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					                NEH
The time has come…




        Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
         Academic & Government Grants
The Humanities…

• Without words, without writing
  and without books there would be
  no history, there could be no
  concept of humanity.     Hermann
  Hesse
            Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
             Academic & Government Grants
         Mission Statement
NEH programs help ―…institutions improve
their humanities programs or resources‖ *or*
―individuals pursuing advanced research that
contributes to scholarly knowledge or to the
public's understanding of the humanities.
Recipients usually produce scholarly articles,
monographs on specialized subjects, books
on broad topics, archaeological site reports,
translations, editions, or other scholarly
tools.‖
              Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
               Academic & Government Grants
               Clarification:
             Mission Statement
• The mission of the NEH is to fund…the
  humanities.
• Clarification: Humanities ONLY work, please.
• NEH will invest in permanent advance of
  humanities on a campus.
• NEH will want others ‗locked out,‘ i.e. go to
  National Science Foundation to advance work
  of biologists or psychologists.
• Campuses are becoming interdisciplinary, but
  federal funding is still disciplinary.

                 Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
                  Academic & Government Grants
NEH Programs…
• Three Types
   – Institutional-Level
   – Individual-Level
   – ‗In-between‘ Level
• ‗In-between‘ Example: Faculty Humanities Workshops
   – Core group of faculty pursue collaborative humanistic
     inquiry by drawing on expertise within their institution
     and without (visiting scholars, new resources…).

• Check out NEH Grant Guide

                   Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
                    Academic & Government Grants
NEH Programs…
• Example: Institutional-Level Programs
  –   Challenge Grants
  –   Planning Grants
  –   Preservation and Access Grants [for institutions]
  –   Summer Institutes
       • Hosted by individual colleges for visiting faculty/scholars
  – Timely Grants
       • ―Rediscovering Afghanistan‖ Program
       • ―Chairman‘s Emergency Grants: Hurricane Katrina‖
  Due to limited number of proposals, NEH program officers
  are able to review and respond to preliminary drafts.

                         Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
                          Academic & Government Grants
NEH Programs…
• Examples: Individual-Level Grants
   –   Fellowships (academic year)
   –   Summer Stipends
   –   Preservation and Access Grants [for individuals]
   –   Summer Seminars
        •   Apply to attend as a participant: Request Application.
        •   Receive stipend for travel, lodgings, and research expenses
        •   Range of topics and length (two to six weeks)
        •   15 participants work with 1-2 leading scholars

Due to overwhelming number of submissions, NEH
program officers can not read and respond to initial drafts.
                           Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
                            Academic & Government Grants
Deadlines
Like most federal agencies or foundations, the NEH
    has multiple grant awards that it posts annually.
    Check out NEH's Grants Programs and Deadlines.
Sample annual grants, with deadlines:
1. Challenge grant: May 1 and Nov 1
2. Digital Humanities Workshops: Jan 17
3. Summer Stipends: October 2
4. Preservation and Access grants: July 3
5. Summer Seminars: March 1
                  Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
                   Academic & Government Grants
     Sample ―Cornerstone‖ #1:
        Summer Seminars
Faculty who participate can:
• Develop sense of directions in field
• See design of humanities programs
• Meet other humanities scholars
• Discuss their ideas and those of colleagues
• Be energized, renewed, inspired


                Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
                 Academic & Government Grants
        Sample ―Cornerstone‖ #2:
           Summer Stipends
• Summer Stipend criteria are exemplary for NEH
  grant applications.
  – Common elements: Project Abstract, Project Narrative,
    Bibliography, Letters of Support
• You can get a quick handle on the NEH application
  process because Summer Stipends are a ―small‖
  program ($5,000).
• Often, faculty begin with NEH Summer Seminars
  or Summer Stipends to establish good track record
  and position themselves for larger NEH grants.
                  Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
                   Academic & Government Grants
Springtime…and
Summer Stipends
NEH submission: August 1 – October 2
NEH posting: April
              ***BEGIN in SPRING***
6 months allows for:
§ Research and conception of project
§ Ample peer reading and response
§ Institutional review and nomination

