoons it was
always after food) and later on was called Tuffy(The tough one)

6. In 1843, mathematician Ada Augusta Lovelace published the first computer programs.
She based them on Jacquard's punch-card idea. Her programs were for the first general-
purpose mechanical digital computer that had just been invented by Charles Babbage.


7. The "black box" that houses an airplane's voice recorder is orange so it can be more
easily detected amid the debris of a plane crash.

8. The coffee filter was invented by Melitta Bentz, in Germany in 1908. She pierced
holes in a tin container, put a circular piece of absorbent paper in the bottom of it and put
her creation over a coffee pot.
9. In 1881, Procter & Gamble's Harley Procter decided that adding the word "pure" to his
Ivory soap would give its sales a necessary shot in the arm. Analysis proved that Ivory
was almost 100 percent pure fatty acids and alkali, the stuff that most soap is made of.
Ivory's impurities were limited to 0.56-0.11 percent uncombined alkali, 0.28 percent
carbonates, and 0.17 percent mineral matter. Harley marked his soap "99 and 44/100
percent pure," deciding that using the exact number sounded more credible than rounding
up to 100 percent.


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Quiz #97
Dated - April 7, 2000
Vivek Reddy
1. What was inspired by a real-life incident during WW2 when some secretaries at a
British embassy in the Middle East, for fun, invented a nonexistent agent and
successfully tricked the Germans into looking for him?

2. Born in Chicago in December 1928. [Middle name was Kindred]. Moved to Berkeley,
California soon thereafter. Became a published author in 1952. Wrote and sold nearly a
hundred short stories and two dozen novels in the 50s and 60s. He experimented with
drugs and was married 5 times. He claimed to have a visitation from God in 1974. His
final novels all deal with this, especially "Valis", in which the title character is an
extraterrestrial God-like machine that chooses to make contact with a schizophrenic drug-
addled and mixed-up science fiction writer (that was himself). Who ?

3. Rum Rebellion is the name usually given to events that took place in Sydney on Jan.
26, 1808, when the New South Wales Corps illegally arrested and deposed the Governor.
Shortage of coins prevented farmers from selling their crops for money. Instead, they had
to barter their grain for other commodities, including rum. Many of the military officers
were rum traders, making enormous profits from dealing in liquor. To help the farmers,
the Governor issued an order prohibiting this sort of trading in spirits which led to the
rebellion. Who was the governor ?

4. During WW2, America had to use film sparingly and there was pressure on directors to
complete films quickly. Edward Dimitryk used what was known as "broadbrush
lighting"- lighting the figure in the foreground and letting shadows fall across everything
else- because it was cheaper and quicker. How was this process immortalised ?

5. In May 1992, this great actress was buried in Berlin, the city where she was born 93
years before. At the funeral, a small but vociferous group of Germans protested because
they considered her a traitor. Who?

6. Pauline Kael writing in I lost it at the movies, wrote about this movie, I was
exasperated by the defects of _____________, when I saw it. Now, a month later, I
realize I will never forget it. Which movie was she referring to.
7. In Issac Asimov's classic SF Foundation Series, what is the name of the home planet of
the emperors, and the administrative center of the galaxy?

8. It was the worst aviation disaster in history. On this date in 1977, two Boeing 747s
collided and exploded in flames on a foggy runway. A total of 577 people were killed -
including everyone aboard the KLM jumbo jet. Amazing, some people on the Pan Am
airliner survived and were able to climb out of the wreckage to safety. Where did this
tragedy take place?

9. How did Eric Clapton earn the nickname "Slowhand"?

10. Who was the last man on the moon


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Answers to Quiz #97

1. The film North By Northwest

2. Phillip K. Dick

3. William Bligh (later captain of HMS Bounty - whose crew mutinied

4. Film Noir

5. Marlene Dietrich

6. Satyajit Rays "Jalsaghar" - one of the few movies to have music by Ustad Vilayat
Khan.

7. Trantor

8. Tenerife Islands

9. Clapton's powerful guitar-playing regularly broke strings on his guitar. He would
change the strings onstage, as the audience slowly clapped their hands.

10. Gene Cernan, on Apollo 17 (Dec 1972)


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Quiz #98
Dated - April 15, 2000
Ravinder Rao
1. Which was the first commercial organization to purchase and use a computer?

2. Which was the first company to have assets in excess of US$ 1 billion, and nearly
attracted anti-trust litigation as a result?

3. In ancient Rome, it was believed that the Goddess Juno protected the Romans by
warning them of impending danger. Therefore, the Romans dedicated something to her
and made her priests the sole producers of this necessity. We still use it, and call it after a
name given to Juno. What?

4. Which yesteryears cricketer wrote an autobiography called "Balls of Fire"?

5. This financial instrument is said to have been devised by Evan Galbraith, a director of
Bankers Trust International in London (and later American ambassador to Paris), while
watching a rubber duck floating in his bath. What?

6. What line from Ethel Merman's hit song in "Annie Get Your Gun" has become a
Hollywood catchphrase?

7. Which was the first LP record to sell over a million copies?

8. Which comic strip hero was created inspired by a character in Philip Wylie's 1930 sci-
fi book "Gladiators"?

9. When Italy was formed from a group of scattered provinces, which Italian province's
dialect was adopted as the "official" Italian?

10. Early choices for its name were "Facts", "Briefs", "Destiny" and "Chance". What is it
known as today?


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Answers to Quiz #98

1. General Electric, which installed a Univac Mark 1 built by Rand Corp.

2. US Steel

3. Money - after Juno Moneta

4. Fred Trueman

5. The floating rate note
6. There's no business like show business

7. Calypso by Harry Belafonte

8. Superman, by Jerry Siegel and Joe Schuster

9. Tuscany

10. TIME magazine


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Quiz #98
Dated - April 15, 2000
Ravinder Rao
1. Which was the first commercial organization to purchase and use a computer?

2. Which was the first company to have assets in excess of US$ 1 billion, and nearly
attracted anti-trust litigation as a result?

3. In ancient Rome, it was believed that the Goddess Juno protected the Romans by
warning them of impending danger. Therefore, the Romans dedicated something to her
and made her priests the sole producers of this necessity. We still use it, and call it after a
name given to Juno. What?

4. Which yesteryears cricketer wrote an autobiography called "Balls of Fire"?

5. This financial instrument is said to have been devised by Evan Galbraith, a director of
Bankers Trust International in London (and later American ambassador to Paris), while
watching a rubber duck floating in his bath. What?

6. What line from Ethel Merman's hit song in "Annie Get Your Gun" has become a
Hollywood catchphrase?

7. Which was the first LP record to sell over a million copies?

8. Which comic strip hero was created inspired by a character in Philip Wylie's 1930 sci-
fi book "Gladiators"?

9. When Italy was formed from a group of scattered provinces, which Italian province's
dialect was adopted as the "official" Italian?

10. Early choices for its name were "Facts", "Briefs", "Destiny" and "Chance". What is it
known as today?
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Answers to Quiz #98

1. General Electric, which installed a Univac Mark 1 built by Rand Corp.

2. US Steel

3. Money - after Juno Moneta

4. Fred Trueman

5. The floating rate note

6. There's no business like show business

7. Calypso by Harry Belafonte

8. Superman, by Jerry Siegel and Joe Schuster

9. Tuscany

10. TIME magazine


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Quiz #99
Dated - April 23, 2000
Suresh
1. As a child in school, Gandhiji's class was visited by a school inspector, who wanted to
test the students. He asked them just one thing, the spelling of a certain word. Only
Gandhiji couldn't spell it - and refused to listen to his teacher, who tried to prompt him,
saying that he could not cheat. Now, (and you are going to kick me for this, I fear), What
was the word Gandhiji would not spell?

2. In South Africa, as a young lawyer, one of Gandhiji's first civil disobedience
movements was against the South African government's decision to force colored (i.e.
asian) and black races to carry a pass (which soon came to be called the "Dompas" or
"Damned Pass"). Gandhiji was imprisoned, but later released, and managed to secure
significant concessions from the South African goverment. As a parting gift, he gave this
South African soldier and statesman a pair of shoes which he had made while in prison.
Who?
3. Gandhiji involved himself in the struggle against oppressive indigo planters in
Champaran, Bihar, and the peasants there gave him a loving nickname. What?

4. There's a scene in Attenborough's "Gandhi" where a group of Satyagrahis (during the
salt satyagraha) go forward, batch by batch, to raid the Government Salt Works. Each
batch is systematically beaten to pulp by British cops, and their place is taken by the next
batch, which again gets beaten up (over 700 satyagrahis volunteered to get beaten up that
day - May 21, 1930). This incident was filmed by the foreign press, shocking the world.
Just name the town (a few km from Dandi) where this took place.

On Jan 26, 1931, Gandhiji was invited for talks (which led to the Gandhi - Irwin Pact) by
the Viceroy, Lord Irwin. At the Viceregal Lodge (it's now Rashtrapathi Bhavan), Lord
Irwin served him tea, to which Gandhiji added a spoonful of salt. Why did he do this?

After retiring from active politics in the mid 1930s, Gandhiji built himself a small ashram
(more of a rural community) in a village called Segaon, modeled, like his earlier
communities (Phoenix Farm etc), after John Ruskin's ideas. This soon became a major
hub in the Indian freedom struggle. What did Gandhiji rename the ashram?

7. In 1941, Sir Stafford Cripps came to India with a proposal to grant freedom after the
war, along with a constitution drafted by Indians. It however gave states and provinces
the permission to opt out of this. How did Gandhiji describe this proposal? [memorable
phrase]

8. In 1946, following Jinnah's call for a "Direct Action Day", Hindu- Muslim riots broke
out all over the country. Thanks to the inaction of H.S.Suhrawardy's Muslim League
cabinet in Bengal, the riots were especially vicious there. Gandhiji spent four months in a
remote district of Bengal trying to keep the peace. Name this place.

9. Now for the last part - the assasination. Where was Gandhiji staying when he was
assasinated?


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Answers to quiz #99

1. Kettle

2. Field Marshal Jan Christiaan Smuts. Smuts later said that "he was not fit to stand in
those shoes".

3. Bapu (or Father)

4. Dharasana
5. In his own words - "Thank you. I will add some salt to it to remind us of the Boston
Tea Party"

6. Sevagram (near Wardha in Maharashtra)

7. "A post dated cheque on a crashing bank"

8. Noakhali (which is now in Bangladesh). For what it's worth, Gandhiji later (in late
1946) saved Suhrawardy from an angry mob, calming the crowd down.

9. Birla House, Delhi, which was put at his disposal by one of his close associates - the
industrialist Ghanshyam Das (G.D) Birla.


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Quiz #100
Dated - April 29, 2000
Sushil Chandani
Visual Quiz
1. Identify this object (of which this is a cross-section).

The wing of a stealth bomber


2. Identify the man of letters caricatured here

Gabriel Garcia Marquez


3. Whose self portrait is this?

Norman Rockwell (famous for his cover illustrations in the Saturday Evening Post


4. Identify both these people

George Lucas & Steven Spielberg


5. What's famous about the platform in the foreground?

At Fatehpur Sikri: Tansen's singing platform.


6. Identify this well known Indian woman.
Malavika Sarukkai.


7. In whose honor is this cartoon?

Jerry Garcia


8. What is this type of cloud called?

The Table cloth. It is wrapped around a mountain, is stationary and may linger for weeks.
btw, this place is Mount Ararat (where Noah's ark is supposed to have landed)


9. Identify this popular 'destination'

Dubai


10. What is this dish called?

The Japanese Rice Dish, Sushi.




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

. During his childhood days whenever his dad used to bring a new copy of FORTUNE
magazine he used to read it in the night secretly under the blanket with the help of a
flashlight. Who is this person?

2. Adolf Hitler said to a person " you have to look to nature to find out what
streamlining is " and asked him to do something. When this person followed Hitler's
advice to produce a masterpiece, Hitler called it as " strength through joy ". What
did this person do?

3.This creature gets its name from the Greek word for 'womb' because it resembles
the shape of the womb. Name the creature?

4. Etymologically it comes via Latin from Greek and it means 'folded paper' and
very frequently used in academic circles and in diminutive form in the bureaucratic
circles. Which word is it?

5.What is the Latin word for 'finger' or 'toe'? It's a common word nowadays.
6. Process by which an unfamiliar or slightly outlandish foreign word is deconstructed
and then reassembled using similar sounding elements in the host language .In this case
the source was French 'dame-Jeanne', literally 'lady Jane ', a term used in French for such
a container since the 17th century 'dame Jeanne' became 'demijohn' in the English
language. What do you call such process in the field of etymology?

7.What is the Hebrew word for 'adversary'? (Very common word: clue Bible).

8. First Sanskrit work to be printed in the Devanagari script, at least 500 years old,
its importance lies in the fact that it is the original source of many of the folk tales of
Europe. It was translated in 1787 and was printed at Serampore in 1803. Which
book is it?

9. What is the Latin word for 'poison'?

10. D.W. Mehra and (jimmy) JD Nagarvalla, J.L.Kapur. What is their claim to fame?


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Answers to Quiz #81

1. Bill Gates.

2. He asked Ferdinand Porsche to design Volkswagen Beetle and then went on to say that
"It was to carry two adults and three children and to look like beetle".

3. Dolphin. From Greek 'delphis'.

4. Diploma.

5. Digit.

6. Folk etymology.

7. Satan.

8. Hitopadesa.

9. Virus.

10. The investigating officers from the Crime Branch who submitted the report of the
commission of inquiry into the conspiracy to murder Gandhiji. J.L.Kapur was the judge
of the Supreme Court of India who tried the case.
Quiz #82
Dated - December 25, 1999
G.V.S.Sreedhar
1. Lord Halifax was the British ambassador to the United States during World War II. He
is better known in India under another title - as the viceroy who concluded a pact with
Mahatma Gandhi. The Dandi March and Bardoli Satyagraha were both during his tenure.
Name him.

2. This ill fated queen was educated in France and loved golf. Her pages, who followed
her around the golf course, were all from noble families, were called Cadets (pronounced
Kah-Day in French) - from which we get the word "Caddy". Name her.

3. The Gold Standard, in which currency was redeemable against gold, was first
perfected by the Master of the Royal Mint in 1717. Name this official, who's more
famous for his research into other areas.

4. When asked why he wrote only horror stories, what did Edgar Allan Poe say?

5. To mix a drink called a "Flip", strong beer was mixed with sugar and rum and
stirred with a red hot poker. Bar-room brawls were often settled using these pokers
as weapons. So, what English phrase originated from this poker's name?

6. Around the end of the 18th century, who commanded the army of the Nizam of
Hyderabad? Several years later, he shot to fame as one of the greatest generals of all
time in the world.

7. The ancient Romans were all avid acrobats - and acrobatics formed a part of every
gentleman's education. At a public performance, an acrobat fell to his death at the feet of
Marcus Aurelius. What did he order - a practice which is still implemented now?

8. Which famous quiz show was sponsored by the Revlon company?

9. In 1885, what did Canada sell the State of New York for $150,000?

10. When this story was being translated into English from French, the translator
goofed and misread "en vair" as "en verre", a mistake that has come down to us
unchanged. What was this story?


