University of Michigan - DOC 10

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					   University of Michigan
   MLK Tournament 2005

         packet by



Michigan State
      B
     and
Chicago      C
Michigan MLK Tournament 2005
Packet by Michigan State B and Chicago C

TOSSUPS

1. This river begins in a region with 2,000 mm of rainfall a year and ends in one with less than 50
mm. In-between, it flows through or borders three countries. The country in which it has its source
is completely surrounded by the country through which this river flows for most of its length. A little
southwest of Kimberley, it is joined by its most important tributary, the Vaal. For 10 points, name this
river that flows from Lesotho west to form the border between South Africa and Namibia, and for which a
Free State is named.

        Answer: Orange River


2. Martin Schongauer etched a version of this scene between 1480 and 1490, and Matthias
Grunewald included one in his Isenheim Altarpiece. In the triptych by Heironymous Bosch, the
central panel features an elaborate Black Mass, and in the version by Salvador Dali, monstrously tall
horses and elephants with impossibly spindly legs confront the title figure. Athanasius' biography of the
title figure give us the literary evidence for, for 10 points, what event affecting a fourth-century Egyptian
hermit and pioneer of monasticism?


        Answer: the Temptation of Saint Anthony


3. The second scene of this play affords a comic interlude in which the protagonist's servant
provides a philosophical proof to three scholars who have come to seek him. Earlier on, that
protagonist had combined two Bible verses into a proof that the Bible says everyone is damned. Its
author was also accused by a contemporary playwright of stating that "Christ was a bastard and his
mother dishonest," although not of imitating his character and turning to magic. Helen of Troy is conjured
up by Mephistophelis for the title character's delectation in, for 10 points, what play by Christopher
Marlowe?

        Answer: Doctor Faustus


4. In his research, he asked participants questions about a man who would need to steal a drug to
save his wife from a terminal illness. He was criticized by Carol Gilligan for his failure to consider
how gender might impact responses to his question. In the papers "Stage and Sequence" and "From Is
to Ought," he developed and defended his most famous theory. FTP, name this Harvard psychologist
who developed a six-level theory of moral development, beginning with mere obedience to the law and
progressing to "postconventional morality."

        Answer: Lawrence Kohlberg


5. Recent sightings of it have occurred in a state park along Lake Michigan and in the Toledo area,
possibly as the result of people breaking a quarantine on thirteen Michigan counties, including the
Ann Arbor area. As a result, Major League Baseball may face a bat shortage and a certain kind of
tree is being cut down all over northern Ohio. Agrilus plannipennis Fairmaire is the name of, for 10
points, what pestiferous insect commonly named for its color and an action it has performed in the
Midwest on about 8 million trees of the genus Fraxinus.

        Answer: The Emerald Ash Borer (prompt on "Ash Borer")


6. After her younger sister is crippled at age three, she gets to know Lady Aashild. Like her
creator, who converted to Catholicism in 1924, this former fiancée of Simon Andresson and
eventual wife of Erlund Nikulausson becomes more religious toward the end of her life, which in
her case means until she dies of the Black Death. Her creator earned a Nobel Prize in 1928 for The
Bridal Wreath, The Mistress of Husaby, and The Cross, all of which portray this character in medieval
Norway. For 10 points, name this creation of Sigrid Undset.

        Answer: Kristen Lavransdatter


7. This city has leant its name to a breed of largish, floppy-eared dogs with short greyish-brown
hair that are featured in the photographs of artist Bill Wegman. It is located in Thuringia, near
Erfurt, and it was the city where Liszt lived and from which Wagner fled in 1849. Its most revered
inhabitant moved there in 1775 and died there in 1832, in between which he wrote Wilhelm Meister's
Apprenticeship and hung out with Schiller. For 10 points, name this city that was the residence of Goethe
and where, in 1918, a new constitution was made for the post-WWI German republic.