                  Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
                   Academic & Government Grants
  ―Full-dress‖ Proposal

● ―Attitude and presentation are critical in a
  highly competitive field.‖ – Fred Winter,
  Program Officer, NEH Challenge Grants.
● Read with care the precise aims and criteria
  at NEH Summer Stipend Guidelines (or
  another targeted program).
● Highest award rate = 2nd submission; revised
  according to ―prior response.‖


         Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
          Academic & Government Grants
―Full-dress‖ Proposal
• Great Tip: request sample proposal
  – Go to NEH Summer Stipends (or targeted program).
  – Select ―Previously-Funded Summer Stipends‖
    (menu on right).
  – Select one and email request to stipends@neh.gov.
  – Have a friend (or two) request another sample.
  – You will discover the NEH project narratives are
    uniquely dense. You will then know what you have
    to do—and you can do it!

                  Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
                   Academic & Government Grants
Project Narrative
• Statement of Need or Intent is insufficient
  because NEH awards are highly competitive.
• Convey ideas, objectives, and methods of
  your project.
• Clarify contribution of your project to
  humanities scholarship.
• Present plans to disseminate your findings to
  the field and potentially the public.
               Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
                Academic & Government Grants
               Project Narrative

• Strategy: How to best convey ideas,
  objectives, and methods of your project.
  –   Open with goals (guiding principles)
  –   Identify strategies and activities to realize goals
  –   Project outputs
  –   Set outcomes (short term; long term; projected)
  –   Map evaluation (formative and summative)


                   Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
                    Academic & Government Grants
Project Narrative
• Strategy: How to draft great objectives that
  convince reviewers you can successfully
  move from Goal to Outcomes? Write
  SMART objectives:
   – Specific (target population/materials)
   – Measurable (quantifiable)
   – Achievable (plausible & possible)
   – Results-oriented
   – Time-bound (have deadlines)
                Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
                 Academic & Government Grants
          How To Be Convincing:
             Process Details
• Do not write, ―I will present my findings at
  professional conferences and journal articles.‖
• Do write, ―I will present a series of three papers on
  ‗Civic Leadership Development among First
  Americans‘ at the Wye Faculty Seminar, and based
  on audience response I will then edit the papers for
  publication in American Journal of Political
  Science.‖
• This establishes your academic ―street cred.‖


                  Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
                   Academic & Government Grants
         How To Be Convincing:
          Evidentiary Details
• Do not write, ―I have a good track record with
  sucessfully completing grants.‖
• Do write, ―I have completed three grants during
  my six years as an assistant professor. I was
  awarded an Ira G. Zepp Teaching Enhancement
  Grant to develop curricular materials for
  departmental-wide art history classes, and I was
  awarded two Arts in Education grants to develop
  community arts classes for underserved
  populations.‖
• Result = more academic ―street cred.‖
                 Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
                  Academic & Government Grants
         How To Be Convincing:
           Illustrative Details
• Do not write, ―I detail how the goddess Diana was a
  model for the modern female hero in the English
  novel.‖
• Do write, ―I details how the goddess Diana, the
  chaste huntress whose domain over natural life was
  a symbol of the moon‘s powers, served as the
  modern female hero in the English novel from
  Dafoe to Joyce.‖
• Result = most academic ―street cred.‖


                 Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
                  Academic & Government Grants
            5 Review Criteria

(1) The intellectual significance of the project
  to the humanities;
(2) The quality of the applicant's work as an
  interpreter of the humanities;
(3) The quality of the conception, definition,
  organization, and description of the project;
(4) The feasibility of the work plan.
(5) The applicant‘s capability to complete that
  work plan.
                Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
                 Academic & Government Grants
Help Is All Around…

• Ask colleagues in the field for feedback.
• Ask grants associate to respond.
• Ask any ―knowledgeable persons‖ to read and
  discuss.
• The NEH will have ―knowledgeable persons‖ as
  your reviewers for all grants. Sometimes the NEH
  describes these as ―nonspecialist reviewers.‖ Target:
  generalist expert.