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Answers to Quiz #82

1. Lord Irwin
2. Mary, Queen of Scots

3. Sir Isaac Newton

4. "Because they sell"

5. At Loggerheads (the poker was called a loggerhead)

6. Sir Arthur Wellesley, the future Duke of Wellington (the Iron Duke)

7. A safety net for the acrobats

8. The $64,000 Question

9. Niagara Falls

10.The story was Cinderella, where "en vair" (of fur) became "en verre" (of glass) -
leading to the popular fiction that Cinderella wore glass slippers to the ball.



Quiz #83 [Millenium Quiz]
Dated - January 3, 2000
Sushil Chandani
1. Connect the year 1980 A.D. with the year 29,940 A.D.

2. By the 12-13th century, the practice of alchemy had declined in India, while it
continued to attract much attention (and brains) in the West. Why ?

3. In 1546, the Spaniard Ynigo Ortiz de Retez sailed past this land, a finding that it
reminded him of an African shore that he had visited earlier, named it after that place.
What place are we talking about ?

4. Who was Hazrat Nizamuddin Auliya's most famous disciple ?

5. TV broadcasts, when strong enough, were/are the first sign of life emanating from
earth that could be picked up by other civilizations several light years away. What
would they first get to see ?

6. In 1999, the Comdex is called "Technology's Main Event". What was technology's
main event in 1900 ?

7. Victrola sold the first affordable home phonograph machine in 1906. What business
strategy was used to ensure sales.
8. When MK Gandhi was the man of the year for the Time magazine in 1930, a close
second was an American named Albert Henry Wiggin, who was described as being
"sagacious, resourceful and confidence-inspiring".Who was Wiggins?

9. To show that arthritis had a high tendency to natural cure, Gull and Staton (1865) first
used a method that has subsequently been used to prove many other things in the medical
sciences. What did they use ?

10. The use of rocket-propelled armaments in warfare got its main impetus from the
effect of what cause ?

11. The inaugural trophy of this event, first held in 1900, was won by Gordon Bennet, a
wealthy American publisher. The event continues to be
held
every year, though with a different goal. What event ?

12. Henry Stanley is remembered today mostly for a single encounter. But his most
significant contribution was the meticulous charting of what ?



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Answers to Quiz #83

1. Y2K-related bugs: In early Windows versions, if you typed in 01/01/00, the OS
assumed it was 1-1-1980; in the present MacOS, the Y2k-like bug will occur in year
29,940. The Windows guys have still to deal with the Y10K bug before that...

2. The wide-spread use of mercury in Indian medicine reduced the charm of alchemy
because it was the only weird, mysterious substance that could be shown to gullible
onlookers/venture-capitalists.

3. New Guinea - named after the Guinea Coast of Africa.

4. Amir Khusro.

5. Hitler's inaugural speech at the 1936 Berlin Olympics.

6. The Paris Exposition.

7. They designed their products to look like household furniture, with rich walnut fittings.
Other models looked like bits of poorly designed machinery, with wires and tubes
sticking out at all angles.
8. In a depression-torn county, he was the Chairman of the Chase National Bank, who
helped arrest the depression. A sort of depression era Alan Greenspan.

9. The were the first to use placebos. (Many symptoms that can be associated with
arthritis are weather-related, and may go away with or without medication).

10. They were needed in Naval battles, as cannons tend to have large recoils that can
upset the ship.

11. The Paris-Lyon motor race. Now run as the Paris Dakar motor rally.

12. The 2000-mile courrse of the river Congo.


Quiz #84
[20 Questions Prelims, Mt. Carmel College, Bangalore]
Dated - January 9, 2000
Suresh Ramasubramanian
There are 30 questions here, which you have to crack in 20 minutes. Starred questions
count in case of a tiebreak. In the actual prelims, the top score was 23, and the cutoff was
16.5. Good luck.

1. A Hard Day's Knight

2. The Horror, The Horror of his horrifying death *

3. We make all the gadgets used by Wile E Coyote

4. This movie made Amitabh a Star and Rajesh Khanna a Superstar

5. Ennio Morricone's music always announces this anonymous hero.

6. He owns the VVR Western Ghat Oil Company - but nobody wants his oil.

7. Gypsy guitarist didn't have two fingers on his playing hand.

8. Darth Vader's voice says "This is CNN"

9. Bobby Kooka's Airborne King.

10. Bellerophon's horse presented by Readers Digest.

11. You wouldn't want to treat Prince Vlad Tepes to a drink.

12. Obelix was impressed by her Nose.
13. The best actor of 1929 died in the arms of Jean Harlow. Rather a beastly question *

14. Sir Miles Messervy gives him orders, and Major Boothroyd gives him lots of
gadgets

15. Narya the Wise is an expert in making fireworks.

16. She couldn't seduce Arjuna and so cursed him to become an Eunuch.

17. John Hinckley tried to impress her by shooting Reagan. *

18. His operation flooded India.

19. Who the hell composed the first Rock Opera?

20. Mosaic meets Godzilla

21. The Whole Woman followed the Female Eunuch. *

22. Still Going Strong - since 1820.

23. He was hanged for murdering Ahmed Raza Kasoori. Log kehte hain woh bekasoor
tha.

24. Dogs Bite, Bees Sting, She Thinks.

25. Tombstone had enough tombstones for the Clanton brothers after this event. *

26. The White Star never expected she would go down.

27. He counted on the sex life of rabbits to give him an idea.

28. Eccentric terrier keeps wickets *

29. This Indian chief inspires charging US Marines

30. Dev Anand, Kalpana Kartik, Robert deNiro and Jodie Foster (debut).


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Answers to Quiz #84

1. Paul McCartney

2. Colonel Kurtz (Apocalypse Now) or Heart of Darkness (Joseph Conrad)
3. The Acme Company (almost all their gadgets are labeled "Does not work on
Roadrunner")

4. Anand (dir: Hrishikesh Mukherjee, dedicated to Raj Kapoor and the city
of Bombay)

5. The Man With No Name (Clint Eastwood in the Sergio Leone "No Name"
trilogy)

6. P. Ramar Pillai (Herbal Petrol scamster)

7. Django Reinhart

8. James Earl Jones (also Mufassa in The Lion King)

9. The Air India Maharaja

10. Pegasus (Readers Digest best ad award)

11. Count Dracula (he'd likely drink your blood)

12. Cleopatra

13. Rin Tin Tin the dog

14. James Bond (Sir Miles - M and Major Boothroyd - Q)

15. Gandalf (The Lord of the Rings)

16. Urvashi. So Arjuna could become Brihannala during the "Agnyatavaas"

17. Jodie Foster

18. Dr. Verghese Kurien (Operation Flood - Amul)

19. The Who (Tommy)

20. Mozilla / Netscape

21. Germaine Greer

22. Johnny Walker scotch whisky

23. Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto
24. Baroness Maria von Trapp (Julie Andrews) - The Sound of Music.

25. Gunfight at the OK Corral

26. The Titanic

27. Fibonacci (Fibonacci Series based on the family tree of a pair of
rabbits)

28. Jack Russell (Jack Russell Terriers, former - rather eccentric -
England wicket keeper)

29. Geronimo

30. Taxi Driver (hindi - Dev and Kalpana - where Kalpana dresses up as a boy, english -
deNiro and Jodie Foster)


Quiz #85
Dated - January 15, 2000
Arun Subramanian
1) This Indian company started off as a single unit manufacturing a single product -
hermetically sealed panel Meters. Now it is a billion dollar company. What is it?

2) Her "Harry Potter" trilogy has created a sensation in the New York Times
bestseller lists. For the first time ever, the top 3 slots have been occupied by books
written by the same author. Who is this wonderful lady? Also, try to name at least
one of the Harry Potter books.

3) This music director acted in two movies , one was a hilarious performance in Bhoot
Bangla , and the other a cameo in Pyaar Ka Mausam . He also made lyricist Anand
Bakshi sing in three movies - Balika Badhu, Sholay and Maha Chor. Who was he?

4) This is a change in frequency observed when light is scattered in a transparent
material. What is this popularly known as?

5) Which famous T.S.Eliot poem ends with these words- "shanti, shanti, shanti"?

6) In 1972 Henry Kissinger justified the presidents action of ordering the invasion of
cambodia by saying : "after all we are ___ ____ _________ _____ " what?

7) After the first Viking photographs of the surface of Mars were beamed back to earth
scientists found an anomaly. On the Martian surface was the impression of a human face.
Not only that, there were numerous other anomalies showing geometrical patterns. what
is the name given to this area?? (sorry for this really vague one)
8) In literature what is the unique position occupied by the day 16 June 1904?

9) If you were reading a book with a two headed guy caleed Zaphod Beeblebrox in it
and wich describes Earth as "mostly harmless" which would it be?

10) He was, in his chequered career, an Ambulance driver, a successful writer, ... He
married four times and died of self inflicted gunshot wounds. His posthumous
memoir is "True at first light". Name him.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Answers to Quiz #85



1) BPL in Palakkad

2) The books are - The Prisoner of Azkaban, The Sorcerer's Stone and The Chamber of
Secrets

3) Rahul Dev Burman

4) The Raman Effect

5) Wasteland

6) All the President's Men

7) Cydonia

8) James Joyce's Ulysses - the entire massive story takes place on this day, in Dublin

9) Douglas Adams' Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

10) Ernest Hemingway


Quiz #86
Dated - January 21, 2000
Nitin Sankar
1. In ancient Rome, the emperors used to store the royal treasure in baskets woven
from the bark of a fig tree. What financial term comes from these baskets

2. Who coined the term "Business Process Reengineering" in their book Reengineering
the corporation?
3. Which company once so dominated it's sector that it, and the other corporations
which were then in the sector were referred to as "Snow White and the Seven
Dwarfs"?

4. Which liquor giant markets Dom Perignon champagne (at Rs.12,000 a bottle) in
India?

5. Motorola popularized the 6 Sigma concept. What does 6 Sigma stand for?

6. What is the most famous quality award given in the USA which has become a
benchmark for companies to measure overall competence?

7. During World War II, name the only private company which supplied fighter aircraft
to the Luftwaffe (German Air Force).

8. Who was the first British industrialist to die in a plane crash? What change came
about because of his death?

9. Singapore Airlines calls its first class Kris Class. What is a Kris?

10. Shyam Benegal's movie Manthan had over a thousand producers - perhaps a record.
How is this possible?


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Answers to Quiz #86

1. Fiscal (from Fiscus - fig)

2. Hammer and Champy

3. IBM

4. Moet and Hennessey

5. An error rate of less than 6 standard deviations from the mean - that is less than one
error per million

6. The Malcolm Baldridge Quality Award

7. Messerschmitt

8. Charles Rolls of Rolls Royce. The Rolls Royce logo was painted a sober black instead
of the original bright red to mourn him.
9. A Malaysian dagger with a curved blade, usually worn by noblemen

10. It was produced using contributions from the cooperative society of dairy farmers
who form Amul


Quiz #87
Dated - January 31, 2000
Suresh Ramasubramanian
On the occasion of Republic Day, here is a belated quiz on one of India's largest business
undertakings - the Government of India. Here's a quiz on the GoI's role in industry.

LAW AND POLICY
1. It has been hailed as the "Economic Constitution of India", and has influenced Indian
economic policy for over three decades. It has also been criticized as the root cause of
stagnation in Indian economy. It divided Indian industry into three schedules - A (PSUs),
B (private, with governmental control) and C (private sector). What is it?

2. Till this act was considerably toned down, it was a favorite with corporate rivals, who
regularly sued each other, charging them with violation of this act whenever they released
an ad or conducted a competition for their customers. Name it.

3. The precursor to this act was introduced by the British to control movement of funds,
during World War II. On Jan 1, 1974, a considerably expanded and even more draconian
version came into force and contributed a great deal to the closure of the Indian economy,
till it was repealed recently. Name this act, and its replacement.

Public Sector Undertakings
4. Which was the first PSU which the GoI partly divested its stake in, when it wished to
raise money through disinvestment? A hint - it went from proposal to approval to full
production in record time, perhaps because a famous (or rather notorious) personality was
the driving force behind it.

5. PSUs like LIC, Air India, IFCI, RBI, ONGC, NTC etc have been set up after the GoI
passes an act decreeing their existence. What are such organizations examples of?

6. This word was first used by Peter Drucker in his book "The Age of Discontinuity"
(1969). However, it picked up steam in India only in 1993, when the GoI appointed the
Rangarajan Committee to study and recommend new measures for this. It is now fast (or
as fast as the GoI moves) becoming a reality. What?

Money
7. This organization was established in 1988 by the RBI, in association with public sector
banks and national financial institutions. It participates in the inter-bank call / notice
money, commercial paper and term deposit markets, both as a borrower and lender. It
also provides repos (buyback) facility to banks. Name it.

8. The word "Budget" is derived from the French word for a leather bag used to
carry papers, as the Chancellor of the Exchequer of England would generally carry
his papers in such a bag. Till recently, the Indian budget was always read out at
5:30 PM - a tradition broken by Yashwant Sinha. What is the reason for this odd
timing?

9. This committee, headed by a former RBI governor, was set up in 1991 to study
possible reforms in the banking sector. It has made sweeping suggestions, which set
clearly defined roles and areas of operation, gave additional autonomy in operational
areas and recommended opening up of capital markets to FIIs. Just name it.

... and now, here's one on a lighter note to end the quiz.
10. Till a few years ago, the sub collectorate at Dindigul, Tamil Nadu would, once a
year, write "nil" on a form and forward it on. They had been filling in this form for
over forty years before it was scrapped in a drive to cut down useless paperwork.
What was this form for?


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Answers to Quiz #87

1. The 1956 Industrial Policy (implemented on 30 April 1956)

2. The Monopolies and Restrictive Trade Practices (MRTP) act

3. Foreign Exchange Regulation Act, which has been replaced by the milder FEMA
(Foreign Exchange Management Act)

4. Maruti Udyog Limited

5. Statutory Corporations

6. Privatization

7. Discount and Finance House of India Ltd.

8. The British budget is traditionally presented at noon, ie 12:00 GMT. As IST is 5:30
hours ahead of GMT, the Indian budget has been, till now, presented at 5:30 PM to
coincide with the British budget.

9. The Narasimham Committee.
10. Cigars for Winston Churchill. Churchill, as an army officer posted in India (briefly in
Bangalore), developed his well known taste for Dindigul cheroots. The local officials
considered his annual cigar supply so important that a special form was printed for it.
After India's independence, and Churchill's death, the export of cigars stopped, but the
form still existed and had to be filled out.

Quiz #88
Dated - February 6, 2000
Sushil Chandani
1. The scheme of constellations, as we now know them, has been determined to have
been created around 2800 B.C., either in Asia Minor, or in India. How has this been
determined ?

2. After having rejected as absurd the idea of the earth being supported by Sesanagas,
Kachhapas or Diggajas (snakes, tortoises or elephants), Bhaskara also rejected the notion
that the earth was continually falling. What was his proof ?

3. What was the Arab name for the Indian system of calculus of the stars ?

4. Brahmagupta's major work in astronomy was named "Brahmasphetasiddhanta". What
was his minor work called ? (English translations permitted)..

5. Aryrbhatta created two systems of Astronomy - Audayika and Ardharatika. How did
they differ ?

6. The astronomer Gargya is associated with the first enumeration of the constellations.
In what work did he set forth this theories?

