mbas by club76

VIEWS: 13 PAGES: 3

									A Closer Look                                                                                   at Business Education
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  MARCH 2006


            : Women and MBAs
            INTRODUCTION:
            Despite concerted efforts by business schools to attract women to their MBA programs, women
            are underrepresented in these degree programs. Enrollment of women rarely exceeds 30% -
            compared with over 40% in medical and law schools. There are exceptions, among them:
            Columbia and Yale with 34% women and Stanford with 32%.

            A Catalyst/University of Michigan survey conducted in 2000 cites several factors that deter
            women from pursuing an MBA. They include the lack of female role models in business, a
            sense that business is incompatible with work/life balance, and a lack of confidence and
            preparation in math skills. Women also receive less encouragement from employers to pursue an
            MBA than men do.1

           Women who do choose MBA programs experience the programs differently than men do.
           Overall satisfaction with MBA programs is high among both men and women. However,
           women are more critical than men of some important aspects. For example, women are more
           likely than men to agree strongly that there should be more discussion related to social
           responsibility in core MBA courses, and they are less likely to agree that their business school is
           the kind of place where such issues can be raised. One out of 4 women (25%) believe their
           schools are not teaching them “at all” to manage values conflicts in the workplace, compared to
           16% of men.2

           Women also find it harder than men to relate to the people in the teaching cases used in their
           business schools, and many regret the lack of female faculty.3

            In light of these observations, this edition of A Closer Look explores how business schools are
            introducing gender related topics into coursework and extracurricular activities.

            THE BOTTOM LINE:
                       Managing diversity is a well-established topic in organizational behavior and human resource
                       management courses in many business schools, both in core and elective courses. Work-life
                       balance, fairness, changes in the composition of the workforce are common themes.
                       A few schools offer elective courses that are dedicated specifically to exploring the role of
                       women in business.
                       Membership in the National Association of Women MBAs is growing at many business
                       schools in the U.S. Currently there are 58 chapters and 1500 members.
                       Some schools use public forums – conferences and speaker series - as opportunities to
                       explore the role of women in the workplace and in society.
                       Research on women is becoming ensconced in academic scholarship.


            1
             Catalyst and University of Michigan, Women and the MBA: Gateway to Opportunity, 2000. See www.catalystwomen.org.
            2
             Business and Society Program at the Aspen Institute, Where Will They Lead? 2003 MBA Student Attitudes about Business and
           Society, May 2003.
           3
             Catalyst and University of Michigan, Women and the MBA: Gateway to Opportunity, 2000. See www.catalystwomen.org.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   A Closer Look                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    at Business Education
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________




                                   NOTABLE ELECTIVES ON WOMEN AND WORK*:
                                                                       Stanford University has several electives including “Women and Work” which examines
                                                                       issues such as “the rise in women's labor force participation and the movement of women
                                                                       into high-wage work, earnings discrimination, occupational segregation, time-management
                                                                       and work/family conflicts, the economic value of stay-at-home moms, the economics of child
                                                                       care, and the role of public policy.” Its “Women and Organizations” course “examines the
                                                                       experiences of women in organizations, especially those with executive positions.”
                                                                       University of Michigan’s “Women and Change” explores the challenges and opportunities
                                                                       faced by women who are taking on increasingly visible and influential positions and looks at
                                                                       these issues from a cross-cultural perspective.
                                                                       York University’s “Women and Men in Organizations” looks at “the implications of the
                                                                       changing workforce demographics” and issues such as “dual career couples, the women's and
                                                                       men's movements, sexual harassment and alternative leadership styles and definitions of
                                                                       success.”
                                                                       HEC School of Management – Paris – One of the objectives of its “Gender, Diversity, and
                                                                       Management” course is to “tackle the issues raised by the development of feminization and
                                                                       the cultural diversity in management.”
                                                                       Monterey Institute of International Studies’ electives include “Gender and the
                                                                       Environment” which explores the relationship between gender, equity and the environment.
                                   NOTABLE CENTERS/INITIATIVES*:
                                                                       Georgetown University supports a Women’s Leadership Initiative which “aims to
                                                                       contribute to the social and economic progression of women by addressing their intellectual
                                                                       and practical needs.”
                                                                       IESE Business School and Boston College both host centers dedicated to work and family
                                                                       issues.
                                                                       New developments include the establishment of a center for Women in Business at the
                                                                       London Business School, with support from Lehman Brothers, and Instituto de Empresa’s
                                                                       offering of scholarships covering 70% of MBA program fees for women residing in the
                                                                       province of Madrid.

