The Relative Pronoun by vts15196

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									                  The Relative Pronoun
The relative pronoun serves two purposes:

1.) It stands in the place of another noun or pronoun
    mentioned previously (its antecedent)

        This is the woman who caused the war.

                Antecedent   Relative Pronoun


2.) It introduces a subordinate clause.

   Main Clause: Can stand by itself as a sentence.

   Subordinate Clause: has subject and verb, but cannot stand
                       by itself as a sentence.

        This is the woman who caused the war.

            Main Clause         Subordinate Clause

In English, the form of the relative changes according to the
gender (which it receives from its antecedent) and its case (which
is determined by its use:

Subject Case (Nominative)

This is the hero who won the war.
This is the city which stands on the hill.

Possessive Case (Genitive)

This his the hero whose virtues we praise.

Object Case

This is the woman whom he loves.
This is the book which he read.
*Sometimes in English we just drop out the relative pronoun.
 For example, we may say something like:

             This is the hero Hector killed.
             This is the hero (whom) Hector killed.
             The Relative Pronoun In Latin

In Latin the Relative Pronoun has the same two functions:

1.) It stands in the place of its antecedent.

2.) It introduces a subordinate clause.

To determine the correct form of the relative pronoun in Latin
we will use the same rule we have used for other pronouns:

1.) It gets its gender and number from its antecedent.*

2.) It gets its case from its use.

*N.B. You must use the grammatical gender of the Latin
      word which is the antecedent. For example, although
      it is a thing, the Latin word for book is masculine.

To distinguish between the main and subordinate clause:

- As a general rule the subordinate clause will start with the
  relative pronoun and will end with the first verb that follows it:

                          Main Clause



               Insula quam spectas pulcra est.

                      Subordinate Clause

As with the personal pronouns, we can combine the relative with
cum when using ablative of accompaniment:

quocum                     quacum               quibuscum
                  Using The Relative Pronoun

1.) Femina quae causam belli dedit Helena erat.

   Relative Clause:

   Antecedent:

   Gender and Number of Ant:

   Function of quae in Relative Clause:

   Translation:


2.) Hocne est regnum quod Graeci oppugnaverant?

   Relative Clause:

   Antecedent:

   Gender and Number of Ant:

   Function of quae in Relative Clause:

   Translation:


3.) Iuno cuius potentia magna erat naves Troianorum submergit.

   Relative Clause:

   Antecedent:

   Gender and Number of Ant:

   Function of quae in Relative Clause:

   Translation:
4. Ubi est femina cui librum dedisti?

   Relative Clause:

   Antecedent:

   Gender and Number of Ant:

   Function of quae in Relative Clause:

   Translation:

5. Ei sunt gladii quibus hostem intefecit.

   Relative Clause:

   Antecedent:

   Gender and Number of Ant:

   Function of quae in Relative Clause:

   Translation:

6. Templa quae visitamus pulchra sunt.

   Relative Clause:

   Antecedent:

   Gender and Number of Ant:

   Function of quae in Relative Clause:

   Translation:

								
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