Docstoc

The SEE

Document Sample
The SEE Powered By Docstoc
					The S.E.E.  
    Spiritual Enlightenment Exchange                                                                              September, 2007 (02:07)    

In This Issue                              Dear colleague 
          Research update                 You are receiving this email because you recently participated in 
                                          important post‐graduate level research exploring your spiritual and 
  Spiritual practice suggestions  
                                          life experiences. Thank you for your participation.  
       It makes you think ...  

Book review: Integral Spirituality  
                                          The appetite for all things spiritual is increasing ... the conscious 
    Please help: Refer a friend           consumer awakens.  

                                          Just five years ago who would have thought that big business would actively 
                                          promote how they ‘carbon off‐set’ (e.g., EuropCar and VirginBlue) and that one of 
                                          the fastest growing industries in Australia would be organic supermarkets!  

 My S.E.E. Blog 

The 'lazy mind' is what I am              Or, that The Sunday Life (23rd September) magazine for this week would have 
presented with in my practice at          dedicated a lead article to spiritual 'grazing' in Australia (the magazine is from The 
present.                                  Age ‐ one of Victoria's major newspapers).  More on spiritual ‘grazing’ later in this 
A mind that does not want to              edition of The S.E.E.  
observe itself or its ceaseless 
motion.  I observe the thought,            On another note, I am excited to provide you with a complimentary self‐paced 
                                          workbook, entitled How to enhance your Spiritual Life.  Email me for more details. 
 "I do not need to practice!" 
 And I return to the breath ...  
The workbook has been designed to be utilised regardless of your spiritual ‘path’. It presents a series of three 
activities for developing your understanding of your spiritual values and purpose, as well as your spiritual growth 
support network. The activities are based on the findings of my ongoing research into people’s spiritual practices.    

Please utilise your free workbook.  If you think it valuable, then you are encouraged to tell others of my research and 
encourage them to participate.  Rather than just forward on the workbook, please ask your colleagues to complete 
my study's online survey (found at www.developfullcircle.com). Every person that completes my online survey will 
increase the validity of my research data and will receive their own copy of this workbook.  

Thank you for assisting in my research and referring your colleagues.  


Richard  
Research update: Shamanism, 'states' of spiritual experience and deeper levels of Self knowing 
Of more than 200 responses to my study's online survey, one person's depth of spiritual experience stands out. I do 
not know the person's name, age or gender; however, they ‘scored' 97 out of a possible 100 for my research's 
measure of Depth of Spiritual Experience. This person's score was more than 20‐points higher than the next person.  

I do know their spiritual practice: Shamanism. Only having a rudimentary understanding of this ‘indigenous' spiritual 
practice, I visited my reference texts and learnt that shamans act as an intermediary between the natural and 
spiritual worlds. As part of their spiritual practice, shamans travel between these two worlds in a state of trance.   

This is interesting, as it highlights the need to explore additional ‘states' of consciousness in order to deepen one's 
spiritual experience. Ken Wilbur, a spiritual philosopher and arguably the ‘founder' of integral approaches to 
understanding one's own spiritual practice, suggests that there are at least five natural states of spiritual 
consciousness, including:  

    1. gross ‐ waking states, such as those experienced while undertaking ‘body‐work' or focused spiritual practice 
    2. subtle ‐ dream states, such as those experienced during a vivid dream, visualisation meditation or (possibly) 
       during a shaman trance  
    3. causal ‐ formless states, such as dreamless sleep, or formless meditation and experiences of vast 
       openness/emptiness  
    4. turiya ‐ ‘witnessing' states, which is the capacity to ‘watch' all of the other states and to experience 
       unification.  
    5. ever‐present Non‐dual awareness ‐ not really a state but rather, an ever present grounding in all states. 
       Enlightenment is possible from this state perhaps?  

Of course, regardless of a person's spiritual practice the attainment of ever‐present Non‐dual awareness is possible. 
Also, obviously the practice of shamanism is not the only ‘path' towards deeper spiritual experiences. For example, 
mystical experiences are examples of peak spiritual ‘experiences'‐ that may also be experiences as turiya ‐ and are 
documented by nearly all spiritual and religious faiths.  Indeed, my data is suggesting that there is no statistically 
significant difference in the 'power' of any of the spiritual practices provided by those who have participated in my 
study. I guess, whatever works for you is best.  

Why is this interesting in terms of a person's spiritual practice? Well, it suggests that entering the range of ‘non‐
altered' and ‘altered' states of consciousness are critical to fully appreciate your spirituality.  Practices that provide 
for the experience of altered states of spiritual consciousness might include:  

    •    dancing, singing and the playing of music  
    •    various forms of meditation and prayer   
    •     breath‐work, or  
    •    the many other activities described by those who have completed my study's online survey. 

