Docstoc

THE FALL, THE FLOOD, AND THE GARDEN OF EDEN

Document Sample
THE FALL, THE FLOOD, AND THE GARDEN OF EDEN Powered By Docstoc
					                                                                                               18.01.05
    THE FALL, THE FLOOD, AND THE GARDEN OF EDEN

                                      A  siren  call  of  political  unreality  surrounds  us  at  the 
                                      moment.  
                                       
                                      The latest opinion polls suggest that the Conservatives would lose the 
                                      next  election,  even  if  no  one  stood  against  them.  The  leadership  of 
                                      Michael  Howard  has  not  rescued  the  Tories  from  the  politics  of 
                                      Frankie Howard. By the day, they become more and more of a joke, a 
                                      party that gives confusion a bad name.  
                                       
                                      This must come as welcome relief for Downing St, where the fear and 
                                      loathing between the Prime Minister and the Chancellor had reached a 
                                      point where even the most timid of groups (the Parliamentary Labour 
                                      Party)  was  demanding  they  both  be  sent  to  their  rooms  without  any 
                                      supper. Now, we have a Tory MP defecting to Labour, saying that Tony 
                                      Blair’s party is a comfortable home for any ‘One Nation’ Conservative.  
                                      You might have hoped that a Party that was once proud to call itself  
the Labour Party would have shown some embarrassment at such praise. But no, Downing St celebrated 
and  campaign  ministers  announced  this  as  justification  of  an  election  manifesto  that  would  be  more 
‘New Labour’ than ever – a thin code name for the wholesale transfer of public assets into private hands 
and the replacement of common services by individual market choices. 
 
This is perhaps the greatest self‐delusion of all. The moment of quiet triumphalism has to be punctured 
by the realities of the world outside Parliament. In simple terms, we are entering an era that has run out 
of  individual  market  solutions.  Of  course  we  can  still  make  personal  choices,  but  events  outside  our 
personal control will define the limits of such market choices.  
 
When the Asian tsunami swept 200,000 or more to their death it did not ask who was a luxury traveller, 
who was a back packer, who was a peasant surviving on the hand outs of the rich. No one had enough 
cash to buy themselves out of its path or divert its course.  
 
Rich and poor alike lived in similar proximity to each other in Carlisle, Cumbria. However, two months 
rainfall in two days sank the city under water. The river Eden could not contain the downpours, burst its 
bank and plunged 120,000 households into darkness. Fortunately most were able to flee to safety, but 
the consequential costs will be enormous, and all the most important solutions will be collective. When 
the  garden  of  Eden  floods,  you  need  more  than  Adam  and  Eve/Tony  and  Gordon  to  turn  up  with  a 
manifesto for personal hand pumps. The world is giving us a much bigger warning.  
 
In the last year there have been a record 10 typhoons in Japan, 4 hurricanes in the Caribbean and the 
first  ever  hurricane  in  South  America.  Munich  Re,  the  world’s  largest  re‐insurance  company,  has  just 
reported to the UN that, in the first 10 months of 2004, climate change crises were responsible for $90 
billion damage worldwide. The tsunami will send this figure soaring.  
 
The  era  of  personal  greed,  heralded  in  by  Margaret  Thatcher  and  Ronald  Reagan,  is  spiralling  into  its 
own confusion and demise. The idea that we could pillage the planet in pursuit of everlasting, free trade 
profitability was the ideological equivalent of fool’s gold. We simply stole for today what would have to 
be paid for tomorrow…and paid for in spades.  
 
Every  privatisation  delivered  profits  and  dividends.  Then  we  discovered  that  railway  dividends  were 
paid for out of track maintenance, gas profits came from abandoning apprenticeships and laying off gas 
fitters, and electricity infrastructures came a poor second to shareholder demands. Pension funds were 
‘liberated’  to  chase  stock  prices  into  massive  over  valuation  until  the  bubble  finally  burst.  British 
workers  saw  £250  billion  wiped  out  of  their  pension  funds  in  a  single  year  and  in  many  cases  fund 
managers were able to walk away with what remained; leaving people with next to no pension after 40 
years of saving.  
 
