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NRA Women on Target Pistol Clinic

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									                  NRA Women on Target Pistol Clinic




Each year the Snake River Firearms Instructors puts on at least one free "NRA
Women On Target" event where women can learn the basics of firearms safety and
pistol shooting skills. We had 25 women attend this free event, a combination of
basic marksmanship training and an introduction to the shooting sports. The
picture above shows the firing line at the SEIPS range. We conducted the
classroom portion for this class at the Idaho Fish & Game classroom.




The range safety officer, Kim Maskalenko, came all the way from San Diego,
California to help out with the event. She has participated in a number of Women
on Target clinics in Southern California and was instrumental in the success of our
first effort here in Idaho Falls. You can't read the button on her collar, but it says,
"You can't beat a woman who shoots."
It was easy to spot the coaches, called "mentors" at a Women on Target event.
They were the ones wearing the red vests and caps provided by the NRA. Notice
the correct grip and stance displayed in this picture. Many beginners bring their
heads down to the sights on the pistol, when the correct method (bring the gun up
to eye level) is being demonstrated here. You'll notice that we used .22 pistols and
revolvers in the beginning and switched to centerfire guns once the basic skills were
mastered.




Here's a picture of Kim checking on the time the attendees were on the range. It
was a hot dry day and we all needed to be reminded to "water up" as often as
possible. Mentors Christina and Belva are helping the students.
Here is a picture of one of the fun activities, an introduction to Cowboy Action
Shooting. Sandi Davis, the one with the Women on Target cap on top of her
cowgirl hat, is teaching how to use a lever action rifle. The women also had a
chance to shoot the older model pump shotgun that's resting on the rack, and to
shoot a couple of sixguns - the basic "battery" of a cowboy shooter.




Our main objective after safety was that everybody have a good time with the
attendees learning new skills and the coach-mentors improving their teaching
skills. This picture, worth a thousand words, indicates the participants were having
fun. The pistol shown here is a Smith & Wesson .22 with a "dot sight." You put the
green dot on the target, hold the gun steady and p r e s s the trigger and hit the
bullseye every time.

								
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