        Answer: Weimar

8. Along with the Unique Prime Factorization Theorem, it was rediscovered in 1982 by Doug
Lenat's "Automated Mathematician" system. In 1973, Chen Jing Run made a substantial
advancement toward proving it by showing that all sufficiently large even naturals can be
expressed as the sum of a prime number and the product of at most two prime numbers. In 2000, a
$1,000,000 prize was offered to anyone who could prove it, but the prize went unclaimed and the offer
expired in 2002. For ten points, name this unsolved problem from number theory, which asserts that every
even natural greater than two can be expressed as the sum of two prime numbers.

        Answer: (strong) Goldbach conjecture


9. In 1794, he published a pamphlet advocating the general arming of the German people to halt
French advances. His country suffered the humiliation of the Treaty of Schönbrunn six days after
his appointment to his most famous position, but his arrangement of the marriage of Napoleon and Marie-
Louise improved relations with France. For 10 points, name this designer of the repressive Carlsbad
Decrees and architect of the Congress of Vienna, the long-time minister of foreign affairs in nineteenth
century Austria.

        Answer: Klemens von Metternich

10. Both its first and third movements begin with a pianissimo tympani roll and end with a brass
chorale. Harp glissandos and wind arabesques feature in the second movement, which is called Jeux
de Vague, although the composer disliked it when these were seen as influenced by Impressionism. The
score's title page famously displayed Hokusai's print of "The Wave" in, for 10 points, what nautically-
titled orchestral piece by Claude Debussy.
Answer: La Mer or The Sea


11. Chapter Two is entitled "Spinners End." Chapter Six is entitled "Dracos Detour". Chapter
Fourteen is entitled "Felix Felicis." The mysterious title character's name is not known, but will become
so on 16 July of this year, although it is certainly not Mark Evans, Hagrid or Lord Voldemort. For 10
points, name this worthy successor to "the Prisoner of Azkaban" and "the Goblet of Fire," which will be
the sixth of J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter novels.

        Answer: Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince


12. This man gained power after the Battle of Tecoac in 1876, but a few months later got himself
elected president, promising not to allow his own re-election. He stepped down for a hand-picked
successor, Manuel Gonzalez, in 1880, but ran again himself four years later and went on to rule for
two more decades. He defeated Francisco Madero in the last election he won, but a military coup
immediately forced him from office. For 10 points, name this ruler of Mexico from 1876 to 1911.

        Answer: Porfirio Diaz

13. For Joule-Thomson processes, this quantity is zero. It is an extensive property, and under
standard conditions, for the creation of two moles of water from two moles of hydrogen gas and one
mole of oxygen gas, it is equal to -483.6 kilojoules. The free energy of a system can be calculated by
taking this quantity and subtracting the product of the temperature and entropy change. FTP, name this
thermodynamic quantity, the measure of the total heat gained or lost in a process, represented by delta-H.

        Answer: Enthalpy change
(accept _change in enthalpy_ and other reasonable equivalents, and _delta-H_ on an early buzz)


14. He once sang a revised set of lyrics to "You Give Love a Bad Name" at a Bon Jovi concert, and
sings "Underage Bichon" at the same Atlantic City venue where Robert Goulet performs. He calls
Philip Glass an "atonal ass" and says that Britney Spears has "the face that launched a thousand
preteen skanks" in his song "I Keed." For 10 points, name this cigar-smoking creation of Robert Smigel,
famous for having his plastic jaws squeezed shut by Eminem on the 2002 Video Music Awards.

        Answer: Triumph the Insult Comic Dog


15. Variants of this dance include the Kujawiak and Oberek, as well as the later Varsoviana. It
gained popularity in Germany in the seventeenth century thanks to Augustus of Saxony, but only in
the early nineteenth did it hit London and Paris. It is in three-four time, but has the accent on the
second or third beat, and is danced with a good deal of foot-stomping, heel-clicking and such. Borodin's
Petite Suite contains two, but still the most famous are the 50 or so for solo piano written by Chopin. For
10 points, name this folk dance that started in Poland's Mazovia region.

