SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS INSTITUTE FOR LEARNING SAN DIEGO CITY by armedman2

VIEWS: 36 PAGES: 33

									SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS                              INSTITUTE FOR LEARNING
   SAN DIEGO CITY




   REPORT ON AVID STUDENT PERFORMANCE
           IN GATE COURSE WORK




                          November 2000




        Standards, Assessment, and Accountability Department
                    PROGRAM STUDIES OFFICE
                        Report Number 810
                               Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
                                                                                        Page i




                               TABLE OF CONTENTS




List of Tables       .     .      .       .       .        .        .        .        .         ii
List of Figures      .     .      .       .       .        .        .        .        .         ii

INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT            .       .       .        .        .        .        .         1


BACKGROUND           .     .      .       .       .        .        .        .        .         1

     AVID Program Background      .       .       .        .        .        .        .         1
     GATE Program Background      .       .       .        .        .        .        .         3
     Board Policy Revision        .       .       .        .        .        .        .         5
     Focus of Report       .      .       .       .        .        .        .        .         5
     Students Demographic Findings        .       .        .        .        .        .         6
     Student Achievement Findings         .       .        .        .        .        .         8
     Teacher Survey Findings      .       .       .        .        .        .        .        15
     Summary of Findings .        .       .       .        .        .        .        .        20


CONCLUSIONS          .     .      .       .       .        .        .        .        .        21


INSTRUCTIONAL IMPLICATIONS .              .       .        .        .        .        .        21


FACILITIES IMPLICATIONS.          .       .       .        .        .        .        .        22

BUDGET IMPLICATIONS        .      .       .       .        .        .        .        .        22


PUBLIC SUPPORT AND ENGAGEMENT IMPLICATIONS .                        .        .        .        22


BOARD POLICY IMPLICATIONS         .       .       .        .        .        .        .        22




SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS                          Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department
Institute For Learning                                                      Program Studies Office
Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
Page ii




                                            LIST OF TABLES


Table                                                                                      Page

  1      GATE Identification of GATE Cluster Course Enrollees    .          .        .        6

  2      Teacher Respondents’ Report of GATE Core Courses That
         Included AVID Students    .      .     .      .       .            .        .      15

  3      Teacher Respondents’ Report of Individuals Responsible for
         Oversight of AVID Student Progress .      .     .        .         .        .      15

  4      Teacher Respondents’ Report of AVID Student Characteristics        .        .      16

  5      Teacher Respondents’ Report of Behavioral Changes in AVID Students          .      16

  6      Teacher Respondents’ Report of AVID Program Aspects     .          .        .      18

  7      Teacher Respondents’ Report of AVID Student outcomes
         Relevant to GATE Strategies .    .      .       .    .             .        .      19




                                            LIST OF FIGURES


Figure                                                                                    Page

  1      Ethnic Composition of AVID Students in the Program and in GATE
         Cluster Course Work by GATE Identification       .      .     .             .        7

  2      Grade Level Composition of AVID Program Participants and
         GATE Cluster Course Work Enrollment     .       .      .           .        .        8

  3      Average GATE Cluster Course Grades by AVID and GATE
         Identification: End-of-Year 1999-2000  .      .     .              .        .        9

  4      Average GATE English Cluster Course Grades by AVID and
         GATE Identification: End-of-Year 1999-2000     .      .            .        .      10

  5      Average GATE Mathematics Cluster Course Grades by AVID and
         GATE Identification: End-of-Year 1999-2000    .     .      .                .      10



Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department                    SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS
Program Studies Office                                                     Institute For Learning
                                  Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
                                                                                         Page iii




Figure                                                                                        Page

  6      Average GATE History/Social Science Cluster Course Grades by
         AVID and GATE Identification: End-of-Year 1999-2000          .                  .       11

  7      Average GATE Science Cluster Course Grades by AVID and
         GATE Identification: End-of-Year 1999-2000     .      .                .        .       11

  8      Average AP Course Grades by AVID Participation                .        .        .       12

  9      Average Spring 2000 SAT 9 Percentile Ranks for Students in GATE
         Cluster Course Work by AVID and GATE Identification .          .                .       13

 10      Average Spring 2000 SAT 9 Percentile Ranks for Students in AP
         Course Work by AVID Participation        .        .      .             .        .       13

 11      Average GATE Cluster Course Grades by Years in AVID           .        .        .       14

 12      Average Percentile Ranks on Spring 2000 SAT 9 for AVID Students
         in GATE Cluster Course by Years in AVID           .     .      .                .       14

 13      Teacher Respondents’ Report About Which Obstacles Limit AVID
         Student Success in GATE Cluster Course Work   .      .      .                   .       17




SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS                             Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department
Institute For Learning                                                         Program Studies Office
Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
Page iv




Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department               SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS
Program Studies Office                                                Institute For Learning
                                 Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
                                                                                         Page 1



                               SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS
                                  Institute for Learning


                     REPORT ON AVID STUDENT PERFORMANCE
                        IN GATE CLUSTER COURSE WORK

                                    November 28, 2000

Introductory Statement

In March 1999, the Board of Education approved a policy that permitted principals
discretion in the placement of additional Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID)
program students in Gifted and Talented Education (GATE) cluster classes after spaces had
been filled by students who qualified for placement as defined by the GATE Cluster policy
adopted on June 23, 1998. In August 1999, the Board directed the Institute for Learning to
report on AVID student participation in GATE cluster course work. This report focuses
primarily on the level of academic success of AVID students who participated in these
courses during the 1999-2000 school year. However, it also provides a broader context for
assessing their level of achievement through a review of AVID student performance on
additional measures of achievement, a brief summary of the AVID program model and
GATE program strategies, the demographic characteristics of students in both programs,
and a summary of survey feedback from teachers whose GATE course(s) included one or
more AVID students.

Background

AVID Program Background

The AVID program was first implemented at Clairemont High School in 1980 by local
educator Mary Catherine Swanson in an effort to assist “underachieving” and “under-
served” students — those who were felt to typically end up in remedial classes. Since its
inception, AVID’s primary goal has been to provide secondary-level students with the
skills, support, and expectations necessary to succeed in college-preparatory classes and to
enter four-year colleges.

AVID proponents contend that the program’s success can be measured, in part, by its
growth. What began in 1980 with one school and 30 students is now a broad-based program
serving over 40,000 students in 700 schools in California alone (Mary Catherine Swanson,
Union Tribune, October 6, 2000). AVID is implemented in over 850 schools in thirteen
states (including California), and by Department of Defense schools in thirteen countries
throughout Europe and Asia.

