Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out

THANET EARTH SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT REPORT

VIEWS: 27 PAGES: 5

THANET EARTH SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT REPORT

More Info
									Thanet Earth Sustainability Assessment Report 
Presented by Bidwells Agribusiness 
        
        
        
        
        
       Thanet Earth Marketing commissioned industry specialists Bidwells Agribusiness to 
       assess the overall sustainability of the Thanet Earth site and the supply of products 
       to customers. Greg Hilton led the research with the objective of providing an 
       independent and verifiable assessment of the baseline position of the project. The 
       carbon emissions, or carbon footprint, associated with the supply of Thanet Earth 
       vegetables to customers were measured using the recently released PAS 2050 
       guidelines 1 .  The study also set out to identify opportunities to further improve the 
       efficiency and sustainability of the site.   
        
       The study assessed all the various materials, construction processes and operations 
       contributing to greenhouse gas emissions for Thanet Earth and compared these 
       against alternative sources and techniques, including other UK production and 
       overseas crops grown in Spain, Italy, Israel, Poland and Holland using the PAS 2050 
       assessment criteria. 
        
       KEY FINDINGS 
           •   Peppers and cucumbers grown at Thanet Earth have very low carbon 
               emissions; they have a lower carbon footprint than current alternative 
               sources. 
           •   Tomatoes grown without lights at Thanet Earth have very low carbon 
               emissions; they have a lower carbon footprint than the Mediterranean 
               sources studied. 
           •   Tomatoes grown at Thanet Earth with lights have a similar carbon footprint 
               to UK grown tomatoes without lights or CHP. 
           •   The use of combined heat and power (CHP) actually contributes a negative 
               carbon emission towards the total measured Thanet Earth carbon footprint. 
               The power is produced more efficiently than most other forms of UK power 
               generation because it utilises both the heat and electricity produced by the 


       1
         PAS2050, published by the British Standards Institute and the Carbon Trust in 2008, is the 
       recognised standard for the assessment of greenhouse gas emissions associated with the supply of 
       goods and services 
                fuel.  Both DEFRA and the PAS2050 standard recognise this carbon reduction 
                and build it into their measurement criteria. 
         
GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS 
The data has been compiled considering growing operation emissions, packhouse 
emissions, waste disposal emissions and transport emissions. The emissions 
associated with the materials used to build the glasshouses at Thanet Earth and at 
overseas sources has also been considered. 
 
                               GHG emissions from alternative cucumber sources relative to Thanet Earth




            Thanet Earth




    N. Europe (no CHP)




                   Spain




                           0            2          4                6             8         10         12
                                                           Relative GHG emissions
                                                              (Thanet Earth = 1)




                                 GHG emissions from alternative pepper sources relative to Thanet Earth




            Thanet Earth




    N. Europe (no CHP)




                  Spain




                           0       50       100        150        200         250     300        350   400
                                                        Relative GHG emissions
                                                           (Thanet Earth = 1)
                               GHG emissions from alternative tomato sources relative to Thanet Earth




            Thanet Earth (no lights)



        Thanet Earth (with lights)



    N. Europe (no lights, no CHP)



     Poland (coal fired, no lights)



      Spain (no lights, unheated)


                                   0.0   0.2   0.4   0.6       0.8     1.0      1.2        1.4   1.6   1.8   2.0
                                                             Relative GHG emissions
                                                           (Thanet Earth with lights =1)

                                                                                                                    
 
 
POTENTIAL DEVELOPMENTS 
 
Bidwells were also asked to recommend further potential improvements to the 
overall site sustainability. Their recommendations were as follows: 
 
        •      Use a proportion of renewable energy sources – wind, biomass and energy 
               from waste to power CHP, recognising that it would not be practical to 
               operate the whole site with renewable energy at this time. 
        •      Use LED glasshouse lights 
        •      Grow higher‐yielding varieties 
        •      Improve transport efficiency 
        •      Use renewable substrate as a growing medium 
 
The use of biomass CHP as a source of energy for Thanet Earth is under investigation, 
with a number of different technologies under consideration. 
LED lighting is still under commercial trials in Holland with Kaaij Redstar having the 
world’s largest horticultural research project and will be installed if considered 
commercially effective. 
At present, Rockwool substrate is used as a growing medium. It is recyclable but not 
a renewable resource. Coir (coconut fibre) would be a renewable, compostable 
material to use. Growers at Thanet Earth are running trials. 
 
NEXT STEPS 
This carbon model will be validated during Thanet Earth operations. 
The site will look for certification to the PAS 2050 standard 
The water footprinting study will be piloted and formalised 
Viability of renewable energy supply and consumables will be assessed. 
 
 
FERTILISER USE 
The production techniques employed at Thanet Earth mean fertiliser can be used 
more efficiently than some alternative sources. Optimum levels of fertiliser can be 
applied to the crop in a targeted manner ensuring the plant can efficiently use the 
nutrients it receives to boost yields. The advanced drainage systems ensure that run‐
off is collected and recycled reducing fertiliser wastage. This differs from other less 
efficient systems which typically waste over half of the applied nutrients through 
run‐off. 
Compared directly, kg of fertiliser used per kg of crop produced, the following 
findings are announced: 
    •   Typical Spanish producers use between 3.5 and 4.5 times more fertiliser on 
        tomatoes than Thanet Earth.  
    •   Typical Spanish producers use between 5 and 7 times more fertiliser on 
        peppers than Thanet Earth 
    •   Typical Spanish producers use up to 14 times more fertiliser per equivalent 
        output on cucumbers than Thanet Earth. 
 
WATER USE 
Preliminary water footprint data (awaiting verification) indicates that traditional 
Spanish producers of tomatoes will use on average 17 times more water per kg of 
production than Thanet Earth. This is due to Thanet Earth using rainwater capture 
and recycling irrigation water.
 
NOTE: 
For further information on the Thanet Earth Sustainability Assessment Report, as  
presented by Bidwells Agribusiness, please contact Mel Beeby, Kelly Davis or Richard 
Cook at Bray Leino on 01179 731173 or e‐mail mbeeby@brayleino.co.uk / 
kdavis@brayleino.co.uk / rcook@brayleino.co.uk 
 
 

								
To top