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CONVERSATIONS WITH THE MAYOR

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CONVERSATIONS WITH THE MAYOR Powered By Docstoc
					              CONVERSATIONS WITH THE MAYOR


Mayor Tom Swisstack:

     Hello. My name is Tom Swisstack. Welcome to another
Mayor’s Talk Show. My very special guest today is Bill
Cicola. He is the Director of Library and Information
Services. We will be back in a minute to find out what
Bill is doing for the City of Rio Rancho and its residents.

Bill, how are you doing? Welcome, it’s a pleasure to have
you here today. Well, Director of Library and Information
Services. Before we get to kind of what is being
offered over there Why don’t you kind of explain a little
bit about yourself and how long have you been in this
business.

William Cicola: Director of Library & Information Services.

     Actually I have been in the library business for
thirty-five years now. I began my career in 1974 as a
young adult librarian and then I became Assistant Director
in that first library and then moved into a series of
progressively larger libraries and I am one of those few
fortunate people who think I have the best career in the
world. Libraries do change people’s lives and it’s just
really great to be a part of the whole process.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:

     Bill, explain a little bit because thirty-five years I
imagine libraries have changed a little bit and what are
some of those changes that you are seeing even in Rio
Rancho’s library.

William Cicola: Director of Library & Information Services.

     Well the changes, you’re right have been dramatic.
Thirty-five years ago it was the old pencil date due stamp
and obviously technology has a major impact on what we do
and how we do it. It’s taken a lot of the drudgery out of
the efforts of borrowing books and making sure they are
returned. The computer monitors everything, checks
everything. With the onset of the internet we are able to
offer a lot of our services, catalogs and programs online
live to the public.
     A lot of people felt that when the internet came that
libraries were going to go away but actually the reverse
has happened and more and more people have discovered their
libraries and their resources using the technology that all
the libraries throughout the country now provide computer
access, internet access, line data basis. The changes have
been dramatic as I said. Thirty-five years ago libraries
didn’t offer programs. Now, that an intrical part of how
we reach out to the community and get more and more of the
public into take advantage of the amount of amazing
services that libraries around the country have to offer.

     Rio Rancho, I have been here a little under a year now
and I’ve seen dramatic changes in Rio Rancho itself. With
the change in the economy people couldn’t afford a lot of
the services that they would purchase so they have turned
to their local public libraries. We register on an average
a thousand new library patrons a month. They come in, in
droves. They are using our DVD’s our CD’s our books on
tape obviously our books. The increase since last October
has been twenty to thirty percent increases in activity in
the library. Borrowing of material. New patrons coming
in. A thousand patrons a day visiting three libraries in
he city.

     So it’s very common and it’s happened before in the
past. In my lifetime I saw it in the 70’s when the economy
had a little down turn. Libraries then also became very,
very busy and maintained a life long, established long term
relationships with new customers who hadn’t been there
before. Things have changed dramatically. It’s exciting.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:

     Let me fast forward these thirty-five years to the
year 2009. Rio Rancho libraries. What are some of the
services and the programs that you are offering and is
there a particular age group that you are just offering
them to?

William Cicola: Director of Library & Information Service.

     We offer programs and services to every age within the
community from pre-birth particularly for mothers and you
know, and proper healthcare for their yet to be born
children, through senior citizens. For the month of July
we have fifty-two different programs in the three libraries
in Rio Rancho that meet all ages of the community and I
have sort of highlighted and picked out a few programs that
we will be having that I would like to bring to the
attention of the audience.

     In the Loma Colorado library on July 18, Saturday from
11:00am to 1:00pm and from 1:00pm to 1:30pm we are going to
be having a Navajo weaving demonstration and lecture. Tyra
Peston whose works are prized and renowned throughout the
country weave specimens of the sixteen regional tribes in
traditional style as well as their own unique contemporary
work. So she will be discussing and demonstrating her
weaving techniques.

