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Designing a Lesson Plan

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Designing a Lesson Plan Powered By Docstoc
					Ms. Quirk

Lesson #1: The Theory and “Realization” of the American Dream
Text/Subject: The Great Gatsby
Purpose: for students to grasp the concept of the American Dream and to understand the history context of
the book
Date: Tuesday, March 31 and Wednesday, April 1

    1.   Context:
         Grade Level and Discipline(s): English 11
         Text(s) Used: The Great Gatsby

    2.   New York State Standards Addressed:
         1. Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding by
         2. Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression by
         3. Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation by
         4. Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction by

    3.   Learning Objectives:
         Long-Term:

         Short-Term:
             match and discuss elements of 1920’s history and culture [Tea Party]
             describe what the “American Dream” is and how people sought it [reflection]
             collect and synthesize information in small groups about the 1920’s [presentation]

    4.   Assessment: (Diagnostic, Formative, and/or Summative)
              Reflection (diagnostic/formative)
              Presentation (formative/summative)
              Tea Party Forms and Discussion (diagnostic)

    5.   Set-Up and Agenda:
              Agenda
                    o Vocabulary
                    o Tea Party
                    o American Dream
                    o News Reviews
                    o 1920s Research Groups
                    o HW: Work on presentation

    6.   Motivation: (“Do Now” or Hook)
         Journal: Make a list of your dreams/goals/hopes for the future?

    7.   Procedures:
         Introduction: (3-5 min.)
              Journal: complete
         Vocabulary:
         Tea Party: (10-15 min.)
              Hand each student a different card
              Students will have a half-sheet of paper to write what their card is and what their
                 matching cards were
              Explain that all of the cards have at least one other card related to them and that they
                 should walk around and talk to other students, trying to decide which cards might go
                 together and why
              When they find a match, they should write it down and why
              Allow students to get together and discuss for approx. 5 minutes then ask them to sit
                 down and discuss as a class what they found
         American Dream:
              Web: (10 min.)
                     o Write “American Dream” in the center of a thought-web on the board
                  o   Explain nominal brainstorming: Each student says what comes to mind when
                      they think about the American Dream
                            Each thought is written down quickly on the board
                  o What are some common themes/ideas? What can we say about the “American
                      Dream”? What is it, exactly?
                  o What are your dreams/goals for the future? (Journal) Do they fit our idea of the
                      “American Dream”?
          Picture: (20 min.)
                  o On the digital projector, show the advertisement of the man and boy sleeping on
                      the hammock
                  o On a handout (with two columns: What Do You Notice? / What Might It
                      Mean/Imply?), students should take 2 minutes to write down everything they
                      can in the first column; then, ask students to take another 2 minutes to respond
                      in the second column
                  o Give students 5 minutes to complete the back of the handout (with 2 columns:
                      What Do You NOT See? / What Might This Mean/Imply?)
                  o Ask students to share what they noticed and what they didn’t see and what that
                      might mean
     Read News Reviews: (15 min.)
          Have students take out the “Early News Reviews” handout
          Have students work together with others who are near them
          Explain that students are to read the reactions, count how many were positive and how
             many were negative, decide if it was well-received, and predict what it might be about
          After 10 or so minutes, collect the handouts
     1920s Research: (10 min.)
          In pairs or threesomes, students will research a certain topic and then present the
             information they found informally to the class at the end of the next class period.
                  o Groups will be made by finding the person who had the same card as you during
                      the Tea Party
                  o Each group will pick a topic from a hat/cup
                  o Topics:
                            F. Scott Fitzgerald
                            Women’s liberation movements
                            Music, dancing, and fashion
                            Art and literature
                            Spending and waste
                            Leisure and sports
                            Transportation
                            Organized crime (prohibition and illegal activities)
                            Moral revolution
                            Marriage and family life
                            Major historical events
                            Politics and government

     Conclusion: (5 min.)
         Quick Quiz
                 o Which topic are you researching?
                 o When The Great Gatsby was written, was it well-received? Did people like it?

8.   Effective Questioning:
     Creating: What are your dreams/goals for the future? What do you think the book will be about?
     Evaluating: What Might It Mean/Imply?
     Analyzing: What are some common themes/ideas? What Do You Notice? What Might It
     Mean/Imply?
     Applying: What can we say about the “American Dream”?
     Understanding: Which reviews are positive and which reviews are negative? Was the book well-
     received in its time?
     Remembering: What is the “American Dream?”

