REVISIONS

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					   DIAMOND CONSTRUCTION, INC.
                                                   “WORKING TO BE THE BEST”
    OUR VALUES                                    OUR BELIEF                                         OUR VISION                                       OUR MISSION
PEOPLE BEFORE PROFIT                           QUALITY TEAMWORK                               CONTINUAL IMPROVEMENT                                 SATISFIED CLIENTS




                                                            Safety Program
                                                               Table of Contents
   Filename:

   General Safety Program                                                                                                                                        Pg. #

   Introduction ................................................................................................................................................... 1
   Plan Administration ...................................................................................................................................... 2
   Safety Committee Responsibilities ............................................................................................................... 2
   Accident Reporting ....................................................................................................................................... 2
   Safety Training.............................................................................................................................................. 3
   Safe Conduct ................................................................................................................................................. 3
   Housekeeping................................................................................................................................................ 3
   Personal Protective Clothing ......................................................................................................................... 3
   Personal Protective Equipment ..................................................................................................................... 4
           Safety Glasses .................................................................................................................................. 4
           Hearing Protection ........................................................................................................................... 4
           Hardhats……………………………………………………………………………………..…4/5/6
           Foot Protection ................................................................................................................................. 7
           Fall Protection .................................................................................................................................. 7
           Material Handling and Earth Moving Equipment............................................................................ 8
           Aerial Lifts and Erection Procedures ............................................................................................... 8
           Protective Grounds........................................................................................................................... 8
           Safety Harnesses .............................................................................................................................. 8
           Respirators ....................................................................................................................................... 9
           Gloves .............................................................................................................................................. 9
           Rubber Aprons ................................................................................................................................. 9
   Fire Extinguishers and First Aid Kits ........................................................................................................... 9
   Building Evacuation...................................................................................................................................... 9
   Outside Contractors or Suppliers ................................................................................................................ 10

   Hazardous Chemical Communication Program

   General Company Policy ............................................................................................................................ 11
   Labeling ...................................................................................................................................................... 11
   List of Hazardous Chemicals & Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) ...................................................... 11
   Training ....................................................................................................................................................... 11
Non-Routine Tasks ..................................................................................................................................... 12
Communication with Contractors/Subcontractors ...................................................................................... 12
Additional Information ............................................................................................................................... 12

Machinery and Equipment

Safety Code ................................................................................................................................................. 13
Grinder and Sander ..................................................................................................................................... 13
Drill Press ................................................................................................................................................... 13
Buffing Wheels ........................................................................................................................................... 13

Job Site Safety Program

Introduction ................................................................................................................................................. 14
Responsibilities of Job Site Supervisor and Lead Worker(s)...................................................................... 14
Training ....................................................................................................................................................... 14
        First Aid Training .......................................................................................................................... 14
        New Employee Training ................................................................................................................ 14
        Ongoing Employee Training.......................................................................................................... 14
Communication ........................................................................................................................................... 15
        Safety Posters and Signs ................................................................................................................ 15
        Material Safety Data Sheets ........................................................................................................... 15
        Tool Box Safety Meetings ............................................................................................................. 15
        Personal Protective Clothing and Equipment ................................................................................ 15
First Aid and Medical Care ......................................................................................................................... 15
        First Aid Kits ................................................................................................................................. 15
        Medical Care .................................................................................................................................. 15
Traffic Control and Protection of the Public ............................................................................................... 16
        Construction Traffic Control.......................................................................................................... 16
        Protection of the Public .................................................................................................................. 16
Fire Prevention and Protection.................................................................................................................... 16
        Fire Prevention ............................................................................................................................... 16
        Fire Protection................................................................................................................................ 16
Sanitation Facilities..................................................................................................................................... 17
        Toilets ............................................................................................................................................ 17
        Portable Water ............................................................................................................................... 17
        Washing Facilities.......................................................................................................................... 17
Safety Inspections and Reports ................................................................................................................... 17
        Safety Inspections .......................................................................................................................... 17
        Reports ........................................................................................................................................... 17

                                                                                                                                      UPDATED OCT. 2002
                                                                                                                                      UPDATED JUN. 2003
                                                                                                                                      UPDATED JULY. 2003
                                                                                                                                      UPDATED JULY. 2005
                                                                                                                                      UPDATED MAR. 2006
                                                                                                                                       UPDATED MAR.2008
           DIAMOND CONSTRUCTION, INC.
                                “WORKING TO BE THE BEST”
    Our Values                     Our Belief                         Our Vision                    Our Mission
People Before Profit            Quality Teamwork               Continual Improvement              Satisfied Clients




                              General Safety Program

 Introduction:       Diamond Construction, Inc. (DCI), similar to other businesses, has potential hazards
 in the workplace. Because the company believes it has a responsibility to provide a safe work
 environment for its employees, this Safety Program has been adopted by DCI’s management.

 The Safety Program complies with Department of Labor OSHA Safety and Health Standards
 (29CFR1910), the Construction Safety and Health Regulations (29CFR1926), the Montana Safety Culture
 Act, and other applicable local, state and federal laws.

 The Human Resource Department has overall responsibility for implementation of the General Safety
 Program, and a Safety Coordinator has the responsibility of monitoring day-to-day safety habits and
 practices in the workplace. NOTE: DCI’s Job Site Safety Program is under the direct supervision and
 responsibility of the job site supervisor on specific DCI’s construction sites. Reference the Job Site
 Safety Program for more detailed information.