        Answer: Mazurka


16. It can be used to synthesize anisole from phenol and methyl iodide with relatively high yields.
However, if isopropyl bromide is used instead of methyl iodide, yields decrease considerably. This
reaction is a second-order nucleophilic substitution, and consequently requires the substrate to be
sterically unhindered to avoid a competing elimination. For ten points, name this elementary reaction
from organic chemistry, in which an alkoxide ion attacks an alkyl halide in an alcohol solvent to yield an
ether.

        Answer: Williamson ether synthesis


17. This follower of the Tractarian movement wrote hymns including "In the Bleak Midwinter,"
but also wrote short stories contained in 1870's Commonplace and Other Stories and 1874s Speaking
Likenesses. "Bloom down-cheeked peaches" and "swart-headed mulberries" tempt the maid Laura
who has to be saved by Lizzie in one of this poet's best-known works, which was originally published
with illustrations by her brother. "Goblin Market" was written by, for 10 points, what sister of a
prominent Pre-Raphaelite?

        Answer: Christina Rossetti


18. She arrived in her current residence either because her father couldn't stand her temper any
more, or because her older sister got mad at her for seducing her husband. The two relatives in
question are Kane Milohai and Na-maka-o-kaha'I, and another sister, Hiiaka, is the patroness of a
popular dance. She is known as "she who shapes the sacred land," and her original home was far to the
southwest in Tahiti, but now she resides in a location that gives constant evidence of her continued bad
temper. Mt. Kilauea is that residence of, for 10 points, what Hawaiian and Polynesian volcano goddess?

        Answer: Pele


19. Harold Bloom once recited this entire poem backwards, word for word, while drunk. The
section entitled "Three Songs" opens with an epigraph from Christopher Marlowes "Hero and
Leander," while section one, "Ave Maria," opens with a line of Seneca. Transportation is a major
theme, as the section named "Cape Hatteras" features an eight page poem on the airplane, while an old
mariner tells sea stories in "Cutty Sark." Pocahontas, Rip van Winkle, the New York subway are major
figures in for 10 pointswhat poem, conceived of as an American epic by its poet Hart Crane?

        Answer: The Bridge


20. He captured the forces of Colonel A.D. Streight near Cedar Bluffs, and his quarrels with
General Bragg earned him a promotion to Major General. A former slave dealer and enlisted
soldier, he refused to surrender at Fort Donelson and instead escaped to fight with distinction at
Shiloh. Among his victories were the battles of Brice's Crossroads and Fort Pillow, the latter of which
involved a massacre of 300 black Union soldiers. "Git thar furstest with the mostest" was the great
strategic maxim of, for 10 points, what brilliant cavalry commander who after the war helped found the
Ku Klux Klan.

        Answer: Nathan Bedford Forrest


21. It is the oldest surviving of the twenty schools of its religion, and its name means "teaching of
the elders." It promotes the "teaching of analysis," the logical investigation of religious doctrine
rather than blind faith. Steam-enterers, once-returners, non-returners, and arahant are levels of spirituality
that its followers can attain: the last group are those who have embraced the Nibbana and reached
Enlightenment. FTP, name this primary Buddhist sect of Southeast Asia.

        Answer: Theravada Buddhism


22. In mammalian development, Rathke's pouch forms parts of it, and another part of it, the pars
tuberalis, is only seen in amphibians and higher vertebrates. Its lobes, sometimes referred to as the
adenohypophysis and neurohypophysis, are connected via a portal vein that allows transfer of crucial
biochemicals. It stores hormones created by the hypothalamus and also produces many crucial hormones
of its own, including the growth hormone somatotropin. For ten points, name this small gland located at
the base of the brain that regulates endocrine function in vertebrates.