7. The most magnificient observatory of the dark ages was at Herasha. Which amateur
astronomer - king built it ? He is more famous for his lineage.

8. What real astronomical event, in 2 B.C., and easily extrapolated in astronomy software
packages, most closely matches the description of the Star of Bethlehem that the Magis
followed ?


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Answers to Quiz #88

1. The named constellations do not cover the entire sky. Parts of the sky that did not arise
above the horizon at that time (and place: between 36 and 38 degree north latitude) were
apparently not mapped. The deduction was made in 1807 by a certain Carl Schwartz, the
Swedish counsel in Baku.
2. Being heavier, the falling earth should fall faster than an arrow shot upward; such
arrows would therefore never fall back to earth.

3. SindHind (from Siddhanta/Hind)

4. Khandakadhyaka.. Khandaka is sugar-candy; so this would loosely mean "chewing
gum for the brain"...

5. Day begins at Sunrise/day begins at midnight. In the 14,400 years that have elapsed
Mahayuga, there is a difference of 1 day in these systems.

6. The Atharvaveda.

7. Hulagu Khan, in the 1260s. He was the grandson of Genghiz Khan.

8. A conjunction of Jupiter and Venus, the two brightest non-lunar night objects.

Quiz #89
Dated - February 13, 2000
Rotary Coke 2000 Quiz
Time - 30 minutes. Starred questions are tiebreakers
1. What is the most famous item stored in the bank vaults of the Trust Company
Bank, Atlanta?

2. The sixth Nizam of Hyderabad once went on a tour with several of his Begums.
When they were suddenly caught in a rainstorm, several tents and huts were put up
for them to take shelter. When they moved on, these tents were occupied by people,
and grew into which town?

3. In Asterix and the Cauldron, what did the cauldron originally contain?

4. Zeus was supposed to be swallowed by his father Cronos as a baby, but he was
tricked into swallowing a rock wrapped in cloth. He later vomited out the rock.
What did it become? [hint - Computers] *

5. Thought to be a result of a huge protection exercise launched by government
departments, scientists and NGOs, thousands of these animals returned to the
beaches of Orissa to nest after an absence of three years. But after the recent super
cyclone the population has started declining again. Name them.

6. In India, lots of people chew paan. In Colombia, the local people use another leaf
in the same way - applying chuna to the leaves, rolling them up and chewing them.
What leaf do they chew? *
7. This widely used commercial product bases its structural strength on that of an
egg. Usually, over 30 of it can be manufactured in a minute and each lasts for about
1000 hours. What?

8. What word originates from a 19th century Irish family which used to live in
Southwark, London, and was notorious for violence, rowdiness and crime?

9. What trend was set by the song "Jalte Hain Jiske Liye" from the movie
"Sujata"?

10. What was the rather strange reason why West Indian cricketer Lawrence Rowe had to
give up cricket midway through the 1976 tour of England?

11. By what name is the building "Phiroze Jeejebhoy Towers" better known as?

12. Mars is known as the "Red Planet". Why is it red colored?

13. Who was the song "Candle in the Wind" by Elton John originally dedicated to?

14. From which scripting language was Sabeer Bhatia inspired to name his free mail
service "Hotmail"? *

15. In which ad would you expect to hear Mozart's 25th Symphony?

16. What is a column in a newspaper containing advertisements of missing relatives
and friends called?

17. All donations to the Orissa Cyclone Relief & Reconstruction Fund are 100%
exempt from income tax under which section of the Income Tax Act?

18. Which rishi was known as 'the black man born on an island'?

19. The Indian Department of Tourism (ITD) has classified hotels into six
categories. The first five are One star to Five Star. What is the sixth category? *

20. In which famous novel would you find a submarine captained by Prince Dakkar
of Bundelkhand? *

21. What is the singer Gummadi Vithal Rao better known as?

22. Complete the famous second line from this poem by Subhadra Kumari Chauhan -
"Bundelon Harbolon ke muh hamne suni kahani thi // _________".

23. Which musical instrument's name means "Wood Music" in Greek?

24. In the Oral-B brand of dental care products, what does the B in Oral-B stand for?
25. What is the claim to fame of Mrs.Savitri Bai Khanolkar, and based on Indra's
Vajra?

26. This was introduced by Momofuko Ando in the 1940s, and originally priced at
10 cents a pack. Nobody thought it would sell, as this was six times the cost of
buying the prepared dish at a restaurant. What?

27. To whom did Maruti present the first Maruti 800 car they produced? *

28. Talking about his books, who commented "My books are water, those of the great
geniuses are wine. Everybody drinks water"?

29. What are the Gibb Brothers better known as?

30. Which song has received 11 Grammy nominations this year?


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Answers to Quiz #89

Answers - Rotary Coke 2000 Prelims
1. Coke Formula

2. Mahbubnagar (from Mahbub Ali Pasha)

3. Onion Soup

4. The Oracle at Delphi *

5. Olive Ridley Turtles

6. Coca leaves (Cocaine) *

7. The electric bulb

8. Hooligan (from Houlihan)

9. Telephone songs (hero and heroine singing over a phone)

10. He suddenly became allergic to grass

11. Bombay Stock Exchange (on Dalal Street)

12. Its soil is extremely rich in iron ore
13. Marilyn Monroe

14. HTML (HoTMaiL) - because the site uses HTML extensively *

15. Titan Watches

16. Agony Column

17. Section 80(G)

18. Krishna Dvaipaayana (Veda Vyasa)

19. Heritage Hotels *

20. Twenty Thousand Leagues Under The Sea (Jules Verne) *

21. Gaddar

22. Khoob Ladi Mardaani, Woh tho Jhansi Wali Rani Thi.

23. Xylophone (Xylos = Wood)

24. Brush

25. The Param Vir Chakra

26. Top Ramen Noodles (Nissin Foods)

27. Venkateswara Temple, Tirupati *

28. Mark Twain

29. The Beegees (Robin, Maurice and Barry Gibb)

30. Smooth (Santana)

Quiz #90
Dated - February 18, 2000
<a href="mailto:contactus@kcircle.com" onmouseover="self.status='All of us at
KCircle';return true" onmouseout="self

This all-time great bowler commented to his team mates during the 10-minute break
between the 3rd and 4th innings, "This thing can be done." And it was done. Name
the bowler and the (historic) test.
2. With reference to Indian cricket, what was the Beaumont Committee set up to
investigate?

3. He made his test debut in the 5th match of the 1953-54 WI v/s England series as a
specialist left-arm spinner (replacing Alf Valentine). To the surprise of all
concerned, he turned out to be one of the greatest all-rounders ever. Who?

4. Which great batsman said, referring to the batting of an illustrious team mate, " Come
and see it. You won't see the like of it again"? (The 2 cricketers and the Test please)

5. These two brothers, both cricketing legends, were known as 'The Big Dog' and
'The Little Dog'. Name them.

6. Jim Laker took an incredible 19 wickets in the England v/s Australia test at Manchester
in 1956. Name the only australian batsman not to get out to Laker that time - and the
bowler who scalped him, denying Laker a perfect haul.

7. At which cricket ground has the maximum number of One Day International matches
been played? It is also a ground at which India hates to lose - but loses with alarming
regularity.

8. Which contemporary Indian cricketer is related to Ranjitsinghji and Duleepsinghji, and
is part of one of Gujarat's oldest royal families?

9. The Maharajkumar of Vizianagaram (after whom the Vizzy Trophy is named) had a
long standing rivalry against this eminent cricketer, about whom he and his followers
coined this rhyme - 'Baahar se kaala, Andar se bhi kaala, Bada badmaash hai saala, yeh
Indore waala'. Name the cricketer about whom this rhyme was coined - perhaps the only
cricketer to represent his country over a span of six decades. [obviously, he was from
Indore]

10. On 443 Not Out, with just one more day to go in a First Class match (Ranji Trophy,
Maharashtra v/s Kathiawar, December 18, 1948), Bhausahib Nimbalkar needed just 10
runs to beat the existing record set by Bradman. He could not bat further, thus losing his
chance to beat the record. Why? [No, contrary to the popular myth, it's not because he
was getting married that day.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Answers to Quiz #125

1. The 1882 test at the Oval - where Frederick Spofforth said this, and proceeded to bowl
out WG Grace's England for 77, with a spell of 7/46. This started the Ashes series.
2. The expulsion of Lala Amarnath from the Indian side in 1936 - this committee
exonerated him.

3. Sir Gary Sobers

4. Sir Don Bradman, about Stan McCabe's 232 against England (1st test, 1938 series at
Nottingham)

5. Peter and Graeme Pollock

6. Jim Burke - out to Tony Lock

7. Sharjah

8. Ajay Jadeja

9. Col. CK Nayudu

10. The Maharaja of Kathiawar - captaining the opposing team - deliberately conceded
the match and refused to come on the field, in order to deny Nimbalkar his record

Viva la rebellion!! its pay-back time folks...
lets ditch organised qustions.. just shoot out stuff whenever u want.
here are 3 from me.
easy one for starters...


1. Back down in these parts poor white farmers tolling in their fields
were found to be prone to a disease called pellagra which produced certain
characteristic symptoms. What was the most prominent of these symptoms??




2. The story of Leda and the swan(with zeus as the swan)is pretty well know.
Read Yeats for a tempered version. Anyway at that point of time, Leda was
already on the family way by her legal husband and with the zeus
encounter,she began to carry some more...
So the jist of all this is,
(i)who were the 4 children she bore??
(ii) Who were the legit ones and the bastards??




3.Edmund Spenser's "The Faerie Queeene" was an allegory that praised
Elizabeth I.(He however wrote it while in prison!!!). It also has some
fundas on being the first poem that has some kind of poetic
sequence(someone elighten). Anyway, without digressing any more,
Elizabeth was naturally happy and ordered her treasurer,Lord Burghley to
reward our poet with 500 pounds. Our treasurer, however didnt like the
poet and did something which gave rise to a phrase. Which one??
(No clues on this one cause it would be a dead giveaway then)


Everyone please guess. All answers are most guessable. nothing hard core
from some obscure corner of an even obscure book.


kid


      Hi guys,


          Well, here are 2 more from the dreaded one:


         1. Which book is dedicated to "the faceless Indian voter who is
           not aware of the enormity of the fraud committed in his name-
           for him, allegedly."? (Topical)


         2. Who is Sterculius?


           No more clues at present. Good luck!


                                         Ram K.




With clues


1. On low sunday, the introit begins "_____ ______ geniti infantes..."
  (approx meaning - as newborn babes..). So what are the first two words.
QUASI MODO (There is some funda that he was born on that day. I'm not
too sure about that, but he was named for this prayer)




2. Which movies title comes from a William Burroughs story about people who
  supply medical instruments to outlawed doctors who can't obtain them
  legally. The movie had nothing to do with this but the director liked the
  name and obtained permission to use it.


BLADE RUNNER (It was based on Phillip K Dicks' "Do Androids dream of
electric sheep" but Ridley Scott felt that this title would not do and
searched around for another title.
The Arnie. movie was "Total Recall" based on PKDs' "We can dream it
for you wholesale"


3. Summary of facts from the biography of a well known person:


 ``No. 230 873, Second Subaltern ... Age: 18, Eyes: blue. Hair:
  brown. Height: 5 ft. 3 ins. Assigned to/Needed for car repair''.
           Who?
                      Read the description well. There's a good clue in there.
Cloo3. This is almost uncluable. Anyway, twas the British army and the height,
     look at the height.


Q. ELIZABETH II


4. What was the British operation to defend Gibraltar during WWII codenamed. One of the
  planners later became famous in another field and named his house after it.


Cloo4. The house in question is in the West Indies.


GOLDENEYE. The house was Ian Flemings'. Fleming named his house after
the operation and becuz one of his favorite books was Carson
McCuller's "Reflections in a golden eye"


Govi,matt got this along with others mentioned earlier.
And to end up with some trivia...


5. What as yet undiscover algorithm is known as God's algorithm (As a clue, it's not
 the algorithm for some hardcore CS problem. I can wager that all of you have at one
 time or another tried to solve this problem)


Cloo5. The "problem" caught the younger generations fancy during the 80s'.


SHORTEST METHOD OF SOLVING RUBIKS' CUBE FROM ANY CONFIGURATION.


Kid got this in add/n to the others mentioned earlier.


Hari




Since juntas are askin koschans left right and center..
1.What was called the "Hump" in WWII?
Close to home.
Tmax,kid,paddu have got this.
2.What was Rudolph Dirks contribution to "humour??"?
think Katzejammer Kids...
3.Who are the creators of Spiderman and Hulk ? ( two diff questions)
Stan Lee didnt create Spidey..
4.Who first wrote in a pulp magazine called All-Story?
Think olympics...(very far fetched)
5.Whats the German word for Prison camp?
The word is part of a very famous movie.
Paddu and P2 have got this.
  Hi guys,


          Here are clues to the sitters I asked:


     1. Which book is dedicated to " the faceless Indian voter who is
          not aware of the enormity of the fraud committed in his name-
          for him, allegedly"?


          I think clues are unnecessary on this one. So far, Hari,TMax,
          Paddu, Mats, Kannan, Venu, and Ninja have got it. I told
          you that the book was topical.


     2. Who is Sterculius?


          Clue: Mythox funda.


     Clarification on question 1: While the magnificient seven have named
     the subject of the answer, nobody has actually named the book itself.
     Not that I care, but it should encourage the others to guess, since I
     am not looking for perfection.


                                           Ram K.




here are the clues


1. 1. Back down in these parts poor white farmers tolling in their fields
> were found to be prone to a disease called pellagra which produced
certain
> characteristic symptoms. What was the most prominent of these symptoms??
Nickname of a certain group of people..
p2,tmax,paddu have got this.Though Govind had it-but he diddnt


2. (i)who were the 4 children she bore??
> (ii) Who were the legit ones and the bastards??
clue:constellation
tmax,hari,govind


3.No one has got this.No clues as it would be a dead giveaway then.
kid




      Hi guys,


          Here is a clarification of the clue I gave to the 2nd question:


          1. Who is Sterculius?


            Clue: It is related to mythology, but there is no major
            "funda" concerning the answer. I guess I should be a little
             more explicit when giving clues.


           BTW, Kid, Srinivas Sunder, and P2 have also answered the 1st
           question. P2 even named the book correctly, the only one to
           do so. Also, due credit should be given to TKB, who also
           answered this question.


                                        Ram K.




Whos ship was the Karboudjan?
Whats its significance?(the ships)




junta,
since ques 1. and 3. are unclueable, here are the ans for them. q.2 is
very guessable and i will provide a clue for it.




> 1. Which are the longest words that can be made using only one row of
> the typewriter? (there are at least three of them)


the words i had in mind were : typewriter, proprietor and perpetuity. i
missed one other common word pointed out by many: repertoire.


special mention to Tmax, PV and neeraj for getting 3 words.
those who didn't get (guess) typewriter... kick yourself!


there r at least 3 other words which can probably be found in an
expanded dictionary:
              peppertree,prototyper (credits to tmax for these)
              and prerequire.
hari points out two 11 letter words from the FAQ of rec.puzzles,
namely -
              rupturewort,proterotype
i dunno if they exist. if so, these would be the longest words,
one letter longer than those mentioned above.




