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					                             Finding The Way – Teacher’s notes
Activity 1               Locational review

   ∑ Introductory activity
     Review locational phrases that students have previously learnt. Under, next to, on top of,
     behind, in front of etc.

   ∑ If students have not yet learnt these phrases, follow the suggestions below:

             o in front of            RR
             o behind                 RRR
             o next to                RRR    RR         aR
             o on top of              RR
             o under                  RR                Y
             o inside                 RR

       Demonstrate each position with ‘actions’. That is, move your hands to demonstrate their
       position in relation to your body, forming a bit of a dance. (depending on how game you
       are!) Say the word at the same time you demonstrate it so the students form a visual link
       with the word.

   ∑ Have all students stand behind their chairs. Play a variation of the game ‘Simon Says’.
     The teacher drills students so they are very familiar with the terms. Say one of the terms,
     and have the students demonstrate that position with their hands. A command of ‘ ’
       should see the students with their hands above their heads, a command of ‘ ’ should
       see them put their hands behind their backs and so on.

       The last student should stand out the front and assist in identifying the last student in the
       next round and so on. The game continues until there is only one student left, who is
       declared the winner.

       For the next round that person can be ‘Simon’, or the teacher can call another round.

   ∑ Copy flash cards in Appendix 1 onto cardboard to drill or review these terms.




Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004                                                       1
Activity 2              Where is it?

       ∑ Introductory activity
         Do you know what the particle R means? It is often translated as ‘of’. We use this particle
         when describing where something is located.

       ∑ Introduce this expression and explain how it would be used.

                            thing R place R position RRRRR


       e.g.             RRRR             R   RRR          R        R   RRRR
                        RR               R   RRR          R   Y    R   RRRR
                        RRRR             R   RRRRR R               R   RRRR


       ∑ *A Find a picture with lots of things in it. (e.g. Kimono 2 workbook, p. 36) Have students
         write 5 sentences to describe where various things are located.

       ∑ In pairs, students walk around the room and ask each other questions about items around
         the room using the following question:

                             thing R     RR   R    RRRRR

          Students should alternate between asking questions and answering.

          e.g.
          Student 1                  R   RR    R      RRRRR
          Student 2     (              R) RR      R       R    RRRR

          Student 2     RRR      R     RR     R   RRRRR
          Student 1     (RRR      R) RRR          R   RRR      R   RRRR


          Student 1     RRR      R     RR     R   RRRRR
          Student 2     (RRR      R) RRRR             R       R    RRRR

    ∑ A variation of this activity is to set a time limit and see how many questions and answers
      each pair can complete in the allocated time period. Pairs could race against other pairs.


A
 suitable for assessment task (W)
Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004                                                      2
Activity 3               Getting from one place to another

       ∑ Introductory activity
         Japanese addresses are very different from Australian ones. We have streets with
         numbers that go sequentially. In Japan it is very different. Addresses are just a series
         of numbers and only main roads have names. So, the address 1-5-6 Yoshifuji means
         that in the suburb of Yoshifuji, this house is in District 1, Block 5, and House 6.

                                                     Yoshifuji

        District 1              Block 1                District 2




       Block 7                  Block 2




       Block 6                  Block 3




       Block 5                  Block 4

       1     2       3
       6     5       4

       District 3                                     District 4




                              1-5-6 Yoshifuji




Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004                                                    3
      ∑ The numbers used for houses and districts sometimes follow no apparent pattern.
        This is part of the reason that there is such a proliferation of police boxes (RRRR) in
        Japan. They are small booth like buildings every few blocks to foster close links
        between the law and the community. Each RRRR has a wall sized map of the
        immediate vicinity with each and every house marked on it. Very handy if you are a bit
        lost!
        So, it is important to give good directions in Japanese. Many of the streets are only a
        car width wide, despite being two way streets, and one street quickly starts to look like
        another.

      ∑ Drill the following expressions and requests:
        Go straight ahead               RRRR RRR                   RRRR          RRYRR

          Go left                          RRRRRR                     RRRRRYRR

          Go right                         RRRRRR                     RRRRRYRR


      ∑ Students could use the RRR CD Rom to practise directions.


      ∑ Students can fill in their own map using the proforma in Appendix 2, or a map such as
        the map in the Japan Foundation Activity Resources 3 booklet.