        Answer: pituitary gland [accept hypophysis before "adenohypophysis"]


23. This period saw the flowering of Pure Land Buddhism, as well as the spread of the Tendai and
Shingon Buddhist sects. This period began under the fiftieth emperor Kammu, though power was
actually held by the Fujiwara nobility. It is considered the peak of imperial court and culture, and the
lyrics to Kimi Ga Yo, the iroha, the Pillow Book, and the Tale of Genji were all written during, FTP, what
period of classical Japanese history that followed the Nara period and lasted from 794-1185 AD.

        Answer: Heian period


24. One of his pet causes in life was popularizing the works of the Earl of Shaftesbury, both by
translating his work and by plagiarizing it. To support his mistress, Madame de Pusieux, he took
to writing erotic novels such as The Indiscreet Toys. His other fiction includes "This is Not a Story"
and Rameau's Nephew, but his most famous work was originally planned as an adaptation of an Ephraim
Chambers work and was later extended to 17 volumes which included his own contributions on "the
beautiful" and "eclecticism." For 10 points, name this former friend of Rousseau and author of Jacques
the Fatalist who collaborated with D'Alembert on editing the Encyclopedie.

        Answer: Denis Diderot

25. As a verb, this word was used to refer to illegally importing slaves after the slave trade was
banned in the U.S. It is also the creature whose eye is the only thing moving among twenty snowy
mountains, according to a Wallace Stevens poem, and the nickname of the Lockheed stealth aircraft
with the official name SR-71. For 10 points, identify this creature, who is said to be "singing in the dead
of night" in a song by the Beatles, and which is baked into pies in increments of 24.

        Answer: blackbird


26. This movie's protagonist, much like Chris Frankel, was at one point caught by his mother
pleasuring himself to furry porn, and he first meets his love interest at a beach party hosted by Rob
and Carrie. Taking its title from the Alexander Pope poem "Eloisa to Abelard," this movie features
Kirsten Dunst as Mary Svevo, a receptionist who once had an affair with Dr. Howard Mierzwiak, who has
in turn invented a revolutionary procedure for Lacuna, Inc. FTP, name this movie starring Kate Winslet
and Jim Carrey in which Joel Barish fights to keep his memories of Clementine from being erased.
Answer: Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
BONUSES

1. Given statements of some laws from electromagnetic physics, name them for ten points each.

(10) The amount of steady current in a circuit is equal to the quotient of the voltage driving the current
and the resistance in the circuit.

        Answer: Ohms' Law

(10) For a closed loop path, the sum of the length elements times the magnetic field in the direction of the
length element is equal to the permeability times the electric current enclosed in the loop.

        Answer: Ampere's Law

(10) An induced electromagnetic field always acts in the direction opposite to that of the inducing flux
change.

        Answer: Lenz's Law


2. Answer the following questions about a dramatic genre FTPE.

(10) This Italian genre started in the sixteenth century and featured actors in masks portraying stock
characters like Pulcinella, Octavio, and Scaramuccia.

        Answer: commedia dell arte

(10) This character wore a patchwork of multi-colored diamonds and a cat mask. The baton that he
carried gave rise to the term "slapstick."

        Answer: Harlequin or Arlecchino

(10) This eighteenth-century Venetian playwright put commedia dell'arte characters into more realistic
and literary plots in works such as The Liar and The Servant of Two Masters.

        Answer: Carlo Goldoni


3. Name these contributions of New Hampshire to American History, for 10 points each:

(10) This landmark 1819 Supreme Court case laid the foundation for contract rights in America in a
dispute involving a famous New Hampshire institution and the principle of eminent domain.

        Answer: Dartmouth v. Woodward

(10) This Mercury Project astronaut and New Hampshirite reportedly prayed, "God, please dont let me
fuck up" before becoming the first American in space.

        Answer: Alan Bartlett Shepard, Jr.
(10) Name the fourteenth President of the United States, a native of New Hampshire, during whose term
the Kansas-Nebraska Act was passed and the Ostend Manifesto surfaced.

        Answer: Franklin Pierce


4. In the 2000 film High Fidelity, Jack Blacks character Barry objects to having to listen to "sad-bastard
music" on a Monday morning. Name these sad-bastard favorites for ten points each.