                                   NOTABLE PUBLIC EVENTS*:
                                                                       At the University of Virginia, two student clubs – Graduate Women in Business and Black
                                                                       Business Student Forum - work together to hold annual forums on issues surrounding women
                                                                       and minorities. A recent theme was “Our Separate Ways” which “explored traditional and
                                                                       stereotypical roles for women in society and looked at the ways in which these roles both
                                                                       challenged and impeded women’s' progress in the workplace.”
                                                                       University of Minnesota hosted a speaker series on “Diversity – The Competitive
                                                                       Advantage for the 21st Century.”
                                                                       A speaker series, “A Financial Perspective” hosted at Concordia College included
                                                                       discussion on possible strategies to bridge the gender gap in the investment industry.
                                                                       University of Texas Austin recently held its fifth annual conference on Women in Business
                                                                       Leadership. The theme – “Let the Journey Begin.”
                                                                       IESE Business School convened an international conference on Women, Enterprise and
                                                                       Society to “address how structures in society should be made more human so that men and
                                                                       women's roles can co-exist in a fair way” and consider the role today's woman can play as
                                                                       “an agent of change in society and business.”

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       -2-
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   A Closer Look                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    at Business Education
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________




                                   NOTABLE ELECTIVES FOCUSING ON WOMEN AND LEADERSHIP*:
                                                                       Notre Dame – offers a lecture series and seminar called “Women Leading: Is it Different?”
                                                                       University of New Mexico’s “Women in Management” features experiential learning.
                                                                       “Constructive and critical dialogue is encouraged among students and faculty and with
                                                                       women and men in the workforce.”

                                   NOTABLE RESEARCH*:
                                                                       Case Western University and University of Michigan: “Breaking silence: Tactical choices
                                                                       women managers make in speaking up about gender-equity issues” (Piderit and Ashford),
                                                                       Journal of Management Studies (2003).
                                                                       University of California, Berkeley and Stanford University: “Asymmetric reactions to
                                                                       work group sex diversity among men and women” (Chatman and O’Reilly) Academy of
                                                                       Management Journal (2004).
                                                                       Portland State, Boston College and University of Texas Austin, “Is it the kids or the
                                                                       schedule?: The incremental effect of families and flexible scheduling on perceived career
                                                                       success” (Almer, Cohen and Single), Journal of Business Ethics (2004)
                                                                       University of Calgary and Oxford University: “Spirals of silence: The dynamic effects of
                                                                       diversity on organizational voice,” (Bowen and Blackmon), Journal of Management Studies
                                                                       (2003)

                                   RESOURCES:
                                   BeyondGreyPinstripes.org – World’s biggest MBA database, including detailed records on 1,672
                                      courses, 1,730 extracurriculars, and 216 research articles at 128 schools on six continents.
                                   CasePlace.org – Free, online library of business school case studies, including teaching materials
                                      about women in business.




                                   *Notable courses, public events, centers and research papers are drawn from Beyond Grey Pinstripes, a research
                                   survey conducted biennially by the Aspen Institute and the World Resources Institute. Additional information is
                                   available at www.BeyondGreyPinstripes.org.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________




A Closer Look is an occasional series of briefing papers on topical issues in MBA education, based on the research and programs of the
Aspen Institute. The Aspen Institute Business and Society Program works with senior corporate executives and MBA educators to
prepare business leaders who will effectively manage the financial, social, and environmental impacts of the private sector.

                      Contact Rich.Leimsider@aspeninstitute.org to order reprints or to offer feedback.




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       -3-

								
To top