 It is expected that all employees will be safety conscious and take every precaution to protect themselves
 and their co-workers by completing job tasks in a safe and responsible manner. Safety related work
 practices will be a consideration on individual performance evaluations, and violations of this Safety
 Program may result in disciplinary action up to and including termination of employment.

 Supervisors, Field and Office staff –you are responsible for the safety of not only the employees you
 supervise, but for the safety of all our employees. You need to insure all work being performed by
 any of our employees and yourself will be done so in a safe fashion by following approved safety
 procedures, and the wearing of required personal safety equipment, such as hard hats.

 As a Field or Office staff, you are responsible to follow all safety regulations and to ensure that you
 are complying with all safety items. You need to watch out for you fellow workers. If you are
 directed to do what you consider an “unsafe practice” you have every right to refuse, and let the
 Safety manager know of the issues.

 It is the policy and position of Diamond Construction to comply with the operating procedures of
 the manufacturer.

 Employees who violate safety standards, who do not wear or use personal safety equipment such as
 hard hats, who cause hazardous or dangerous situations, or who fail to report or, where appropriate,
 remedy such situations, may be subject to immediate termination of employment
Plan Administration:           DCI’s Safety Program is administered, governed and enforced by an
Employee Safety Committee. The committee consists of a minimum of five (5) employees. Membership
is on a volunteer basis and represents a cross-section of the company’s work groups. Two (2) members
represent company management, one of which is a representative from the Human Resource Department
who also serves as Secretary and record keeper of all committee activities. DCI’s Safety Coordinator also
serves on the Employee Safety Committee.

All committee members serve a one-year term and are eligible for re-appointment on an annual basis.

The Safety Coordinator, in conjunction with the Human Resource Department, is responsible for
coordinating and handling all committee responsibilities and activities.

Safety Committee Responsibilities:
   Develop, implement, administer and maintain a written company-wide safety program, which is in
    compliance with local, state and federal safety regulations.
   Inspect, identify and make corrective action recommendations for potential hazards or unsafe
    workplace conditions or practices.
   Review incidents of workplace accidents, injuries and occupational diseases.
   Establish safety related training programs covering topics such as:
     hazardous materials
     personal protective equipment
     first aid/CPR
     new employee safety awareness program
   Conduct regularly scheduled employee safety meetings, which will take place at least once every 3
    months or more often on an as-needed basis.

Accident Reporting:           All accidents must be reported immediately to the work area or job site
supervisor or, in his/her absence, the Safety Coordinator or Human Resource Director.

Attention must be given to all work-related accidents and injuries. The type and amount of attention will
be dependent on the severity of the injury. Medical attention can range from minor first aid
administration to an injured employee being transported by ambulance to a hospital emergency room for
treatment of a life threatening injury.

If first aid attention is required, please note the list of employee names posted on the company bulletin
boards and communicated in the company newsletter on a periodic basis. These people have had first aid
training and may be called upon to provide first aid.

In addition to verbally reporting an accident, a written Accident Report must be completed as soon as
possible following an injury. The standard “First Report of Injury or Occupational Disease” will be used
for this purpose. It is the responsibility of the work area or job site supervisor, in conjunction with the
Human Resource Department, to see that the Accident Report is completed and submitted in a timely
manner.

Further, DCI is required by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to use certain
forms and procedures for recording and reporting personnel illnesses and injuries in the workplace.

OSHA Form #200 is maintained by the Human Resource Department and is a log and summary of all
injuries and illnesses resulting in occupational fatalities, non-fatal occupational illness, and nonfatal
occupational injuries that result in loss of consciousness, restriction of work or motion, transfer to another
job, or medical treatment other than first aid. This form is completed annually and posted by February 1
in the Human Resource Department. The purpose of posting the report is to increase employee/employer
awareness and promote prevention of injuries and illnesses.

The forms are filed and retained for a period of five years. They are available for employee review in the
Human Resource Department.

Safety Training:        Employees will receive one or more safety training sessions while in the employ
of DCI. Initially a basic safety orientation will occur at the time of hire. The Safety Coordinator and/or
work area or job site supervisor may conduct a more detailed and individualized training session.

Additional training programs will be conducted on an ongoing basis as dictated by needs in the workplace
and directed by the Safety Committee.

Safe Conduct:        Because of the various processes associated with the construction industry and the
wide variety of machinery, tools and equipment in use, it is extremely important that employees conduct
themselves in a safe and responsible manner.

Unsafe conduct and acts such as horseplay and fighting will not be tolerated.

Employees taking prescription medication which in any fashion might impair their alertness or physical
body control must notify their supervisor and/or the Human Resource Department regarding the side
effects of the medication.

Housekeeping:         A work environment must be clean and orderly if it is to be safe. Employees should
take time to return materials, tools and equipment to where they belong when finished with them.

Clean up spills immediately and dispose of cleaned-up materials in a proper manner and in appropriate
containers.

Any damaged equipment should be immediately reported to the work area or job site supervisor.
Improper functioning equipment can result in accidents.