Another way of considering the various ‘states' of spirituality is to identify your own range of spiritual experiences. I 
explored this with a friend just last week. During our discussions he identified the following states' of spiritual 
experience relating to him:  

    •    gross ‐ sitting with the evolving beauty of God's love presented to him through the plants in his front garden 
    •    subtle ‐ ‘seeing' a host of angels sitting with him during a recent period of personal challenge  
    •    causal ‐ his evening ‘quiet‐time' meditation  
    •    turiya ‐ sitting and being ‘one' with God one morning and allowing God's love for all people to flow through 
         him  

What are the many ways you experience your spirituality? How does each of these states guide your understanding 
of your true Self and your relationship with the Higher Being of your understanding? Can you understand your true 
Self without also considering your relationship ‐ your 'connection' ‐ to all other sentient beings? And. how do 
you create your bridge from the natural to the spiritual world?   

As the advertisement asks, "please consider ..."  
 Suggestions to enhance your spiritual practice 
 Although there is not a great deal of academic research on the topic, the little there is suggests that a person must 
explore more than one spiritual ‘path' in order to truly understand the depths of their spirituality.    

Most people will have heard the term, spiritual ‘seeker'. That is, a person that creates their own spiritual ‘space' by 
borrowing elements, beliefs and traditions from various religious and mystical traditions. Spiritual seekers place a 
greater emphasis on self‐growth, emotional self‐fulfilment, and the sacredness of ordinary objects and experiences.   

A spiritual grazer is a person that moves from one religio‐spiritual tradition to the next in an attempt to more fully 
appreciate the depth of their spirituality. Research would suggest that those people who have undertaken more than 
just one spiritual ‘path' and less than three has a (statistically) significantly deeper level of spiritual understanding.   

Conversely, those who have undertaken four or more spiritual ‘paths' do not ‐ that is, they have a shallower spiritual 
experience than those who have only ever explored one spiritual path.     

So ‘grazing' outside of your primary spiritual practice is just one way of gaining another perspective ‐ a deeper 
appreciation ‐ of your spirituality.  

Another suggestion for enhancing your spiritual practice is your complimentary self‐paced workbook, entitled How to 
         enhance your Spiritual Life. Once again, email me for more details – richard@developfullcircle.com   

 It makes you think ... 
"... spiritual awakening could have a powerful effect on stopping the downfall of 
society."                                                                    ‐ Scott, age 19: quoted in The Spiritual Revolution (page 67)  

      "Wisdom is like a mass of fire ‐‐ it cannot be entered from any side. Wisdom is like a 
                                           clear cool pool ‐‐ it can be entered from any side." 

                                                                                                                                                   ‐ Nagarjuna 

"We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created 
  them."                                                                                                                                     ‐ Albert Einstein  
 Book review 
 Wilber, K. (2006). Integral spirituality: A startling new role for religion in the Modern and Post‐
modern world. Integral Books: Massachusetts.  

Utilising the Integral Model ‐ All Levels, All Lines, All Levels ‐ Wilber provides a thought provoking account of the 
development of one's spirituality that assumes no particular position is completely 'right' or 'wrong' and looks for 
patterns of meaning across the world's wisdom traditions. I found the book useful in understanding the potential 
blind‐spots that can be manifested by pursuing just one spiritual path and without validating one's spiritual 
experiences with others fellow 'travellers'.  

For those who have read much of Wilbur's work this is by far the easiest read (and yet not that easy) as I think he has 
tried to appease those who may be more 'grazers' of his work. A dense read but well worth it.  
                                       Refer a colleague to this research  
One final plug for your help in recruiting new people to participate in my research.  

I aim to finish this current data collection phase by the end of 2007.  Doing so will allow me to move on to the next 
phase of my study: an exploration of the efficacy of specific spiritual practices and the creation of a spiritual growth 
‘learning program'.  

However, to truly validate my model of Spiritual Oneness (refer to your free workbook for more information) I need a 
lot more people to complete my study.  

I invite you to ask five of your friends to participate in my survey. For their participation they will also receive the free 
self‐paced workbook and a summary of the study's key findings.  

Follow the link below to send this edition of The S.E.E. to your colleagues with an invitation from you to participate.  

                                             Forward this message to a friend  
             Richard Harmer | PhD Candidate at Australian Catholic University | St Patrick's Campus | Australia  
         

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:13
posted:3/13/2010
language:English
pages:4
Description: The SEE