Compare and contrast essay

Document Sample
Compare and contrast essay Powered By Docstoc
					Compare and contrast essay 
Impact of video game content and impact of multimedia content 
Liam Smith 
Hustler@hotmail.co.uk                   
In this essay, a range of issues will be covered relating to the impact of video game content, 
compared to the impact of multimedia content. Multimedia content being the footage that is shown 
in films, movies and videos. Whereas video game content can only be exposed to its target audience 
by specific hardware that it was intended for; multimedia violence can be exposed to a range of 
audiences, in a range of different ways, this argument will be covered later in the essay. Also this 
essay will aim to compare and contrast which entertainment based media has more affect of its 
subject audience.  

Firstly I will be looking at the impact of video game violence and what effects it has. To start I will 
look at the most studied link between crime rates and video games, more specifically violent crimes. 
The department of Health and Human Services shows that crime if down but not violence by young 
adults (Department of Health and Human Services 2001, accessed: April 2009 [1]). This being that 
video game violence is said to affect the mind of its target audience, and therefore raising crime 
rates. As a study on a group of teenagers found that video game violence made the frontal part of 
the brain to engage less, and this part was associated with holding back unacceptable thoughts 
(telegraph, accessed: April 2009 [2]). This showing that people engaged in violent video games have a 
tendency to act on violent thoughts, rather than suppress them. As well as that study, there are 
more numerous other studies claiming that video games are making the audience who are exposed 
to them less sensitive to violence.  “It has been suggested that the active nature of video games 
makes them unique among the screen‐based media” (Wartella, O’Keefe, & Scantlin, 2000 [3]). This 
source was included within a report which goes on to talk the interaction with video games. When a 
user plays a violent video game the player has to think about the situation within the video game, 
therefore the player has to make strategically thought out plans to survive or strategically thought 
out plans to kill and/or harm other players, these plans then being rewarded by the game and giving 
the player incentive to continue to make constant violent plans. The player also has the ability to 
choose the way in which they inflict harm to the games computer generated enemies, which are 
controlled using artificial intelligence (A.I.). All of this game play interaction and not once does the 
player have any negative consequences. This interactivity from the player was studied and shown 
that it made the player have negative thoughts and behaviour (Anderson & Bushman, 2001 [4]). 

Secondly with more realistic game scenarios the negative effects on the audience are more 
apparent. This was revealed in another study which says “New‐generation violent video games 
contain substantial amounts of increasingly realistic portrayals of violence. Elaborate content 
analyses revealed that the favoured narrative is a human perpetrator engaging in repeated acts of 
justified violence involving weapons that results in some bloodshed to the victim.” (Violent video 
games ..., accessed: April 2009 [5]). 

In addition, because of its interactivity, which makes the player more violent, it also makes the 
player have less feeling for other people. A few studies have looked at this link, one study on a few 
hundred students around the ages of ten to fifteen, shown that everyday video game usage lowered 
the empathy of the player (Sakamoto’s 1994 [6]). The second study on two hundred adolescents 
shown they preferred violent video games and also stated they had poor empathy scores (Barnett 
1997 [7]). 

In the past few years there have been key games that have caused more controversy that others, 
one series of games in particular, have been included in most studies to do with violence. This would 


                                                                                             Page 2 of 6 
 
be the ‘Grand theft auto’ (GTA) series, and from this series one of the most controversial games 
would be GTA: vice city. This was set in a fictional city and included gang wars, hate crime, murders, 
and other violent crimes. The game came under so more criticism and nearly being sued, the makers 
decided to change the game and re‐release it (Video game controversy, accessed: April 2009 [8]).   

On the other hand there are positives to video games and the way they can be used to teach. Video 
games have been shown to improve skills of the user, such as hand‐eye coordination, reaction time, 
logistics, and also more needed skills like maths; where the user improves skills like estimating and 
problem solving (Video games , accessed: April 2009 [9]). 

In some cases, video games have improved the vision of users. Like the ability called contrast 
sensitivity function, whereby the user notices little changes to greyscale on any backdrop. As well as 
this it can improve the user’s ability to track multiple objects. A study says that video games can 
enhance multiple abilities, of the user’s eyesight, at the same time and goes on to say that it 
improves vision so much it can be used after eye surgery for a faster recovery (Plasticity in the Visual 
System, accessed: April 2009 [10]).  