      ∑ *A Have students pretend they are a lost traveller looking for somewhere, and asking a
        friendly policeman for directions. Have them write a dialogue and perform it.

      ∑ Have students work in pairs where they both have a map. One student indicates a
        starting point (place RRRR) then gives the other student a number of directions.
        See if they both finish up in the same spot.

      ∑ *A Each student has the same map in front of them and makes up a series of
        directions as in the previous exercise. They must specify their beginning point, (place
        RRRR) and have been given directions on the number of instructions they are to
        give. Give each student a response sheet (Appendix 3) and have them listen to each
        student’s instructions, and write down where they started and ended, as in the
        example.

                     Student’s name         Where they started      Where they finished
             Sally                        bank                     post office
             Liz                          station                  bookshop


A
 suitable for assessment task (S, L)
Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004                                                  4
Activity 4           Shinkansen

   ∑ Introductory activity
     Why is the bullet train called so in English, and what does its name mean in Japanese?

       Ask the students critical questions to elicit information such as:
        Why do you think most of the tracks are above ground?
       Why do you think it is called the “bullet train”?
       Why do you think it is called the “new trunk line” in Japanese?
       What is the meaning of RRR and RRR?
       Why doesn’t the train turn around?
       Look at the kanji for     ] and see if you can work out what it means.
       Why do you think the fastest train is called Nozomi? (wish/hope)

       The RRRRRR was built in 1964 to coincide with the Tokyo Olympics. It is a very high
       speed train that runs on its own tracks. Because most coastal areas of Japan were
       already built out by that time (and the mountain areas are too steep for such a train), most
       of the RRRRRR tracks are above ground.

       The inside of the train is like a plane. Each seat has a number, there are window and
       aisle seats (and the dreaded one in between), the seats recline, and there is a hostess
       serving food and drink. The front of the train has a nose like that of a jumbo, and it is this
       shape that gives it the name in English of the bullet train. (Appendix 4)

       In Japanese it is literally called the ‘New Trunk Line’     Z      RRRRRR              as it is
       like the trunk of a tree – the backbone of the system. The RRRRRR now has 7 lines
       operating, all radiating out from Tokyo. (Appendix 5) Each line has its own name, and
       each of the different speeds of trains on that line is also named.

       The longest, oldest and most patronised line is the Tokaido        ] line that runs from
       Tokyo 1186 km to Hakata on Kyushu. It covers the most densely populated 800km
       stretch of coastline from Tokyo to Hiroshima, yet the Nozomi, the fastest train, can cover
       that distance in under 4 hours!

       There are 280 RRRRRR each day between Tokyo and Osaka. The maximum speed
       of the train is 300km/h, and the average speed is 286 km/h. Each day 360,000
       passengers use the RRRRRR.

       Most RRRRRR have 16 carriages. Carriage number 1 always points away from Tokyo,
       so on trips from Tokyo it is at the front (YR   RRR) and on trips to Tokyo, it is at the
       back ( R RRR). The trains do not turn around. Being hundreds of metres long, that
       would indeed be a mean feat.


Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004                                                         5
      The middle car of the train is the ‘Green Car’. Passengers need to pay a special
      surcharge to sit in this area.

   ∑ Distribute a RRRRRR timetable, either downloaded from the web
     (http://www.jr-central.co.jp/info_e.nsf/doc/corp-infomenu_e/$FILE/westbound.pdf), copied
     from a text or a copy of one brought back from Japan. (Appendix 6)

   ∑ Elicit observations from students such as:
          o Each train has a number             a    ^               RRRRRRRR
          o Each train has a booking code       a      `             RRRRRRR
          o Each train has a name        a    `    RRRRRR          eg RRR       RRR      or RRR
          o There is no weekday / weekend timetable for the RRRRRR. It is the same one
             every day.
          o There are cautions on the timetable as some trains may only run on certain days.
                                                     ]    X          RRRRRRRRR
          o The arrival of the incoming train to operate the service is given. All trains terminate
             at Tokyo Station.                  ]Z                   RRRRRRRR
          o The platform number is given        ^    ^Z              RRRRRRRR