9.   Adaptations:
     Visual: picture for the “American Dream” activity, Tea Party
     Verbal/Written: “American Dream” activities, news reviews
         Aural/Spoken: “American Dream” activities, news reviews Tea Party
         Kinesthetic: Moving around during Tea Party
         Tactile:


    10. Materials:
            Tea Party cards (2 of each, 13 sets)
            Tea Party handouts
            Picture on the digital projector – online at
                http://www.parfumdepub.net/collection/Estee_Lauder/Pleasures_for_men/Pleasures_for_
                men_2.jpg
            Picture Handout
            “American Dream” handout



On the Tea Party cards:

Picture of an advertisement (eyes)
Money
Power
War
Fame
“I saw the skins of tigers flaming…: I saw him opening a chest of rubies to ease, with their crimson-lighted
depths, the gnawings of his broken heart.”
The American Dream
“I am one of the few honest people that I have ever known.”
Reputation
“His count of enchanted objects had diminished by one.”
“He paid a price for living too long with a single dream.”
Personal Reaponsibility
Heebie-Jeebies
Cat’s meow
F. Scott Fitzgerald        F. Scott Fitzgerald

Women’s liberation         Women’s liberation
movements                  movements

Music, dancing, and        Music, dancing, and
fashion                    fashion

Art and literature         Art and literature

Spending and waste         Spending and waste

Leisure and sports         Leisure and sports

Transportation             Transportation

Organized crime            Organized crime
(prohibition and illegal   (prohibition and illegal
activities)                activities)

Moral revolution           Moral revolution

Marriage and family life   Marriage and family life

Major historical events    Major historical events

Politics and government    Politics and government
Tea Party

Your Card:



Matching Cards:

1.
Why do you think it matches?



2.
Why do you think it matches?



3.
Why do you think it matches?




Tea Party

Your Card:



Matching Cards:

1.
Why do you think it matches?



2.
Why do you think it matches?



3.
Why do you think it matches?
Name:
Date:
Picture Notes

         What Do You Notice?   What Might It Mean/Imply?
Name:
Date:

        What Do You NOT See?   What Might This Mean/Imply?
Historical Context Research for The Great Gatsby

Overview of the Project:

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby takes place in and around New York City during what we call the
“Roaring Twenties” that lasted until the Great Depression in the 1930s. The text makes a lot of points
about and references to the defining elements of this decade, and so learning about it is important.

Each group (of 2 or 3) will be assigned a different topic to research and will be responsible for putting
together a 3-5 minute presentation on that topic for the class. It is important that the work is done and the
presentation well put together because your peers will be depending on you for the information you are
responsible for.

These are the possible topics, which will be assigned on the first day:

        F. Scott Fitzgerald (the author)
        Women’s liberation movements
        Music, dancing, and fashion
        Art and literature
        Spending and waste
        Leisure and sports
        Transportation
        Organized crime (prohibition and illegal activities)
        Moral revolution
        Marriage and family life
        Major historical events
        Politics and government

Expectations and Assessments:

Expectations include:
    Sharing the work equally and being responsible (don’t disappoint your partner!)
    Splitting the presentation equally
    Being on task while doing research during class
    Providing your peers with clear, organized points and explanations
    Good speaking skills for the presenters
    Good active listening skills for the audience

For the presentation, you are not required to have a visual aid or handout; however, it is suggested and
would be greatly appreciated by your audience (and will get you some extra credit).

The presentation will be a major grade and you will be assessed both individually and as a group. There
will be two grades: one for content and the presentation and another for responsibility and group work:
This is how you will be graded:
      Content: (60 points)
              o Accuracy of your information (30)
              o How interesting your information is (15)
              o Presentation is 3-5 minutes long (15)
      Presentation: (40 points)
              o Organization and coherence (15)
              o Voice (loud and strong) and clarity (5)
              o Eye contact (you can have notes but don’t read from them) (5)
              o The presentation is split equally (15)
      Responsibility and Group-Work: (100 points)
              o You did your share (50)
              o You worked well with your partner (20)
              o You were prepared (20)
              o You used your in-class time wisely (10)

				
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