(10) The Scottish band to whom Jack Blacks character was referring, whose most recent album is 2004s
Dear Catastrophe Waitress.

        Answer: Belle and Sebastian

(10) This Englishman died of an antidepressant overdose in 1974, only to reach a new audience in 2000
when his song "Pink Moon" was featured in a Volkswagen commercial.

        Answer: Nick Drake

(10) The Canadian poet and singer who croaks his way through bleak classics like "Bird on a Wire,"
"Suzanne," and "Hallelujah."

        Answer: Leonard Cohen


5. Answer some questions about current shenanigans in Russia, for 10 points each:

(10) Russian president Vladimir Putin is encountering criticism for his attempts to extend government
control of what largest Russian oil producing company?

        Answer: Yukos

(10) One of the most vocal critics is this former head of Yukos, who supported opposition political parties
to Putin and has been in prison since 2003 on tax charges.

        Answer: Mikhail Khordokovsky

(10) Putin seems to be conspiring to make a large part of Yukos a subsidiary of what massive state natural
gas monopoly?

        Answer: Gazprom


6. FTPE, identify these members of Faulkner's Compson family:

(10) The Compsons sell Benjy's pasture to send this character to Harvard, where he meets his Canadian
roommate, Shreve, and throws himself into the Charles River.

Answer: Quentin Compson
(10) Benjy says this older sister smelled like trees when she was young, but Quentin identifies her with
the scent of honeysuckle.

Answer: Caddy Compson

(10) This oddly named daughter of Caddy sneaks out of the Compson estate to meet with her lover, the
man with the red tie, whose identity obsesses Jason.

Answer: Miss Quentin Compson


7. Name these country music classics from lyrics for 10, or from the performer most famous for singing
them, for 5.

(10) "I keep a close watch on this heart of mine / I keep my eyes wide open all the time / I keep the ends
out for the tie that binds."

(5) Johnny Cash

        Answer: "I Walk the Line"

(10) "Sometimes its hard to be a woman / Givin' all your love to just one man."

(5) Tammy Wynette

        Answer: "Stand By Your Man"

(10) "You got to know when to hold em, know when to fold em, / Know when to walk away and know
when to run."

(5) Kenny Rogers

        Answer: "The Gambler"


8. Name these sons of Jacob, for 10 points each:

(10) This first born son of Rachel spent his time interpreting the disturbing dreams of the Pharaoh and
wearing fancy clothes.

        Answer: Joseph

(10) This eldest of all Jacob's sons advised his brothers to sell rather than kill Joseph. He also had an
affair with his father's concubine Bilhah.

        Answer: Reuben

(10) This second son of Leah was held by Joseph as a hostage in Egypt while he sent his other brothers
back for his father.

        Answer: Simeon
9. Identify these works of 1950s American social science for 10 points each.

(10) This William Whyte work criticized corporate conformity and described the rise of the title character
type.

        Answer: The Organization Man

(10) This 1958 work of John Kenneth Galbraith advocates greater government social spending, as
opposed to the accumulation of consumer goods by private individuals within the title community.

        Answer: The Affluent Society

(10) C. Wright Mills explains the political attitudes of the titular class of workers in this 1951 work.

        Answer: White Collar


10. FTPE, answer these questions about the ill-fated British colony at Roanoke Island.

A. (10) He was the financier and organizer of the colony, who had been granted a charter by Elizabeth I.

        Answer: Sir Walter Raleigh

B. (10) She was the first English child born in North America, granddaughter to John White, the colony's
governor.

        Answer: Virginia Dare

C. (10) This is the single word that White discovered carved on a tree when he returned from England,
the only clue as to the colony's fate.