                  Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
                   Academic & Government Grants
   Formatting
• ESSAY (translation = highly readable for general
  reviewers)
• Save all proposal material as plain text.
• Edit and proofread to perfection.
• Cut and paste closely-edited materials into online
  application forms.
• If you type in materials anew, you will likely have
  typos, etc.


                  Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
                   Academic & Government Grants
Formatting
• Summer Stipend Example:
• You are given 12,500 characters (includes spaces and
  punctuation).
• Use run-in headers to save spaces yet clarify organization
  for readers.
• Use single space (not double) after period to save spaces.
• Do not use bold, italics, underlining, or ―curly quotes.‖
• Use plain quote marks or all upper case for book titles.
• Avoid <> (signals http:// address).



                    Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
                     Academic & Government Grants
          Project Statement
• Write last. Write after you have fully conceived
  your project
• This is a 120-word ―brief description‖ of your
  project
   – This creates *first impression* of your project with
     reviewers
• Launch this with title that clarifies your project‘s
  substance.
• It‘s part of ―Application Cover Sheet‖
• Write, edit, proofread, then cut-and-paste this
  clean text into the application

                    Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
                     Academic & Government Grants
                         Bibliography
• Limit = 570 words/one single-spaced page
• List primary and secondary sources that relate
  *directly* to your project.
• Sources can relate *directly* to the substance,
  theory, or methods of your project.
• Do not duplicate references within the ―Project
  Narrative.‖
• Format tip: Place title in straight quotes or make all
  caps; plain text e-submissions do not recognize
  curly quotes, italics, or underlining, and will think
  angle brackets <> signal a hyperlink.

                  Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
                   Academic & Government Grants
           Letters of Reference
• General Limit = 2
• Preferred: Two *external* references because you are
  presenting evidence of the significance of your work to the
  field (not to your institution).
• One can be internal.
• The other should be external.
   – Former dissertation advisors or committee members are
      discouraged.
   – Try editors of journals who published your work.
   – Try co-panelists from conferences.
   – Try colleagues at other institutions.

                    Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
                     Academic & Government Grants
       Supplementary Materials
• In general, *no* supplementary materials are
  allowed for Summer Stipends. You make
  your entire argument in the project
  narrative.
• Three exceptions:
  – Sample of a translation
  – Sample of a new database
  – Sample of new edition
• Limit = 570 words/one single-spaced page
                Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
                 Academic & Government Grants
 “SAVE” and Edit
―Test Drive‖ the grant‘s online application system.
• ―Save‖ your application, and you are free to revise
  and edit it.
• ―Submit‖ your application, and it‘s gone forever.
• You can edit your application online until the final
  deadline (October 2).




                  Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
                   Academic & Government Grants
 College Nomination

• Write one-page abstract *after* your project is fully
  conceptualized.
• Submit to Faculty Grants Associate by September 1.
• All abstracts are forwarded to appropriate
  administrators.
• Two nominees will be chosen in a timely manner.
• Members of Grants Committee will usually
  volunteer to be additional readers and responders
  to your draft.

                  Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
                   Academic & Government Grants
            Test of Endurance
• NEH encourages applicants to read reviewers‘
  comments, then revise and re-submit.
• New reviewers each year, so none will recognize a
  revised proposal.
• Good number of proposals in any year are revised
  ones.
• To obtain reviewers‘ comments, email
  ―stipends@neh.gov.‖



                 Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
                  Academic & Government Grants
            Final Thought
• ―By the paper alone shalt they know you.‖
  Fred Winter, NEH Program Officer, NCURA
  national conference, Nov 5-8, 2006,
  Washington, D.C.




              Gil Harootunian, Director, Office of
               Academic & Government Grants