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Parent Handout - Imaginative Play

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					                                   Imaginative Play
 Children often have few opportunities to explore their imagination. Television and computer games provide entertainment
 but do not challenge your child to ‘think outside the square’. Imaginative play is important for developing creativity and
 problem solving skills. It also allows your child to explore their emotions, and the effect they have on others, in a safe
 environment.
 Activities that encourage imaginative play:
  •      Dolls / Doll’s House                                   •     Using recycled boxes/fabric/paper to create
  •      Cooking with Playdough                                 •     Playing in the sandpit
  •      Building a cubby house                                 •     Cutting a large box into a car/boat/aeroplane
  •      Dress-ups                                              •     Acting out favourite books
 Sometimes children need help to ‘kick off’ their imaginative play sequence. Try these leading statements:
    •    I wonder what …..                                          •    Why do you think ….
    •    Do you think we should …..                                 •    I’d like to know …

 Remember:
 F    Limit T.V., computer and video game time                   F       Provide open-ended play activities
 F       Try not to interrupt your child’s imaginative play      F       Make time for imaginative play each day

                       Follow your child’s lead and remember that nothing is impossible in your imagination!

          mrtt.com.au




                                  Imaginative Play
Children often have few opportunities to explore their imagination. Television and computer games provide entertainment
but do not challenge your child to ‘think outside the square’. Imaginative play is important for developing creativity and
problem solving skills. It also allows your child to explore their emotions, and the effect they have on others, in a safe
environment.
Activities that encourage imaginative play:
 •      Dolls / Doll’s House                                   •     Using recycled boxes/fabric/paper to create
 •      Cooking with Playdough                                 •     Playing in the sandpit
 •      Building a cubby house                                 •     Cutting a large box into a car/boat/aeroplane
 •      Dress-ups                                              •     Acting out favourite books
Sometimes children need help to ‘kick off’ their imaginative play sequence. Try these leading statements:
•       I wonder what …..                                       •       Why do you think ….
•       Do you think we should …..                              •       I’d like to know …

Remember:
F    Limit T.V., computer and video game time                  F        Provide open-ended play activities
F       Try not to interrupt your child’s imaginative play     F        Make time for imaginative play each day

                      Follow your child’s lead and remember that nothing is impossible in your imagination!

         mrtt.com.au

				
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Description: Parent Handout - Imaginative Play