; Design guidelines for car parking in front gardens
Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out
Your Federal Quarterly Tax Payments are due April 15th Get Help Now >>

Design guidelines for car parking in front gardens

VIEWS: 7 PAGES: 3

Design guidelines for car parking in front gardens

More Info
  • pg 1
									LONDON BOROUGH OF RICHMOND UPON Til A MPS
If the property is other than a single family dwelling
house (i.e. flats or other uses) planning permission is
necessary for the provision of parking spaces in the front
garden.
If the property is a listed building the boundary wall
and any other structure within the curtilage is also
listed. Listed building consent is required for any works
of alteration which affect the character of the building.
If the property is within a conservation area, consent is
generally required for the demolition of any existing structure
exceeding 115 cubic metres and front boundary walls over 1
metre in height. It is also necessary in conservation areas to
notify the Planning and Building Control Department six
weeks in advance of any trees being topped, lopped or felled
(see Planning Information Leaflet No,5). If the proposals
affect any tree the advice of the Council's Tree Officer should
be sought.
Planning permission is required to construct a boundary
wall or fence over one metre high abutting a highway or
two metres elsewhere.
2.
DESIGN GUIDELINES
FOR CAR PARKING IN
FRONT GARDENS
3.
4.
r
m
>
&
HI ■
•J*
m
3
5.
WTA
wn
DO
1
If a vehicular crossing over the footway is required, an application
should be made to the Highways & Transport Department
(Highways Maintenance Group), who will arrange for (i) an estimate
to be made and (ii) the crossing to be constructed. It can be illegal
to drive over a footway without a properly constructed crossing.
&
•• .-
21
Car parking blending in with the character of the street
In areas where the council consider that forecourt parking
is having a damaging effect on visual quality, a special
direction, called an Article 4 (2) Direction, can be made with
the agreement of the Secretary of State for the Environ¬
ment, Transport of the Regions in order to control the problem.
This would remove permitted development rights regarding
forecourt parking.
Introduction
This leaflet is one in a series of documents which give
design information on various topics and will form planning
guidance supplementary to the statutory local plans produced
by the Council. The London Borough of Richmond has a high
standard of environment which the Council seeks to maintain
and improve. An important part of the environment is the
space between the road and the buildings which front it, and
' this can be seriously affected by the introduction of ill-con¬
sidered car parking. When front gardens are replaced by hard
surfaces and vehicles, the harmony and continuity of the
street frontage is interrupted and enioyment of the buildings
themselves can suffer. It is therefore important that fore- .
court parking should be designed to cause minimum
disruption. Dormobiles, caravans, boats or other vehicles
which are larger than a private car should not be parked in
front gardens.
The guidance contained in this document is for the benefit
of all who intend to construct forecourt parking whether or
not such work is permitted development.
Guidelines
mm
p
aw
IV
D j iSSSSS
Parking presents difficulties in many residential areas of
the Borough, particularly in those areas where houses are
not able to have garages,'and it can be especially, inconven¬
ient where it is not possible for residents to park nearby. In
these areas, where space permits, there is an increasing
demand for forecourt parking. Unfortunately in many cases
this has been achieved without consideration for its effect
on the surrounding environment. With a little thought the
visual impact of such parking can be reduced so that the
scheme blends,more satisfactorily with the neighbourhood,
often without involving extra work or cost. This leaflet
suggests how suitable schemes can be designed.
m
m
m-
J,
i
*■2
Si
ik
m-i
Legal Considerations
In many cases alterations to front gardens fall within the
terms of 'permitted development'. Applications for planning
permission are not required for permitted development and
therefore the local authority has little control over the creation
of forecourt parking. However, notification to or approval from
the local authority is necessary in the following cases:
Important points to remember
The general aim of any design for parking in front gardens
should be to maintain as much sense of enclosure as is
practical through the retention, where possible, of existing
walls or fences and the provision of gates and generous plant¬
ing. If this can be achieved, the appearance and character of the
street need not be greatly disturbed and the visual impact of
If the property is on a classified road, planning per¬