> 3. Which is the only word in the English language that has all five
> vowels in succession.


              the answer i had was miaoued! past tense of the verb miaou.


before i get a number of mails protesting its validity, let me be my
own critic. btw, i got this from a book called "Hodgepodge" by
J.Bryan,III


here is what the OED has for MIAOW: (which is the more accepted
spelling):


MIAOW v.,intr ... Forms: miau, meaw, miaw, mieaou, meaow, miauw,
miao(u)w, miow, mi-owe, me(e)ow
Echoic: the spelling is partly influenced by Fr. miaou


the bottom line is that i was correct.. and incorrect. looks like there
is no word such as MIAOU in english though it does exist in French.
however if Forms implies accepted spellings then there exists a MIEAOU,
that would answer the question without resorting to past tenses.


as an aside, Tmax suggested sequoiae, plural of sequoia. the OED does
not give any info whether plural is obtained by appending an 's' to
the word, or an 'e'.


take ur pick !


ninja




> 2. According to the US Postal Directory, which is the longest place name
> consisting of only ONE word? (For e.g. San Francisco is ruled out as it
> consists of two words)
>


Nobody has got this so far.


Clue: this is not an obscure town in Alaska or Hawaii. there is a
famous university located here.


ninja




guys, please welcome Pros (Prasanna), who was my classmate in IIT-M,
batch of 1992:
e-mail: pnrao@mailbox.syr.edu


he has already added himself to the quiz mailing list.


ninja




           Hi people,
                        Here's a bunch of Qs that just happened to pop into
my head....


           1. What did the ancient Greeks call the fear of woods and
forests?


           2. What do all these have in common?


           - Wales, The Silures (a Central Asian tribe), the Ordovices
(another Central Asian tribe), the British county of Devonshire, coal,
the Jura mountains in Switzerland, the town of Perm in Russia/Ukraine,
the peaks of Eiger, Monch and Jungfrau in the Swiss Alps. I asked this
Q in Madras before - so I'm expecting quite a few answers!


           3.                                         1
                                                11
                                               121
                         1331


           and so on forms Pascal's triangle. This was discovered much
before Pascal by another mathematician. Who?


           4. The Celtic druids wrote their spells in Runic script on
slabs of beechwood. What word has been derived from this?
          5. What's the connection between Herge (creator of Tintin) and
Thomas Mann?


          6. Old Q, repeated. Boris Karloff made his debut in the 1931
version of Frankenstein. How was he listed in the credits?




          - Some of these are pretty guessable - so give it a shot.


                                                               Paddu




   Hi guys,


   Since I don't expect any more responses, here are the answers to my 2
   questions.


   1. Which book is dedicated to "the faceless Indian voter who is yet
     not aware of the enormity of the fraud that is committed in his
     name-for him, allegedly"?


     Answer: "Seshan: An Intimate Story" by K.Govindan Kutty. Include
     Neeraj also in the list of people who answered it. As I already
     told you, P2 was the only one who actually named the book correctly.
     This may sound obvious, but the dedication is made by the author, and
     not by Seshan.


   2. Who is Sterculius?


     Answer: He is the Roman God of feces. Before the shit hits the fan,
     let me mention a few things. Firstly, blame Mats for this "crappy"
     question :-). The reason: After I asked the Beavis and Butt-head
     question, I received a reply from Mats, who speculated that Mike
     Judge (the creator of B and B) was an astrophysicist. So I checked
     up on that and found an article in Rolling Stone which was about
     him. In that article, Mike Judge mentions that once, when his friend
     was looking up the dictionary for something else, he noticed an
     entry:"Sterculius: the Roman God of feces". Judge insists that
     there really is such a God. The word "stercoraceous" means
     "excremental". (Check Webster: I hope I spelt that right!). Anyway,
     it obviously provided the inspiration for the type of dudes B and
     B would turn out to be, because in the very first B and B episode
     Judge made, (homemade i.e. was never shown on TV) B and B attend
     a "thrashothon" where a big truck destroys everything including
     outhouses, and from one such outhouse emanates a noxious fume
     which assumes a "human" form, and Butt-head in rare moment of
     literacy, intones " Sterculius, The Roman God of feces". Then
     the form says it has been offended and promptly rises to become
     a cloud and dump shit on everybody below.


               BTW, Mike Judge majored in Physics at UC San Diego,
     and has taken Math grad courses (Talk about a coincidence!). This does
     not qualify him to be an astrophysicist. His wife was supporting him
     before he made it with B and B.


              Lastly, you may find it hard to believe, but I hate
     Beavis and Butt-head, and the show.


                                    Ram K.




>
>
> > 2. According to the US Postal Directory, which is the longest place name
> > consisting of only ONE word? (For e.g. San Francisco is ruled out as it
> > consists of two words)
>>
>
> Nobody has got this so far.
>
> Clue: this is not an obscure town in Alaska or Hawaii. there is a
> famous university located here.


To clarify further, the answer is not hyphenated.


the univ in question was founded by a famous person in American history
(i am not completely sure of this).




ninja




Here we go .....
1.What was called the "Hump" in WWII?
A. The Himalyas.
The story goes like this. I think the japs closed down the Rangoon road.
during the WW and the allies had to airlift supplies into CHina for
Chiang Kai . They had to find a new route and the but they had a prob in
the other route the Hump the himalayas which they had to overcome.
2.What was Rudolph Dirks contribution to "humour??"?
A It was he who started/propagated the idea of sppech balloons in
    cartoons.
3.Who are the creators of Spiderman and Hulk ? ( two diff questions)
 Steve Ditko and Jack Kirby. Both were created ion the same year 1962.
 Matt was the only guy who got this.
4.Who first wrote in a pulp magazine called All-Story?
 Edgar Rice burroughs.
5.Whats the German word for Prison camp?
Stalag




Deat Net.Citizens:
1. Who in 1950, was nominated for the position of the
Chancellor of Cambridge University by E.M.Forster
and Bertrand Russell and would have easily beaten his
rival candidate Lord Tedder had he not declined
the offer ?


2. Roderick Phillips' Untying the Knot: A Short History
of Divorce, cites an old law regulating wife-beating :
"if a stick were used, it should not be thicker than
a man's ....... " (Fill up the blanks, I leave it to
your imagination.)


3. Apple Computers recently changed the name of one
of their projects to "Butt Head ..... ". Fill in the
blanks, and what and why did they change it from/to ?
(Very topical, I know its unfair to ask a question
which goes who changed his name from what to what,
but I am sure that someone will get this without the
clue. As always, cloos provided on request..)


4. Obligatory "Kadi" Question: One close relative
of India's Chief Election Commisioner cannot legally
vote in India. Who ? (Very Guessable, what say Kid ?).


Cheers,


TKB.




              Hi Roopesh,
                          To clue you in...
>>
>>            1. What did the ancient Greeks call the fear of woods and
> > forests?
          - Try the obvious guess.


>>        2. What do all these have in common?
>>
>>        - Wales, The Silures (a Central Asian tribe), the Ordovices
> > (another Central Asian tribe), the British county of Devonshire, coal,
> > the Jura mountains in Switzerland, the town of Perm in Russia/Ukraine,
> > the peaks of Eiger, Monch and Jungfrau in the Swiss Alps. I asked this
> > Q in Madras before - so I'm expecting quite a few answers!


          - You've got the idea, but not the exact answer. As a kloo,
most of the coal was laid down in one period and not spread outover
time like you said. Look at the names carefully.


>         3.                                         1
>>                                             11
>>                                            121
>>                          1331
>>
>>        and so on forms Pascal's triangle. This was discovered much
> > before Pascal by another mathematician. Who?


          - Not Pythagoras. Guy was better known in another field.


>>        4. The Celtic druids wrote their spells in Runic script on
> > slabs of beechwood. What word has been derived from this?


          - You got it.


>>        5. What's the connection between Herge (creator of Tintin) and
> > Thomas Mann?


          - Connection involves a recent book abt Tintin not written by
Herge. Can't say more than this. Q is a bit vague, but I found the
funda amusing.


>>        6. Old Q, repeated. Boris Karloff made his debut in the 1931
> > version of Frankenstein. How was he listed in the credits?


           - uncluable. Go rent the movie :-)


           I was @ Guindy during 89-93. Did two of the Techoffes' quizzes
then. Did you attend them? Have quizzed around with most
of the Saras crowd you mentioned.


                                                                 Paddu




Hi:


Here are the clues to my questions posed earlier...


1. He has a University named after him in India.


Sunder and Hari got this one.


2. There is a phrase in the English language because of this.


Sunder, Hari, Neeraj and Paddu have got this.


3. The clue is Aryabhatta. (might be misleading if not
interpreted correctly).


Sunder and Neeraj have got this so far.


4. There might be a CIA Agent amongst us.


Sorry about this stinker. Couldnt help it.


Cheers,
TKB.




           For the connection between Holden caulfield and Christ, the clue
seemed to mislead a few people. So read Oswald as assassination. Last
chance for guessing.


           Baiju Bawra and waterloo


           The movie titles start with the quote - what is history but legend
agreed upon by Napoleon 2 and then Waterloo is too obvious I guess.


           Dr. Jekyll and Dr. Watson.


           Dr. Watson - Doyle - Illustrator Sydney Paget - His Bhai Walter
Paget - Illustrator of RLS - Dr. Jekyll.


RG.




Here is the status on the questions I posed yesterday:


1. People have been guessing wildly on this one, since
I said that a University is named after him. But no one
has got this after the clue ( 2 people did get it before the
clue). Clue: Chicago.


2. Again Junta's been guessing the obvious.
Clue : There is a Fairy Tale Character (who has nothing
to do with the answer) whose name is got by adding
something to this word. (Obviously there is no fairy
tale character by the name of Dick Head or Butt Head).
So far the situation is Grimm (Sorry).
3. Maybe Aryabhatta was a "Kaat" clue after all.
Think Astronomy. Bhatta put people on the wrong track.
Again since this was in the papers recently, you can probably
answer this only if you'ver ead this somewhere.


4. You should be able to work this out with my previous
mail. At least the Madras junta should get this.


I will mail the answers tonight befor I leave,
around 6PM Pacific Time.


Cheers,


TKB.




Following up on Mats, your question for the day is: When (what occasion is fine,
year not necessary) DID Caesar cross the Rubicon? What is the Rubicon, and
why did his crossing it and the expression come to have the connotation it has?


No clues on this one, because I have no idea what clue would help.


-srini




And what *did* Caesar say when he crossed the Rubicon? This is stuff
that is of legend and has passed into historical documents like
Asterix comics. This should be easy.
             Murali




After the clarification of the clue for the first one, P2 got it.
So finally here is the answer :
Caulfield - Catcher in the Rye - inspired - shot Lennon - More popular than
Christ.


Connect Newton' s Third LAw to the movie Aman.


Connect Eliza Dolittle to the song "Hum Bewafa Hargiz Na The"


After Tom Selleck, who inspired Indiana Jones?


RG.




Hari got it all. Kannan about half. Nobody else has even tried it
so far, but I realize it is early for those of you geeks who do not
have to stare at a computer screen for the greater part of your day,
with beeps advertising incoming mail.


-srini




Connect Sophia Loren to Bill Clinton.


As important a clue as any is in the Subject line.


Answer for this as well as the Rubicon question at 9:00 AM
CST tomorrow.


-srini




I've been plotting revenge on the quizzers from Madras ever since MG91.
There we were, taking part in a competition where we were given four
clues (one in each round) and we had to work out the context (Like
given Caulfield, Jesus, Indra and apple you have to work out "Beatles")
So far so good. But then came up this question which had clues like
"socks" (the other clues, which I thankfully do not remember now, but
were equally mindboggling) and the answer was Gandhi.


Gandhi, it seems, never wore socks.


Now all this may seem perfectly normal to the Madras junta, but I can tell
you, the rest of us were shattered. It shook our faith in humanity. We never
dreamt that people setting quizzes could stoop to committing such vile acts.


I've been dreaming about settling this score for the rest of us. And now
that I have the opportunity to do so, here it is.


------------------------------------------------------------------------
Connect Pan (the greek chappie) to quarks.
------------------------------------------------------------------------


Time has tempered my urge to be brutal. I'll even hand out the clue.
The connection is through Pink Floyd.


Hari


PS: Pliss not to be taking diatribe cirrusly.




2. According to the US Postal Directory, which is the longest place name
consisting of only ONE word? (For e.g. San Francisco is ruled out as it
consists of two words)


> > Clue: this is not an obscure town in Alaska or Hawaii. there is a
> > famous university located here.
>
> the univ in question was founded by a famous person in American history
> (i am not completely sure of this).
answer:    charlottesville (15 letters), site of the univ. of virginia.


i think the university was established by Thomas Jefferson, who even
designed one or more of the buildings in it.


P2 is the only person to get it!


ninja




The clue is Rome from Loren's side of the connection. On Slick Willie's
side, remember that he's the most cerebral and meditative president that
the US has had since Nixon.


-srini


PS: Does nobody here watch AMC?




1.Kareem Abdul Jabbar apart from BB tarined in another sport.His guru
was a master of the sport and prob more known when one takes areas other
than what the Americans call "World"?
What was this sport and who was KAJ's guru?
2.Whos first work was Tale of a Tub?
3.Who first used the term "black humour"?
4.The play "Ghosts" by Henrik Isben shocked the Victorian audiences in
both America and Europe. What was the reason?
5.Spock being a Klingon has some diffs from us mortals. The color of his
blood is diff. Whats the color of Spocks blood?Also whats its chief
componant?Ours is Fe, by the way.
Namashkar:


Here are the answers you haven't been waiting for:


In addition those mentioned earlier, many other folks
tried successfully/unsuccessfull, and I will omit names.




1. Who in 1950, was nominated for the position of the
Chancellor of Cambridge University by E.M.Forster
and Bertrand Russell and would have easily beaten his
rival candidate Lord Tedder had he not declined
the offer ?


It was Jawaharlal Nehru. E.M.Forster remarked "Its a pity,
I wish he had risked it", when Nehru declined it on
grounds of Political expediency. (BTW, there is a JNU
and a JNTU in India).


2. Roderick Phillips' Untying the Knot: A Short History
of Divorce, cites an old law regulating wife-beating :
"if a stick were used, it should not be thicker than
a man's ....... " (Fill up the blanks, I leave it to
your imagination.)


Its the Thumb (One Person worked this out from the cloo,
which led him to Thumbelina). According to my source,
this is the origin of the phrase "Rule of Thumb".
(PS: The piece claims that there are two other
alleged sources - 1. Brewmasters using the thumb
to test the temperature and 2. From a Tailors'
jargon, but this is the one which has some evidence
to back up the claim).


3. Apple Computers recently changed the name of one
of their projects to "Butt Head ..... ". Fill in the
blanks, and what and why did they change it from/to ?
(Very topical, I know its unfair to ask a question
which goes who changed his name from what to what,
but I am sure that someone will get this without the
clue. As always, cloos provided on request..)


The person in question is Carl Sagan. When Apple
computers named one of its projects as "Carl Sagan",
Mr.Cosmos objected and a disgusted Micahel Spindler's
supposed to have remarked, "Why that Butt Head
Astronomer", and so some smart alec manager decided
to rename the project as "Butt Head Astronomer".
Paddu has promised to get back to me on this one,
so dont tell him :-) BTW, junta seemed to know this
one, and a few of them got this without the clue,
as mentioned earlier.