Exits, fire doors, fire extinguishers, electrical panels, and machinery power switches in the office and
shop areas must be kept clear and accessible at all times.

Safety equipment must be maintained in proper working order at all times.

Personal Protective Clothing:             Due to a variety of potential hazards in the workplace, it is each
employee’s responsibility to take every precaution to protect themselves and others by completing job
tasks in a safe and conscientious manner.

In addition to practicing safe work habits, employees are required to wear Personal Protective Clothing
and Equipment as may be designated for their work area or job site and as dictated by their job duties.
Generally, attire is governed by concerns for personal safety and what is appropriate or suitable for the
type of work as determined by this safety program, the work area or job site supervisor, or the Safety
Coordinator. Employee attire should complement an environment that reflects a safe, efficient, orderly
and professionally operated business.
Personal Protective Equipment:               Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) may be issued to
employees if job duties or work areas require personal safety equipment. In these cases the employee is
responsible for the care and maintenance of company-issued safety equipment.

DCI will replace issued safety equipment if it is worn out through normal use. Equipment that is lost or
damaged through negligence will have to be replaced at employee’s expense. DCI will issue Personal
Protective Equipment for temporary use by visitors on job sites. If you expect to have visitors on a job
site, contact the Safety Coordinator in advance to arrange proper equipment.

Visitors, guests or employees entering a work area or job site must comply with safety regulations in that
area.

Jobs at DCI have been reviewed for the types of Personal Protective Equipment needed for performing
job duties. However, if an employee does not feel comfortable performing certain job tasks without a
particular kind of safety equipment, s/he should contact the Safety Coordinator or Human Resource
Department for an evaluation of the situation.

   Safety Glasses: Safety glasses are used to protect the eyes from flying particles, dust, small
    chemical splashes, and any other hazard that may damage the eyes through impact. The safety
    glasses we use are designed to protect the eyes from 90% of the hazards likely to be encountered.
    The other 10% of hazards require the use of chemical splash goggles or the use of the full-face shield.

    The chemical splash goggles will be used when pouring or transporting large volumes of solvents or
    other liquid chemicals. The full-face shield protects the entire face from particle impact injuries and
    will be used when grinding or sand blasting.

    Safety glasses, chemical splash goggles, and full-face shields are available from the Tool
    Room/Materials Department.

•   Hearing Protection: One of the least noticeable injuries in the workplace is loss of hearing. It
    slowly accumulates over time until it becomes apparent that hearing has been lost. Whenever loud,
    loud repetitive, repetitive, impact-related noise is encountered, hearing protection should be used.
    Desibles above 85
    We have several pairs of the ear cover, muffler type hearing protection. Also available are the foam
    plug type earplugs. These are as effective as the ear cover type and are more comfortable for some
    people to wear. Hearing protection is available from the Tool Room/Materials Department.

   Hardhats:

    Hardhats are available from the Tool Room/Materials Department. All employees are required to
wear Hard Hats on all DCI jobs. Failure to wear a Hard Hat constitutes grounds for disciplinary action up
to and including termination. The decision to wear a Hard Hat is not up to the worker; only the
Superintendent or Safety Specialist from DCI may determine if Hard Hats are not required. Don’t be
caught without your Hard Hat on!!
OSHA 1926.100 HEAD PROTECTION
        (a) Employees working in areas where there is a possible danger of head injury from impact,
            falling or flying objects, or from electrical shock and burns, shall be protected by protective
            helmets.

General Duty Clause 11-5-90, S (a) S (b)
        Each Employer –
        (1) Shall furnish to each of his employees employment and a place of employment which are free
            from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm
            to his employees;
        (2) Shall comply with Occupational Safety and Health standards promulgated under this Act.

OSHA 1910.132 P.P.E.
Personal Protective Equipment (P.P.E.) shall be provided used and maintained in a sanitary condition. It
shall also be of a safe design and constructed for the work to be performed. The Employer shall verify a
workplace hazard assessment has been conducted through a written certification that identifies the
workplace evaluation.

What is P.P.E.?
Personal Protective Equipment includes all clothing and accessories designed to create a barrier against
workplace hazards (Keller – What OSHA Really means)

In order for the policy on wearing P.P.E. to be successful, all employees need to be involved and become
pro-active. Some of the key players are the Job Supervisors. Job Supervisors should understand that
they are responsible for full compliance with established Company Policy, not limited to production, but
also “accident prevention”. On the plus side of “Working to be the Best” it is one of our goals to become
accident free. A well-developed plan, with adequate provisions for monitoring its progress will result in
effective accident prevention.

(1) Hardhats

The following policy plan for the wearing of hardhats is as follows:

a) All Construction Workers shall wear hardhats appropriate for head exposure at all times on the job.
   [Reference OSHA 1926.100 (a)]

b) Workers will not be allowed to wear hardhats that have had the shell altered in any way. Only
   appropriate Company and safety stickers are allowed on the Hardhat. [Manual of Accident Prevention
   for Construction]

c) Wearing of Hardhats on Company property (not including job sites) is not necessary unless the work
   being performed dictates, i.e. overhead exposure or other hazards. [refer to OSHA 1926.100]

d) All levels of supervision shall be responsible for ensuring that workers wear or use the proper
    protective equipment and that the equipment is kept in good repair.
e) Should a worker arrive at a Diamond Construction, Inc. job site without his/her issued hardhat; the
   individual will be loaned a hardhat from the Supervisor for the day. If the worker arrives the
    following day without his/her hardhat it will be the worker’s responsibility to purchase a hardhat from
    the attending Supervisor.
f) To better insure and understand who’s who on job sites the following colors have been adopted:
         Blue-office personal
         Red- visitors
g) Disciplinary Action – refer to pages 8,9,10 of the Employee Policy Handbook.