Evaluation of AVID programs has produced considerable evidence that demonstrates the
program’s effectiveness. According to Swanson, 95 percent of AVID graduates have entered
college (77 percent of those in four-year universities). Currently, 87 percent of AVID


SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS                           Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department
Institute For Learning                                                       Program Studies Office
Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
Page 2



graduates from San Diego County enrolling at San Diego State University pass the writing
portion of the college placement exam, in contrast to an overall passing rate of roughly 50
percent. Research conducted by the University of California in 1994 found that, among
AVID graduates who enrolled in college, nearly 90 percent of those students were still in
college two years later (Ken Bushweller, American School Board Journal, March 1998).
Swanson recently also stated that 85 percent of AVID students entering four-year colleges
are on track to complete their degree in four to five years. (Union Tribune, October 6,
2000).

AVID research has also revealed that, while the national average for African Americans
entering four-year colleges is 33 percent, 55 percent of African Americans who have
participated in AVID for at least three years go on to four-year colleges. Roughly 43 percent
of Hispanics participating in AVID enter four-year colleges — a rate more than double the
national average of 20 percent (David Ruenzel, Education Week, February 1997).

Summary of Program Design. AVID program participants are routinely enrolled in college
preparatory course work. The program expects that students will not only succeed in
rigorous curricula but also enter mainstream activities of the school — activities that can
help to promote responsible citizenship and leadership.

In addition to academic course work for college-bound students in general, AVID students
take an elective class (the “AVID class”) that meets five hours per week. In this class,
students receive academic and social support and specific strategies for succeeding at
school. AVID strongly emphasizes writing and note-taking skills that are considered to be
fundamental to college success.

Just as students within the AVID program are encouraged to collaborate and support each
other, AVID staff team members are expected to do the same. The AVID team at each school
generally consists of teachers (who often serve as site team coordinators), counselors,
principals, and tutors who are recruited from colleges and universities (and are often AVID
graduates). All AVID team members are expected to receive intensive and ongoing staff
development.

The program regularly monitors implementation and student progress. In addition, each
school is assessed annually for AVID certification.

Participation Criteria. AVID does not target remedial students, students who are failing, or
students without motivation to succeed. Rather, AVID typically serves students who are
capable of succeeding but would benefit from additional support in completing a rigorous
college-preparatory academic program. Admittance to the program generally depends on
ability, determination, and membership in an under-served group (e.g., low income, or first
generation in their families to attend college). AVID program candidates usually have met



Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department                   SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS
Program Studies Office                                                    Institute For Learning
                                  Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
                                                                                          Page 3



minimum standards on a norm-referenced assessment and have earned a “C” average in core
course work.

Program participation is voluntary. Students are generally referred by their counselors,
teachers, or parents, after which each potential participant is interviewed for the program.
The interview assesses the student’s eagerness to be academically successful, her/his
commitment to the AVID program, and the level of parental support. Additionally, students
must sign a contract agreeing to participate in the program for a full year, to actively
participate in class assignments and activities, and to take the PSAT and SAT exams. The
parents must also contract to support and encourage the students’ academic activities and
attend all AVID parent meetings.


GATE Program Background

AVID participants who are enrolled in GATE -identified course work benefit from a number
of instructional strategies and concepts that are frequently implemented in GATE courses
(and are often used by teachers in non-GATE classrooms as well).

“Differentiation” is viewed as a cornerstone of instruction for students identified for
participation in gifted and talented education programs. In Meeting the Challenge: A
Guidebook for Teaching Gifted Students, differentiation is described as a composite that
involves the adjustment of curriculum and instruction using four curricular dimensions
(depth, complexity, novelty, and acceleration), and three “management” strategies (tiered
assignments, curriculum compacting, and thematic interdisciplinary instruction) (California
Association for the Gifted, 1996).

•   Depth refers to the concept of challenging learners by enabling them to venture further,
    deeper, and more elaborately in an area of interest. For example, if a group of students
    demonstrates extraordinary knowledge, skill, or interest in architecture after studying
    Egyptian culture, a teacher might provide additional instruction and materials to identify
    the theory for the construction of a pyramid, a set of blocks with which to create a
    number of alternative buildings, and further instruction in solid geometry to prove a
    theory the students researched. As this example demonstrates, the teacher modifies the
    core curriculum by strengthening the study of the topic and by developing or utilizing
    outside resources.

•   Complexity involves broadening the learner’s understanding of the areas under study by
    asking her/him to make connections, relationships, and associations between, within,
    and across subjects and disciplines. For example, a group of students may decide, after
    studying the structure of DNA, to pursue the topic of genetic engineering. Students
    might interview geneticists at a university or medical center, review the original research
    of Mendel, or work with a local agronomist to develop a new strain of tomatoes. As
    with other forms of differentiation, the teacher takes cues from the students in deciding


SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS                             Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department
Institute For Learning                                                         Program Studies Office
Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
Page 4



    how to increase complexity, always relating differential activities back to the core
    curriculum.

•   Novelty refers to the concept of gaining a personal understanding of the area under study
    or constructing meaning in an individualized manner. In the context of differentiation,
    novelty      means      that     the    teacher     can     stimulate     learners     by
    (1) encouraging them to seek original interpretations, reinterpretations, or restatements
    of existing information; (2) suggesting that they look for new implications among or
    within disciplines; and (3) helping students approach areas of study in personalized,
    individualistic, and nontraditional ways.

•   Acceleration or Pacing is perhaps the most straightforward means of differentiation to
    meet the needs of learners who demonstrate high levels of knowledge and understanding.
    A teacher could arrange for such students to move more rapidly through a particular
    subject area. Such acceleration can be either self-paced or in a group setting with the
    students participating in a class or course for a higher grade or age.

•   Tiered Assignments are varied levels of activities to ensure that students explore ideas at
    a level that builds on their prior knowledge and prompts continued growth. These types
    of activities encourage broader reading than might otherwise be required. Tiered
    assignments can also provide meaningful work with peers of similar interest and
    readiness.

•   Curriculum Compacting is a procedure used to streamline the regular curriculum for
    students who are capable of mastering it at a faster pace. The compacting process has
    three basic phases: (1) determining the goals and objectives of the regular curriculum,
    (2) assessing students for previous mastery of these objectives, and (3) substituting
    with more appropriate (challenging) options. With compacting, pre-testing identifies
    learning objectives already mastered, and students are allowed to “test out” of certain
    academic exercises and move on to new material.

•   Thematic Interdisciplinary Instruction places an emphasis on making connections
    between and across disciplines to promote more complex understanding, while
    simultaneously hastening the speed by which the subject matter can be comprehended
    and assimilated. Thematic interdisciplinary instruction is exemplified by the study of
    the theme “change” wherein students determine how various cultures (social studies),
    economic systems (mathematics), and literary styles (language arts) have changed either
    within a specific time period or over many time periods.

According to the guidebook, it is sometimes easier to define what differentiation is not than
what it is. It is not intended to be a reward or punishment, but rather the right of all
students to have an appropriate curriculum that is responsive to their needs, interests, and
abilities.



Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department                     SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS
Program Studies Office                                                      Institute For Learning
                                  Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
                                                                                          Page 5



Board Policy Revision
In March 1999, the Board of Education adopted a recommendation that modified the GATE
Cluster policy adopted on June 23, 1998. The cluster policy specified district procedure for
the identification of additional students eligible for cluster placement. The revised section
reads as follows:
 B.2. The remaining (cluster) spaces are to be filled from the following qualified students,
      incorporating the ethnic makeup of the school and residency as considerations when
      selecting from these students for placement. Any one of these qualifications makes a
      student eligible for placement in the cluster class:
       a. students who were not district-identified but who scored in the 90th through 97th
          percentile on a district-approved ability test administered by a district psychologist,
          OR
       b. students who give evidence of academic performance capability as demonstrated by
          a portfolio score of “ 4 ” or above on a 5-point district rubric and teacher
          recommendation, OR
       c. students who give evidence of academic performance capability as demonstrated by
          a score in the 90th percentile or above on the district’s norm-referenced
          achievement test from any year in one or more total areas (total reading, total math,
          language, science) and teacher recommendation.
 B.3. After all cluster-identified students and all students who meet one of the three criteria
      in B.2. have been placed, the principal may use his/her discretion in the placement of
      additional AVID students in the places remaining in the class.


Focus of Report

Scope of Report. The Board of Education requested information about the performance of
AVID students in GATE cluster course work during the 1999-2000 school year. In an effort
to determine the level of academic success among these students, the report’s methodology
asked the following general questions:

 • To what extent were AVID students successful in GATE cluster course work?

 • How did the performance of AVID students who were enrolled in GATE cluster courses
   compare with other students who were enrolled in these courses?

 • How well did AVID students perform in AP course work and on the district’s norm-
   referenced assessment?

 • How did GATE teachers summarize the experiences of AVID students who participated
   in their GATE cluster courses?




SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS                             Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department
Institute For Learning                                                         Program Studies Office
Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
Page 6



Prior to data collection, and as requested by the Board of Education, the scope of the report
was reviewed by several secondary-level principals for their comments and suggestions. A
draft of this report was also reviewed by a number of district and county staff from the
AVID and GATE programs before it was finalized.

Student Comparison Groups. It is important to note that many AVID students who are
enrolled in GATE cluster courses have GATE identification and are therefore automatically
eligible for enrollment in these classes. The board policy adopted in 1998 addressed the
enrollment of AVID students without GATE identification in such courses.

Student performance in GATE cluster course work was disaggregated by the four groups of
students enrolled in such classes: (1) AVID students with GATE identification, (2) AVID
students with no GATE identification, (3) non-AVID students with GATE identification,
and (4) non-AVID students with no GATE identification.

Assessment Results. The report provides average end-of-year (1999-2000) GATE cluster
and AP course grades in all core subject areas, and average percentile ranks in all total test
areas of the Spring 2000 SAT 9 . A separate analysis reviews student performance by
number of years of AVID program participation.

Teacher Opinion. As requested by the Board, all secondary-level teachers who taught a
GATE course in which at least one AVID student was enrolled (n=200 ) received a survey
that asked their opinions about AVID student participation in GATE course work.


Student Demographic Findings

GATE Cluster Composition. Among the 2,719 students participating in the AVID program
during the 1999-2000 school year, 690 AVID students were enrolled in one or more GATE
cluster courses (25.4 percent). The enrollment data showed that 44.5 percent of these
students have GATE identification (see Table 1). A breakdown among non-AVID students
in these courses indicated that two in three have GATE identification. Appendix A
provides AVID enrollment in these courses by school.

                                         Table 1
                 GATE IDENTIFICATION OF GATE CLUSTER COURSE ENROLLEES

                                               No GATE ID           GATE ID
                        Student Group
                                            Percent   Number   Percent   Number
                        AVID                  55.5     383       44.5     307
                        Not AVID              33.3    2,540      66.7   5,096




Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department                         SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS
Program Studies Office                                                          Institute For Learning
                                          Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
                                                                                                  Page 7



Ethnic Composition. Figure 1 compares the ethnic composition of AVID program
participants with AVID enrollment in GATE cluster course work. Each category is further
disaggregated by GATE or non-GATE identification.

The data indicated that African American and Hispanic AVID students were somewhat
underrepresented among those who participated in GATE cluster course work. Other
groups were slightly overrepresented. (The percentages of students who fell into ethnic
groups other than the six categories provided were too small to include.)

   African American   AVID Program                         21.3
                      GATE Cluster
                                                      18.3

    Asian             AVID Program
                                         2.5
                      GATE Cluster
                                         3.5

                                                                                           GATE ID
    Filipino          AVID Program         5.5
                                                                                           No GATE ID
                      GATE Cluster             8.8


   Hispanic           AVID Program                                       42.7
                      GATE Cluster                                34.3


  Indochinese         AVID Program             10.3
                      GATE Cluster               12.8


   White              AVID Program                    16.0
                      GATE Cluster                        19.6

                                     0               20           40            60            80           100
                                                                     Percentage



  Figure 1. Ethnic Composition of AVID Students in the Program and in GATE Cluster Course Work
            by GATE Identification



Gender Composition. An analysis of participation by gender revealed that 57 percent of
AVID students in GATE cluster courses were female and 43 percent male. These
proportions are roughly equivalent to those for AVID students districtwide.

Language Fluency. Roughly one in three AVID students who participated in GATE cluster
courses during 1999-2000 was a former English Learner (redesignated to English fluent
status).




SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS                                            Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department
Institute For Learning                                                                        Program Studies Office
Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
Page 8



Enrollment Criteria. AVID staff indicated that schools generally relied on a combination of
factors to enroll AVID students without GATE identification in GATE cluster courses when
space permitted. These factors included student ability (as demonstrated by assessment
results), motivation, teacher recommendation, and parent request.

Grade Composition. Figure 2 compares the grade-level disaggregation of AVID program
participants with AVID student enrollment in GATE cluster course work. As in the
previous example, each category is further disaggregated by the students’ GATE or non-
GATE identification. The data showed that the largest proportions of AVID student
participation in both the program and in GATE cluster courses were in Grades 7-9.


               Grade 7    AVID Program                    16.4
                          GATE Cluster                      22.2


               Grade 8    AVID Program                      21.2
                          GATE Cluster                           27.7


               Grade 9    AVID Program                    19.8
                          GATE Cluster                                  37.4
                                                                                     GATE ID
                                                                                     No GATE ID
               Grade 10   AVID Program               14.3
                          GATE Cluster         8.0


               Grade 11   AVID Program               14.3
                          GATE Cluster         3.9


               Grade 12   AVID Program               13.1
                          GATE Cluster       0.97

                                         0           20            40          60     80     100
                                                            Percentage of Students


            Figure 2. Grade Level Composition of AVID Program Participants and GATE
                      Cluster Course Work Enrollment


Student Achievement Findings

In reviewing the achievement data for AVID students — and particularly in interpreting the
comparison data — the reader is reminded of the placement criteria for GATE cluster
courses. Specifically, in comparing the performance of students without GATE
identification, it is important to remember that non-AVID students were required to meet
formidable achievement levels for selection (i.e., 90-97th percentile on an “ability”
assessment, a portfolio score of “4” or above, or the 90th percentile or above on a total test
area of the SAT 9 ). The inclusion of non-GATE AVID students depended on no similar
criterion and consequently may undermine the valid comparability of these two groups of
students. Nonetheless, their performance in the context of the larger student group in
which they find themselves in these cluster courses is important to consider.



Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department                                                SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS
Program Studies Office                                                                                 Institute For Learning
                                                  Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
                                                                                                          Page 9



Course Grades. To place achievement of AVID students who participated in GATE cluster
course work in a broader context, their performance was compared with that of non-AVID
students in the same GATE courses. It is important to note that, like the AVID student
group, the non-AVID student group typically includes (1) students who have formal
identification for GATE participation and (2) students who have not been identified for
GATE participation but who are considered to be “high achieving.” The data represent
students across all secondary-level grades.

It is important to compare the performance of AVID students without GATE identification
with those of a similar group — non-AVID enrollees without GATE identification who were
also enrolled in GATE cluster courses. The data in Figure 3 show that, among these
students, AVID students slightly outperformed non-AVID students in history/social science
and science. Conversely, non-AVID students outperformed AVID students in English and
mathematics.

It is particularly interesting to note that AVID students without GATE identification
outperformed AVID students with GATE identification. The only exception was in science
where their overall performance was equivalent.

When compared with their non-AVID counterparts, the average grades earned by AVID
students were somewhat lower in English and mathematics. However, AVID students
performed at parity in science and within roughly half a grade point in other subject areas.


                          n = 251                             2.3
                               n = 295                              2.6
           English                   n = 4268                                 3.0
                                          n = 2090                          2.9


                          n = 35                                    2.6
      Mathematics                  n = 41                             2.7             AVID ID/GATE ID
                                        n = 697                                 3.0
                                         n = 303                          2.8         AVID ID/No GATE ID

                          n = 153                                   2.6               No AVID ID/GATE ID
     History/Social             n = 180                                     2.9
        Science                       n = 2929                              2.9       No AVID ID/No GATE ID
                                            n = 1218                      2.8


                          n = 18                                            2.9
                                   n = 41                                   2.9
           Science                       n = 401                            2.9
                                            n = 111                  2.7


                      0                1                 2                  3          4
                      F                D                 C                  B         A
                                                   Average Grade


    Figure 3. Average GATE Cluster Course Grades by AVID and GATE Identification:
              End-of-Year 1999-2000




SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS                                              Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department
Institute For Learning                                                                          Program Studies Office
Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
Page 10



Figures 4-7 provide a closer analysis of the specific grades earned by the various
comparison groups. The data indicated that roughly 85 percent of AVID students received a
“C” or better in GATE cluster course work, varying somewhat by subject. AVID students
without GATE identification earned the highest percentage of “As” and “Bs” in GATE
science courses, followed by history/social science, English, and mathematics. Only a small
proportion of these students failed to successfully complete these core subject courses.
GATE English proved most difficult where 7.1 percent failed (but still represents a lower
proportion than their AVID counterparts with GATE identification). In other subject areas,
their failure rate was also lower than non-AVID students without GATE identification.


               100                                                                                                     AVID ID/GATE ID (n=251)
                                                                                                                       AVID ID/No GATE ID (n=295)
                 90
                                                                                                                       No AVID ID/GATE ID (n=4268)
                 80
                                                                                                                       No AVID ID/No GATE ID (n=2090)
                 70
                 60
  Percentage




                 50                        41.3
                 40                               32.7
                                                                                36.8
                                                                   31.2 31.8
                                                                                        28.7
                 30                25.8                     25.9                               25.1
                            20.3                                                                                20.0
                                                                                                         17.6
                 20                                                                                                       13.9
                                                                                                                                 10.8                    11.2
                                                                                                                                                                7.1
                 10                                                                                                                        6.2   7.0
                                                                                                                                                                      3.1       3.5

                     0
                                           A                               B                             C                             D                              F
                                                                                       Course Grades


 Figure 4. Average GATE English Cluster Course Grades by AVID and GATE Identification:
           End-of-Year 1999-2000



               100                                                                                                     AVID ID/GATE ID (n=35)
                                                                                                                       AVID ID/No GATE ID (n=41)
               90
                                                                                                                       No AVID ID/GATE ID (n=697)
               80
                                                                                                                       No AVID ID/No GATE ID (n=303)
               70
  Percentage




               60

               50
                                       42.8              42.9
                                                                39.0
               40
                                               32.7                            32.0    31.4   31.7
                                                                       29.4
               30
                                19.5                                                                         19.5
                                                                                                     17.4
               20        14.3                                                                                                                    12.2
                                                                                                                          8.6    9.8
               10                                                                                                                          7.0
                                                                                                                                                          3.3             3.4    3.6
                                                                                                                                                                0.0
                0
                                       A                               B                             C                                 D                              F

                                                                                          Course Grades



   Figure 5. Average GATE Mathematics Cluster Course Grades by AVID and GATE Identification:
             End-of-Year 1999-2000




Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department                                                                                               SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS
Program Studies Office                                                                                                                                Institute For Learning
                                                           Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
                                                                                                                  Page 11




               100                                                                                       AVID ID/GATE ID (n=153)
                                                                                                         AVID ID/No GATE ID (n=180)
               90
                                                                                                         No AVID ID/GATE ID (n=2929)
               80
                                                                                                         No AVID ID/No GATE ID (n=1218)
               70
  Percentage




               60
               50
               40                  38.3                 37.2
                                                 36.6
                            33.9          34.2                        33.6
                                                               31.6

               30    24.2
                                                                             19.0   19.4   18.7   19.4
               20                                                                                           15.7


               10                                                                                                  7.8   7.5   7.4                         5.5
                                                                                                                                     4.6             3.9
                                                                                                                                           1.7

                0
                                   A                           B                           C                             D                       F
                                                                             Course Grades


  Figure 6. Average GATE History/Social Science Cluster Course Grades by AVID and GATE
            Identification: End-of-Year 1999-2000




               100                                                                                       AVID ID/GATE ID (n=18)
                                                                                                         AVID ID/No GATE ID (n=41)
               90
                                                                                                         No AVID ID/GATE ID (n=401)
               80
                                                                                                         No AVID ID/No GATE ID (n=111)
               70
  Percentage




               60
               50
                                                               41.4
                     38.9
               40           34.1                                      33.3   33.3
                                   29.9                 29.3                                      29.7
               30                         25.2
                                                 22.2
                                                                                    26.8
                                                                                           23.4

               20
                                                                                                                   9.8
               10                                                                                                              7.2
                                                                                                            5.6
                                                                                                                         4.0                               4.5
                                                                                                                                                     1.2
                                                                                                                                     0.0   0.0
                0
                                   A                           B                           C                             D                       F
                                                                             Course Grades


  Figure 7. Average GATE Social Science Cluster Course Grades by AVID and GATE Identification:
            End-of-Year 1999-2000




SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS                                                                 Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department
Institute For Learning                                                                                             Program Studies Office
Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
Page 12



Advanced Placement (AP) Course Grades. The Board also requested information about
AVID student performance in AP course work; district records revealed that such
enrollment was limited to Grades 11 and 12. The 83 AVID students who were enrolled in
one or more AP courses do not strongly overlap with those enrolled in GATE cluster course
work; only 11 among this group were also enrolled in GATE cluster courses. Consequently,
AVID participants in AP course work represent a largely separate group of students (and
only three percent of all AVID program participants).