4. Obligatory "Kadi" Question: One close relative
of India's Chief Election Commisioner cannot legally
vote in India. Who ? (Very Guessable, what say Kid ?).


The Man in Question is our very own Ram K,Seshadri.
Sorry about this, I couldn't resist asking this as a
follow up to Ram's T.N.Seshan question. Junta from Madras
could have worked this out using Sherlockian methods
and a few of them did. Now we all know...


(PS Ram/Kid: One interesting answer that I got was "Shanmati",
which would have made a good clue to this question.)


I will return after these messages ......


TKB.




of late there have been many of those weird connections type questions,
which i don't particularly favour. however, as they say, if u can't beat
them, join them...!


------------------------------------------------------------------------
1. connect Ho Chi Minh (of Vietnam fame) to the city of Melbourne.


2. connect Plato (Gr. philosopher) to Poseidon (greek God)


3. connect Lord Byron to Prometheus
------------------------------------------------------------------------


hope that these are vague enough for junta's tastes..! :-))
clues on request.


ninja




Hokay,


Fst of all, a thousand apologies for inflicting such a question upon
you.


sekind of all, the solvers...
             TKB and Govi got halfway there from opposite directions...
             Kannan sent in an .. what shall I call it .. I suppose answer
             is as good a word as any. I'm tagging his answer along at the
             end of the post.


thrd of all, the answer..


             Well, Pink Floyd`s 1st album -- Pipers at the gates of dawn.
             Title taken from TheWindInTheWillows where Pan was the piper
             at gates of dawn.
             That album lead singer -- Syd Barrett (aka "Crazy diamond")
           Syd Barrett solo album - The Madcap laughs..
           has song "Golden hair" written by none other than James Joyce.
           James Joyce - Finnegan's wake - Three quarks of muster mark -
           which was where they picked up the name quark.


Simple, isn't it? (It's a good thing this wasn't a real quiz with
participants and setter face to face.)


Now for Kannan's answer ....


    (1)Pan, the Greek god, was chasing some female (the goddess of crops
           and fertility, or her daughter - Demeter?), who was transformed into
           a laurel tree to protect her modesty (some solution that!).


           (2) The laurel tree, of course, belongs to the same genus as our own
           betel nut tree (hence the desi name paan for betel, in gratitude for
           the eponymous dude who created its Greek equivalent).


           (3) Here's the Pink Floyd connxn. PF dudes, when in India, decided
           to try their pan/veth-thalai with white sunnambu/chunnambu. They
           watched the panwala as he dumped some Calcium Carbonate in a bit
           of water, to prepare the sunnambu mix. As you mite recall from your
           undergrad/ hi school chemistry (depending on whether you went to
           school in B'lore or Madras, respectively :-)), there is an exothermic
           reaction, giving off heat, effervescence, etc. which looks almost like
           smoke coming out of water. When they took a bite of it, needless to
           add, the pan-man had to dial 101 to save them from 3rd degree tongue
           burns. It was while recuperating that the famous lines were written,
            about the vile bit of CaCo3.




           "Smoke on the water,
           Fire in disguise."




           Latter day enthusiats mite have come out with another version, but
           this is the original.
           (4) James Joyce, OTOH, loved this mix, diligently prepared for him, by
           the same panwala, Kothanda Rama Krishnan, or Ko.Ar.K, as he was called.
           JJ never having quite mastered Tamil pronounciation, thought that it was
           pronounced in quite a different way and coined a new term to honor his
           friend in Finnegan's Wake - you guessed it - "quark."




Hari




... starred in the movie "The Fall of the Roman Empire" as the daughter of
Marcus Aurelius, the Emperor, who was also a philosopher and whose "Meditations"
is one of Bill Clinton's favorite books ("adorns his nightstand," according to
some who know).


Nobody got this one.


-srini




Nossiree ... it is mentioned somewhere in the Koran/Shari'a/Hadith
that the stick which should be used to beat one's wife should be
no thicker than the hubby's thumb.


There was a Letter to the Editor in the Economist (reproduced below)
some weeks back which mentions this. The letter was in response to the
E.'s set of articles on Islam. I think this showed up on s.c.i. recently.


-srini
____________________________________________________________________________
[The letter]


Sir,


Your happy conclusion that most of the problems endured by Muslim women
are not due to anything intrinsically rooted in the Islamic faith, and are
therefore remediable within an Islamic context, can be supported only if
one is willing to overlook distasteful facts.


Perhaps the most disturbing is Muhammad's own proclivity for multiple
wives; at the time of his death, he had no fewer than 11 of them, even
though the Koran restricts Muslims to a maximum of four. Because the
Prophet is the model that all Muslim men are expected to emulate, it is
difficult to believe your assertion that Islam's condonation of polygamy
is only grudgingly offered.


Although you correctly indicate that the Koranic verse dealing with the
beatings of wives is somewhat ambiguous, your article fails to point out
that the Prophet's own words on this subject are alarmingly clear. After
all, he went so far as to specify the exact size of the stick with which a
man may beat his wife (it should be no thicker than one man's thumb).


Rizwan Khan,
(Willowdale, Ontario)




> And what *did* Caesar say when he crossed the Rubicon? This is stuff
> that is of legend and has passed into historical documents like
> Asterix comics. This should be easy.


As everyone pointed out in a hurry, he said 'Alea Jacta Est' (or 'Alea
Iacta Est' if he was not pronouncing his j's that day) which in
English means 'The die is cast'.
Everyone who replied to me got it.




>          Kloos for the Qs...
>
>>>>
>>>>       1. What did the ancient Greeks call the fear of woods and
> > > > forests?
>
>          - Too easy. Try the obvious guess. Hari, Roopesh, Ninja got
> this. TM after clue.
>
>>>>       2. What do all these have in common?
>>>>
>>>>       - Wales, The Silures (a Central Asian tribe), the Ordovices
> > > > (another Central Asian tribe), the British county of Devonshire, coal,
> > > > the Jura mountains in Switzerland, the town of Perm in Russia/Ukraine,
> > > > the peaks of Eiger, Monch and Jungfrau in the Swiss Alps. I asked this
> > > > Q in Madras before - so I'm expecting quite a few answers!
>
>          - Think 'Rocks'. Roopesh was really close.
>
>>>>       3.                                          1
>>>>                                            11
>>>>                                            121
>>>>                             1331
>>>>
>>>>       and so on forms Pascal's triangle. This was discovered much
> > > > before Pascal by another mathematician. Who?
>
>          - Better known in literature - this is a giveaway!
>
>>>>       4. The Celtic druids wrote their spells in Runic script on
> > > > slabs of beechwood. What word has been derived from this?
>
>          - 'Read' the question carefully. Tmax, Roopesh score.
>
>>>>       5. What's the connection between Herge (creator of Tintin) and
> > > > Thomas Mann?
>
>          - Connection involves a recent book abt Tintin not by Herge
> and a Thomas Mann novel. Can't do a better clue. Funda is obscure, but
> interesting.
>
>>>>       6. Old Q, repeated. Boris Karloff made his debut in the 1931
> > > > version of Frankenstein. How was he listed in the credits?
>
>          - Rent the movie! :-)


           ...Answers follow shortly.


                                                               Paddu




Whose Last words are


"Its Been Fun", followed by a Gasp and then a "Oh! My".


I will post the answers tonight by 6PM Pacific.
Cloos on request.


TKB.




Sorry for the delay in posting the answers. its been sucha long time that
i have forgotten who got what. apologies..


1.Disese got by poor white farmers working in the south (Pellagra)
produced REDNECKS i.e.scaly red dermatitis around theneck.
2.Lead and the swan--Cator pollux Helen and Clymenstra.
Helen and pollux were the bastards (via Zeus).Surprising since cator and




> 3.Edmund Spenser's "The Faerie Queeene" was an allegory that praised
> Elizabeth I.(He however wrote it while in prison!!!). It also has some
> fundas on being the first poem that has some kind of poetic
> sequence(someone elighten). Anyway, without digressing any more,
> Elizabeth was naturally happy and ordered her treasurer,Lord Burghley
to
> reward our poet with 500 pounds. Our treasurer, however didnt like the
> poet and did something which gave rise to a phrase. Which one??
> (No clues on this one cause it would be a dead giveaway then)


Intersting one. No one got this.Herers the rest of the story..
The treasurer thought it was an outrageous sum to pay for a mere "song".
So he cut the reward to 100 pounds and so inspired the phrase "going for
a song" meaning to be sold for a surprisingly low price.


kid




1.Kareem Abdul Jabbar apart from BB tarined in another sport.His guru
was a master of the sport and prob more known when one takes areas other
than what the Americans call "World"?
What was this sport and who was KAJ's guru?
-----> dishum dishum.
Most of the junta has got it .
2.Whos first work was Tale of a Tub?
--> Giant???
junta has got this too.
3.Who first used the term "black humour"?
--> I dont know how to clue for this.
Prob Matt could, he got the answer.
4.The play "Ghosts" by Henrik Isben shocked the Victorian audiences in
both America and Europe. What was the reason?
--> Guys have been guessing it as homosexuality.
  But the clue is that this is a story about a widow whose husband dies
  of a heriditary disease (at least the disease was heriditory in him)
  Matt got this too.
5.Spock being a VULCAN has some diffs from us mortals. The color of his
blood is diff. Whats the color of Spocks blood?Also whats its chief
componant?Ours is Fe, by the way.
--> Junta has got the color right.
   For the element. Its tested by using H2S. Though it isnt a
confirmatory test.
   Atleast LT (DAV junta) taught me to do it that way...




1. With due regards to Hari what is the Qwerty syndrome?
2. What was the logic behind designing the typewriters keyboard like what
it is..


/-------------------------------------------------------------------------/


                       Govindarajan K


                      4504 16th Ave N.E.
                      Apt # B306 Seattle WA 98105
                                           Phone # (206)-523-9931
                                           e-mail : govindk@george.ee.washington.edu.
/-------------------------------------------------------------------------/




apparently these r not as vague as i thought!
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> 1. connect Ho Chi Minh (of Vietnam fame) to the city of Melbourne.


Clue: Paris. couple of very well known fundas here.


tmax got it, paddu aft cloo


------------------------------------------------------------------------


> 2. connect Plato (Gr. philosopher) to Poseidon (greek God)


Clue: Edgar Cayce. if u know who this guy is, this is a giveaway clue


rg and paddu have it


------------------------------------------------------------------------
> 3. connect Lord Byron to Prometheus




Clue: Prometheus in recent times...


again no new fundas here.
host of people have figured this one out.




ninja




             Answers...




             1. What did the ancient Greeks call the fear of woods and
   forests?
          - Panic (for obvious reasons)


          2. What do all these have in common?


          - Wales, The Silures (a Central Asian tribe), the Ordovices
  (another Central Asian tribe), the British county of Devonshire, coal,
  the Jura mountains in Switzerland, the town of Perm in Russia/Ukraine,
  the peaks of Eiger, Monch and Jungfrau in the Swiss Alps. I asked this
  Q in Madras before - so I'm expecting quite a few answers!


          - The geologic ages of the earth are named after these
places/things since the rocks characteristic of each age were first
identified in the corresponding place. The answer key is


                               Wales = Cambria - Cambrian
                               silures - Silurian
                               Ordovices - Ordovician
                               Devon - Devonian
                               Coal - Carboniferous
                               Perm - Permian
                               Three peaks - Triassic
                               Jura mts - Jurassic


          3.                                         1
                                               11
                                              121
                       1331


          and so on forms Pascal's triangle. This was discovered much
  before Pascal by another mathematician. Who?


          - Well. no one got this. Its Omar Khayyam.


          4. The Celtic druids wrote their spells in Runic script on
  slabs of beechwood. What word has been derived from this?
          - "Book" from the old English bec, for beechwood.


          5. What's the connection between Herge (creator of Tintin) and
  Thomas Mann?


          - Last year, a close friend of Herge's published a novel in
which 'Tintin grows up' - in the course of the story he learns abt
love, life and most importantly, loses his virginity! Thomas Mann's famous
novel 'The Magic Mountain' has a similar story in which a young guy
does much the same thing in a spa in Germany. Herge's friend set the
Tintin novel in the same spa and peopled it with the same characters
that Mann used in the 'MAgic Mountain' (An important name to remember
is Claudia Chauchat, the babe who deflowers Tintin - might make an
interesting Q). Sorry, can't remember the name of either the author or the book.


          6. Old Q, repeated. Boris Karloff made his debut in the 1931
  version of Frankenstein. How was he listed in the credits?


          - He was listed simply as '?'




                                                                 Paddu




Mon. morning again (I can understand that girls sentiment when she
said "I don't like mondays").
I'm afraid some of them are rather long questions.
I can't seem to think of any short ones. And most of these fall in the sitter
category. I expect most of the questions to be cracked before clues.




1.Well, there was this playwright, John Dennis, who wrote not-very-successful
 plays back in the 18th C. In 1709, he wrote a play "Appus and Virginia"
 which bombed, but did have an outstanding (for those times) special effect.
 After the play failed, Dennis went to see a staging of "MacBeth", and during
 the scene of the three witches, he saw his special effect being used. He ran
 up to the stage shouting "They will not see my plays, but they will .....
 .... .......". The last three words have passed on to the language. What were
 they?


2. Who wrote under the following pseudonyms?


           Laura Bancroft
           Edith Van Dyne
           Floyd Akers
           Capt. Hugh Fitzgerald
           John Estes Cooke
           Suzanne Metcalf
           Schuyler Staunton
           (one person used all these psuedonyms)


There is an ongoing scientific project (at least it was on a couple of years
ago) which was named after his books.




3. The first internet question. And a sitter of sorts. I'm giving the text of
  a post in one of the newsgroup. Identify the author.


"Dave Gilmour asked me to fiddle around some of the lyrics, which I did,
though I don't think he used any of my suggestions in the end. The only
suggestion of mine that I know was used was that the album should be called
'The Division Bell'. I didn't think up the title, of course, I merely
pointed out that the phrase was lying there in one of the song lyrics and
would make a great title. In fact, there's a story there. I had given a
talk at the Royal Geographical Society in aid of the Environmental
Investigation Agency's work on rhino conservation. Both Dave and Nick came
along and we all went out to dinner afterwards. Dave was a bit preoccupied
about the title problem - they had to have the title by the following
morning, and no one could decide what it should be. I said, OK, I'll give
you a title, but it'll cost you a £5,000 contribution to the EIA. Dave
said, Well, tell me what your title is and we'll see. So I suggested The
Division Bell. And Dave said, Hmmm, well seems to work. Sort of fits the
cover art as well. Yeah, OK.
So - it' called the Division Bell."


Lots of clues in there.


ObToughie...


4. In Indian mythology, a 1000 chatur yuga forms a day in Brahma's life. This
    period is called a Kalpa. (We're apparently in the kalpa called "Sveta varaha")
    In each Kalpa, there are 14 manus who rule the earth. During the lifetime of
    a Manu, there is a separate Indra. Right now we are under the 7th Manu (called
    Vaivaswata - never heard of him myself). The next Manu is to be Savarni. Who's
    to be the next Indra.
Cloo: "South Indian"


The ObUltimateSitter,


5. In Italy, during the med. days, when bankers lost all their money in unwise
    speculations (or in some other way), his "place of work" was generally broken
    up by the Junta. What word did this give rise to? (Pardon the very general terms
    being used here; if I use specific words this would be too obvious).