mission is required to create a new vehicular ac.cess
and a hardstanding.
1.
additional hard surfaces will be dimished. Therefore the follow¬
ing paragraphs set out guidelines for the improvement of
existing and future forecourt parking proposals. It must be
realised that each site has different problems and
solutions will vary from case to case. However, most of the
basic principles set out below are generally applicable.
(ii) York stone slabs.
(iii) Granite or other stone setts or cobbles.
(iv) Concrete paving blocks.
(v) Open concrete blocks and other paving products which
allow grass to grow through - proprietary brands are avail¬
able for this purpose. These are not always successful when
in constant use for parking.
(vi) Open concrete blocks which allow grass to grow through
— proprietary brands are available for this purpose.
layout
The front garden should be large enough to allow a car to be
parked at right angles to the road without overhanging the
pavement, and with sufficient space between the parked car
and the building to avoid the obstruction of daylight to rooms
on the ground floor or basement, and to avoid staining of the
building by exhaust fumes. There should be sufficient space
to allow for access to entrances in the building, to enable front
gates to open inwards and to accommodate planting around
the hardstanding. There must be a minimum depth of 4.8m
from the back of the footpath to the front of your building.
Front garden parking should only be considered where there is
sufficient room to park at 90° to the road, as parking parallel to the
road in small gardens in particular is very detrimental to the setting.
The amount of hard surface used for parking and the width of
the entrance should be kept to a minimum and should always
attempt to avoid disturbance of any existing trees or signifi¬
cant established plants or hedges.
(vii) Gravel — loose gravel needs to be contained to prevent
it spilling onto planted areas and the footway. Other
less graded aggregates such as Breedon Gravel can be
compacted by rol I ing.
Materials such as asphalt and concrete, are not satisfactory on
their own. However, they can be effective in limited areas when
used in conjunction with other materials. Asphalt and bitumen
material can be made more attractive by rolling into it a covering
of gravel, provided that unnatural colours are avoided. Concrete
can be improved by the use of a coarse aggregate exposed on
the surface by brushing away the cement before it is fully dry.
Thought should be given to the arrangement of materials. The
severity of large expanses of in situ concrete or asphalt can
be broken down visually by the use of dividing strips or
edgings of smaller unit materials such as brick. For minimal
visual impact stone or concrete paving can be laid as wheel
strips with grass or gravel between. A bed of loose material,
such as gravel, appropriately sited at the centre of a scheme
can be effective in dispersing the unsightly effects of oil
staining associated with car parking.
T V
If
r
--.T
h
•V
/.
■J
&
■.V
tT.'ri': par-,
walls, fences, and hedges
up gi.ou.i'
Where an opening has to be made in an existing fence or wall
it should be kept to a minimum and made good at both ends
to match existing materials and detaiIs, such as timber posts
or brick piers. Where possible, gates should be provided and
these should swing inwards or if there is insufficient depth
they should fold or slide behind the wall.
"Do's and don'ts"
A hard surface should be laid to a slight gradient to allow
for the satisfactory drainage of rainwater. The further need
forgulleys and drains should also be considered. An existing
entrance path to a front door should, where possible, be
retained, separated from the parking space by a planted
margin.	'
Fences, walls and
shrubs within the
shaded areas to be
kept to a maximum
height of 600mm
A scheme for forecourt parking should take advantage of the
opportunities to make proper provision for dustbins.
y
24m
surface materials
1
"25m
The success of a hardstanding can often depend upon the
attention given to surface preparation. In most cases topsoil
and plant roots should be removed and replaced with com¬
pacted hardcore covered by a layer of sand or concrete. This
will provide a firm base for surface materials that will also
resist the intrusion of weeds.
A wide variety of surface materials is available for the con¬
struction of hardstandings and the colours and textures of
the house and the character of its surroundings should be
allowed to influence the choice of such materials. In general,
traditional materials such as brick and stone are preferred as
they weather well and will always mellow to complement
existing buildings. This is, of course, particularly important
where historic buildings and conservation areas are concerned.
Also small paving units tend to be better, as large slabs are