The data in Figure 8 provide the average grades earned by AVID and non-AVID students in
AP course work. The findings indicated that, overall, non-AVID students moderately
outperformed their AVID classmates in all four core subject areas; the greatest gap occurred
in mathematics. The differences between the two groups were slightly greater than those for
GATE cluster course work. (The reader will notice that AVID participation numbers become
very small when the data are analyzed by subject.)

In AP English and science, all AVID students and their non-AVID classmates earned grades
of “C” or better. While seven AVID students received a “D” in one of the two other AP
subjects, none received a failing grade. Small percentages of non-AVID students in AP
courses earned grades of “D” or “F”, ranging from 2.5 percent in English to 8.4 percent in
mathematics. (The number of AVID students was too small to disaggregate by “A” through
“F” grades.)

                                             n = 26                                2.9
                       English
                                             n = 1012                                        3.3


                                             n = 14                        2.4
                  Mathematics
                                             n = 405                                    3.1
                                                                                                   AVID Students in
                                                                                                   AP Courses
                History/Social         n = 51                                     2.8
                   Science             n = 2067                                         3.1
                                                                                                   Non-AVID
                                                                                                   Students in AP
                                                                                 2.7
                      Science
                                       n = 13                                                      Courses
                                       n = 670                                         3.0


                                 0.0   0.5       1.0    1.5    2.0        2.5     3.0        3.5   4.0
                                 F                D             C                 B                A
                                                          Average Grade


               Figure 8. Average AP Course Grades by AVID Participation




Other than maintaining the grades that students received in AP course work, the district
database is unable to provide information about whether a student took the AP exam or
passed it. Testing Office staff report that individual (hard copy) results are sent directly to
the school and the student. However, the district does not receive an electronic file of AP
results that would permit analyses with other student information.



Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department                                                       SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS
Program Studies Office                                                                                        Institute For Learning
                                               Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
                                                                                                      Page 13



Stanford Achievement Test, 9th Edition (SAT 9). To give AVID student performance
additional context, SAT 9 results are also provided, using GATE cluster and AP course work
enrollment in each subject as separate reference in the two figures below. The data showed
that AVID students overall performed above the 50th percentile in all test areas of the
SAT 9 .

As in the earlier analysis of GATE cluster course grades, Figure 9 provides a comparison of
SAT 9 performance among the four student groups in GATE cluster courses. The data show
that, among students without GATE identification, non- AVID students well outperformed
AVID participants in all three SAT 9 test areas. Among students with GATE identification,
non-AVID students again outperformed their AVID classmates. Independent of GATE
identification, the greatest disparity in performance occurred in mathematics.

                                 n = 239                          66
                                n = 289                     55                           AVID ID/
         Total Reading                                                  78               GATE ID
                                  n = 4143
                               n = 2025                           67

                                                                                         AVID ID/
                                                                       75
                                 n = 231                                                 No GATE ID
                               n = 288                            66
             Language                                                        84
                               n = 4073
                              n = 1990                                 75                No AVID ID/
                                                                                         GATE ID
                                   n = 34                                   81
                              n = 40                       54
          Mathematics                                                            85
                                                                                         No AVID ID/
                                  n = 275

                              n = 149                             66                     No GATE ID

                         0              20         40        60       80               100
                                              Average Percentile Rank

          Figure 9. Average Spring 2000 SAT 9 Percentile Ranks for Students in GATE
                    Cluster Course Work by AVID and GATE Identification


Figure 10 provides SAT 9 results based on AP course enrollment and shows that non-AVID
students outperformed AVID students in all three test areas. The greatest disparity in
performance between these two groups occurred in reading.

                                            n = 1167                        80
          Total Reading                n = 31                58
                                                                                             Non-AVID
                                                                                             Students in
                                                                             84
              Language
                                               n = 1190                                      AP Courses
                                              n = 31              65
                                                                                             AVID Students
                                                                                             in AP Courses
                                          n = 1180                                88
           Mathematics
                                              n = 29                    77


                          0              20        40       60        80               100
                                              Average Percentile Rank


          Figure 10. Average Spring 2000 SAT 9 Percentile Ranks for Students in
                     AP Course Work by AVID Participation



SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS                                             Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department
Institute For Learning                                                                         Program Studies Office
Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
Page 14



Impact of Length of Participation in the AVID Program. AVID student performance in
GATE cluster classes and on the SAT 9 was additionally analyzed by the length of time that
students had participated in the AVID program. The data in Figure 11 indicate no clear
correlation between the length of time in the program and performance in GATE cluster
course work. (It is important to note that there were too few AVID students with three or
more years of AVID participation who were enrolled in GATE mathematics or science
courses to generate data for those years. There were also too few AVID students enrolled in
AP course work to permit a similar analysis by years of program participation.)

                                               4.0

                                               3.5
                       Average Course Grades




                                               3.0

                                               2.5
                                               2.0

                                               1.5           English
                                                             Mathematics ("One Year" only)
                                               1.0
                                                             History/Social Science
                                               0.5
                                                             Science ("One"/"TwoYears" only)
                                               0.0
                                                     One   Two       Three       Four   Five

                                                                 Years in AVID


                   Figure 11. Average GATE Cluster Course Grades by Years in AVID

Figure 12 provides an analysis of SAT 9 results by years of program participation for
students who were enrolled in GATE cluster course work in 1999-2000. The data indicated
that the overall performance of AVID students generally declines as years of AVID program
participation increase; an exception is noted for students with four years of participation.
(It is important to note that the number of fourth-year AVID students, about 13 in each test
area, dropped substantially from previous years when data for 64 students were available.
In addition, there were too few AVID students with two or more years of AVID participation
who were enrolled in GATE mathematics to generate data for those years.)