   ∑ Drill this expression

                  Q. place RR place RR        RR     RR       RRRRRR
                  A. (place RR place RR)              RR      RRRRR


   or for longer distances

                  Q. place RR place RR        RR     RRR       RRRRRR
                  A. (place RR place RR)       XRRR        RRRRR

   ∑ Have students find the following places on a map of Japan, then using the timetable ask
     each other how long it takes to get between places, where they can see that it can be
     easily answered with whole numbers. On some timetables the distance travelled is also
     noted, so students can appreciate the speed of the train. Have students find out why they
     would like to visit certain places e.g. RRRRRRRR

      Use these places in your questions:

                                         RRRRR

Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004                                                  6
                         Y               RRRRRR
                       ZY                RRRR
                       `   Y             RRR
                                         RRRR
                         [               RRRRRR
                       Y                 RRRR
                                         RRRR
                         [               RRR


       Note that the       RR    in RRRRRR meaning ‘new’ also means ‘new’ in the two
       names mentioned above – RRRRRR               Y      and RRRRRR            [      Both
       these places had no room at the existing station to build dedicated RRRRRR
       platforms so they built another station close by and called it the ‘new’ one.


Activity 5             Tokyo railway system

   ∑ Introductory activity
     Whilst the RRRRRR covers vast distances in quick time, the work horse of the
     Japanese transport system is the metropolitan railway systems. The Tokyo system is
     amongst the most comprehensive and efficient in the world, fourth in size behind New
     York, the London Underground and the Paris Metro. There are 240 km of subway lines in
     Tokyo. Japan Rail (JR) also operates many railway lines in Tokyo.

       The Greater Sydney Metropolitan Rail Network, bounded by Bomaderry (Nowra) to the
       south, Lithgow to the west, and Newcastle to the north, has 306 stations. Many of these
       are not manned all the time and some have only a handful of trains stop there every day.
       In contrast, the Greater Tokyo Metropolitan Railway Network covers a similar area, but
       has an astonishing 1,414 stations.

   ∑ Show students a map of the Tokyo railway system. You can download one from
     http://web.yl.is.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp/jp/map.gif (Appendix 7) or for the Greater Metro system go
     to http://web.yl.is.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp/jp/rail.gif

   ∑ Elicit observations on the comprehensiveness of coverage of the lines. There are very
     few places in Tokyo that are not within comfortable walking distance of a railway station.

   ∑ At some stations on the system including Shinjuku and Tokyo, men with white gloves at
     times push commuters onto the trains to maximise capacity. Every morning and every
     afternoon 2 million people pass through Shinjuku station. That’s nearly half the population
     of Sydney! Shinjuku Station has 13 lines passing through it, a combination of JR, subway
     and private lines.
Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004                                                   7
   ∑ Trains so very rarely run late that if you used that as an excuse for lateness, your boss
     wouldn’t believe you. When trains genuinely do run late the station master issues
     commuters with a ‘late note’, explaining why the train was late and apologising for the
     inconvenience.

   ∑ Even though trains are fuller on weekdays the actual number of trains that run is often
     greater on the weekends. They run more frequently to provide optimum convenience for
     people keeping weekend social appointments.

   ∑ The trains don’t run between 1:00am and 4:30am. This is to provide a window of
     opportunity for essential system maintenance. This curfew has led to the proliferation of
     ‘business hotels’ and ‘capsule hotels’ around railway stations. Company employees who
     have missed the last train home can find a cheap, clean place to put their head down for
     the night. Many people commute long distances, so catching a taxi home is often not
     feasible.

   ∑ There are very clear announcements both on trains and platforms. Not only do they
     announce the destination of the train but they also announce which lines you can change
     to at each station, to take care when disembarking, and a reminder not to forget your
     umbrella! All announcements are preceded by chimes, examples of which can be
     downloaded from http://www.geocities.com/TheTropics/Harbor/9128/midi/index.html


Activity 6          The Yamanote line

   ∑ Introductory Activity
     The Yamanote              line is the circle line that runs around Tokyo. It is a very big
     version of the City Circle line in Sydney. Can you name all the stations on the City Circle?
     (Central, Town Hall, Wynyard, Circular Quay, St James, Museum)

   ∑ On a Tokyo railway map, estimate, then count the number of stations on the Yamanote
     line.

   ∑ Each line is colour coded in Tokyo. The colour on the map matches the colour of the
     signs on the platform, and the colour of the trains themselves. The Yamanote line is
     green. (Appendix 8)

   ∑ Show the Yamanote railway timetable to students. (Appendix 9) Ask them to make
     observations about it.