     Then on July 25 also at Loma Colorado main library the
Youth Services Department will feature a family barn dance
and ice cream social and all members of the community are
welcome to come to that.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:

    Elected officials too Bill?

William Cicola: Director of Library & Information Service.

     Everybody come especially you Mr. Mayor. To cap off
the feature the events at Loma Colorado on July 10 from
7:00pm to 9:00pm there is going to be a special program for
the teens of the library called “Murder At the Library”
and it’s “Who Killed The librarian” and I don’t know if
it’s going to be me yet. The teens will find out if they
attend the program and they can expect suspense and laughs
and some probably really bad acting. That does require
some registration so visit the twilight zone in the Teen
Services Department at Loma Colorado.

     Then at Esther Bone the adult services will be
offering on July 23 a presentation entitled “Wrestling with
Anxiety and Depression” and renowned Dr. Laura Smith and
Dr. Charles Elliott will present a talk on handling anxiety
and depression. Both are clinical psychologists and have
authored several books in the “For the Dummy Series” like
“Car Repair for the Dummies” and this is mental health and
basic and information.
     Also, the Youth Services Department at Esther Bone
will featuring an exciting program martial arts and Chinese
dragon dancing on the outside lawn on July 11 at 10:00am.
So don’t miss that one. In the Star Heights Learning
Center which is on Polaris Boulevard, teens can be creative
by participating in popular altered book craft program with
jesso, glue, magazines, pictures and their own photos,
ribbons, glitter and a whole bunch of other stuff. Teens
can create a keepsake out of an old hardwood book. So that
is just a sampling of some of the fifty-two programs that
we offer and will be offering in July and those programs
continue throughout the year.

     There are the standard summer reading programs and the
reading incentive programs and activities all related to
getting families to focus on reading and how fundamental it
is for the growth and development of child.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:

     It’s kind of interesting because you mentioned the
dragon, I guess, who killed the librarian, just a number of
other things. I remember going to the library and never
had those before. Okay Bill, you have me coming into the
library. What kind of service? Is everything automated?
Suppose I don’t know how to use a computer? Is there
anybody there that can help take care me?

William Cicola: Director of Library & Information Service.

     We have a highly trained staff of librarians who can
assist anybody and any of their research needs. If they
have trouble using computers we also offer workshops during
the course of the year on internet basics and for
beginners. We will assist anybody in doing internet
research. Creating email accounts. How to log on to
employment opportunities. A lot of applications now
require online applications which also require people
setting up email accounts. We will assist the patrons in
that respect.

     If they have problems printing there is always a staff
member on hand in all facilities that will assist anybody
on any level of service that they require. Recommending
current books and popular fiction if they want it.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:
     So, if I am a student at Rio Rancho High School or can
I come there and do my homework? Do you have research base
material over there that would help me if I needed to.

William Cicola: Director of Library & Information Service.

     Absolutely. Actually because our twilight zone is
centered in Loma Colorado library, as school gets out we
get a lot of the students coming up the hill. The building
is also completely wireless so they can YFI if they have
their own laptops. All the buildings are. So there is a
lot of internet searching. We do home workup. We support
the curriculum. We are complementary to the school system.
We are there until 8:00 pm at night. Schools are out at
2:00 to 2:30 in the afternoon. So we fill that gap from
2:30 to 8:00 where students can come in and do their
research. So we have all the materials there to help them.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:

     You mentioned during the center of your process over
there. The twilight zone, what is the twilight zone?

William Cicola: Director of Library & Information Service.

     Twilight zone is a separate teen facility that you
have to have a teen in your birth year to get in.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:

    So that would leave me out.

William Cicola: Director of Library & Information Service.

     That would leave you out, sorry and it’s leaves me out
also but I somehow get special permission to get in their
and I am sure you will to Mayor. It’s strictly for teens.
It’s got literature based on the teenage interests. It’s
got nonfiction material to support their collections.
There are spank of computers there for internet access and
so it was actually the first special teen area in the State
of New Mexico exclusively designed and used by teens.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:
     You also mentioned music. You have also mentioned
DVD’s if I am not mistaken. Am I in a position to listen
to those or watch them at the libraries?

