Docstoc

customer survey

Document Sample
customer survey Powered By Docstoc
					                  
                  
Texas Commission on Jail Standards 
                  

                  




                           



                  
  Customer Service Survey 
              2008 
                  
Overview 

As mandated by Texas Government Code Chapter 2114, the Texas Commission on Jail Standards submits 
a Customer Service Survey to the Legislative Budget Board and Governor’s Office of Budget and 
Planning.  Through working with LBB and GOBP, TCJS has been able to tailor the survey to increase its 
relevance to the mission and responsibilities of the agency.  With the information gained from the 
Customer Service Survey, TCJS hopes to be able to increase its effectiveness in achieving its mission of 
ensuring safe, secure, and suitable jail facilities for correctional personnel, inmates, and the community 
through proper rules and procedures and of providing leadership in resolving inmate population issues 
efficiently and economically. 

Methodology 

While TCJS’s “customer” base extends to all Texans who benefit from safe, secure county jails, the 2008 
Customer Service Survey was aimed at county judges and sheriffs.  These two groups have a consistent 
and interactive relationship with TCJS.  Sheriffs comprise the leadership of county jails and are engaged 
in day‐to‐day jail operations. County judges work with TCJS to determine the proper level of funding and 
staffing for the jail, acting as custodian of the county by preparing for the future needs of the 
population. 

Fifty Texas counties were chosen at random from proportional population brackets of less than 50,000 
residents; 50,001 to 100,000 residents; and more than 100,001 residents.  Thirty‐nine counties fell into 
the smallest bracket, four into the middle bracket, and seven in the largest bracket.   

Two different types of surveys were sent, one to the county judges of selected counties and one to the 
sheriffs, with questions tailored to judges’ and sheriffs’ different interactions with TCJS.  A total of one 
hundred surveys were faxed on March 31, 2008, with a requested due date of May 1, 2008. 

The survey “questions” are statements about TCJS.  Respondents were asked to reply to the statement 
with their level of agreement according to the Likert scale: “Strongly Agree”, “Agree”, “Neutral”, 
“Disagree”, or “Strongly Disagree” or “Not Applicable”.  If a respondent’s county jail had been found 
noncompliant by TCJS in the past two years, they were asked to answer two supplemental questions.  
An “additional comments” space at the end of the survey was also included to allow for more 
personalized responses. 

Responses 

By May 1, 2008, thirty‐three sheriffs (66%) and twenty‐nine judges (58%) had returned surveys to TCJS.  
Some incidents of survey error occurred, either as skipped questions or more than one selection chosen, 
and have been omitted in the results tables.     

In general, sheriffs responded more favorably to TCJS’s customer service than judges, with a higher 
response rate, more additional comments, and fewer negative survey responses.  However, the 
responses received from both groups were overwhelmingly positive and reflect favorably on TCJS’s 
customer service record. 
         
     Judges’ 
    Reponses 
 
         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         
     

     




         

 

     

     




         

     

     
 

 




     

 

 

 




     

 

 
 

 




     

 

 

 




     

 

 
 

 




     

 

 

 




     

 

 
 

 




     

 

 

 




     

 

 
Respondents with county jails that had been found out of Minimum Jail Standards compliance 
within the past two years were asked to respond to two additional questions. 
                                               




                                                                                               

                                               

                                               

                                               




                                                                                               
 




          
     Sheriffs’ 
    Reponses 
          
 

 




     

 

 

 




     

 

 
 

 




     

 

 

 




     

 

 
 

 




     

 

 

 




     

 

 
 

 




     

 

 




     

 

 

 
 

 




     

 

 




     

 

 

 
 

 




     

 

 

 




     

 

 
 

 




     

 

 

 




     

 

 
 

 




     

 

 

 




     

 

 
     

     




         

     

     

     




         

     

 
Respondents with county jails that had been found out of Minimum Jail Standards compliance 
within the past two years were asked to respond to two additional questions. 
                                               




                                                                                               

                                               

                                               

                                               




                                                                                               
 

                                              Appendix 
 

Judges’ Additional Comments 

    1. “Inspectors are not consistent with requirements.” 
    2. “Need clearer definition of some jail standards rules.” 
    3. “We feel that the Commission is more interested in the safety and welfare of prisoners than of 
       the needs of the taxpayer and the county’s budget.” 

 

Sheriffs’ Additional Comments 

    1. “I have learned over the years that inspectors are out to help us not to fail us. Their knowledge 
       and expertise has been greatly appreciated.” 
    2. “Jailers need ongoing training classes to include basic jail procedures, inmate movement, 
       searches.” 
    3. “TCJS does a superb job and has been fair and gone above & beyond in assisting anytime help is 
       needed.” 
    4. “Thanks for understanding small county jails.” 
    5. “Jail Standards help keep us out of Federal Court. It offers us official and legal avenues to comply 
       with Jail Standards.” 
    6. “I have found the Commission to be extremely helpful to me from my first term in office 
       through today and feel the State of Texas is fortunate to have such dedicated staff.” 
    7. “Would like to see more training offered by TCJS.” 
    8. “Anytime I contact the TCJS I can get the assistance I’m seeking!” 
    9. “In reviewing the survey responses submitted, there is I feel, a need for additional explanation 
       regarding those response in the attached survey.  While the TCJS was started with the best 
       intentions and goals, it has become a bureaucracy which imposes a one size fits all set of 
       standards on county facilities. Throughout the criminal justice field efforts to enforce a zero 
       tolerance, local situation be‐ignored mentality have failed. The TCJS has done just this through 
       unfunded mandates that serve only to continually justify the further expansion of the TCJS at 
       the expense of the local taxpayer. 

        The inspection process has become inefficient and cumbersome to the local entities. Inspectors 
        spend a large amount of time searching for small errors that have little bearing on the overall 
        efficiency of the county facility being inspected and the safety and security of the inmates 
        housed in these facilities. Currently, the state spends thousands of dollars in mandated local 
        inspections for such public safety issues as generators, boilers, fire alarms, smoke removal, food 
        service, medical, electrical and sanitation standards. TCJS then sends inspectors throughout the 
    state of Texas to review these inspections which could be electronically transmitted to Austin. 
    This change alone could save untold amounts of money if it were implemented. 

    It is not practical to ask elected officials to spend millions to build or ship inmates out of a 
    crowded jail when the county sheriff or commissioners do not have control over all the factors 
    affecting inmate numbers. The population of county jails in Texas is affected by many variables. 
    Currently, the lack of space in the Texas prison system, the lack of mental health beds and the 
    general slowing economic conditions are severely cramping the county jails in Texas. 
    Commanding a financially‐strapped county to either build a new facility or to ship inmates to 
    out‐of‐county jails to relieve a temporary “spike” in population is another example of the “one 
    size fits all” approach the TCJS has adopted. 

    Every jail issue cannot be addressed and most issues that are being addressed are open to 
    interpretation. However, it would be beneficial to most departmental budgets if a material and 
    equipment list, which included cost factors, could be posted on the TCJS web‐site. This would 
    allow departments to view an example of items approved by the TCJS. For example, if a 
    department wishes to replace a sink they must explore options, the selected option sent to the 
    TCJS and then wait for a protracted time to receive either approval or disapproval.  A posted, pr‐
    approved list for jail equipment would allow departments to determine a cost factor and save 
    man hours searching for items that meet with TCJS approval. This is but one example of the 
    “outside the box” thinking needed at TCJS. Local jail facility problem resolution with the support 
    and assistance of the state and not heavy‐handed totalitarian direction will yield better results 
    and much improved relations with the state.”