easily broken, especially where surface preparation has not
been thorough. Some materials which may be particulary suit¬
able are:
2-4
I
Dropped kerb
F7
i* 8m-
V
A
Pavement
Parking space dimensions and visibility splay requirements.
There must be a minimum depth of 4.8m from the back of the
footpath to the front of your building.
In the interests of pedestrian safety the Borough maintains
standards for visibility, the dimensions of which are shown on
the diagram above. In addition vehicular visibility sightlines may
be required. These vary according to the importance of the road
and where the driveway directly meets the main carriageway,
and can be provided for individual circumstances by officers of
the Transport Division.
In order to meet these standards it may be necessary to
recess a gateway and splay the boundary wall. Alternatively
railings can be used.
(i) Paving bricks laid on a strong but permeable base such as
sand on granular material - lack of drainage can leave porous
bricks susceptible to frost damage. Alternatively, certain
types of bricks are suitable for laying on concrete with joints
pointed up.
planting
In some cases the visual impact of cars can be further
reduced by banking up topsoil to raise the level of planting,
if necessary behind a low retaining wall. Planting should
generally be designed for low maintenance and some suitable
species are suggested below:
Every opportunity should be taken to use planting to reduce
the visual impact of vehicles in front gardens and to separate
vehicular and pedestrian access; trees for their height and
evergreen shrubs, for their constant cover are particularly
effective in making cars less visible and in deterring weeds.
PROPER NAME
COMMON NAME
SOME CHARACTERISTICS & USES
GARDEN TREES
Some small to medium sized trees are listed below which may be suited (o front garden planting
Acer ncgundo 'Variegation'
Acer griseiun, rufiiierce
Aluus speck's
Belula species
Cleditsia 'Sunburst'
Koelreutheria paniculata
Mains species
Primus species
Rhus typhina
Sorbus aucuperia
fast growing, white edged leaves
peeling/striped bark, autumn colour
riverside tree, fast growing
native, light crown and bark
delicate soft yellow foliage
late flowering, yellow flowers
Box Elder
Ornamental Maples
Alder
Birch
Gleditsia
Indian Rain Tree
Crab
Cherry, Almond, Plum
Sumach
Mountain Ash
spring flowers, autumn colour
wide variety including native trees
leaf shape, autumn colour, very small
flowers and berries, autumn colour
HEDGES
All hedging plants below are native. Hawthorn hedges are particularly attractive to wildlife, and may be effectively mixed with other
hedging plants such as Field Maple & Holly
Acer campstre
Carpinus betulus
Crataegus monogyna
Fagus sylvatica
Ilex aquifolium
Taxus baccata
spring and autumn foliage colours
retains dead leaves in winter
berries, flowers, wildlife
retains dead leaves in winter
berries, some have variegated leaves
formal character
Field Maple
Hornbeam
Hawthorn
Beech
Holly
E
Yew
E
SHRUBS
A mixture of both deciduous and evergreen shrubs is usually most effective
Buddleia
Choisya teruata
Cornus
Cotoneaster
Escalbnia
Lavandula
Malwuia
I'mus inugo
Philadelphus
Rosa
Viburnum
Vinca
attractive to butterflies, flowers
spring flowers, aromatic leaves
some have coloured stems, autumn colour
berries, vast range of shrubs
late flowering evergreen
summer flowers, fragrance
winter flowering evergreen
shrubby Pine/texture and contrast
dense fragrant flowers, summer
vast variety, flowers, good on walls
some winter flowering
useful ground cover, flowers
Mexican Orange
Dogwood
Cotoneaster
Escallonia
Lavender
Mahonia
Mountain Pine
Mock Orange
Rose
Viburnum
Periwinkle
E
E
E
E
E
E
some E
E
WALL PLANTS
The following are suitable for planting against buildings, other walls and fences
Ceanothus
Clemetis
Ivy*
Climbing Hydrangea
Honeysuckle
Magnolia
Virginia Creeper
Firethorn
Rose Acacia
Wisteria
blue flowers, fast
vast flower range
wide variety, shade
white flowers, shade
scented flowers
flowers, tree-like form
autumn colour
flowers, berries
pink flowers, spring
lilac or white flowers
Ceanothus
Clemetis
Hedera
Hydrangea petiolaris
Lonicera
Magnolia grandiflora
Parthenocissus
Pyracanlha
Robinia hispida
Wisteria
E
some E
S
E
S
some E
S
E
* best avoided on historic buildings and old walls E : evergreen S : self-clinging climbers
Consultation
LONDON BOROUGH OF RICHMOND UPON THAMES
DESIGN GUIDELINE LEAFLET NO. 2
Where there is any doubt about a proposal for forecourt parking,
officers of the Planning & Building Control Department will always be
willing to advise on design, materials, legal aspects and safety
standards. Attention to detail is always worthwhile - take care of your
environment.
Planning & Building Control Department
2nd Floor, Civic Centre, 44 York Street,
Twickenham TW1 3BZ
Tel: 020 8891 1411
November 1999 (First published March 1981)

								
To top