(2) General
a) Hazards encountered and associated with the construction industry are capable of causing bodily
   injury, illness, lost time and even death to the worker. Accidents occur among workers because of
   failure to recognize and prepare for the hazards. Instituting and using all P.P.E. is therefore a plus,
   not only to the employees but also the company and all interested parties (Insurance Company –
   employees’ families, etc.).

b) Periodic evaluations of this program should be conducted not only by the Safety Coordinator but also
   by the Safety Committee and reported to the CEO and Business Director.

c) This information will facilitate employee involvement in the P.P.E. program, assist the company in
   auditing the adequacy of the program, and provide a record for compliance determinations by OSHA.

d) All of the levels of this policy mentioned above are a basic means of achieving results in the best
   interest of safety, not only for the employees but also for Diamond Construction, Inc.

(3) Summary of hardhat usage at Diamond Construction, Inc.

a) Painters
   As for painters, the general consensus is that once all hazardous areas have been abated and no longer
   present a hazard and the painter will not be passing around or through a hazardous area, then and only
   then will the painter be excused from wearing a hardhat. The final release of this subpart on wearing
   the specific P.P.E. is that the project book or any other written or verbal order does not mandate the
   wearing of hardhats.

b) Inside finish work
   The work usually being performed by carpenters in the final stages, generally does not present any
   kind of hazardous expose to falling or flying objects, which allows us to dictate the same policy as is
   allowable for the painters.

c) Roofers
   From the OSHA standpoint, roofing is one of the more hazardous jobs of the construction industry,
   mostly just from the nature of the work being performed, not only because they are always above
   everything and everyone, also that they create the most objects falling or being thrown down. This
   profession is one of the most regulated (OSHA 1926 – subpart C, E, H, I, L, M, T, X).

    In the best interest of all workers all roofing crews will wear hardhats.

d) Distinctions

    Blue Hardhat – Office Personnel
The reason for multiple colors is to distinguish between positions in the field. In case of an emergency a
worker can identify the Superintendent by his/her white hardhat. This is for safety information only; the
various colored hardhats are not for prestige.

   Foot Protection:

    DCI and OSHA Recommended footwear:
    (What DCI recommends Superintendents and Supervisors tell new and old employees)

    Leather Boot, 6” Lace-up, oil/chemical and puncture resistance sole, with steel-toe.

    DCI Mandatory footwear guidelines:
    (What DCI requires as a minimum for footwear safety-mandatory)

           Steel toes and leather boots if required by customer or contract
           Leather boot, 6”, lace-up is authorized
           Composite boot (Hiking/Sport) shoe, must be 6” height, lace-up is authorized
           No sport/canvas/vinyl low tops (less then 6” height)
           No sandals/slippers

    Did you know that DCI has a boot purchase program?

    DCI has a boot program to help all employees purchase safety-working boots.

       Staff can charge boots on account and have the cost taken out of their paychecks over a two-week
        span.
       DCI will contribute $25.00 to the cost of the boots, the employee may choose between a steel-
        toed or non-steel-toed boot. The employee needs to understand that if they select to purchase a
        non-steel-toed boot and they find themselves on a mandatory steel-toed job that DCI will not pay
        for a second pair of steel-toed boots.
       The DCI boot purchase program is available to all new employees to help purchase there first pair
        of safety footwear. DCI reserves the right to discontinue the boot program at any time at the sole
        discretion of management.
       Replacement of worn out safety footwear will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

   Fall Protection

    DCI’s Fall Protection Policy follows OSHA Standard 1926. 1926.501 Duty to have fall protection.

    (a) General (1) this section sets forth requirements for employers to provide fall protection systems.
    All fall protection required by this section shall conform to the criteria set forth in § 1926.502 of this
    subpart.

    (2) The employer shall determine if the walking/working surfaces on which its employees are to work
    have the strength and structural integrity to support employees safely. Employees shall be allowed to
    work on those surfaces only when the surfaces have the requisite strength and structural integrity.

    (B)(1) Unprotected sides and edges. Each employee on a walking/working surface (horizontal and
    vertical surface) with an unprotected side or edge which is 6 feet or more above a lower level shall be
    protected from falling by the use of guardrail systems, safety net systems, or personal fall arrest
    systems.

    (2) Leading edges. (i) Each employee who is constructing a leading edge 6 feet or more above lower
    levels shall be protected from falling by guardrail systems, safety net systems, or personal fall arrest
    systems.

