; Introduction to Criminal Justice
Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out
Your Federal Quarterly Tax Payments are due April 15th Get Help Now >>

Introduction to Criminal Justice

VIEWS: 6 PAGES: 6

  • pg 1
									             Introduction to Criminal Justice 
                              Instructor: Thaddeus D. Hicks 


   Intro to Criminal Justice is an exploration of the historical development, current 
operation, and future trends of criminal justice.  Emphasis will be placed on 
contemporary problems in the definition of law, the enforcement of law, strategies of 
policing, judicial systems, sentencing strategies, correctional practices, and emerging 
forms of justice.  While the focus of the content will be practices in the United States, we 
will also look at other cultures and their systems of justice. 

Course Description: 

This course will provide students with an introduction and overview of the system of 
criminal justice operated in the United States today.  Beginning with a survey of the 
sources, philosophies, and role of law in society, this course will provide a brief 
examination of those factors that distinguish civil, criminal and social justice from one 
another. 

Students will be introduced to the notion that our definitions of what constitutes a 
"crime", how society responds to it, and how we explain crime and criminals have 
changed over time.  Similarly, those methods used to measure and compare crime have 
also changed and students will be introduced to the major sources of our understanding of 
what we know about the extent of crime in society.  A broad survey of the origins, 
historical development of policing, prosecution, adjudication, sentencing and corrections 
in the United States will provide students with a basic understanding of the 
administration of criminal justice and challenge them to decide whether the criminal 
justice system is a "system" or a "process". 

Course Objectives:

   ·    To examine the basic organization of each of the major elements of the Criminal 
        Justice System.

   ·    To create an awareness of the challenges of the law enforcement, judiciary and 
        corrections elements in today's world.

   ·    To examine the operations of the various systems.

   ·    To examine the pathway which an individual follows from first arrest to 
        incarceration. 

Course Textbooks:
Hahn, Paul (1998) Emerging Criminal Justice, Thousand Oaks, Sage Publications 

Schmalleger, Frank. Criminal Justice Today, Eighth Edition. Upper Saddle River, NJ: 
   Prentice Hall. ISBN 0­13­184493­8 

Zehr, Howard (1995) Changing Lenses: A New Focus for Crime and Justice. Scottdale 
   PA., Herald Press. 

Zehr, Howard (2002) The Little Book of Restorative Justice, Intercourse, PA, Good 
   Books. 

Course Requirements: 

1.  Successfully complete one (1) short essay describing your view of Criminal Justice. 

2.  Complete 2 Papers.  The topics will be given in class, and the length will be 6­8 pages 
    each.  The student will use the MLA style. 

3.  Successfully complete one (1) group presentation.  The topic will be decided by class 
    conversations. 

4.   One (1) examination will be given.  The date will be announced in class. All 
     examinations will be based on material from the lectures, textbook and other 
     materials. 

5.   There will also be a potion of the grade decided by student attendance and class 
     participation.  Part of this grade will include the assigned readings.  Failure to do so 
     will be evident to the instructor and will affect this grade. 

Course Evaluation: 

                      Initial Essay                       100 points 

                      Paper 1                             100 points 

                      Paper 2                             100 points 

                      Group Presentation                  100 points 

                      Prison Design Paper                 100 points 

                      Attendance / Participation          100 points 

Late Assignment Penalty:
   Please take note of the dates when assignments are due. These dates are "carved in stone" 
   and are not negotiable. There will be no extensions of those dates unless a valid note 
   from your medical doctor, employer or the clerk of a court is provided to the instructor. 

   A late penalty of ten percent (10 %) of the total grade for the assignment will be 
   assessed for each day that your assignment is late. This means that your assignment will 
   be graded and then 10 points will be taken from your original grade for the 
   assignment...Ouch! 

   Grading: 

   No curve will be used to adjust grades. Your course grade will be based upon the total 
   number of points earned in the essay assignment, examinations, and class participation. 