                                               100
                                                90
                                                80
                    Average Percentile Rank




                                                70
                                                60
                                                50
                                                40
                                                             Total Reading
                                                30
                                                             Language
                                                20
                                                             Mathematics ("One Year" only)
                                                10
                                                 0
                                                     One   Two       Three       Four

                                                                 Years in AVID

                   Figure 12. Average Percentile Ranks on Spring 2000 SAT 9 for
                              AVID Students In GATE Cluster Courses by Years in AVID



Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department                                             SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS
Program Studies Office                                                                              Institute For Learning
                                      Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
                                                                                             Page 15




Teacher Survey Findings

Teacher/School Profile. Of the 200 teacher surveys distributed in April 2000, 97 were
returned for a response rate of 48.5 percent. Respondents were comprised of 55 middle-
level teachers, 40 at the high school level, and two from atypical schools. The teachers
reported that they typically have an average of six AVID students in all their GATE classes
combined, but the range in any given semester generally varies from 1 to 34.

Teacher respondents reported that English was the GATE core course which most
frequently included AVID students. Table 2 shows that GATE English course enrollment
was followed by history/social science, mathematics, and science.

                                     Table 2
                        TEACHER RESPONDENTS’ REPORT OF
                 GATE CORE COURSES THAT INCLUDED AVID STUDENTS 1
                         GATE Course                        Number          Percent
                         English                               69            71.1
                         History/Social Science                48            49.5
                         Mathematics                           15            15.5
                         Science                               13            13.4
                 1
                     Respondents may have indicated more than one course.



Approximately 93 percent of the teacher respondents identified one or more individuals
who were assigned to oversee the progress of AVID students at their sites. They reported
that classroom teachers are most frequently charged with this oversight (see Table 3).

                                     Table 3
                        TEACHER RESPONDENTS’ REPORT OF
        INDIVIDUALS RESPONSIBLE FOR OVERSIGHT OF AVID STUDENT PROGRESS
                         Person/Position                    Number          Percent
                         Classroom teacher(s)                 75            77.3
                         School/peer counselor(s)             19            19.6
                         Adult tutor                          18            18.6
                         School administrator(s)              17            17.5
                         AVID Teacher/Coordinator             12            12.4
                         Study skills teacher                  9             9.3
                         Parent(s)                             6             6.2
                         Peer tutor                            3             3.1
                         College tutors                        3             3.1




SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS                                   Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department
Institute For Learning                                                               Program Studies Office
Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
Page 16



Student Characteristics. GATE teachers were asked what positive characteristics, in general,
they observed in the AVID students enrolled in their GATE classes. As shown in Table 4,
the largest proportion of respondents reported that their AVID students were curious and
interested in learning and had high aspirations for their future education and careers. (The
lack of higher rates of response to the various qualities may simply indicate that, apart from
the students’ formal assessment results in the course work, teachers were unable to
adequately assess these characteristics during classroom interactions.)
                                     Table 4
           TEACHER RESPONDENTS’ REPORT OF AVID STUDENT CHARACTERISTICS

                       Student Characteristic                           Number          Percent
                       Curious and interested in learning                 62              63.9
                       High aspirations for education/career              60              61.9
                       Embrace rigorous curriculum                        54              55.7
                       High level of initiative, self-starters            50              51.5
                       Highly collaborative learners                      47              48.5
                       Positive role model for other students             46              47.4
                       High level of self-esteem                          36              37.1
                       Other1                                             21              21.6
                1
                    Responses from the “other” category with multiple occurrences included being
                    well organized (n=4) and having good note-taking skills (n=3).



Teachers were also asked about positive changes they observed in AVID students while
enrolled in their GATE courses. As suggested above, many respondents confirmed that they
had too little time to make such judgments, or that they did not know the students prior to
enrolling in their GATE classes to make such a comparison. But roughly one in two teachers
reported that they observed heightened expectations for achievement, improved grades and
skills, higher aspirations, and improved motivation (see Table 5). A somewhat smaller
proportion also noticed improved self-esteem, more interaction with their classmates, and
better attendance and class participation.

                                     Table 5
      TEACHER RESPONDENTS’ REPORT OF BEHAVORIAL CHANGES IN AVID STUDENTS

          Quality                                                                Number           Percent
          Heightened expectations for academic success                             55              56.7
          Improved grades and overall academic skills                              50              51.5
          Higher aspirations for education / career goals                          49              50.5
          Increased sense of initiative and desire to learn                        49              50.5
          Increased self-esteem                                                    45              46.4
          Increased interaction with academically gifted peers                     44              45.4
          Improved attendance and participation of students in classes             31              32.0




Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department                                   SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS
Program Studies Office                                                                    Institute For Learning
                                                 Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
                                                                                                        Page 17



Obstacles to Student Success. The survey also queried teachers about perceived challenges
to the success of AVID students in their GATE cluster course work, and about what
strategies might be effective in addressing these challenges. Where these obstacles were
observed, the respondents cited a lack of student motivation and commitment as the most
frequent cause for limiting success (see Figure 13). To overcome this, teachers suggested the
need for (1) increasing parental support, (2) increasing the efficacy of school/AVID support
services, (3) exposure to career and college possibilities, and (4) better screening to prevent
unmotivated students from enrolling in the program.

A smaller proportion of respondents (one in three) also identified the lack of parental
support and a lack of access to resources (e.g., computers and other resources) as obstacles
to student success. To address these obstacles, teachers suggested (1) continued efforts to
improve communication with parents (e.g., providing them a list of parent obligations with
respect to AVID participation), (2) new strategies to increase access to school resources
such as computers (e.g., longer library/lab hours, ability to check out equipment for home
use), and (3) increased donations for their school.

                   Insufficient transportation       2.1

                  Extracurricular employment                11.4

                     Negative peer pressure                        19.6

                    Lack of parental support                                   30.9

                 Lack of access to resources                                    32.9

       Insufficient motivation or commitment                                                53.6

                                                 0     10      20         30      40   50    60    70   80   90   100
                                                             Percent of Teachers Who Reported Obstacles
                                                           Routinely or Sometimes Inhibited Student Success


      Figure 13. Teacher Respondents’ Report About Which Obstacles Limit AVID Student Success
                 in GATE Cluster Course Work



Site Programs and Staff. The survey also asked teachers to assess the level of classroom
and schoolwide support that AVID student participation in GATE cluster course work has
received. As the responses in Table 6 show, a decided majority of respondents (roughly
four in five) believe that their GATE classrooms routinely provide AVID students a
supportive environment and view AVID student participation in these courses as a valuable
strategy to promote academic success. A smaller majority reported that their principals and
other school faculty also consider this inclusion a valuable tool. (It is important to note that
one in three respondents was unsure about their principals’ views on this strategy and
therefore could not respond to this specific indicator.)

Slightly more than one in three respondents reported routinely communicating with their
site’s AVID coordinator about the progress of AVID students in their GATE classes.
Conversely, another one-third indicated that such communication occurred seldom or not at



SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS                                                         Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department
Institute For Learning                                                                                     Program Studies Office
Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
Page 18



all. Their communication with teachers from other classes was less predictable, and more
than half noted that such consultation occurred rarely or not at all.