   ∑ Ask students what they think all the numbers mean.
     The numbers in the left column of the page are the hours, and the numbers in the right
     column are the minutes of that hour that the train departs.




Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004                                                 8
   ∑ Why aren’t there any hours and minutes written down for 9am – 8pm? What do students
     think the following expressions mean? What kanji do they understand? What do the
     numbers refer to?

                              RRR                 _     R       RR    (Weekday timetable)
                              RRR             _        R        RR (Weekend timetable)

   ∑ Between 9am and 8pm on weekdays, there is a train every 3 to 5 minutes. That’s 12 to 20
     trains an hour!!

   ∑ On weekends, there are not so many trains in peak hour, but between 9am and 8pm,
     there are trains every 2 – 4 minutes! That is up to 30 trains every hour!! Amazing.

   ∑ Elicit other observations such as:
     In peak hour, between 7 and 9am, there are 23 trains an hour going each way on the
     Yamanote line, the loop line that runs around Tokyo.

   ∑ The timetable can be perfectly understood by an English speaker who doesn’t speak
     Japanese as the important bits – weekday and weekend – are written in English.

   ∑ This photo was taken at Ikebukuro Station, in the north of Tokyo. This train is heading in a
     clockwise direction, towards Ueno and Tokyo. It takes about an hour to go around the
     whole loop.

   ∑ The kanji symbols above some of the numbers are variations on the timetable, and are
     explained in the key at the side.

   ∑ In peak hour the Yamanote line runs at 130% capacity. (Appendix 10)

          Yamanote line map.

   ∑ There are 2 options for this exercise.

     1. Information gap. (there is another information gap exercise in Activity 8)
   ∑ Distribute Sheet A (Appendix 11) and Sheet B (Appendix 12) to alternate students. Have
     students ask their partner information to complete their sheet as follows.

                  Student 1 Q.       RR       R    RR      RR    R
                  Student 2 A.         RRR            RRRRR        RR

      For extension students:

                  Student 1 Q.       RR       R       RR    R   RRRR      R
                  Student 2 A.        RR      R       RRRRR       R    RRRR

Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004                                                9
       2. Information seeking

   ∑ Distribute a Tokyo rail map to students. Tourist maps of Tokyo (available from Japan
     National Tourist Organisation in Sydney) have a rail map on the back of them.
     Also distribute a blank rail map and ask students to complete it individually (Appendix 13).

   ∑ Check answers against your answer sheet (Appendix 14).


Activity 7           More on transport

   ∑ Introductory activity
     As you would only expect in Japan, everything about the RRRRRR, and transport in
     general for that matter exudes efficiency. You can even go online (in English too) and find
     out what the fastest way to get between any two places is, including which combinations
     of trains to catch. But there’s more. Not only does this website explore all possibilities for
     the RRRRRR, it has every timetable for every mode of transport programmed in so
     that it will even tell you unusual combinations of trips such as bus – train – boat.

       Book a computer lab for a lesson or two. Ask the school computer technician to cache
       this website. Caching makes it a lot faster for everyone when the time comes to do the
       exercise, but caching itself only lasts a few days before it needs to be done again.

                     www.hyperdia.com/cgi-english

   ∑ Take students to the lab and have them complete the worksheet (Appendix 15)

       You are a travel agent and a client is going on a trip to Japan. She wants to make a
       number of trips whilst in Japan but would like you to explore a number of possibilities for
       her. Fortunately the Japanese transport people have come to your rescue and have just
       the website for you to make your enquiries.

       For the cities listed below, investigate all the ways you can travel between them
       immediately after 9am. Complete the details of the cheapest way to travel, and the
       fastest way to travel, as in the example.

       Step 1        Go to the website and enter your starting point and destination. Search

       Step 2        Change the time to 9:00 and click on enter.    Search

       Step 3         Look at the summary of the first 5 trips that match your search. Find out
       which of those is the cheapest and which is the fastest. Scroll down the page for the
       details of these 2 trips and fill them in on the table, as shown in the example.




Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004                                                  10
Trip 1 Tokyo to Hakata

                                 Details of route                                  Time    Distance
                                                                                  (hr:min)   (km)

cheapest 9:03 Depart Tokyo Shinkansen Nozomi 109
           11:40 Arrive Shin Osaka                                       21820        5:33   1174.9
           11:51 Depart Shin Osaka Shinkansen Hikari Rail Star 359       290.00
           14:36 Arrive Hakata
fastest    10:29 Depart Tokyo JR Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line
           10:34 Arrive Hamamatsucho                                     32170
           10:39 Depart Hamamatsucho Tokyo Monorail
           11:02 Arrive Haneda Airport                                                3:37    934
           11:35 Depart Tokyo Airport ANA flight 251
           13:25 Arrive Fukuoka Airport                                  428.93
           14:00 Depart Fukuoka Airport on Airport Line bus
           14:06 Arrive Hakata

   ∑ Use the information your students find to drill expressions such as the following:
           place RR place RR RR R RRRRRR

             place R     RRRR        RRRRR          R

             place RR place RR         RRRR         RRRRRRR

             place RR place RR         RRRRR         RRRRRRR

             place RR place RR         RR           RRR

             place RR place RR         RRR      RRR

             place RRRRRR                 RRRRR           RRRRR                   R   RRRRR

   ∑ For extension students, have them practise expressions such as the following:

             place RR place RR         RRRRR            RRR   R

             place RR place RR         RRRRR              RRR     RRRRR

             place RR place RR         X^RRR         RRRR     R      YRRR

             place RR place RR         X^RRR         RRRR     R      Y    RRR

Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004                                                    11
Activity 8            Information Gap

(taken from Languages Unit Japanese Bulletin Term 4, 2002. This activity was adapted from
“Japanese for Everyone’ Gakken 1990)

     ∑ Divide students into pairs, and alternately distribute Sheet A (Appendix 16) and Sheet B
       (Appendix 17).

     ∑ Model the following conversations and have students take it in turns to ask about the
       information that is missing from their tables.

1.      RRR      R    destination R     RRRRR


                 A. RRR      RRRRR
                 B. RR
                 A. RRRR        RRR      R   RRRRR
                 B.    R     RR     RR
                 A.    R     RR     RRR        RRRRRRRR



2.      place   RR     place RR       RRR     RRR


                A. RRR      RRRRR
                B. RR
                A. RRRRR         RR     RRR        RR   RRR     RRR
                B.               RR     RR
                A.               RR     RRR        RRRRRRRR




Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004                                                  12
Activity 9             Buying a train ticket

         When you travel in Japan for long distances, you often need more than one ticket. First
         you pay the basic fare and receive a            RRRRRRR that enables you to travel
         all the way to your destination, but only on local trains that stop frequently. If you want to
         travel on an express that stops only at major stations, then you need to buy a special
         ticket for it, a ]     RRRRRRR . If you want to travel in a sleeping carriage as
         well, then you need to buy a sleeping car ticket also, a RRRRRR.
         Foreigners are entitled to buy a Japan Rail Pass before they arrive in Japan and this
         entitles them to unlimited travel on all Japan Rail lines (not subways and private railways)
         for the duration of the pass. This also includes unlimited travel on the RRRRRR, but
         not the fastest Nozomi train. 1 The Nozomi attracts a special surcharge.

     ∑ Useful vocabulary
       _]                     RRRR                         one way
                              RRRR                         return
                              RRRRRR                       timetable
         RRRR                 RRRRRRRR                     booking window
                              RRRRRR                       non smoking car


     ∑ Useful expressions
       place RR           RR RRRR
       Could I please have two return tickets to ~

                  ] R RRR                RR R RRR R                     RR      RRRR
         Could I have two tickets on the Hikari 102 on April 10 please.

         Place RR place RR RRR R RRRR RRRRRR
         How much is it for an adult one way ticket from place A to place B?2



     ∑ Have the students form pairs and create dialogues using the above expressions.
       Give each group a timetable of the RRRRRR and a scenario card (Appendix 18).
       Students could also refer to the website in Activity 7 for times of trains.

         Have students perform the dialogues in class.