    (ii) Each employee on a walking/working surface 6 feet or more above a lower level where leading
    edges are under construction, but who is not engaged in the leading edge work, shall be protected
    from falling by a guardrail system, safety net system, or personal fall arrest system. If a guardrail
    system is chosen to provide fall protection, and a controlled access zone has already been established
    for leading edge work, the control line may be used in lieu of a guardrail along the edge that parallels
    the leading edge.

    a) The employer shall instruct each employee in the recognition and avoidance of unsafe conditions
    and the regulations applicable to his/her work environment to control or eliminate any hazards or
    other exposure to illness or injury.

    b) The employer is responsible for requiring the wearing of appropriate personal protective equipment
    in all operations where there is an exposure to hazardous conditions or where activity indicates the
    need for using such equipment to reduce the hazards to the employees.

    Requirements of personnel working on any leading edge or unprotected edge higher than 6 feet shall
    first be instructed in the wearing and operation of safety harness, lanyard, and lifeline. Training
    records shall include but not be limited to the name and signature of each employee, the name and
    signature of the trainer, the date of training, and a brief description and outline of materials covered.

    It is the duty of the Superintendent in conjunction with the safety coordinator to enforce this policy.
    All employees on a leading edge of 6 feet or more will wear a safety harness and lanyard and be tied
    off. DCI Safety Management will approve any alternations made to this policy.

•   Material Handling and Earth Moving Equipment: Material handling and earth moving
    equipment will be equipped with approved rollover protective structures and safety belts as required
    for the protection of the operators.

•   Aerial Lifts and Erection Procedures: Hi-Reaches that are to be used for the elevation of
    personnel to heights above the ground shall be equipped with controls at the ground level and also in
    the work basket. Both sets of controls will be inspected regularly and kept in good working
    condition. Erection of material will be accomplished only with approved type cranes and derricks.
    Lifting lines and chokers will be inspected regularly for damage and discarded when found to be
    defective. All personnel working from aerial baskets will be belted off.

•   Protective Grounds: All 120-volts single-phase receptacle outlets that are to be used for
    construction power (excluding permanent receptacles in the control building) will be provided with
    approved type ground-fault circuit interrupters for protection of the personnel. Cord sets will be
    protected from damage and inspected regularly for possible damage. Repairs will be made as
    necessary to keep all equipment in good working condition.

   Safety Harnesses: Safety harnesses are available from the Tool Room/Materials
    Department.(Safety Belts are illegal)
   Respirators: Respirators are available from the Safety Coordinator. All employees who need to use
    a respirator must complete an annual Medical evaluation Questionaire. The employee must also meet
    other criteria as set forth by OSHA reg. 29 CFR 1910.-1926

•   Gloves: We have several types of gloves for use in protecting hands in our work areas or on job
    sites:

    1. Heavy cotton work gloves: These gloves should be used to protect the hands from abrasion and
       heat. They are available from the Tool Room/Materials Department and should be used when
       performing the following tasks:
       a) demolishing or transporting lumber and wood products
       b) demolishing or transporting sheet metal and unfinished metal products

    2. Green nitryle gloves: These are our general-purpose chemical protection gloves. They will
       protect the hands from all but the harshest chemicals. These gloves are available from the Tool
       Room/Materials Department.

    3. Heavy Leather Gloves: Theses are for those employee’s involved in welding and handling hot
materials.

•   Rubber Aprons: The natural rubber apron is used to protect clothing from chemical splash other
    substances that will harm the clothes or the operator by being trapped next to the skin by the clothing.
    Any contaminated clothing should be removed immediately. Rubber aprons are available from the
    Tool Room/Materials Department and should be used when performing the following tasks:
    1. transporting or transferring chemicals
    2. Printing and painting of some materials.

Fire Extinguishers and First Aid Kits:                 Fire extinguishers and first aid kits are located in
various places in DCI’s office and shop areas and on job sites where required. The type of fire
extinguisher located in an area has been strategically placed there to extinguish the type of fire (chemical,
electrical, wood, paper, etc.), which would most likely occur with materials or substances in that area.
Employees should become familiar with the use and locations of fire extinguishers and first aid kits in
their work areas in case of an emergency.

Employees will be trained in the use and function of safety equipment during the safety orientation
program and receive refresher training annually thereafter.

Building Evacuation:           Situations may occur which would require employee evacuation of DCI’s
office and/or shop areas. Should such an event occur, employees must evacuate these areas as quickly as
possible. Therefore it is extremely important that employees familiarize themselves with the nearest
emergency exits to their work areas. Since there are no audible alarms in the buildings, an announcement
by telephone or in-person will notify employees to vacate the facilities.

Immediately following such an announcement, employees are to walk to the nearest emergency exit, exit
the building and proceed to a predetermined location outdoors and wait for the supervisor to take an
employee count to make sure all employees are accounted for.

Supervisors must immediately report employee counts to the Safety Coordinator.
Employees are to remain at their evacuation sites and wait for further instructions. Under no
circumstances are employees to re-enter the buildings until the Safety Coordinator indicates it is safe to
do so.

Outside Contractors or Suppliers:                It is the responsibility of the Safety Coordinator and/or
the Human Resource Department to contact outside contractors or suppliers doing work in DCI’s office
and shop areas to determine what chemicals or substances will be brought into the workplace.
Contractors or suppliers will be required to provide Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS’s) for those
materials. The contractors or suppliers will be provided with the same information from DCI.