William Cicola: Director of Library & Information Services.

     No. Actually we lend them out. We increased our
collection of DVD and CD’s and also books are tape which
are very popular with commuters and travelers. They are
for home use only and borrowers can check them out five at
a time for a week at a time. We try and get the current
releases as soon as they come out to the public. There are
popular. People can reserve them and put them on hold so
that as a copy comes in the computer automatically emails
you and says you requested this item and it’s now here
waiting for you and you have a week to come in and pick it
up.

     So people can look at our catalog from home and if
they see a book, DVD or CD or book on tape or any materials
that the library has they can be borrowed they can put a
hold on it and the computer automatically sends an email
saying this material is here. People can also renew their
materials on line so that if they can’t get back in time to
return the stuff you can automatically go on line and renew
the materials, check your account to see if you have stuff
you have checked out or you may have forgotten.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:

     That would be me. Very Well. We have about thirty
seconds. Is there anything you want to say about your
libraries or your staff.

William Cicola: Director of Library & Information Service.

     Staff, I have an extraordinary staff that the city is
blessed with people who will cooperate and assist you in
any way possible. I encourage everybody to make sure that
they use the services available from the three Rio Rancho
libraries. We have over a hundred and seventy thousand
items and its all there for their borrowing pleasure.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:

     Bill, I want to thank you very much for joining me
today. On behalf of myself, Tom Swisstack, Bill Cicola,
Director of Library and Information Services, thank you for
allowing us to be in your rooms today with you and talk
about libraries in the Rio Rancho area. We look forward to
talking to you again. Have a good day.


       CONVERSATION WITH THE MAYOR (PART 2)



 Mayor Tom Swisstack   :

     Hello. Welcome to another Mayor’s talk show. My name
is Tom Swisstack. I have two very special guests today who
are actually shooting film in New Mexico called; I was a
Seventh Grade Dragon Slayer. We have Ryil Adamson and
Gavin Gillette here today. We will be back in just a
moment.

     Gentlemen. Welcome. Ryil and Gavin correct? I was a
Seventh-Grade Dragon Slayer. Now that’s not me so I just
need to make that clear. So why don’t you explain a little
bit about this movie. What is it about?

Ryil Adamson: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

     Well it’s a family film. It’s a family adventure film
and the title pretty well tells you what the movie is going
to be about. A seventh grade boy plays around in the
sewers and he finds the key to a dragon. He finds somebody
whose leading him to a dragon who wants to destroy all
civilization and the whole world all hinges on a seventh
grade dragon slayer.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:

     So obviously then it wants to destroy the world.   This
is not really a friendly dragon is that correct?

     Ryil Adamson: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-
Grade Dragon Slayer.

     The dragon is not friendly. I hate to give that part
away. (lots of laughter) No, he’s not friendly.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:
     And so, is this a film that is being produced here in
Rio Rancho solely. Is it being produced in any parts of
New Mexico? Could you give a little information about
where it’s being produced.

Gavin Gillette: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

     It’s being produced in Rio Rancho and Albuquerque.   We
have several locations in Rio Rancho area. We have a
warehouse down in Albuquerque and we are on location in
about two or three different live places around both
cities.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:

     Okay, who are some of the celebrities? Do you have
some children involved this year? Do you have any known
actors that are around?

Ryil Adamson: Executive Producer, I Was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

     We have a great, I’m sorry to interrupt. We’ve got a
cast of actors. People that you have heard of. Leah
Thompson from, Back to the Future. Carolyn in the City.
Wendy Malik from, Just Shoot Me. Bob Fraser, The American
President. You are just going to love her she is so funny.
Hunter Allen, is our child star. He was a regular on the
Young and Restless for four years. A number of other
people, Eric Lutz from, Carolyn in the City. Amy Peeds
from, Alien’s in America. So quite a few name people.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:

     Congratulations. You do have some name people. How is
it to work with these stars. How is it to put a film
together a movie together. How do you do that?