                    "A" grades mean outstanding performance. Represents work of an 
                    exceptional quality. Content, organization and style all at a high 
90 ­ 100  A         comprehension of the subject and uses existing research and literature 
                    where appropriate. Also uses sound critical thinking, has innovative ideas 
                    on the subject, and shows personal engagement with the topic. 

                    "B" grades mean good performance. Represents work of good quality with 
                    no major weaknesses. Writing is clear and explicit and topic coverage and 
80 ­ 89    B        comprehension is more that adequate. Shows some degree of critical 
                    thinking and personal involvement in the work. Good use of existing 
                    knowledge on the subject. 

                    "C" grades mean satisfactory performance. Adequate work. Shows fair 
                    comprehension of the subject, but has some weaknesses in the content, 
70 ­ 79    C 
                    style and/or organization of the paper. Minimal critical awareness or 
                    personal involvement in the work. Adequate use of the literature. 

                    "D" grades mean a marginal performance. Minimally adequate work, 
                    barely at a passing level. Serious flaws in content, organization and/or style, 
60 ­ 69    D 
                    Poor comprehension of the subject and minimal involvement in the paper. 
                    Poor use of research and existing literature. 

                    "F" grades mean an inadequate understanding and application of the course 
0 ­ 60     F 
                    and its materials. Failing work. 

   Plagiarism: 

   College and University regulations regarding academic misconduct, as set forth in the 
   Hicks University Student Handbook and other University documents and publications 
   will be strictly enforced. Any student caught in the act of cheating will be assigned a 
   grade of F (0 points) for that examination and cannot retake the examination. If your
written work does not appear to be your own, you will be questioned informally about the 
issue. The general rule to follow is this: if a thought is not your original thought or a 
product of your analysis, then the original author should be cited. 

Assignments: 

      Week Of                           Topical Area and Assignment 



January           8     Introduction to Class 

January          10     Presentation of Initial Essays 

January          15     What Is Justice                           Chapter 1 

January          17     The Crime Picture                         Chapter 2 

January          22     The Search For Causes                     Chapter 3 

January          24     Criminal Law                              Chapter 4 

January          29     Paper on Police Identity 

January          31     Police: History & Structure               Chapter 5 

February          5     Police: Organization and                  Chapter 6 
                        Management 

February          7     Policing: Legal Aspects                   Chapter 7 

February         12     Police: Issues & Challenges               Chapter 8 

February         14     Guest Speaker: 

February         19     Courts: Structure and Participants        Chapter 9 

February         21     Pretrial Activities and the Criminal      Chapter 10 
                        Trial 

February         26     Sentencing                                Chapter 11 

February         28     Guest Speaker:  r 

March            11     Probation, Parole & Community             Chapter 12
                        Corrections 
March            13     ACJS                                       No Class 

March            18     ACJS                                       No Class 

March            20     Prisons and Jails                          Chapters 13 

March            25     Prison Life                                Chapter 14 

March            27     Prison Design Individual 
                        Presentations 

April            1      Prison Design Individual 
                        Presentation 

April            3      Juvenile Justice                           Chapter 15 

April            8      Drugs and Crime                            Chapter 16 

April            10     Terrorism and International                Chapter 17 
                        Criminal Justice 

April            15     The Future of Criminal Justice             Chapter 18 

April            17     In Class Preparation for Group 
                        Presentations on some aspect of 
                        Justice. 

April            22     Presentations 

April            24     Presentations 

April            29     Presentations 

May              1      Class wrap up, completion of Group 
                        presentations if necessary. Future of 
                        Justice Paper Due 

Criminal Justice Resources on the World Wide Web: 

There are a number of sites on the World Wide Web (WWW) which may provide you 
with information concerning the criminal justice system. Please avoid sites such as Time, 
Newsweek and The Democrat­Gazette, in favor of those sites which are more "academic" 
in nature, such as those sites maintained by a government agency, college or university. 
Examples of those sites which are more "scholarly" include: 

National Criminal Justice Reference Service at http://www.ncjrs.org/
Federal Bureau of Prisons at http://www.bop.gov/ 

National Criminal Justice Reference Services at http://www.ncjrs.gov/

								
To top