1
    taken from Wakatta Course Book (Jaffray & Sorrell) 1999 p. 270
2
    taken from Wakatta Course Book (Jaffray & Sorrell) 1999 p. 269

Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004                                                     13
Appendix 1




Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004   14
Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004   15
Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004   16
Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004   17
Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004   18
   Appendix 2


                    Map of _____________________




Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004   19
    Appendix 3


       Student’s name                  Where they started   Where they finished




Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004                                  20
    Appendix 4




Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004   21
 Appendix 5




Photos courtesy of Central Japan Railway Company and East Japan Railway Company.

http://jin.jcic.or.jp/kidsweb/formerkids/japan/k/q6.html




Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004                                   22
         Appendix 6




http://www.jr-central.co.jp/info_e.nsf/doc/corp-infomenu_e/$FILE/westbound.pdf



Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004                                 23
      Appendix 7




http://web.yl.is.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp/jp/map.gif

Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004   24
 Appendix 8




http://www.japan-guide.com/e/e2370.html




Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004   25
   Appendix 9




Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004   26
    Appendix 10




http://www.japan-guide.com/e/e2020.html

Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004   27
             7. Ikebukuro




                                                                                        Acknowledgement to
                                                   6.




                                     JR Yamanote Line
                                           Sheet A                   5. Nishi Nippori



8.


                                                                     4.




9. Shinjuku
                                          16.                        3. Akihabara

                                     17. Suidobashi
                                                                     2.

                                   18.
                                                                     1. Tokyo
                                19. Ichigaya
                                                                     15. Yurakucho
                             20.
10.
                                                               14.

      11. Ebisu


                       12.                         13. Shinagawa
Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004                                     28
             7.                                    6. Komagome




                                                                                  wledgement to
                                      JR Yamanote Line
                                            Sheet B                 5.



8. Takadanobaba


                                                                    4. Ueno




9.
                                            16. Ochanomizu          3.

                                      17.
                                                                    2. Kanda

                                   18. Iidabashi
                                                                    1.
                                19.
                                                                    15.
                            20. Yotsuya
10. Shibuya
                                                                 14. Shinbashi

     11.




               12. Gotanda                            13.


Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004                                 29
             7.                                    6.




                                                                           wledgement to
                                    JR Yamanote Line

                                                                    5.



8.


                                                                    4.




9.
                                           16.                      3.

                                     17.
                                                                    2.

                                   18.
                                                                    1.
                                19. I
                                                                    15.
                            20.
10.
                                                              14.

      11.




               12.                                      13.


Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004                          30
                                                                                       knowledgement to
             7. Ikebukuro                          6. Komagome



                                    JR Yamanote Line


                                                                    5. Nishi Nippori



8. Takadanobaba


                                                                    4. Ueno




9. Shinjuku
                                          16. Ochanomizu            3. Akihabara

                                     17. Suidobashi
                                                                    2. Kanda

                                   18. Iidabashi
                                                                    1. Tokyo
                                19. Ichigaya
                                                                    15. Yurakucho
                            20. Yotsuya
10. Shibuya
                                                                 14. Shinbashi

    11. Ebisu




               12. Gotanda                           13. Shinagawa

Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004                                    31
  Appendix 15
                                        Travelling in Japan worksheet

          You are a travel agent and a client is going on a trip to Japan. She wants to make a
          number of trips whilst in Japan but would like you to explore a number of possibilities for
          her. Fortunately the Japanese transport people have come to your rescue and have just
          the website for you to make your enquiries. www.hyperdia.com/cgi-english

          For the cities listed below, investigate all the ways you can travel between them
          immediately after 9am. Complete the details of the cheapest way to travel, and the fastest
          way to travel, as in the example.

          Step 1        Go to the website and enter your starting point and destination. Search

          Step 2        Change the time to 9:00 and click on enter.    Search

          Step 3         Look at the summary of the first 5 trips that match your search. Find out
          which of those is the cheapest and which is the fastest. Scroll down the page for the
          details of these 2 trips and fill them in on the table, as shown in the example.


Trip 1 Tokyo to Hakata


                                    Details of route                                Time    Distance
                                                                                   (hr:min)   (km)

cheapest 9:03 Depart Tokyo Shinkansen Nozomi 109
              11:40 Arrive Shin Osaka                                      21820     5:33      1174.9
              11:51 Depart Shin Osaka Shinkansen Hikari Rail Star 359     290.00
              14:36 Arrive Hakata
fastest       10:29 Depart Tokyo JR Keihin-Tohoku Negishi Line
              10:34 Arrive Hamamatsucho                                    32170
              10:39 Depart Hamamatsucho Tokyo Monorail
              11:02 Arrive Haneda Airport                                            3:37       1100
              11:35 Depart Tokyo Airport ANA flight 251
              13:25 Arrive Fukuoka Airport                                428.93
              14:00 Depart Fukuoka Airport on Airport Line bus
              14:06 Arrive Hakata




Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004                                                       32
Trip 2       Kyoto to Himeji


                               Details of route      Time     Distance
                                                   (hr:min)     (km)



cheapest




fastest




Trip 3       Sapporo to Nagasaki


                               Details of route      Time     Distance
                                                   (hr:min)     (km)



cheapest




fastest




Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004                   33
Trip 4       Shinagawa to Shinjuku

                             Details of route        Time     Distance
                                                   (hr:min)     (km)



cheapest




fastest




Trip 5       Asakusa to Nikko


                             Details of route        Time     Distance
                                                   (hr:min)     (km)



cheapest




fastest




Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004                   34
Trip 6       Tokyo to Narita Kokusai Kuko (International Airport)

                             Details of route                         Time     Distance
                                                                    (hr:min)     (km)



cheapest




fastest




Trip 7       Ginza to Roppongi

                             Details of route                         Time     Distance
                                                                    (hr:min)     (km)



cheapest




fastest




Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004                                    35
 Appendix 16                                                            A

RRRR         Z     RRRRRR


    station name              arrival time         distance     fare
RRRRR                             7:24              0km             -
RRRR                              9:51             352 km       *
RRRR                               *               535 km     13840


RRRRR          Z    RRRRRR


    station name              arrival time         distance     fare
RRRRR                             7:48              0km             -
RRRR                               *               334 km     10270


RRRRRR             Z   RRRRRR


    station name              arrival time         distance     fare
RRRRR                             7:10              0km             -
RRRR                              7:26              29 km     1320
RRR                               9:10             366 km     10580
RRRR                               *               514 km     13220
RRRR                             10:10             553 km       *


RRRR         Z     RRRRRR


    station name              arrival time         distance     fare
RRRR                             10:12              0km             -
RRR                              10:27              40 km     1450
RRRR                             12:00             342 km       *
RRR                                *               627 km     14590


Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004                            36
 Appendix 17                                                            B

RRRR         Z     RRRRRR


    station name              arrival time         distance     fare
RRRRR                             7:24              0km             -
RRRR                               *               352 km     10590
RRRR                             10:43             535 km       *


RRRRR          Z    RRRRRR


    station name              arrival time         distance     fare
RRRRR                             7:48              0km             -
RRRR                              9:51             334 km       *


RRRRRR             Z   RRRRRR


    station name              arrival time         distance     fare
RRRRR                             7:10              0km             -
RRRR                              7:26              29 km     1320
RRR                               9:10             366 km     10580
RRRR                              9:53             514 km       *
RRRR                               *               553 km     13750


RRRR         Z     RRRRRR


    station name              arrival time         distance     fare
RRRR                             10:12              0km             -
RRR                              10:27              40 km     1450
RRRR                               *               342 km     9950
RRR                              13:23             627 km       *


Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004                            37
  Appendix 18
                                        Scenario cards

 You are part of a school group that is staying in Kyoto. Your group needs to be in
 Hiroshima by 10am for a talk at the Peace Park. Book tickets for 20 students and
 3 teachers.

 Your friend is getting married in Hakata. You live in Hiroshima. The wedding is at
 10am, and should finish by 3pm. Book both a train there and back, leaving
 yourself about 30 minutes to get to the ceremony. You are travelling with another
 friend from school.


 You are a businessman living in Tokyo, and you have to be at a business meeting
 in Osaka at 9am. Book a train, giving yourself plenty of time to arrive. The
 company is paying, so it doesn’t matter if the fare is high.



 Your family is going from Shizuoka to Kyoto for the day to enjoy the autumn
 leaves. You would like to get there early in the morning to make the most of the
 day. Book 5 tickets for a train that will arrive in Kyoto at about 8am.


  You are finishing school next year and you are investigating possibilities for
  university. Some friends and you have decided to take a trip to Okayama as the
  university there is holding an open day. You live in Himeji. The open day starts at
  9:30am. Book 4 tickets for the train.

  You want to surprise your best friend who is a mad sumo fan. You have bought
  very-hard-to-get tickets to the Nagoya tournament. The sumo starts early in the
  day, but you are only interested in the top level bouts that come on after 3pm.
  However, you will take the opportunity to do three hours shopping beforehand.
  You live in Shizuoka. Book two tickets for the train trip.




Languages Unit, Curriculum K-12 Directorate 2004                                    38

				
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Description: Finding The Way – Teachers notes