Gavin Gillette: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

     It’s very hard. I liken it to controlled Chaos. There
are thousands of movie parts. It really is. There are so
many different parts to put together movie. It’s amazing.
Anyone that doesn’t move you ashore really kind of commands
you respect because it really is a thousand pieces coming
together for twenty-four these shoes. Between logistics
and catering and dealing with actors agents and dealing
with other producers, locations and cities, permitting
processes, the fire department. It’s just really a whole
bunch of entities coming together for twenty-four days to
shoot and eight months later to edit.

Ryil Adamson: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

     We have had a lot of local Rio Rancho people in
background scenes and that’s the one thing you always hear.
I can’t believe this involved so much.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:

     So, you are saying it takes twenty-four days to make
this particular film. Correct? A twenty-four day shoot?

Gavin Gillette: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

    Right.   Twenty-four days of shooting.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:

     And then eight months to edit and actually put it
together for is that production or for show?

Gavin Gillette: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

     It takes eight months to complete the film because we
have a lot of CGI. There is a dragon in it. There is a
troll. There is about one hundred and twenty-five special
effect shots. Some of those special effects won’t even
look like special effects though. We got to integrate
eighteen from Albuquerque also.(could not understand what
he said) Coby Jacks and Brent Peterson putting it
together. So, after we shoot and Ryil and I are using a
lot of green screen which we are not really we haven’t shot
too much before in our past. We both have had a little
experience but when you start to deal with green screens
and having actors act against a fake puppet or a green
dragon it brings another element of acting that they have
to be that good and our cast is that good.
Mayor Tom Swisstack:

     How long does it take?   When does your day start and
when does it end?

Ryil Adamson: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

     A day is about a fourteen hour day from the time we
start to finish. Today, we started around six and we will
wrap around eight. Most of the people work about twelve
hours. There is a troll there who has to be made up for
three hours before we can start.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:

      So there’s actually a live body. Right?

Ryil Adamson and Gavin Gillette: Executive Producers, I was
a Seventh-Grade Dragon Slayer.

      (In unison)   Right.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:

      How long does it take to makeup?

Ryil Adamson: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

     Three hours to make up and then about an hour and a
half to take off. So he’s got a lot done.

Gavin Gillette: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

     Sitting in the makeup chair for three hours every day
even if you are only in for one hour, two hours, three
hours for makeup. One or two hours to shoot and an hour to
take it off. So he probably has the most grueling
schedule.

Ryil Adamson: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

      Either that or the makeup people who are putting it
on.
Mayor Tom Swisstack:

     Why Rio Rancho? I mean I know you both from the
Albuquerque area. How come Rio Rancho?

Gavin Gillette: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

     Rio Rancho is just really easy. Albuquerque is easy
also. The permitting process. In Rio Rancho, the folks at
SSCAFCA James and David at SSCAFCA made it really easy for
us. The Rio Rancho public school system, we are shooting
at the Rio Rancho Mid High. We are shooting at SSCAFCA.
It’s a one stop shop in your city to permit. The folks
have been real, real friendly and welcoming. The Cabazon
community has been real welcoming. We are shooting four or
five or three or four days in the Cabazon community and all
the neighbors have been great to work with.

     It’s just the people here are easy, Albuquerque is
easy also. The whole Albuquerque and Rio Rancho are great
places for film friendly to shoot at.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:

     I’m glad to hear that. I really am. So let’s go
twenty-four days, eight months. When does something like
this come out at the movie theater? What’s the process
quite honestly because I know you are doing this but how I
get it from the production the final draft ready to show
into a movie theater?

Ryil Adamson: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh Grade
Dragon Slayer.