        Answer: Croatoan


11. FTPE, given its capital city, name the Canadian province.

(10) Victoria

        Answer: British Columbia

(10) Charlottetown

        Answer: Prince Edward Island

(10) Regina

        Answer: Saskatchewan
12. Name the Lerner and Lowe musicals from songs, for 10 points each:

(10) "I Wonder What the King is Doing Tonight," "The Lusty Month of May," "If Ever I Would Leave
You"

        Answer: Camelot

(10) "On the Street Where You Live," "I Could Have Danced All Night," "Wouldn't It Be Loverly"

        Answer: My Fair Lady

(10) "Almost Like Being In Love," "The Heather On The Hill," "Ill Go Home With Bonnie Jean"

        Answer: Brigadoon


13. FTPE, name the gland from a description.

(10) The chromaffin cells found in this gland's medulla produce epinephrine and norepinephrine.

        Answer: adrenal gland

(10) Calcitonin is produced by the parifollicular cells of this gland, which is affected by Hashimotos
syndrome.

        Answer: thyroid gland

(10)The favial nerve runs through this largest salivary gland, which produces serous fluid.

        Answer: parotid gland


14. Name these famous Trojans, for 10 points each:

(10) This king of Troy and father of Hector is killed in Book 2 of the Aeneid.

        Answer: Priam

(10) This father of Priam got in big trouble for getting Apollo and Poseidon to build the walls of Troy and
then stiffing them for the fee.

        Answer: Laomedon (lay-AH-meh-don)

(10) This rich Trojan is caught by Odysseus and Diomedes on their expedition into no-man's land in Book
9 of the Iliad. They kill him.

        Answer: Dolon


15. Answer the following questions about some ancient historians for 10 points each.
(10) This deservedly maligned lover of the aristocracy wrote a treatise on horsemanship, and the
Education of Cyrus, as well as the story of his own military expedition to Persia, the Anabasis.

        Answer: Xenophon

(10) This Sicilian wrote the forty-volume Historical Library. He is usually believed to quote liberally
from earlier, now lost, historians, and remains our best narrative source for much of Hellenistic history.

        Answer: Diodorus Siculus

(10) This moralizing Greek and supposed pupil of Isocrates wrote a history of Philip of Macedon that is
now lost. He seems to have thought Philip was a drunk and that Demosthenes was cool.

        Answer: Theopompus of Chios


16. Given some of the main characters from a Henrik Ibsen play, name the play for 10 points each.

(10) Judge Brack, Eilert Lovborg

        Answer: Hedda Gabler

(10) Mrs. Linde, Dr. Rauk, Torvald Helmer

        Answer: A Doll's House

(10) Helene Alving, Pastor Manders, Oswald Alving, Regina Engstrand

        Answer: Ghosts


17. Answer these questions concerning Public Choice Theory of economics, FTPE.

(10) This is the name for the unintended effects that individuals' choices have on society as a whole.

        Answer: Externalities

(10) This problem happens in the case of public goods such as national defense that cannot be provided to
individuals on a fee-for-service basis without also providing them to the title group of non-payers.

        Answer: Free Rider Problem

(10) This University of Chicago economist won the 1991 Nobel Prize in Economics for his principle
about the efficiency of government allocations of property.

        Answer: Ronald Coase


18. Karl Jaspers is so darn cool I wrote a whole bonus on him. For 10 points each name:
(10) For a while Jaspers was buddies with this German existential philosopher, but broke the friendship
off when this man got too friendly with the Nazis and became rector of Freiburg University.

        Answer: Martin Heidegger

(10) Like Heidegger, Jaspers tried to define this concept, a German noun which derives from the words
"being around."

        Answer: dasein

(10) Jaspers attempted to write a world history that focused heavily on a postulated age of massive
cultural changes throughout world civilization that occurred from about 800 to 200 BC. Give Jaspers'
name for that age.

        Answer: Axial Age or Achsenzeit


19. Name these architectural things that you have to look up to see, for 10 points each:

(10) Many Romanesque churches have roofs supported by this type of vault, which consist of a series of
arches that distribute weight and thrust evenly.

        Answer: barrel vault or tunnel vault

(10) This is a semicircular or arched window above a door.