                                        Table 6
                 TEACHER RESPONDENTS’ REPORT OF AVID PROGRAM ASPECTS

                                                                     Somewhat/
                                                      Definitely/                   Not At All/
Program/Staff Indicator                                             Unpredictabl                   Not Sure
                                                      Routinely                      Seldom
                                                                         y
My GATE classroom provides a supportive                  85.6           11.3            0.0            2.1
environment for participating AVID students.
I view AVID participation in GATE coursework as a        80.4           16.5            2.1            1.0
valuable strategy to promote academic success.
Most faculty views AVID student participation in
GATE coursework as a valuable strategy to promote        59.8           25.8            0.0          13.4
academic success.
The principal views AVID student participation in
GATE coursework as a valuable strategy to promote        55.7            9.3            2.1          33.0
academic success.
The AVID counselor and/or coordinator and I
consult about the progress of AVID students in my        36.1           26.8           34.0            2.1
GATE class(es).
Teachers from other classes and I consult about the      17.5           26.8           54.6            1.0
progress of AVID students in my GATE class(es).




Student Outcomes and GATE Strategies. Teachers were additionally asked to what extent a
number of GATE strategies (described more fully in the Background section) had impacted
their AVID students. Roughly half the teachers believed that one or more GATE strategies
had positively reinforced academic performance, effort, or interest. The data in Table 7
suggest that the development of higher-level thinking skills, practice with problem solving,
and the depth and breadth of curriculum were most influential across all three outcome
categories. Their responses indicated that, perhaps not surprisingly, some strategies were
more strongly correlated with specific outcomes. For example, the teachers believe that the
Socratic method and the novelty of the GATE curriculum increased interest, while the
depth, breadth, and complexity of the curriculum appeared to be more successful in
promoting effort.

In general, the survey results seem to indicate that, from the teachers’ perspectives, GATE
strategies have had a slightly more profound effect on academic effort and interest than on
academic performance — the inextricable relationship among these three components
notwithstanding.




Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department                                 SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS
Program Studies Office                                                                  Institute For Learning
                                       Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
                                                                                              Page 19


                                          Table 7
                  TEACHER RESPONDENTS’ REPORT OF AVID STUDENT OUTCOMES
                               RELEVANT TO GATE STRATEGIES

                                                  Improved            Improved             Improved
GATE Strategies                                   Academic          Academic Effort     Enthusiasm and
                                                 Performance                            Academic Interest

Development of higher-level thinking skills         56.7                 50.5                 60.8
Problem solving                                     54.6                 57.7                 59.8
Depth and breadth of curriculum                     47.4                 67.0                 56.7
Concept development                                 45.4                 44.3                 47.4
Tiered assignments                                  44.3                 49.5                 35.1
Thematic interdisciplinary approach                 44.3                 49.5                 58.8
Complexity of curriculum                            38.1                 68.0                 47.4
Novelty of curriculum                               38.1                 48.5                 72.2
Socratic method                                     35.1                 38.1                 61.9
Acceleration/pacing of curriculum                   33.0                 50.5                 41.2
Compacting                                          33.0                 40.2                 38.1


Overall Assessment of AVID/GATE Participation. Nine in ten teacher respondents reported
that, given their experiences with AVID students in their GATE class(es), they believe that
exposing these students to more challenging GATE curricula is a worthwhile strategy. Those
who expressed reservations about such inclusion noted that they either had too few AVID
students in their courses on which to base a judgment, or that the few students they had
lacked the motivation and commitment needed to succeed in the challenging atmosphere of
GATE classrooms.




SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS                                  Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department
Institute For Learning                                                              Program Studies Office
Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
Page 20



Summary of Findings

1. During the 1999-2000 school year, 2,719 students in Grades 7 to 12 participated in the
   AVID program, of whom 690 were enrolled in one or more GATE cluster courses and 83
   in one or more AP courses. African American and Hispanic students were somewhat
   underrepresented in GATE cluster courses, while other groups were slightly
   overrepresented.

2. Roughly 85 percent of AVID students without GATE identification earned a “C” or
   higher in GATE cluster courses, varying somewhat by subject. Only a very small
   proportion of these students failed to successfully complete one of these courses (7.1
   percent in English and less than two percent in other subjects).

   Among students in GATE cluster course work without GATE identification, AVID
   students slightly outperformed non-AVID students in history/social science and science.
   Conversely non-AVID students slightly outperformed AVID students in English and
   mathematics.

   AVID students without GATE identification outperformed AVID students with GATE
   identification. The only exception was in science where their overall performance was
   equivalent.

   The average end-of-year grades earned by AVID students who were enrolled in GATE
   cluster courses were somewhat lower than those of their non-AVID counterparts in
   English and mathematics. However, AVID students performed at parity in science and
   within roughly half a grade point in other subject areas.

3. In AP English and science, all AVID students earned grades of “C” or better. Seven AVID
   students received a “D” in one of the two other AP subjects, but none received a failing
   grade in any of their AP courses.

   Non-AVID students moderately outperformed their AVID classmates in AP courses in all
   four subject areas; the greatest gap occurred in mathematics. The differences between
   these two groups were slightly greater than those for GATE cluster course work.

4. The average performance of AVID students, independent of GATE identification, was
   above the 50th percentile on all test areas of the SAT 9 . Among students without GATE
   identification, non-AVID students well outperformed AVID participants in all three
   SAT 9 test areas. Among students with GATE identification, non-AVID students again
   outperformed their AVID classmates. Independent of GATE identification, the greatest
   disparity in performance occurred in mathematics.




Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department                  SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS
Program Studies Office                                                   Institute For Learning
                                 Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
                                                                                        Page 21



  Among those in AP course enrollment, non-AVID students well outperformed AVID
  students in all three test areas of the SAT 9 . The greatest disparity in performance
  between these two groups occurred in reading.

5. The data generated no correlation between the length of time that students had
   participated in the AVID program and their GATE cluster course grades. (The number of
   AVID students participating in AP course work was too small to permit a similar analysis
   by years of program participation.)

  The SAT 9 performance of AVID students who were enrolled in GATE cluster course
  work generally declined as their years of AVID program participation increased.

6. A decided majority of teacher respondents (roughly four in five) reported that AVID
   student participation in these courses is a valuable strategy to promote academic
   success. They also reported that their GATE classrooms routinely provide AVID
   students a supportive environment.


Conclusions

The report’s findings suggest that the criteria being used to place AVID students without
GATE identification in GATE cluster or AP courses reliably predict ability to master more
challenging work. The data may also imply that enrollment in more challenging course work
is enhancing overall performance. In addition, the findings demonstrate that GATE teachers
— many of whom are not part of their schools’ AVID team — generally support the
strategy to include these AVID students in higher-level course work.