Hari




>
> > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> > 1. connect Ho Chi Minh (of Vietnam fame) to the city of Melbourne.
             > Clue: Paris. couple of very well known fundas here.


Ho Chi Minh worked as a cook under a chef named Escoffier in Paris. This
same chef has a claim to historical fame, in that he made a new dish and
named it in honour of an Australian soprano. what was the dish?
> > 2. connect Plato (Gr. philosopher) to Poseidon (greek God)
>
> Clue: Edgar Cayce. if u know who this guy is, this is a giveaway clue


Let me ask a related question.
When the 3 main Gods in Greek myth divided the world, Zeus got most of
the land, Hades the underworld and Poseidon the sea.
Poseidon however also got one part of the land. what?


> > 3. connect Lord Byron to Prometheus
 > Clue: Prometheus in recent times...


what was the (most famous?) result of a story contest between
Lord Byron and a few other literary friends, when they found one night
that they had to stay indoors due to stormy weather ?
(it was a book, and it was not by Byron)




ninja




PS: The Kaat Clues are actually a connection...You will have to
figure it out.


1. What does The Division Bell in the title refer to ?


There is a cloo in the Name itself. Political Trivia.


2. Why is the X Window System so called ?


Cloo: Remember why C is called C ? Also there is another
reason to it.


3. What was first published on July 3, 1884 in "Customer's
Afternoon Letter" ?


S&P 500 is more reliable than this.


4. What happened to the "Customer's Afternoon Letter" in 1889 ?


Oliver Stone. (Kaat Clue).


5. If you ever played Poker, and lived in this country around 1904,
you would know this (which otherwise too is a sitter). Poker chips
came in different colors. What was the color of the most expensive
chips ?


I cant clue this except that this gave rise to a term...


6. Obligatory Sitter and Desi Question : Which Desi is currently
acting on TV's Bold and the Beautiful. (watch today's episode
if you want to get this one).




Vatsayana (Kaat Clue..)




With cloos


1.Well, there was this playwright, John Dennis, who wrote not-very-successful
 plays back in the 18th C. In 1709, he wrote a play "Appus and Virginia"
 which bombed, but did have an outstanding (for those times) special effect.
 After the play failed, Dennis went to see a staging of "MacBeth", and during
 the scene of the three witches, he saw his special effect being used. He ran
 up to the stage shouting "They will not see my plays, but they will .....
 .... .......". The last three words have passed on to the language. What were
 they?
Everybody got this one. I won't bother to clue it. Roopesh pointed out that
appeared in MG90 (Tmax and Rajeev Rai).
Venu,Neeraj,Tmax,Roopesh,Ninja,TKB,Paddu,Matt,Ramkumar


2. Who wrote under the following pseudonyms?


           Laura Bancroft
           Edith Van Dyne
           Floyd Akers
           Capt. Hugh Fitzgerald
           John Estes Cooke
           Suzanne Metcalf
           Schuyler Staunton
           (one person used all these psuedonyms)


There is an ongoing scientific project (at least it was on a couple of years
ago) which was named after his books.


Cloo:Kansas. (If you've read the book, this is enough)


Matt got it.




3. The first internet question. And a sitter of sorts. I'm giving the text of
  a post in one of the newsgroup. Identify the author.


"Dave Gilmour asked me to fiddle around some of the lyrics, which I did,
though I don't think he used any of my suggestions in the end. The only
suggestion of mine that I know was used was that the album should be called




Lots of clues in there.
Cloo: Author. Another clue is that a question related to this answer was asked
    as the first question in the MG88 prelims (I remember, cause I missed
    it. Darn). Another is that a fairly famous group "derived" it's name from his
    works.(Not steppenwolf. Hesse is dead, I guess)
TMax,TKB, Ramkumar


ObToughie...


4. In Indian mythology, a 1000 chatur yuga forms a day in Brahma's life. This
  period is called a Kalpa. (We're apparently in the kalpa called "Sveta varaha")
  In each Kalpa, there are 14 manus who rule the earth. During the lifetime of
  a Manu, there is a separate Indra. Right now we are under the 7th Manu (called
  Vaivaswata - never heard of him myself). The next Manu is to be Savarni. Who's
  to be the next Indra.
Cloo: "South Indian"
Cloo2:Festival


Ninja.


The ObUltimateSitter,


5. In Italy, during the med. days, when bankers lost all their money in unwise
  speculations (or in some other way), his "place of work" was generally broken
  up by the Junta. What word did this give rise to? (Pardon the very general terms
  being used here; if I use specific words this would be too obvious).




They conducted their work from benches which is how the word bank was
derived and I'm looking for one word.


Tmax,Ninja,TKB,Matt.




Hari




Hi:
Firstly, some junta feel that I send in clues too early
before people can even get to read the original posts.
I guess we should (In the future) mail the clues only to
those who request it and then wait for a day before
posting the clues to junta.


Secondly this is where you stand. I will name the junta
when I mail out the answers tomorrow morning.


1. Junta seemed to have got this one. So I will post no further
clues.
2. Since someone felt that asking a Computer Question is not
fair to the rest of the junta, I will post a clue which is
a giveaway. C is derived from a language called B (which was
developed by Ken Thomson).
3. S&P 500 stands for The Standard and Poor's 500.
4. Oliver Stone. Cloo-2: No Photos. One person has worked this out.
5. This seems to be a sitter. Junta's cashed in on this.
6. People are on the right track, but they stop thinking
once they figure (sic) out Pooja Bedi.


Answers posted at 900 AM Pacific tomorrow..


Cheers,


TKB.




1. Which company's ad slogan is "Where do you want to go today?".
2. Who was the original Frankenstein dedicated to?
3. Where and what is Planet Hell?
4. Whose autobiography is "Everything is True: except the facts"?
5. Who assumed command of the New South East Asia Command of
  the allies to retake Burma.?
6. There was an relatively unknown movie in 1974 called Big Bad Momma..
  but became famous because of an explicit sex scene. I dont know the
  heroine but the hero was someone we all know.
  Who is this chap?


/-------------------------------------------------------------------------/


                       Govindarajan K


                      4504 16th Ave N.E.
                      Apt # B306 Seattle WA 98105
                                           Phone # (206)-523-9931
                                           e-mail : govindk@george.ee.washington.edu.
/-------------------------------------------------------------------------/




Complete the list:


Deth Spacula, Sky Cries Mary, Severe Tire Damage, ___________




Topical. Expect the list to be uncontroallably long soon.


--P2




These should be easy enough ... old questions I may have asked before. Those
who have been asked this will hopefully be honest enough to admit it.


i) This member of the House of Commons in the late 1800s was known as Mr.
Narrow Majority (for at least one more reason than the obvious one). Who?


ii) This member of the US Senate from the late '40s was conversely known as
"Landslide _______________" (his first name). Why?


iii) T.A. Gopinatha Rao, in a book published in 1914 (whose name I cannot
remember) records the existence and the celebration of an utsavam (festival)
in Madurai associated with something that happened to a Pandya King called
Koon Pandyan (hunchbacked). What happened to him? [My room-mate, from Madurai,
knows nothing of this and it is possible that this utsavam is no longer
celebrated]


iv) What, specifically, was the medieval feudal practice of droit de seigneur?
[hope I got the spelling right]


v) And the sitter for today ... the writer of the book "Crossing the Threshold
of Hope" is __________ ?


-srini




Complete the list:


Deth Specula, Sky Cries Mary, Severe Tire Damage, _______________


The answer is the Rolling Stones.


These bands have already "broadcasted" live on the internet via M-Bone/Mosaic.


Just a blurb from yesterday's NYT.


--P2




The guy who plays the guitar for the threads is Paul allen (yeah,
Bill's buddy). He also owns the Portland trailblazers, Ticketmaster,
a chunk of AOL and Assymetrix (the multimedia company).
BTW he plays lead..Thanx P2 .


My next question: Whats common between Zaire, Sudan and Reston (Robert redford)s<|
> > >> 1. Which company's ad slogan is "Where do you want to go today?".
> ---> Think of the company started by Paul Allen.
-----> Kloo1: not an airline company.
-----> Kloo2: Paul Allen was a co-founder.
     Apart from the guys who already got it , before the last set
    of clues nobody has come close.
Answer... Microsoft. Srini got this apart from other junta I had already
mentioned. Microsoft was co-founded by Bill Gates as well as Paul Allen.


> > >> 2. Who was the original Frankenstein dedicated to?
> ---->A give away clue ... An enquiry concerning political justice.. was
>    a book written by this person.
Answer... William Godwin, her father. Kid got this and Hari came close.




> > >> 3. Where and what is Planet Hell?
Answer... Its the name given to the set of StarTrek by its crew.


> > >> 4. Whose autobiography is "Everything is True: except the facts"?
> ---> This guy recently released a video on how "actually on should play
> golf".
> ND got this.
--> Hari, RamK, TKB got it.
Answer ----> Leslie Nielse(o)n.




> > >> 5. Who assumed command of the New South East Asia Command of
> > >>     the allies to retake Burma.?


Lord Mountbatten.
> > >> 6. There was an relatively unknown movie in 1974 called Big Bad Momma..
> > >>     but became famous because of an explicit sex scene. I dont know the
> > >>     heroine but the hero was someone we all know.
Answer .. William Shatner.


Chinaman--- googly bowled by an orthodox left arm spinner.
Govind.




On Wed, 23 Nov 1994, K.Govindarajan wrote:
> > > >> 6. There was an relatively unknown movie in 1974 called Big Bad Momma..
> > > >>   but became famous because of an explicit sex scene. I dont know the
> > > >>   heroine but the hero was someone we all know.
> Answer .. William Shatner.


The BillMeister is also known for a rendition of 'Lucy in the
Sky with Diamonds' that is a musical ad for free goosepimples.


BTW, does anyone know the name of the book, by I.Asomov, I think,
where the discovery is made of a satellite of Jupiter or Saturn
that is Pure Diamond. In order to prevent the crash of diamond
prices on Earth, a coded message is sent that goes : " We have
found Lucy" or something to that paraphrased extent.


matts




                                           My America
                   -------------
                    R. K. Narayan




At the American Consulates the visa issuing section is kept busy
nowadays as more and more young men seek the Green Card or profess to go
on a student visa and many try to extend their stay once they get in.
The official handles a difficult task while filtering out the
"permanents" and letting in only the "transients". The average American
himself is liberal-minded and doesn't bother that more Indian engineers
and doctors are swamping the opportunities available in the country
possibly to the disadvantage of the American candidate himself.
I discussed the subject with Prof. Ainslee Embree of Columbia
University who has had a long association with Indian affairs and
culture. His reply was noteworthy. "Why not Indians as well? In
course of time they will be Americans. The American citizen of today
was once an expatriate, a foreigner who had come out of a European or
African country. Why not from India too? We certainly love to have
Indians in our country."


There are however, two views on this subject. The elderly parents of
Indians settled in America pay a visit to them, from time to time (on
excursion round ticket), and feel pleased at the prosperity of their
sons or daughters in America. After a Greyhound tour of the country and
a visit to Niagara, they are ready to return home when the suburban
existence begins to bore them whether at New Jersey, or The Queens or
the Silicon Valley neighborhood of California. But they always say on
their return, "After all our boys are happy there. Why should they come
back to this country, where they get no encouragement?"


EXASPERATION


Our young man who goes out to the States for higher studies or training,
declares when leaving home, "I will come back as soon as I complete my
course, may be two years or a little more, but I will definitely come
back and work for our country, and also help our family....." Excellent
intentions, but it will not work that way. Later when he returns home
full of dreams, projects, and plans, he only finds hurdles at every turn
when he tries for a job or to start an enterprise of his own.
Form-filling, bureaucracy, caste and other restrictions, and a generally
feudal style of functioning, exasperate the young man and waste his
time. He frets and fumes as days pass with nothing achieved, while he
has been running around presenting or collecting papers at various
places.


He is not used to this sort of treatment in America, where, he claims,
he could walk into the office of the top man anywhere, address him by
his first name and explain his purpose; when he attempts to visit a man
of similar rank in India to discuss his ideas, he realizes that he has
no access to him, but can only talk to subordinate officials in a
hierarchy. Some years ago a biochemist returning home and bursting with
proposals, was curtly told off by the big man when he innocently pushed
the door and stepped in. "You should not come to me directly, send your
papers through proper channels." Thereafter the young biochemist left
India once for all. having kept his retreat open with the help of a
sympathetic professor at the American end. In this respect American
democratic habits have rather spoilt our young men. They have no
patience with our official style or tempo, whereas an Indian at home
would accept the hurdles as inevitable Karma.


The America-returned Indian expects special treatment, forgetting the
fact that over here chancellors of universities will see only the other
chancellors, and top executives will see only other top executives and
none less under any circumstance. Our administrative machinery is slow,
tedious, and feudal in its operation, probably still based on what they
called the Tottenham Manual, creation of a British administrator five
decades ago.


LACK OF OPENINGS


One other reason for a young man's final retreat from India could also
be attributed to the lack of openings for his particular qualification.
A young engineer trained in robotics had to spend all his hours
explaining what it means, to his prospective sponsors, until he realized
that there could be no place for robots in an over-crowded country.


The Indian in America is a rather lonely being, having lost his roots in
one place and not grown them in the other. Few Indians in America make
any attempt to integrate in American cultural or social life. So few
visit an American home or a theater or an opera, or try to understand
the American psyche. An Indian's contact with the American is confined
to his colleagues working along with him and to an official or seminar
luncheon. He may also mutter a "Hi!" across the fence to an American
neighbor while lawn-mowing. At other times one never sees the other
except by appointment, each family being boxed up in their homes
securely behind locked doors.


After he has equipped his new home with the latest dish-washer, video,
etc., with two cars in the garage and acquired all that the others have,
he sits back with his family counting his blessings. Outwardly happy,
but secretly gnawed by some vague discontent and aware of some inner
turbulence or vacuum, he cannot define which. All the comfort is
physically satisfying, he has immense "job satisfaction" and that is
about all.


ENNUI


On a week-end he drives his family fifty miles or more towards another
Indian family to eat an Indian dinner, discuss Indian politics, or tax
problems (for doctors particularly this is a constant topic of
conversation, being in the highest income bracket). There is monotony
in this pattern of life. so mechanical and standardized.


In this individual, India has lost an intellectual or an expert; but it
must not be forgotten that the expert has lost India too, which is a
more serious loss in the final reckoning.


The quality of life in India is different. In spite of all its
deficiencies, irritations, lack of material comforts and amenities, and
general confusion, Indian life builds up an inner strength. It is
through subtle inexplicable influences (through religion, family ties,
and human relationships in general). Let us call them psychological
"inputs" to use a modern terminology, which cumulatively sustain and
lend variety and richness to existence. Building imposing Indian
temples in America, installing our gods therein and importing Indian
priests to perform the puja and festivals, are only imitative of Indian
existence and could have only a limited value. Social and religious
assemblies at the temples (in America) might mitigate boredom but only
temporarily. I have lived as a guest for extended periods in many
Indian homes in America and have noticed the ennui that descends on a
family when they are stuck at home.
Children growing up in America present a special problem. They have to
develop themselves on a shallow foundation without a cultural basis,
either Indian or American. Such children are ignorant of India and
without the gentleness and courtesy and respect for parents, which forms
the basic training for a child in an Indian home, unlike the American
upbringing whereby a child is left alone to discover for himself the
right code of conduct. Aware of his child's ignorance of Indian life,
the Indian parent tries to cram into the child's little head all
possible information during an 'Excursion Fare' trip to the mother
country.