The Safety Coordinator will ensure that all individuals concerned will be provided with the following
information:
1. Hazardous chemicals or substances to which they may be exposed while in the workplace.
2. Measures to reduce the possibility of exposure.
3. Location of Material Safety Data Sheets for all hazardous substances.
Hazardous Chemical Communication Program

General Company Policy:             In the process of work at DCI, employees may be exposed to
hazardous chemicals. In order to protect the safety of employees and the environment, we are enacting
this hazardous chemical communication program. This program will include labeling of containers,
hazard warnings in areas of chemical use, the posting of material safety data sheets and proper training for
all affected employees.

The Human Resource Department will coordinate the program with assistance from the Safety
Coordinator. Copies of this program may be obtained from the above persons or from the work area or
job site supervisors.

Under this program, employees will be informed of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration
(OSHA) standards, the hazardous properties of chemicals with which they work, safe handling and
disposal procedures and the procedures to insure protection from the chemicals. The program will be
integrated into the existing safety program to insure that DCI continues to provide a safe and accident-free
work environment.

_____________________________                                     __________________________
President, Diamond Construction, Inc.                                    Date

Labeling:       This program will insure that all hazardous chemicals will be properly labeled. Labels will
include chemical identity, hazard warnings, first aid procedures, chemical manufacturer and appropriate
safety measures. The Tool Room/Materials Department, in conjunction with the Safety Coordinator, will
insure that all containers of hazardous chemicals are properly labeled and that chemicals shipped or
transported from DCI are properly labeled.

If an employee transfers materials from one bulk container to another bulk container, both must be
properly labeled. If an employee transfers chemicals from a labeled bulk container to another for
immediate use, no labels are required on the portable container. If new labeling is required, these
materials will be made available from the Tool Room/Materials Department.

List of Hazardous Chemicals & Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS):                               The
Safety Coordinator will assemble and maintain a list of all hazardous chemicals and assemble all
corresponding MSDS. A master list will be kept in his/her office. Sub lists will be provided to affected
work area or job site supervisors as necessary.

These lists will include the name of the chemicals, specific associated health and safety hazards,
protection and handling procedures as well as the MSDS. These lists will be designed to provide clear
and practical information regarding hazardous chemicals. If questions arise, consult the Safety
Coordinator.

The Safety Coordinator will be responsible to make sure lists and MSDS are accurate and up-to-date.

Training:     Employees at DCI will receive training on the hazard communication standard and the safe
use of hazardous chemicals from the Human Resource Department or Safety Coordinator during their
initial training period. Additional and more specific training will be provided when the employee begins
work in their final work area. Whenever a new hazard is introduced, all affected employees will receive
the proper training. Work area or job site supervisors on an as-needed basis will conduct reviews and
updates. Work area or job site supervisors will be trained regarding all safety hazards and appropriate
protective measures so they will be available to answer questions and monitor daily work practices for
safety.

The training program will emphasize the following items:

1. Summary of the hazardous material communication standard and this program.
2. Chemical and physical properties of hazardous materials in DCI’s work areas or on job sites. This
   will include reactivity with other materials, potential fire or explosion; spill danger to humans and the
   environment and methods for detecting spills or unwanted release of the chemicals.
3. Health hazards, including signs and symptoms of exposure, medical conditions aggravated by
   exposure and proper first aid techniques in the event of exposure.
4. Proper safety and procedures to protect against hazards; handling and storage procedures; what
   protective equipment is appropriate and where it is available.
5. Emergency response procedures and techniques to be used in case of a spill; where the spill cleanup
   material is located.
6. Where MSDS’s are located; how to interpret the information presented on MSDS and container labels
   and where employees may obtain more information about hazards.

The Safety Coordinator will insure that the training program is accurate and up-to-date with current use of
chemical materials. Retraining will be provided whenever a new hazard is introduced into the workplace.
Input from employees will be used to access and improve the training program. It is company policy to
provide the best training possible to insure a safe, healthy and productive work environment.

Non-Routine Tasks:            When an employee is required to do a non-routine or newly required task, a
special training session will be held to inform him/her of the possibilities of exposure to hazardous
chemicals and of the proper precautions to avoid or minimize exposure.

Communication with Contractors/Subcontractors:                            The Safety Coordinator, in
conjunction with work area or job site supervisors, will advise outside contractors/subcontractors or their
designated representative of the chemical hazards to which his/her employees may be exposed. Access to
this program and all MSDS will be provided, as well as specific warning or procedures as the specific job
dictates. It shall then be the responsibility of the contractor/subcontractor or designated representative to
provide this information to his/her employees.

Any chemical brought on DCI’s job sites or into its work areas by a contractor/subcontractor will be
reviewed by the work area or job site supervisor in conjunction with DCI’s Safety Coordinator and
appropriate warnings or training will be provided to DCI employees in the affected area.

Additional Information:           Any employee with questions, suggestions or concerns about this
program or any other safety matter may direct these inquiries to the Safety Coordinator or representative
of the Human Resource Department.
                           Machinery and Equipment
Safety Code:        Before using any machine or device, the employee will be fully briefed by the
supervisor or designated trainer in the use of that machine. Training will include proper operation,
appraisal of the potential danger, methods of preventing unsafe operation and what safety devices are
appropriate.