The free‐trade obsession was sustained by the pursuit of ever cheaper labour costs. Production pushed 
towards  the  most  vulnerable  and  exploitable.  Marginal  lands  have  been  sucked  in,  over‐farmed, 
contaminated and spat out when exhausted. So too have been the people who survive on them. 
 
Starvation then drives into migration. And though the rich are increasingly dependent on the poor, they 
live in fear that the poor will eventually want to come and live in the same neighbourhood.  
 
Even our own greatest triumphs now seem to threaten us. In the industrial world, life expectations have 
increased on the back of common improvements in health care and nutrition. One of Britain’s proudest 
legacies  of  the  last  50  years  was  a  framework  of  pensions  provision  that  was  essentially  an  act  of 
solidarity  from  one  generation  to  another.  Everyone  in  work  paid  National  Insurance  (NI)  and  the  NI 
fund then paid the state pension of those who were already old.  
 
The  apprenticeship  system  (and  long  term  jobs)  tied  all  of  us  in  as  long  term  contributors,  but  it  also 
made  us  eventual  beneficiaries.  Privatised  pensions,  and  flexible  labour  markets  turned  this  into  an 
individual free‐for‐all. And the shift into means‐tested entitlements simply fed a belief that we could no 
longer rely on/believe in each other for a secure future.  
 
Now,  we  tell  our  kids  (and  the  poor)  they  are  not  saving  enough  to  meet  tomorrow’s  pension  needs. 
They  look  into  our  eyes  with  a  mixture  of  sadness  and  derision.  Saving  is  for  suckers,  they  tell  us. 
Granddad paid in all his life, then someone stole the pension fund. A mug’s game.  
 
And if the bosses don’t steal your pension the Chancellor will. The shift to tax credits means that those 
with a small works pension lose out most, because of the high marginal tax rates that go along with any 
means tested system of benefits and pensions. In a myriad of different ways we are all encouraged to 
cheat on the future because we fear we have squandered it already.   
 
Political parties have become worse than most. The Fall – for politicians – has not been from innocence 
but  from  faith;  faith  in  each  other,  in  tomorrow,  in  common  provision  and  interdependence.  The  real 
hope, however, is that the tsunami has produced a second seismic shift, at least as profound as the first.  
 
In  the  aftermath  of  its  devastation,  public  donations  outstripped  (and  shamed)  their  respective 
governments.  Suddenly  we  learn,  too,  that  while  citizens  give  cash,  governments  give  promises; 
promises that invariably go unfulfilled. Not one of the major UN Appeals has seen governments pay in all 
that they promised. The UN itself has to beg, and wait, for payments while people starve. 
The aid that governments give then frequently gets skewed to meet the desires of the donor rather than 
the needs of the receiver. In Afghanistan, less than 20% of the promised aid ever appeared. Of this, 84% 
has gone to the military coalition and only 3% to reconstruction.  
 
The public do not give this way. They give cash. They give unconditionally. And they give immediately. 
We should empower the UN to do the same. Let countries promise what they like but give the UN the 
power  to  treat  the  promises  as  drawing  rights  on  the  World  Bank.  Then  let  the  Bank  chase  the  rich 
nations  rather  than  the  poor;  leaving  citizens  and  aid  agencies  to  get  on  with  disaster  relief, 
development and sustainability.  
 
If the tsunami has reminded us how fragile life is, and how interdependent we all are, then it could have 
thrown out a political lifeline. Tomorrow offers no individual solutions to all the big challenges the 21st 
century will throw at us. Solutions (or survival strategies) will be collective, structural and sustainable; 
the politics of mutuality and interdependence. Do not expect political leaders ‐ arguing over one set of 
spending cuts or another set of market freedoms ‐ to even recognise this lifeline. But the rest of us can.  
It is a lifeline of human hands; holding together, not to defeat nature but to survive the crises we have 
helped create, and (slowly) begin to clean up the mess…together.  
 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:6
posted:3/10/2010
language:
pages:3
Description: THE FALL, THE FLOOD, AND THE GARDEN OF EDEN