DIFFERING EMPHASIS


In the final analysis America and India differ basically, though it
would be wonderful if they could complement each other's values. Indian
philosophy lays stress on austerity and unencumbered, uncomplicated
day-to-day living. On the other hand, America's emphasis is on material
acquisitions and a limitless pursuit of prosperity. From childhood an
Indian is brought up on the notion that austerity and a contended life
is good. and also a certain other- worldliness is inculcated through
the tales a grandmother narrates, the discourses at the temple hall, and
through moral books. The American temperament, on the contrary, is
pragmatic.


INDIFFERENCE TO ETERNITY


The American has a robust indifference to eternity. "Visit the church
on a Sunday and listen to the sermon if you like but don't bother about
the future," he seems to say. Also, "dead yesterday and unborn
tomorrow, why fret about them if today be sweet?" - he seems to echo
Omar Khayyam's philosophy. He works hard and earnestly, and acquires
wealth, and enjoys life. He has no time to worry about the after-life;
he only takes the precaution to draw up a proper will and trusts the
Funeral Home around the corner to take care of the rest. The Indian who
is not able to live on this basis wholeheartedly, finds himself in a
half-way house; he is unable to overcome the inherited complexes while
physically flourishing on the American soil. One may hope that the next
generation of Indians (American-grown) will do better by accepting the
American climate spontaneously or in the alternative return to India to
live a different life.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------




i) This member of the House of Commons in the late 1800s was known as Mr.
Narrow Majority (for at least one more reason than the obvious one). Who?


a) Dadhabhai Naoroji. A whole bunch of people got it afer the clue. Kannan
nailed it before the clue.


ii) This member of the US Senate from the late '40s was conversely known as
"Landslide _______________" (his first name). Why?


a) Lyndon Baines Johnson. He won the Democratic primary for the election to
fill a Senate seat against Gov. Coke Stevenson by what was believed to be,
and has been now documented (in Robert Caro's "Means of Ascent") as vote-fraud.
The final vote-count showed LBJ below by 130 votes or so, and then one of his
hired hands who was a county judge in one of Texas' counties produced a box
of about 200+ uncounted voted which were so lopsidedly tilted in LBJ's favour
that he was then declared to have won the race by 87 votes. Stevenson appealed
all the way to the Supreme Court but got nowhere. In those days, there was
no real GOP in Texas and winning the Democratic primary was equivalent to
winning the election. Hence, the nickname (anything but a) "Landslide." Oh,
this was in 1948.


Kannan and Govind got this, both before the clue.


[Both Hari and Mats ought to get out and see the LBJ Presidential library in
Austin once in a while. Mats esply., given it's on campus]
iii) T.A. Gopinatha Rao, in a book published in 1914 (whose name I cannot
remember) records the existence and the celebration of an utsavam (festival)
in Madurai associated with something that happened to a Pandya King called
Koon Pandyan (hunchbacked). What happened to him?


a) Koon Pandyan was a Jain, converted by Thirugnanasambandhar (a Tamil saint
circa 1st century AD) to Saivism, after his "Koon" (or hunched back) was cured
by the Saint. He then celebrated his conversion by impaling Jain munis on the
streets of Madurai, which occasion, at least in 1914, was still being
commemorated by a festival. My room-mate denies this vigorously and claims that
the real story was that the Jain munis impaled themselves, this being the
pre-determined penalty for losing in debate against their Saivite adversaries,
and that that is what was commemorated, and now, even that no longer happens.


[Just an interesting fact I thought I'd pass on.]


iv) What, specifically, was the medieval feudal practice of droit de seigneur?
[hope I got the spelling right]


a) The practice of the feudal lord getting the right to deflower his serfs'
newly-weds. I believe there was an incident in Bihar where this recently
happened. If you have read Ken Follett's "Pillars of the Earth," there's a
case where this happens, and the bewildered serf says that this practice was
outlawed long before even then (the book is set at about the 11th century AD).
Many people got this. Hari, Roopesh, TMM, TKB (who was close), come to mind.
Can't recollect the


v) And the sitter for today ... the writer of the book "Crossing the Threshold
of Hope" is __________ ?


a) Pope John Paul II. Most got it.


BTW, can someone tell me what the name of Roger Penrose's latest book on the
notion of consciousness, etc. is? I haven't been able to find the name anywhere.


-srini
You folks might recall sometime back that Kannan had voiced a semi-objection
to the answer to one of my questions regarding the Roman orator Cicero.
Specifically, while I had stated in the official answer that "cicero" was
Latin for "chick-pea," Kannan thought it actually meant "wart."


I went back to my sources ("Fall of the Roman Republic," Penguin Classics)
and Plutarch does say that "cicer" is Latin for "chick-pea," and that it is
possible that one of Cicero's ancestors got this name from a wart on the
nose.


I hope that settles it, if ever it was unsettled.


-srini




First a sitter...
1. What is the Tin Pan alley
Initially referred to the popular song writing trade in NY.
But I think now refers to the entire pop-music industry.
Everybody was close.


2. Who was Hollywood's "Man of a Thousand Faces "
Lon Cheney.
 Cant remember anybody not getting this one.


3. Whose first directorial venture was " The Lodger ". Who was it
  based on
  The answer I have is A. Hitchcock who based it on the Ripper.
  But Paddu points out that this was his first thriller and not his
  first movie, havent been to check it out yet..
  Junta got this too...


4. Whose acting career started in the role of Kato, the maid servant.
  Bruce Lee in the TV serial The Green Hornet which later became
 a movie.


5. In 1895 there was a cartoon strip called " Down in Hogans Alley "
 Its central character was "The Kid" who was a bald impish type with
 a knowing grin... The character was changed to " The Yellow Kid"
 in 1896.. Why...
 The reason why the cartoon became to be called the yellow kid was
 the printer applied yellow ink to the costume of the Kid accidently (?)
 and the colour stuck as Pulitzer was quite happy with it..
 Junta was close..


6. This above strip was the reason for the coining of a new term..
  What term did it bring into existence... and Why
  Yellow journalism.
   Hearst lured outcault away from the Ny world to NY Journal.
   This made pulitzer to get George Luks to do the cartoon for
   NYW. Thus the cartoon was appearing in two papers at the
   same time.
   This led Ervin ward(?)man of the Ny Press to coin the term
   " yellow Press of NY " which later became Y Journalism.
  Anybody and everybody got this.


 As usual signing off with a sitter from ST....
7. Who was the voice of the computer in JTK's ship
 kiloo---- the person was a crew member...


 Majel Barret. who later became Mrs Roddenbery.




Govind.


1. Who or what is TAFKAP.
The Artiste Formerly Known As Prince. Ever since he changed his name to
that damned symbol, Mags and TV r having a tough time trying to "call"
him.
Gopal and Murali got this one.
2. Who or what is Zappafrank.
A guy named John Scialli, a huge fan of Frank Zappa (duh!), got togather
a lot of E-signatures and convinced the Interantional Astromnomical Union
to name a recently discovered Czech asteroid, Zappafrank. It helped that
one Mr Vaclav Havel is also a Zappa fan.


Hari got this one.


3. Kamal worked in the Bureau of Research and Analysis or BRA.
I received one note of dissent from Balaji who says that Kamal was not
a part of BRA, He was just an Indian secret service agent (RAW?) while
the computer whiz with him was a part of BRA.
In any case Hari, Balaji and Murali got this one.




NEW QUESTIONS:


1.ID the context in which the following words were spoken. "Well, we knocked
the Bastard off".


2. A coupl years back the telegu guy chiranjeevi acted in a
Gongura-western (as opposed to the spaghetti one), This movie was subsequently
dubbed into english, sans the songs. Care to name the english version
(i know a coupla guys who can name the telegu version here)




Here are the answers:


1) The Devil's daughter's descendants: Plantagenets (Richard Lionheart and others)
Her husband was the first Duke of Anjou.


2) Reinhart Heydrich proposed and executed the "Final Solution to the Jewish Problem"
- death camps and all - so the operation was named after him.


3) Erinyes, other name -> Eumenides meaning the Beautiful Ones. The Greeks thought they
could keep the Furies happy by calling them nice names.
4) The Lucasian number 1 prof: Isaac Barrow.




Lots of people proposed Amazons for #1. They, if I am not wrong (gotta check) were
descendants of Zeus and some horribly beautiful shrew.


Everyone missed #2 and 3.


Govi and Tmax got 4. Newton was the second Lucasian Prof.


Saint




> score for "Salut, Jerusalem", "Bladerunner". His real name is E.O.Papathanassiou
> (if I tell you what E stands for, it would give it away immediately, sorry).
> What is he known as popularly?


           Well now, almost everyone seems to have got this, except a couple here
           or there. Perhaps Synthesizer Music would help 'em too?


> One of the rites of this group of monks was to kiss the behind of a (black)
> cat. This was considered heretical, and along with other (political) considerations
> caused them to be purged in the early Middle ages. Name the order.


           Some people have got this too. Okay, Brian de Bois Guilbert was one of
           them. Does that help?


> Speaking still of monastic orders, their name translates to God's dogs. What
> are they better know as?


           Crikey, everyone got this!


Saint


PS: Answers tomorrow, what?
> > 1. In "the silent movie" who is the only person whose voice is heard on screen( sorry if it is an
old one)
>
> Marcel marceau(the french mimic)
>kid, tmax, parma and junta others got this
> > 2. In the song "american pie", there is a reference to "the jester".
> > who is the jester. cloo are there in song
>
>dylan. the cricketer who changed his name to bob dylan was bob dylan willis
> kid, ssd, parma and a couple of others got this.
> > 3. when couriers were taken to secret hideouts, they were initially
> > blindfolded and then taken by a roundabout route to the destination.
> > what word has this given rise to? ( sorry for improper grammar)
nobody got this. answer was hoodwink
guni




1. The answer to which famous unanswered (in the orig source) was later
    given by the creator as
 "Because it can produce a few notes, tho they are *very* flat; and it is
    nevar put with the wrong end in front."
    Read carefully.
    A cloo would be Stephen Kings answer in "The shining"
    " The higher the fewer, of course! Have another cup of tea!"


Tmax, TKB,kid got it.


CLOO: Another answer to the riddle is "Poe wrote on both". The authors'
answer was found recently in the 1896 edition of the book.


2. Stings song "Moon over bourbon street" from the album "The dream of
    Blue turtles" was based/derived/inspired from a bestselling novel.
    Which one. The title of the song is a clue.
TKB.


CLOO: Bourbon street is in New Orleans. This is a recent bestseller
we're talking about.




3. Continuing in the tradition of fill in the blanks quizzing, here's one
  from an ancient book. Music fans may bag this easily.
  There is a major pill associated with this question.
    "We now return our souls to the creator,
       as we stand on the edge of eternal darkness.
       Let our chant fill the void
       in order that others may know.
     In the land of the night
     the ship of the sun
       is drawn by the ______ ______."


Tmax,TKB,P2 ,kid,Ramkumar.


CLOO: The pill is that a rock group takes its' name from the words that are to be filled in.




4. There is a funda associated with statues of men on/with horses (you know the ones).
  What does it mean if
            a. The man is seated on the horse which has all its feet on the ground.
            b. The man is seated on the horse and it has one foot off the ground.
            c. The man is seated ................. it has two feet off the ground.
            d. The man is standing besides the horse.
 Oops. just noticed. the question is politically incorrect. Read man as person.


kannan got it all. P2,Tmax got most of it.


CLOO : a) A war hero who died of natural causes. Can't do better than that.




5.The ObSitter. Name Antonius Blocks' famous chess opponent in the movies.
 And the movie.




Cloo: That was a badly phrased question. Antonius Block is the name of the protagonist
    The movie in question is an old,non-indian, B/W movie. There is a "big" reference
    to this movie in a recent (last 3 years) movie that bombed inspite of expectations
    that it would be a super-hit.


Hari




Not many people have really attempted the questions yet...
So here are the clues...


1. The reason why QE I backed Francis Drake's expedition.
----> It was not any quest for knowledge....
2. What was the play in the Ford theatre when Lincoln was assassinated?
---> TKB has got this..
(Expect Junta to get this)...without the clue
3. Which aircraft was named the "Wobbly Goblin" by USAF?
---> It is an American aircraft..which got this name junta saw it for
   the first time. Used in Iraq.
4. Dr. Watson once suggests a theory called "Inde-Fix"(Iam not sure
whether the word is hyphenated) as a solution
to a case. What was the case and the theory?.
---->The street light plays an important role...
5. What has been nicknamed the M&M trials?
----->An elephant wouldnt support this act.
6. What is the Spirit of Washington?
-----> Largest employer of (Asian)Indians in Washington.
TKB was on the right track.
Govind.
Guys,
some more painful stuff..Me thinks we should all start a quizzus anonymous
soon.


1. Remember those two mutts which stare dumbly at the screen in those
RCA ads..well one of them is (as everybody knows) Nipper. who is the other
mutt?


2.Which cricketer is nicknamed JJ's mom'n'dad?


3.Sashi Tharoor's the great Indian novel cleverly interplays the Mahabharatha
and 20th century Indian history by imposing characteristics (whew) of
those protagonists on politicians from Modern India.. Now, whose character
does Jinnah take on?




Govind's question What was the play in the Ford theatre when Lincoln was
assassinated? impulsively makes me shoot out these questions. since its
off the top of my head, you might have heard them sometime or the other.
So here goes..


1.the play in the Ford theatre when Lincoln was
assassinated introduced a word into English after one of the characters
in the play.What was it??




2.Tom Soppard wrote "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are dead". Why did they
die?




3. In British theatrical history, why is Walter Plinge famous?




I may not be able to induvidually acknowledge if your answers are right.
Will send a general mail with clues sometime indicating who got what.
In vino veriatis...


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sheep get their haircut at the baa baa shop!


Vegetarians eat vegetables. Beware of humanitarians!


Gopal Kidao, Duke University


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------




Hi all,


1. The answer to which famous unanswered (in the orig source) was later
  given by the creator as
 "Because it can produce a few notes, tho they are *very* flat; and it is
  nevar put with the wrong end in front."
  Read carefully.
  A cloo would be Stephen Kings answer in "The shining"
  " The higher the fewer, of course! Have another cup of tea!"


Tmax, TKB,kid. guni after cloo.
Cloo: Another answer to the riddle is "Poe wrote on both". The authors'
answer was found recently in the 1896 edition of the book.


ANS: "WHY IS A RAVEN LIKE A WRITING DESK?", Lewis Carroll's famous unanswered
    riddle from "Alice ..". Carroll gave his answer in the Preface of the
    later edition.


2. Stings song "Moon over bourbon street" from the album "The dream of
  Blue turtles" was based/derived/inspired from a bestselling novel.
  Which one. The title of the song is a clue.


