Responding Effectively and Efficiently to Student Writing by jlx10672

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									Responding Effectively and Efficiently to
Student Writing


                Michelle Navarre Cleary
                          June 28, 2008
                              1 to 3 pm
What we know about feedback

 Students want and will pay attention to
  feedback if they can make sense of it
 Students appreciate knowing instructors
  have taken their writing seriously:
    – Ask questions that prompt more thinking
    – Narrate response to work as a reader


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Nancy Sommers, Across the Drafts:
Students and Teachers Talk about
Feedback,
http://stream.fas.harvard.edu/ramgen/pe
rmanent/exposwrite/acrossthedrafts.rm




                                      3
Purposes of Feedback

 To justify a grade
 Summative assessment
 Formative assessment




                         4
When might you not want to give
feedback
 Generative writing, brainstorming,
  exploratory writing
 At the same time as peer revising
 Journal writing




                                       5
When might you want to give
group rather than individual
feedback
 Writing to learn activities like muddiest
  point, minute papers, class summaries
 Discussion board postings




                                              6
Things to do when you assign
writing to make giving feedback
easier
1.   Have a rubric, i.e. The Grading Rubric for
     Papers at SNL:
     http://snl.depaul.edu/writing/Rubric.html
2.   Articulate to yourself and your students the
     purpose of the assignment
3.   Give students responsibility for evaluating
     their own work

                                                    7
Giving Students Responsibility
for Self Evaluation
   Why?
   How?
    – What were the hardest and easiest parts
      of writing this draft?
    – How did you choose to organize your
      paper and why?
    – What are you proud of in this draft? Why?
    – On what would you like feedback?
    – How did you address the competence?
                                              8
–What do you still need to do?
–What is the strongest part of this essay?
 Why?
–What is the weakest part of your essay?
 Why? How do you plan to deal with this
 weakness?
–How do you deal with objections to your
 argument?
–Why should readers care about what
 you have to say?


                                             9
Before you start marking a set of
papers
   What are the one or two key things you
    want students to have accomplished?
   What do you want students to do with
    your comments?
   Glance back over your rubric



                                        10
Before you start marking a
specific paper
 Sit on your hands and read the paper
  over
 What are the two to three most
  important things you want to convey to
  this student?
 Move from global to local



                                           11
Stop and return the paper if


     it has not been proofread




                                 12
Many students do not know how
to proofread
 Tell  them what you do
 Send them to
  http://snl.depaul.edu/writing/editing.
  html
 Suggest they visit the Writing
  Center -- the WC will not edit, but
  will teach how to proofread
                                       13
What comes first?

 Summary comment
 In-text comments
 Experiment




                     14
Writing the Summary Comment
   Write this comment as a letter
   Start this comment with a positive and
    specific observation about the paper
   If the student has written a self-evaluation,
    respond to it
   Give the student an overview of the main
    things on which they need to work
   Clearly distinguish primary from secondary
    issues

                                                    15
In-text comments

 Exclamation points and checks in the
  margins leave students confused
 Ask questions rather than giving
  answers
 Remember your focus -- do not
  comment on everything
 You are a teacher, not an editor


                                         16
             About grammar
   Grammar often worse when learners are
    struggling with content
   Wait -- save your grammar comments until
    they have a focused, organized and
    developed essay
   Triage -- if there are many grammar
    problems, give the student an overview but
    focus on one or two of the most serious
   Be a coach, not an editor -- help students
    learn to recognize and fix problems on their
    own
                                                   17
Suggestions for coaching
 Fix and explain once
 Directly point out the next few
  instances of the problem
 Indirectly point out
 Askstudents often have a “rule” or
  reason for their mistakes



                                          18
Giving feedback on the computer

   Cons:
    – Takes longer
   Pros:
    – Students can read
    – You have a record of all papers
    – You can link to online sources
   Track changes vs. Comment

                                        19
Example of computer feedback




                               20
Useful online sources
   For proofreading, editing:
    http://snl.depaul.edu/writing/editing.html
   For grammar (all on
    http://snl.depaul.edu/writing/Writing%20Help.html):
     – Capital Community Technical College Guide to
       Grammar and Writing
       
http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/index.
       htm
     – Grammar Girl’s Quick and Dirty Tips for Better
       Writing
http://grammar.qdnow.com/
     – Saint Cloud State University Literacy Education
       Online (LEO)
       
http://leo.stcloudstate.edu/index.html
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   For ESL: Dave’s ESL Cafe
http://www.eslcafe.com/

   For Citation:
     – The Citation Machine 
http://citationmachine.net/
     – Purdue University's OWL (Online Writing Lab)
       
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/
     – How to do an MLA or APA Works Cited
       
http://www.duke.edu/web/HonorCouncil/citationg
       uide.html

   On plagiarism: DePaul's Academic Integrity
    Website
http://academicintegrity.depaul.edu/


                                                       22
Michelle Navarre Cleary
Assistant Professor & Writing Coordinator
The School for New Learning
De Paul University
mnavarr9@depaul.edu


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