In contrast to the positives and negatives of video game content, we have the impact of multimedia 
content, which also affects its audience, just as much as certain video game content does. For most, 
it is yet again violent content that is most affective to an audience. Violence is much more common 
to be seen on screen based media rather than video games, or even real life. If viewers regularly see 
violence in a screen based form their manner may become insensitive or ‘desensitized’ as one report 
likes to call it (Bushman & Huesmann, 2001 [11]). This desensitization affects the audience a lot like 
how video games do, but with a slight twist, where as video games get the interactivity edge, screen 
based videos make up with much more realistic footage. With this a viewer may become less caring 
towards others, and have no understanding for the real consequences of committing violent acts 
towards other people (Strasburger & Wilson, 2002 [12]). 

One report that put together various studies on children’s development, when exposed to screen 
based violence, came to some generalised conclusions, claiming that children would be more violent 
and have anti social behaviour. They would also be less aware to violence and people who suffer 
from brutality, as they consider it to be normal. It also creates a desire for more violence where 
children are actively seeking it, and turning to other forms of screen based violence, like the 
internet, which will be looked at later within this essay. One other way it impacts children is that 
they assume that violence it a way to sort out problems, as again they see it as normal (Children and 
Media Violence, accessed: April 2009 [13]). The impact of screen based multimedia violence also has a 
bad effect of making children fear the real world and any situations, as they are afraid of violent 
situations (Children and Media Violence, accessed: April 2009 [13]). Furthermore in the study of 
children’s development, when exposed to screen based violence. Two psychologists L. Rowell 
Huesmann and Leonard Eron found that younger children, who watch hours of violent videos. Have 
the inclination to grow up and have more frequent outbursts of aggression (Violence in the Media, 
accessed: April 2009 [14]).   

All of these studies of violence and its impact show that screen based content has just as much 
effect on people as video games do. 




                                                                                             Page 3 of 6 
 
In more modern times videos are now more easily accessed using the internet. As the internet is a 
place for free expression for the world, there is a higher chance the video content could have a 
greater impact. This is because there are hardly any rules to the content of videos, and this is due to 
it being hard to track, rate and even check all internet content, and the debate that the internet 
should stay as free expression. So therefore internet videos may show content that is bias, has bad 
morals, has scenes of violence, etc. And more importantly show them to wrong target audience, 
which means they could have an even greater impact. 

Just like video games and films, internet has violent content but there is also other impacting 
content. The main other scenes that effected the audience were alcohol, drugs and sexual 
behaviour. All these things impacted the audience to try these things after they had seen them, or 
even try them underage. A few studies showed this and made the link between screen‐based media 
or content, and the rise in alcohol and drug use, and also the involvement in sexual intercourse. One 
study also showed that sexual intercourse was most linked to a specific genre of videos, these being 
music videos (Media and child and adolescent health, accessed: April 2009 [15]). 

The increased popularity with movies and then the internet boom, with easier access to videos due 
to better internet capabilities. This showed the effect of stereotyping, and this had both positives 
and negatives. In most cases it was negative effects that stereotyping had, with the only positive 
being that someone changed to a stereotyped group as they seen a better way of life. But 
stereotyping caused problems like reducing people to categories and making common assumptions 
of people by what they have seen in the media. This in turn caused arguments and crime between 
certain stereotyped groups (Media Stereotyping, accessed: April 2009 [16]).  

Although most screen‐based videos seem to have a negative impact, there are a few positives, but 
the audience only seems to have positive effects when they set out to find specific videos that they 
intend for, but in reality most people stubble across videos, especially on the internet. But movies 
and television series have the impact to improve a person development, like to learn better 
vocabulary even if they don’t intend to. With movie also they are inclined to show positive morals, 
like that doing the right thing overcomes wrong (Jennings Bryant, 2008 [17]).   

In conclusion both entertainment types have shown there are pros and cons to the way they impact 
people and people’s development. With video game content showing more effective impact than 
multimedia content does, this comes down to its extra edge it has over multimedia, and that is its 
interactivity, this draws the person into the video game, and gives them choices to feel even more 
involved. But multimedia content showing more of a negative impact on its viewers, because unless 
they intend to watch something educational, the viewer is more times than none, going to see 
violence or bad behaviour, particularly on the internet and the content will be more realistic than 
video games are. Out of the two entertainment types, video games would have to have the best 
positive effect as they are stricter with distribution and rating system, so that only the target 
audience can see them, also the positives have quicker and more likely chance of happening, due to 
its edge. All of this being said it may change in the future, so that video games become the more 
negative of the two, but this could only be possible when they get as realistic as videos can be, and 
therefore take on all the impacts that multimedia content has. So then only thing stopping a more 
serious impact would be the rating system so only intended people can see the content of video 
games. 