        Answer: fanlight

(10) A roof with two slopes on each side, the lower slope having the steeper pitch. It is distinct from a
mansard roof in that its diagonal corner-angles are curved rather than straight.

        Answer: gambrel roof


20. Works of John Dryden for 10 points each:

(10) This satirical poem portrays conspiracies at the court of Charles II in the guise of a narrative
featuring the bastard son of a biblical king.

        Answer: Absalom and Achitophel

(10) This work with a Latin title is a discussion of British religious policy and favors the tolerant attitude
toward Catholics displayed by Charles II.

        Answer: Religio Laici

(10) Dryden's best-read works may in fact be his translations from Latin and Greek, including of this
Greek's Parallel Lives of famous Greek and Roman figures.

        Answer: Plutarch
21. Identify the following reagents from organic chemistry for ten points each.

(10) These organometallic reagents are synthesized by reacting alkyl halides with magnesium in the
presence of ether.

        Answer: Grignard reagents

(10) This class of compounds can be used to ensure the creation of an anti-Markovnikov product in
addition across an alkene, and they are often used to catalyze polymerization reactions.

        Answer: peroxides

(10) This is the nitrogenous reagent used in conjunction with a strong base in the Wolff-Kishner carbonyl
reduction. It has chemical formula N2H4.

        Answer: hydrazine



22. Answer the following questions about the Glorious Revolution FTPE.

(10) The Glorious Revolution consisted of William III and Mary II taking the throne from what Catholic
monarch?

        Answer: James II

(10) The army of James II was to be led by this man, who instead defected to the Orange side.

        Answer: John Churchill or Duke of Marlborough

(10) James then retreated to Ireland, where his forces were decisively defeated at this battle of 1690 on
the east coast of that country.

        Answer: Battle of the Boyne


23. Some people are already looking forward to the next election. Name these Democratic state governors
who might want to run for president in 2008, for 10 points each:

(10) This popular Democratic governor of Tennessee was re-elected in 2002 after successfully balancing
the state's budget by curtailing government spending.

        Answer: Phil Bredesen

(10) Her name was floated this summer as a possible dark horse running mate for John Kerry, but this
popular Kansas governor was passed over in favor of John Edwards.

        Answer: Kathleen Sebelius
(10) This Virginia Governor has gained respect as chairman of the National Governors' Association. He's
easily confused with a Virginia senator who shares his last name.

        Answer: Mark Warner


24. Identify the following celestial bodies for ten points each.

(10) This Galilean moon is the largest of all moons in our solar system.

        Answer: Ganymede

(10) The most prominent feature of this moon of Saturn is an impact crater that covers almost one third of
its surface and has led to it being nicknamed "the Death Star moon."

        Answer: Mimas

(10) This star in Lyra used to be the North Star, but the Earth's precession has altered its position in the
night sky.

        Answer: Vega


25. Answer the following questions about a television series that ran on ABC from April 1990 to June
1991.

(10) This series about the supernatural secrets of a small town opened with the investigation of Laura
Palmer's murder.

        Answer: Twin Peaks

(10) Twin Peaks was created and produced by this director of Lost Highway and Eraserhead.

        Answer: David Lynch

(10) This actor played Special Agent Dale Bartholomew Cooper on Twin Peaks, Jeffrey Beaumont in
Lynch's Blue Velvet, and also Josef K in a 1993 adaptation of Kafka's The Trial.

        Answer: Kyle MacLachlan


26. Answer the following questions about some twentieth century artists.

(10) One of her paintings was used on the cover of the 1965 op-art show The Responsive Eye. She first
gained recognition for her paintings of black lines, but later painted lines in a full range of colors.

        Answer: Bridget Riley

(10) This minimalist is known for his "black paintings," his Protractor Series, and his work in aluminum
and copper paints.
        Answer: Frank Stella

(10) This Canadian painter, who lived and worked in New Mexico, recently died at the age of 95. Most
of her works have titles like Untitled No. 3 and to consist of lines of color in grid or other geometric
patterns.

        Answer: Agnes Martin