TKB.
Cloo: Bourbon street is in New Orleans. This is a recent bestseller
we're talking about.


ANS: Nighttime in NewOrleans could only mean INTERVIEW WITH THE VAMPIRE. P2
   says it could indicate "On the Waterfront" too.




3. Continuing in the tradition of fill in the blanks quizzing, here's one
  from an ancient book. Music fans may bag this easily.
  There is a major pill associated with this question.
    "We now return our souls to the creator,
     as we stand on the edge of eternal darkness.
     Let our chant fill the void
     in order that others may know.
     In the land of the night
     the ship of the sun
     is drawn by the ______ ______."


Tmax,TKB,P2 ,kid,Ramkumar, rg, guni.
Cloo: The pill is that a group takes its' name from the words that are to be filled in.


ANS: GRATEFUL DEAD. This quote is from the Egyptian Book of the dead.
   The Pill is that the band took it's name from here, but according to
   Garcia they came upon it in a dictionary where the entry describes this
   as the motif of a cycle of folk tales which involves the protagonist
   spending money to help bury a stranger and later upon his travels coming
   upon a companion who leads him to fame and fortune, and later reveling
   himself to be the dead man. Morbid, or what. Apparently the entry is in
   Funk Wagnall dictionary.


4. There is a funda associated with statues of men on/with horses (you know the ones).
  What does it mean if
           a. The man is seated on the horse which has all its feet on the ground.
           b. The man is seated on the horse and it has one foot off the ground.
           c. The man is seated ................. it has two feet off the ground.
           d. The man is standing besides the horse.
 Oops. just noticed. the question is politically incorrect. Read man as person.


kannan got it all. P2,Tmax got most of it.So did guni


Cloo : a) A war hero who died of natural causes.


ANS: b) Man died of wounds in battle
   c) Man died in battle
   d) Both man and horse died in battle.


Kannan added one for horse on one leg -> Sculptor died before completion.


5.The ObSitter. Name Antonius Blocks' famous chess opponent in the movies.
 And the movie.




Cloo: That was a badly phrased question. Antonius Block is the name of the
protagonist The movie in question is an old,non-indian, B/W movie. There is
a "big" reference to this movie in a recent (last 3 years) movie that bombed
inspite of expectations that it would be a super-hit.


TKB was the only one to get it. Not so much of a sitter, I guess.


ANS: DEATH. The movie I was referring to was Bergmans' "The seventh seal"
  wherein a recurring feature is the chess game played between Block,
  played by Max Von Sydow and death.
  This movie played a big part in "Last Action Hero". Towards the end,
  when the ambulance carrying Schwarznegger passes a theater showing
  "The 7th seal", the ticket activated death and it walks off the screen
  and ....


Hari
By now you guys would have guessed that we are talking about the
paisa equivalent in these countries....
The answer is as follows...
Paisa : Pul: eyrir: fen : piaster : chetrum :kurus:halala : grosz :
kopeck :: India :Afghanistan:Iceland:China:Egypt(not unique):Bhutan:Turkey:Saudi
Arabia:Poland:Russia
Govind.




Well Junta the answers once again..


1. The reason why QE I backed Francis Drake's expedition.
----> It was not any quest for knowledge....


--> If you guys remember this was the time when England's relation with
  Spain was not so good. Only one expedition had circumnavigated
  the globe till then. It was a Spanish fleet under Magellan.
  She was trying to prove that the English were no less than the
  Spanish...
--> Junta got the Spanish connection..but noone could pinpoint it...
2. What was the play in the Ford theatre when Lincoln was assassinated?
---> TKB has got this..
(Expect Junta to get this)...without the clue


---> Our American Cousin..
 Venu, TKB, kid, Paddu, Rg got this...


3. Which aircraft was named the "Wobbly Goblin" by USAF?
---> It is an American aircraft..which got this name junta saw it for
   the first time. Used in Iraq.
---> It is the Stealth Fighter F 117 A.
  Someone came close in guessing it as the stealth aircraft..


4. Dr. Watson once suggests a theory called "Inde-Fix"(Iam not sure
whether the word is hyphenated) as a solution
to a case. What was the case and the theory?.
---->The street light plays an important role...


----> The case was the Six Napoleans.
     The theory was this.
     Since this guy goes generally breaking Nap's statues all over,
     Dr Watson thinks that this is due to a disease called " Inde Fix"
     According to him people suffering from that syndrome have the
     feeling that someone was the cause of all their problems and
     since they cant reach that person they take it upon on whatever
     they think is representative of that person.
     Watch Sherlock Holmes Mysteries on A&E for this....




    5. What has been nicknamed the M&M trials?
----->An elephant wouldnt support this act.
     M&M stands for the trials going on for the abortion pill.
     They feel this is a "less painful" way of doing it,
     M&M stands for "Miefepristone and Misopristone", which are
`    the drugs in the pill.This is going on right now in DesMoines Iowa,
     and there is a lot of controversy about the ethical aspects.




6. What is the Spirit of Washington?
-----> Largest employer of (Asian)Indians in Washington.
TKB was on the right track.
     The Stealth Bomber.
     RG got this right.
     This was in the news very recently when the Bomber was put in
     for public inspection for the first time...


     By the way Boeing is the largest employer of Indians in Seattle,
     M.Soft as some of you might think.(I got this info from a Boeing
employee who says that there are at least 3000 indians..)


Govind.
Folks,
Sorry for posting answers a bit early. But this set of Q;s were a bit
un-cluable. U either knew them or u didn't..


1. The two mutts in the RCA ad's are Nipper and Chipper
Nobody got this.


2.JJ's mom'n'dad is, as everybody knows, Javed Miandad.
Everybody got this.. (I seem to be running a binary quiz here)


3. Jinnah's Mahabaratha equivalent was..I can hold out a little longer
on this one. Clu: Think of the most famous birthmark in the M'b'tha.
Saint & Kannan have got this one sans clu




Here are some clues to the theatrical quiz..
Answers will be posted later.


1.the play in the Ford theatre when Lincoln was
assassinated introduced a word into English after one of the characters
in the play.What was it??


cloo:a kind of whiskers(ie long side-whiskers)




2.Tom Soppard wrote "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are dead". Why did they
die?


cloo: Think on the lines on what happened to them in one of shakespears
plays.


3. In British theatrical history, why is Walter Plinge famous?
cloo: george spelvin;pseydonym


Tmax got this


I may not be able to induvidually acknowledge if your answers are right.


In vino veriatis...


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sheep get their haircut at the baa baa shop!


Vegetarians eat vegetables. Beware of humanitarians!


Gopal Kidao, Duke University


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------




(ugh!). The birthmark connexion is ofcourse Karna's Half moon on his forehead
which closely resembles the islamic symbol.
Gopes got this one after the clu.




1. This guy paraphrased a famous line when he said " The light has
gone out of diwali". What was he talking about and who was he.
hint: These two are as famous, if not more than, the original two,
atleast to young Indians.


2. Fill the blanks. In ____, tensions b/w ________ and its neighbour
__-________ erupted into a fierce 5-day war following a soccer match
b/w the two countries..
3. The ancient Roman men wore that loose stuff called Toga. what was
its female equivalent.




Here are answers to the theatrical quiz..
Answers will be posted later.


1.the play in the Ford theatre when Lincoln was
assassinated introduced a word into English after one of the characters
in the play.What was it??


cloo:a kind of whiskers(ie long side-whiskers)




Answer: Dundreary.


lord dundreary was the chief character of the 1858 play by tom taylor,
the personification of a good-natured, indolent, blundering,
empty-headed swell. e.a. sothern created the character by the
brilliance of his acting and the liberties he took with the original
text. the theatrical make-up for the part included long side-whiskers
which set a fashion among the young men about town. the phrase is
'dundreary whiskers'.[Thanx to Tmax for the above description]


No one got this one. Most gusses centered around gen. Ambrose burnsides
who gave his name to sideburns.




2.Tom Soppard wrote "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are dead". Why did they
die?


cloo: Think on the lines on what happened to them in one of shakespears
plays.
Actually in retrospective this is totally chewed question.Anyway here is
the answer.. Hamlets dad sends him to England with these 2 chappies who
have a letter which requests the king of england to execute the holder of
the letter. Hamlet discovers this leeter during the voyage switches the
contents asa result of which these 2 guys are executed instead.
In the shakespeare version, hamlet kills them on the ship aftera duel.


no one again.


3. In British theatrical history, why is Walter Plinge famous?


cloo: george spelvin;pseydonym


Tmax got this. Hari after the clue.




When an actor plays 2 characters in a play. he assumes the name of
Walter Plinge for the second character. In American, the tradition is to
take the name george spelvin.
Apparently, near the Dury theatre in London, there was barman called
Walter Plinge. Actors used to frequent his place and he was very happy to
find his name on the cast whenever an actor played two roles. The actors
too were happy to take his name cause it assured them a free round of
drinks!!




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sheep get their haircut at the baa baa shop!


Vegetarians eat vegetables. Beware of humanitarians!


Gopal Kidao, Duke University


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
1. In the original French version of the Asterix comics, what was
Dogmatix's name?


2. We all know that the English mathematician Robert Record was the
first person to use '=' to as the mathematical sign for 'equals'. Why
did he choose this particular symbol?


3. What is the claim of fame of the Governor of Massachusetts in 1812
who was also a signer of the Declaration of Independence and a
vice-president of the United States (in Jackson's second term)?


4. Under the London Prize Ring rules introduced in 1839, a round in a
prize fight ended when one of the fighters was knocked down. After a
30-second interval this fighter was allowed eight seconds in which to
make his way to a mark in the centre of the ring. If he couldn't, he
and lost. What is this phrase?


5. The statutory Lewis Carroll question. You must have seen or heard
this game invented by Carroll where you are given two words of the
same length and you have to transform one into the other by changing a
single letter at a time. For example, MAN can evolve from APE in six
steps - APE ARE ERE ERR EAR MAR MAN or in five steps APE APT OPT OAT
MAT MAN. He initially called this game 'word-links' but in a series of
articles in 'Vanity Fair' in 1879, he gave them a different name. What
was this new name and, more importantly, where did he get this name
from?


            TMax




1. This guy paraphrased a famous line "The light has gone out of Diwali"...
Hint: The "event" occured very recently. Think of some kind of an end.
BTW, the answer is not Nehru and Gandhi. I think someone misunderstood the
Q.




It is time for clues. Sorry if I didn't respond to each of you
individually.


> 1. In the original French version of the Asterix comics, what was
> Dogmatix's name?


Think of Dogmatix as DOGMA+tix and not as DOG+matix. And translate to
French.


TKB got this.


> 2. We all know that the English mathematician Robert Record was the
> first person to use '=' to as the mathematical sign for 'equals'. Why
> did he choose this particular symbol?


When Record first used this, it was a much more elongated symbol. His
reason for using it: 'since no two things are more equal than ________
_____.'


TKB got this.


> 3. What is the claim of fame of the Governor of Massachusetts in 1812
> who was also a signer of the Declaration of Independence and a
> vice-president of the United States (in Jackson's second term)?


No one came anywhere near it. Think of an amphibian resembling the
lizard. His name is in a word (that is the whole point of the
question).


> 4. Under the London Prize Ring rules introduced in 1839, a round in a
> prize fight ended when one of the fighters was knocked down. After a
> 30-second interval this fighter was allowed eight seconds in which to
> make his way to a mark in the centre of the ring. If he couldn't, he
> and lost. What is this phrase?


Can't clue this too easily without giving too much away. How could a
mark be made in the centre of the ring? This phrase means 'to make the
grade'. Sorry for the yucko clue.


Paddu got this. Many people said 'throw in the towel'. I think the
boxer's seconds throw in the towel to indicate their camp gives up the
fight.


> 5. The statutory Lewis Carroll question. You must have seen or heard
> this game invented by Carroll where you are given two words of the
> same length and you have to transform one into the other by changing a
> single letter at a time. For example, MAN can evolve from APE in six
> steps - APE ARE ERE ERR EAR MAR MAN or in five steps APE APT OPT OAT
> MAT MAN. He initially called this game 'word-links' but in a series of
> articles in 'Vanity Fair' in 1879, he gave them a different name. What
> was this new name and, more importantly, where did he get this name
> from?


Roopesh got the name - doublets. Now try to guess the place he got the
name from. Think literature.




The following three questions all pertain to science, and are fairly
simple and guessable. Have fun!




1. Many of us who have backgrounds in science, have memorized certain
minute distances pertaining to the interatomic scale, in Angstroms. For
e.g, the length of the C-C single bond is 1.54 A->(with a dot on top!).


However, the current trend in SI units, emphasized in many graduate
level courses in the US, is to preferrably use the unit 'nanometres'.
Thus, the above length would be expressed as 0.154 nm instead, since
1nm = 10 A).


Why is this so?


(To some, this question may seem incredibly obvious, but it puzzled me.)


-----------------------------------------------------------------------


2. Talking about SI units, reminds me of an article by George F. Will,
who IMO is one of the most despicable conservative columnists around!
This was written in about Sept 92 and it was in response to a proposal
by the government to introduce highway signs for speed
limits in miles/hr as well as kilometers/hr.


the scheme would have cost quite a bit of money and Will, as any
true-bloooded conservative would, argued that the nation would do fine
without the metric system. and he then proceeded to give one example of
the horrors that the metric system would perpetrate on the american way
of life...


can u guess the popular american activity, that Will was talking about,
which would have to undergo drastic revision if the metric system was
used for it?


(for bonus points, you can give me the top ten reasons (a la letterman!)
why america should/shouldn't adopt the metric system!)


------------------------------------------------------------------------


3. Jonathan Swift's *Gulliver's Travels* was a brilliant satire of its
times. in the history of astronomy, it is given credit with having
predicted the presence of two moons for the planet Mars, long before
they were discovered.


This has been touted by Erich von Daniken among others, as proof
that Swift was a superhuman prophet. lest we get carried
away, the same book also offers an example of how Swift could go wrong
as well - there are some jokes in the third part of *G's Travels* made at the
expense of a famous astronomer of the time, ridiculing his pet ideas.
however, this astronomer (a very famous one), went on to be proved
right.


who was he?




P.S: Good luck to everybody for end semester exams and projects!!
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


ninja




Folks..
1. The light has gone out of Diwali..
SMG about Kapil's retirement.
govind & TMax got this one.


2. Honduras and El salvador fought the Scccer war in 1969. most
everybody got this one.


3.Tne Female equivalent of the toga was Palla..
Govind got this one.
Ram




Fear not B'lore guys. Mulki is alive as far as I kno..


1. During his struggling days, this actor (like everybody else) had to
knock on a lot of doors. One producer said this to him: "Son, Tony Curtis
played the role of a Bellhop in his first movie. all u had to do was
to take one look at him and think, here comes a star"..To which our
struggling actor retorted "But I thought u were s'posed to think , here
comes the bellhop!!"..Needless to say he was kicked out..
Who was this guy..


2. In the late 50's, worried about the invasion of TV, hollywood
introduced a lot of dumb gimmicks into movies. One of these was introduced
in a schlock-horror flick, The Tingler. What was this gimmick called
and what exactly did it accomplish..


3. The first music video aired on MTV (I think it was in 1980)was by a
rather unknown group and the number was very aptly titled. Song and Group.

								
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