                                                                                             Page 4 of 6 
 
    References  
     
    [1] ‐ Website 
    (US Department of Health and Human Services 2001, Youth violence, accessed: April 2009, 
    http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/youthviolence/) 
     
    [2] – Website 
    (telegraph, accessed: April 2009, http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/1535948/Video‐game‐violence‐harmful‐to‐
    brain.html) 
     
    [3] – Book used in website report 
    Report (Violence exposure in real‐life, video games, television, movies, 
    and the internet: is there desensitization?, http://www.lionlamb.org/research_articles/study%202.pdf) 
    Original book (Wartella, E., O’Keefe, B., & Scantlin, R., 2000, Children and interactive media) 
     
    [4] – Book used in website report 
    Report (Violence exposure in real‐life, video games, television, movies, 
    and the internet: is there desensitization?, http://www.lionlamb.org/research_articles/study%202.pdf) 
    Original book (Anderson, C. A., & Bushman, B. J., 2001, Effects of violent video games on aggressive behavior, page 353–
    359.) 
     
    [5] – Website 
    (Violent video games lead to brain activity characteristic of aggression, MSU researcher shows, accessed: April 2009, 
    http://news.msu.edu/story/337/) 
     
    [6] – Book used in website report  
    Report (Violence exposure in real‐life, video games, television, movies, 
    and the internet: is there desensitization?, http://www.lionlamb.org/research_articles/study%202.pdf) 
    Original book (Sakamoto, A., 1994, Video game use and the development of sociocognitive abilities in children: Three 
    surveys of elementary school children. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, page 21–42) 
     
    [7] – Book used in website report 
    Report (Violence exposure in real‐life, video games, television, movies, 
    and the internet: is there desensitization?, http://www.lionlamb.org/research_articles/study%202.pdf) 
    Original book (Barnett, 1997, Late adolescents’ experiences with and attitudes towards videogames. Journal of Applied 
    Social Psychology, page 1316–1334)  
     
    [8] – Website 
    (Video game controversy, accessed: April 2009, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Video_game_controversy) 
     
    [9] ‐ Website  
    (Video games , accessed: April 2009, http://www.units.muohio.edu/psybersite/cyberspace/onlinegames/video.shtml) 
     
    [10] ‐ Website  
    (Plasticity in the Visual System, accessed: April 2009, http://www.bcs.rochester.edu/people/daphne/visual.html#video) 
     
    [11] – Book accessed through website 
    Report (Violence exposure in real‐life, video games, television, movies, 
    and the internet: is there desensitization?, http://www.lionlamb.org/research_articles/study%202.pdf) 
    Original book (Bushman, B. J., & Huesmann, L. R., 2001, Effects of televised violence on aggression, page 223–254, 
    Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage) 
     
    [12] – Book accessed through website 
    Report (Violence exposure in real‐life, video games, television, movies, 
    and the internet: is there desensitization?, http://www.lionlamb.org/research_articles/study%202.pdf) 
    Original book (Strasburger, V. C., & Wilson, B. J., 2002, Children, adolescents, and the media, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage) 
     
    [13] – Website 
    (Children and Media Violence, accessed: April 2009, http://www.mediafamily.org/facts/facts_vlent.shtml) 
     
    [14] – Website 
    (Violence in the Media, accessed: April 2009, http://www.psychologymatters.org/mediaviolence.html ) 


                                                                                                                Page 5 of 6 
 
    [15] – Website 
    (Media and child and adolescent health, accessed: April 2009, 
    http://www.commonsensemedia.org/sites/default/files/Nunez‐Smith%20CSM%20media_review%20Dec%204.pdf) 
     
    [16] – Website 
    (Media Stereotyping, accessed: April 2009, http://www.media‐awareness.ca/english/issues/stereotyping) 
     
    [17] ‐ Book accessed through website 
    (Jennings Bryant, 2008, media effects, page 406, Published by Taylor & Francis, 
    http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=g_uB3dudoi4C&pg=PA406&lpg=PA406&dq=media+impact+children%27s+vocab&so
    urce=bl&ots=n523z4K1FG&sig=MqRwNvEV‐
    ztTVftJdGOEuIoZxc0&hl=en&ei=Dk_8SfSCG96OjAeP5qChAw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=6) 
     
 




                                                                                                Page 6 of 6 
 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:929
posted:3/10/2010
language:English
pages:6
Description: Compare and contrast essay