The findings support the program’s promotion of AVID student enrollment in challenging,
higher-level course work when a student’s academic record and commitment support such
enrollment. District staff may want to review the AVID program model to determine how
its strategies might support those identified in the Blueprint for Student Success.


Instructional Program Implications

The report’s findings indicate that AVID students have successfully completed GATE
cluster course work and have also performed comparably well in other forms of assessment.
While it is unclear if the experiences of these students can be duplicated among the much
larger majority of AVID students who did not so participate, any expansion of the strategy
may have implications for GATE cluster and AP course enrollment.




SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS                           Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department
Institute For Learning                                                       Program Studies Office
Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
Page 22



Facilities Implications

The report’s findings have no implications for facilities.


Budget Implications

The report’s findings have no budget implications beyond what is identified in the Instructional
Program Implications.


Public Support and Engagement Implications

The report’s findings indicate that participation in GATE cluster course work may be one of
many valuable strategies to increase the achievement of AVID students and contribute to a
reduction in the persistent achievement gap between various ethnic groups. Any innovative
strategies that provide promise for such outcomes will continue to be followed closely and
likely supported by the larger school communities.


Board Policy Implications

The report’s conclusions suggest no change in board policy.




Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department                   SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS
Program Studies Office                                                    Institute For Learning
                            Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
                                                                                  Page A-1




                                  APPENDIX A


             AVID STUDENT ENROLLMENT IN GATE CLUSTER COURSE WORK
                                 BY SCHOOL




SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS                      Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department
Institute For Learning                                                  Program Studies Office
Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
Page A-2




Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department               SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS
Program Studies Office                                                Institute For Learning
                                  Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
                                                                                        Page A-3




    AVID STUDENT ENROLLMENT IN GATE CLUSTER COURSE WORK DURING 1999-2000
                                    BY SCHOOL


                                        AVID Students
                                                          AVID Students With       AVID Students
   School                 Grade        in GATE Cluster
                                                              GATE ID             Without GATE ID
                                         Course Work
   ALBA
   Bell                    7                   7                    6                      1
                           8                   1                    1                      0
                           9                   9                    6                      3
                          Total               17                   13                      4
   Challenger              7                  20                    1                     19
                           8                  23                    1                     22
                          Total               43                    2                     41
   Charter School of SD
   Clairemont HS           9                   8                     6                     2
                          Total                8                     6                     2
   Clark                   7                   2                     2                     0
                          Total                2                     2                     0
   Correia
   Crawford                 9                  2                    0                      2
                           10                 11                    5                      6
                           11                  9                    2                      7
                          Total               22                    7                     15
   DePortola                7                  7                    6                      1
                            8                  6                    2                      4
                          Total               13                    8                      5
   Farb                     7                 19                    9                     10
                            8                 15                   13                      2
                          Total               34                   22                     12
   Garfield
   Gompers                  7                 1                     0                      1
                            8                 5                     0                      5
                            9                 3                     1                      2
                           10                 2                     1                      1
                           11                 4                     1                      3
                          Total              15                     3                     12
   Henry HS                 9                 8                     5                      3
                          Total               8                     5                      3
   Hoover HS                9                 3                     1                      2
                          Total               3                     1                      2
   Kearny HS                9               142                    58                     84
                           12                 1                     1                      0
                          Total             143                    59                     84
   Keiller
   Kroc                    7                  26                   12                     14
                           8                  49                   15                     34
                          Total               75                   27                     48


SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS                             Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department
Institute For Learning                                                         Program Studies Office
Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
Page A-4



                                               AVID Students
                                                                AVID Students With     AVID Students
    School                      Grade         in GATE Cluster
                                                                    GATE ID           Without GATE ID
                                                Course Work
    La Jolla HS
    Lewis                        7                   10                  9                     1
                                Total                10                  9                     1
    Lincoln HS                   9                   12                  5                     7
                                Total                12                  5                     7
    Longfellow
    Madison                       9                  14                  6                     8
                                 10                  18                  6                    12
                                Total                32                 12                    20
    Mann                          7                   7                  5                     2
                                  8                   7                  3                     4
                                Total                14                  8                     6
    Marshall Middle
    Marston                       7                   1                  1                     0
                                  8                   7                  7                     0
                                Total                 8                  8                     0
    Memorial                      9                  16                  7                     9
                                Total                16                  7                     9
    Mira Mesa HS                  9                   5                  1                     4
                                 10                   5                  0                     5
                                 11                   2                  0                     2
                                Total                12                  1                    11
    Mission Bay HS                9                   4                  0                     4
                                 10                   2                  1                     1
                                 11                   2                  0                     2
                                Total                 8                  1                     7
    Montgomery                    7                  15                  5                    10
                                  8                   4                  2                     2
                                Total                19                  7                    12
    Morse HS                      9                   4                  3                     1
                                 10                   1                  0                     1
                                Total                 5                  3                     2
    Muirlands                     7                  11                  6                     5
                                  8                  11                  2                     9
                                Total                22                  8                    14
    Pacific Beach Middle          8                  19                  3                    16
                                Total                19                  3                    16
    Pershing                      7                   4                  4                     0
                                  8                   4                  2                     2
                                Total                 8                  6                     2
    Point Loma                    7                   4                  4                     0
                                  8                   4                  2                     2
                                Total                 8                  6                     2




Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department                            SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS
Program Studies Office                                                             Institute For Learning
                                 Report on AVID Student Performance in GATE Cluster Course Work
                                                                                       Page A-5




                                       AVID Students
                                                          AVID Students With       AVID Students
   School                Grade        in GATE Cluster
                                                              GATE ID             Without GATE ID
                                        Course Work
   Roosevelt               7                 8                     6                      2
                           8                 7                     3                      4
                           9                 4                     2                      2
                         Total              19                    11                      8
   SCPA                    8                 1                     1                      0
                           9                 3                     2                      1
                         Total               4                     3                      1
   San Diego HS            9                 7                     5                      2
                         Total               7                     5                      2
   Scripps HS              9                 2                     1                      1
                          10                13                     5                      8
                         Total              15                     6                      9
   Serra HS                9                 7                     3                      4
                          11                 2                     2                      0
                          12                 1                     1                      0
                         Total              10                     6                      4
   Standley                7                 2                     2                      0
                           8                 5                     5                      0
                         Total               7                     7                      0
   Taft                    7                 8                     7                      1
                           8                 3                     2                      1
                         Total              11                     9                      2
   Twain                   9                 1                     0                      1
                         Total               1                     0                      1
   University City HS      9                 2                     2                      0
                         Total               2                     2                      0
   Wangenheim
   Wilson                 7                  5                      2                     3
                          8                 22                      6                    16
                         Total              27                      8                    19
   Y.O.U.
   DISTRICT TOTAL                          690                   307                    383




SAN DIEGO CITY SCHOOLS                            Standards, Assessment, & Accountability Department
Institute For Learning                                                        Program Studies Office

								
To top