     Well, you know a movie like this, this is what they
call speck film. We are making it, it’s now sold yet. The
studio hasn’t funded it. This is by the way the biggest
New Mexico centric project yet in terms of the number of
New Mexicans who are working on the film. But the, and so
the idea of it is we will make this movie and we are just
building a better mouse trap and then we will take our
movie out to the people who buy movies and sell it. It’s
almost that simple.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:
     So you will have your product in hand right? And then
from there you are going to see who is interested and what
they have to offer. Is that correct?

Ryil Adamson: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

     There is a series of film markets. The first one is
the L.A., The American Film Market in Los Angeles in
November and then after that is Berlin and after that NIPTV
which is the television market in Las Vegas. And then the
final of those four is the Canne Film Festival. Each of
those have a market where people like us go and sell movies
to people who buy them.

Gavin Gillette: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

     Statistically speaking about five to ten percent of
the movies made get distribution so it’s a big cue to get
distribution. The interesting thing about this film with
Ryil and I, we’ve actually had offers of distribution
before we have even finished it yet for DVD. Ryil and I
our hopes are to theatrical distribution. We want everyone
to go to Century Rio, United Artists tomorrow starting next
summer and then see this film. So our key is to get
theatrical distribution.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:

     So help me through then. It’s something that you are
mentioning theatrical distribution versus DVD. What’s the
difference? What does that mean to your film? What does
that mean to you producers and directors?

Gavin Gillette: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

     Bigger market. Theatrical is what everyone shoots
for. I mean every film maker that makes a film would like
for people to go to the theater and see their movie. I
don’t know of the percentages that don’t make theatrical
but a lot of films go straight to DVD and if they don’t get
a marketing campaign behind them you are not going to,
unless you have a block buster, Netflix or Hastings, you
just have to watch them. A theatrical insures at least
millions of people have the opportunity to see it at the
theater. That’s what most people shoot for.

Ryil Adamson: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

     You know in many ways theatrical distribution run is
an advertisement for future sales later. You are much more
likely to rent a DVD that you hear of. Because of the
economy, interestingly enough in a bad economy, box office
figures for theaters shoot way up. More people will go to
the movies in a bad economy. So it’s actually more of a
money maker.

Gavin Gillette:   Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

     It possibly the right elements for this for
theatrical. The Genre is we are shooting for a rating of
G. It’s a family friendly movie so parents can take their
kids. Grandparents can take their kids and if it goes
theatrical around when the DVD comes out people want to buy
it to babysit their kids or to watch them. We are trying
to hit all genres. Males, females, children, middle age
and grandparents. We are trying to hit the whole spectrums
which opens it up to a lot more windows of distribution and
opportunities.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:

     Now because you are producing this here, do you go and
market this yourself then or do you have another company
market this for you? How does that part of it work?

Ryil Adamson: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

     I don’t know but when I said I don’t know yet. We
have some market firms who are interested in signing on
with us. One group that did, that does niche marketing for
this type of movies. The first step for us is to, it’s
like, it’s wholesale for us is to market to the retailers.
For us that is the first step. Then we use our marketing
firm whoever we hire to help the retailers market to the
audience. Because if we can, if they for example the whole
idea they will give us a limited screen run.
     So if they open it up in twenty-five hundred screens
for a couple of weekends. We want to, our marketer wants
to make sure that those theaters fill and so then that
causes our marketers to open up more screens and it gets
the ball rolling.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:

     That’s kind of interesting because what you are
saying, and I don’t know, we as Rio Rancho and me as the
Mayor, it’s like that starts the market even in Rio Rancho
because you have it in the credits where this was filmed
and so forth I’m assuming, the weather, the region over
here and that’s kind of good publicity for our respective
community that we are user friendly as well as Albuquerque
being user friendly. So I’m a seventh-grade dragon slayer,
so is our young person actually young?

Gavin Gillette: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

     Yes, he is about middle school age.   He is our main
actor.

Ryil Adamson: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

     Didn’t he turn fourteen a couple of days ago?   We had
a cake.