When doing maintenance or repair on powered machinery, the power will be shut off and cord unplugged.
If a breaker is used to power down the machine, a lock will be placed on the breaker panel to deny access
to anyone who might accidentally re-power the unit while it is being worked on. Hasps have been placed
on all breaker panels. Padlocks with only one key are available from the Safety Coordinator. The key
will be kept on the person doing the work on the locked out machine. No breaker thus locked out will be
accessed by anyone except the person who locked it out.

When working on powered machinery, rings, bracelets, watches and neck chains will be removed. Hair
and loose clothing will be tied back or rolled up. This is to prevent items connected to the operator from
being caught and drawn into the machine.

Compressed air hoses present certain risks for the operator and those around them. Our blow tips are
OSHA approved and should not be tampered with. Air should never be blown into the face, ears, and
mouth or directed at the skin. Though the chance is small, it is possible to break the skin or rupture
membranes internally. Safety glasses will always be used to avoid blowing foreign matter into the eyes.
If a problem with a compressed air hose is suspected, the Safety Coordinator should be notified
immediately. Compressed air can be potentially fatal and should be treated with respect.

Grinder and Sander:            These are power machines and therefore require the removal of all rings,
necklaces, bracelets, watches, etc. Also sleeves will be rolled up and hair tied back. This is to avoid the
possibility of these items being caught in the machine and drawing the operator in with them. The work
should be placed flat on the support table, never held above the table with the fingers. If held improperly,
the work can catch between the support table and the abrasive disk and force the fingers into the disk.
The work should be placed on the side of the table where the rotation of the disk forces the work down
toward the table. Safety glasses and a nuisance level dust mask are required while using this equipment.

Drill Press:     This is a power machine so the jewelry and hair rules apply. For larger holes, a slower
speed is needed and for smaller holes, a higher speed is permissible. If in doubt, consult the shop
supervisor. The work should be clamped to the table or held securely in a vise. If this isn’t done, the drill
can grab and spin the work, injuring the operator and possible ruining the work. Small metal chips can be
very chemically reactive and should be cleaned up during work and after finishing. As a courtesy, all
tools should be returned to their toolboxes after use. Safety glasses are required and a face shield is
recommended.

Buffing Wheels:         The greatest dangers of the buffing wheel are the flinging of metal particles into
the eyes and the breathing and ingestion of these same metal particles. Safety goggles are required. For
prolonged buffing jobs, a nuisance level dust mask should be used.
           DIAMOND CONSTRUCTION, INC.
                                  “WORKING TO BE THE BEST”
    Our Values                       Our Belief                          Our Vision                     Our Mission
People Before Profit              Quality Teamwork                Continual Improvement               Satisfied Clients




                                Job Site Safety Program

 Introduction:        DCI’s Job Site Safety Program is under the direct supervision and responsibility of
 the job site supervisor on specific DCI’s construction sites. S/he is the resident project representative.

 Responsibilities of Job Site Supervisor and Lead Worker(s): It is vitally important
 that the enforcement of the Job Site Safety Program be carried out by the job site supervisor or foreman
 and his/her lead workers in direct contract with labor crews. All supervisory employees are expected to
 cooperate fully in carrying out their responsibilities of maintaining safe working conditions and safe
 equipment. Each supervisor will become familiar with the provisions of the construction specifications
 and the requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health regulations.

 The job site supervisor, in conjunction with DCI’s Safety Coordinator, has the following responsibilities:

 Training:
 •    First Aid Training: Every job supervisor will work toward obtaining a current American Red
      Cross First Aid Certificate. DCI will make this training available from time to time on an as-needed
      basis.

 •    New Employee Training: DCI’s Safety Coordinator, in conjunction with the job site supervisor,
      will ensure that each new employee receives a copy of DCI’s General Safety Program and Job Site
      Safety Program in addition to a basic safety orientation at the time of hire. In addition, the job site
      supervisor will provide a more detailed and individualized training session specific to the new
      employee’s job tasks.

 •    Ongoing Employee Training: The job site supervisor is expected to ensure that each of his/her
      workers are properly experienced and trained to do the tasks at hand. Verbal instruction,
      supplemented by literature and placards if appropriate, will be issued by supervisors when assigning
      new tasks to employees for the first time - and as reminders to experienced personnel - to familiarize
      them with the necessary safety precautions on the new task.
Communication:

•   Safety Posters and Signs: It is the job site supervisor’s responsibility to ensure that hard hats are
    wore on all DCI job sites-a sign stating such will be posted at all work areas stating
    CONSTRUCTION AREA – HARD HATS REQUIRED BEYOND THIS POINT.
    All other signs and posters as required by state and federal law will be posted.

    In addition, the job site supervisor will ensure that adequate barricades, flasher lights, signs and
    signals are provided as necessary to insure protection of the work and safety of the public.
    Acceptable warning and detour signs are to be provided when necessary.

•   Material Safety Data Sheets: The job site supervisor will post Material Safety Data Sheets
    (MSDS) at the job site and instruct employees in the use of specific hazardous products and the
    interpretation of the MSDS.

    The job site supervisor will also advise outside contractors/subcontractors or their designated
    representative of the chemical hazards to which his/her employees may be exposed. It shall then be
    the responsibility of the contractor/subcontractor or designated representative to provide this
    information to his/her employees.

    Any chemical brought on DCI’s job sites or into its work areas by a contractor/subcontractor will be
    reviewed by the job site supervisor in conjunction with DCI’s Safety Coordinator and appropriate
    warnings or training will be provided to DCI employees in the affected area.

•   Tool Box Safety Meetings: The job site supervisor will conduct a brief “Tool Box” meeting
    during work hours or just prior to the start of the workday on a designated day each week. The
    subject matter of these meetings will consist of discussion of this Safety Program and the necessary
    precautions for the work at hand and safety materials provided by DCI.

•   Personal Protective Clothing and Equipment: The job site supervisor will ensure that
    employees have been provided with and trained to use the appropriate personal protective clothing
    and equipment for the work at hand. It is the responsibility of the job site supervisor to enforce the
    use of this clothing and equipment as required for both DCI employees and job site visitors.

First Aid and Medical Care:
•   First Aid Kits: First aid kits will be located with other required first aid equipment in the project
    office or other prominent and accessible location if there is no project office. Individuals in
    possession of kits will be responsible for completeness of material contained in kits. Replacement
    materials will be obtained from the project office.

•   Medical Care: The job site supervisor, in conjunction with DCI’s Human Resource Department or
    Safety Coordinator, will determine the nearest appropriate medical facilities to the specific job site
    and post this information in a prominent location on the job site. The list will include the following
    information:

        1.   Doctor, Location, Phone

        2. Ambulance, Location, Phone
        3. Hospital, Location, Phone

        4. Emergency Phone: 911

        The job site supervisor will ensure that all work-related accidents are reported to him/her
        immediately. The job site supervisor will convey this information to DCI’s Human Resource
        Department at the earliest reasonable opportunity. Preferably the same day, if not mandatory that
        work week.

Traffic Control and Protection of the Public:
Construction Traffic Control:

1. Construction personnel will park personal vehicles in designated parking areas.

2. Haul routes for company vehicles will be laid out by the supervisor of that work item and will be
   inspected for safe load capacity and traffic hazards. Drivers will be instructed and cautioned on the
   road limitations.

3. All vehicles entering and/or exiting any public roadway will be flagged in and out of the job site.

Protection of the Public:

1. No visitors will be authorized to enter construction sites unless accompanied by DCI personnel and
   provided with appropriate protective equipment.

2. Improvements to access roads that are open to public thoroughfare will be conducted in such manner
   to cause the least possible obstruction and inconvenience to the public traffic. Convenient access to
   public and private facilities will be maintained and, when necessary, temporary approaches to
   crossings will be provided.

3. Special consideration will be given to work areas accessible to the public in general and children in
   particular. At the end of each day, such work areas will be cleared of obvious hazards and equipment
   will be protected from inadvertent unsafe acts by others.

4. Good housekeeping will be maintained at all times to prevent possibility of injury to company
   personnel and public.

Fire Prevention and Protection:

Fire Prevention: Employees working with or near open flames shall be responsible for reducing fire
hazards in their work area. Special care is necessary in the shop areas (welding and cutting torches), on
the carpenter platform, near heating stoves and around all electrical equipment. Regular inspection of
these areas is required of all personnel in charge. The burning of trash will be prohibited as well as the
burning of rubbish. Good housekeeping is maintained to eliminate the accumulation of trash and rubbish
which will be possible sources of fire hazard.
  Special attention will be given when working on or around gas tanks and other highly
flammables.
Fire Protection: Fire extinguishers in working order will be located in area of greatest fire risk.
Employees in these areas will become familiar with the location and proper use of the extinguisher. Job
site supervisors will acquaint themselves with the nearest available fire department to any work area for
which they are responsible.

Sanitation Facilities:
Toilets: The job site supervisor will determine if work crews are authorized to use the existing toilets in
the building. If so, all personnel are reminded that this is a privilege and are expected to keep areas neat
and clean. DCI will also arrange for chemical toilets to be placed on all job sites.

Portable Water: Portable water containers will be provided at the job site with disposable drinking
cups and a receptacle for their disposal.

Washing Facilities: Adequate washing facilities will be provided for employees using insecticides,
herbicides, paints or other contaminates which may be harmful.

Safety Inspections and Reports
Safety Inspections:

1. The job site supervisor will continually be on the lookout during regular site inspections for unsafe
   and/or unhealthy conditions and will ensure they are corrected.

2. Individual lead workers will check their work areas frequently for unsafe physical conditions and
   work practices. Dangerous conditions that are to remain, such as deep trenches, adjacent electrical
   power lines, etc. should be noted and workers will be cautioned to stay away from them. Deep
   trenches will have barriers installed to protect personnel and livestock. Dangerous practices and
   conditions that constitute imminent hazard to life or property shall be corrected immediately.
   Continued unsafe practices by workers in any capacity following being advised of same by
   supervisory personnel will be cause for disciplinary action that may include immediate termination.

Reports:

1. Accident Reports will be completed for all accidents, no matter how minor, as described in the
   “Accident Reporting” section of DCI’s General Safety Program.

2. Weekly lists of all accidents and injuries will be compiled by job site supervisors for use at “Tool
   Box” Safety Meetings. The job site supervisor and work crews will discuss these accidents and
   injuries and the precautions taken to prevent their reoccurrence.

3. Copies of reports of weekly “Tool Box” safety meetings will be completed and provided to DCI’s
   Safety Coordinator office.

				
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