Gavin Gillette:   Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

     We had a bunch of birthdays. Interestingly enough,
Abigail, the female, we have three of the middle schoolers
that are our main characters and the middle one is from
Corrales and Rio Rancho area.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:

    So you have some local talent.

Gavin Gillette: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

    We do have some local talent here.
Ryil Adamson: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

     We made a real effort to make sure that we auditioned
locals first.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:

     You know what, that’s exciting and I want to
compliment you on that for trying to bring in some local
talent. So happens when there is a delay. For example,
the weather doesn’t hold up for you if you are shooting in
a sewer and the weather doesn’t hold up what happens to the
production then. Does it go past twenty-four days? Do you
increase the time frame during the day?

Gavin Gillette: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

     Good questions. Actually we have had several rain
delays but on our very first day of production we were
shooting in the SCAFCA area in the drainage ditches and it
rained so much we actually had have the company move from
there to our indoor warehouse. And, all we did was swap
days and what happens. But it’s a running joke on the set
that Ryil and I told our director, Andy Lower who is an
Emmy nominated actor that Albuquerque and Rio Rancho have
the most predictable weather year around and it’s been
nothing
But predictable. Every time we shoot outside it’s rained.
The first day we had to cancel. But when you are doing the
movies, the very first day is bad weather it’s actually a
good omen

Mayor Tom Swisstack:

    Is it really?

Ryil Adamson: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

     Yeah. You can plant crops.   If we are filming outside
plant your tomatos.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:
     Well, we have just a few couple more minutes over
here. What would you like to say about helping you know
market this tool. This is the time to kind of say a few
things. What do you want to say about the film or about
the aspect of this whole thing?

Ryil Adamson: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

     Well you know, it’s going to be a good movie. It’s
hard work. There is just no way around that. When we look
at the dailies and we look at the acting, this is going to
be a really good movie. So, I hope everybody sees it. The
website is Seventh-Grade Dragon Slayer.com. So they can
get on line and if you register we send out dates about how
things are going periodically.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:

     Now let’s assume you sell this real quick then and do
we find out where these theaters are and if it’s going to
be in Albuquerque do we know about that? If it’s going to
be in Arizona or any other places do we get to know that or
how does that work.

Ryil Adamson: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

    Particularly if they set up on our website.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:

    Okay.   Very good.   There you go.

Gavin Gillette: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

     Once we do sell it, if we do sell it for the first run
or theatrical release it will be marketed like every other
movie out there on transformers and Indiana Jones, all the
regular avenues, television, radio it will be marketed.
The People of Rio Rancho and the community here they are
going to recognize a lot of places and it will be fun for
them too.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:
     Gavin and Ryil, I want to thank you very much for
coming. We appreciate it. I am actually excited so I have
to go rent a few kids or go get the neighbors kids and go
see the movie. Hopefully you will have a lot of success in
selling this and I will you nothing but success and thank
you for using local talents. We truly appreciate that. We
really do.

Ryil Adamson: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

     Thank you. I really wanted to thank the Rio Rancho
Public Schools, Lisa Dobson, Randy Evans, Michelle, Amy
Torres. They were just so good us. The people at SCAFCA,
Jim, I’m just trying to run through these names before I
lose anybody. Greg with the City, the Fire Marshall.

Gavin Gillette: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

    Greg and Matt helped us out a lot at the City.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:

     Boy you guys sound like you are at stage for an award.
I love this.

Ryil Adamson: Executive Producer, I was a Seventh-Grade
Dragon Slayer.

    We are grateful.   We wish we could give back more.

Mayor Tom Swisstack:

     Ladies and gentlemen, thank you very much. I want to
appreciate all the hard work that’s being done here in Rio
Rancho. We encourage you if it comes out to the theaters
go take a look and see how it looking and see what they
have done for our community to make it a more marketable
place and theater friendly. Thank you and have a great
day.

				
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