Math Games Workshop - PDF by stv47267

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									             Math Games Workshop
                      Joe Horyza-Green Oaks School

Crazy 5’s
Write #’s by 5’s starting with zero(0)-125 on the white
board. The students can look at the white board for
visual cues about when to say “beep”. The children sit in
a large circle around the room. They face into the center
of the room while seated on their chairs. A chosen
student begins to count starting with a “beep” for zero.
As students continue counting, if they come to a 5 or a 0
you say “beep”. The object of the game is for the class
to count as high as they can without making any
mistakes. The children count around the circle until
someone makes a mistake. If a mistake is made, then
the game ends and a new game begins. The students
may NOT “coach or help” one another with the counting.

An additional technique is to have the students pass an
object around the room as they count. Passing the
object helps keep them focused on the counting.

Example: be(0)ep, 1, 2, 3, 4, be(5)ep, 6, 7, 8, 9, be(10)ep,
11, 12, 13, 14, be(15)ep, 16, 17, 18, 19, be(20)ep, 21, 22, 23,
24, beep, 26, 27, 28, 29, beep, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, beep,
36, 37...

The one exception to the pattern is when the counting
gets to the 50’s then the pattern changes to: ...48, 49,
be(50)ep, be(51)ep, be(53)ep, beep, beep, beep, beep, beep,
beep, beep, be(60)ep, 61, 62, 63, 64, beep, 66... back to
the regular pattern. The same exception occurs when
the count gets to ...148, 149, be(150)ep, be(151)ep, be(152)ep,
be(153)ep, be(154)ep, be(155)ep ... be(160)ep, 161, 162, 163...

                       Math Games Workshop 2007
            Math Games Workshop
                    Joe Horyza-Green Oaks School




White Board Speed Drill
Place the 5 templates on the white board using
magnets. All of the templates have the same #’s. All of
the #’s are in the same order on each template. Select
the teams, 4 students per team. There are 4 or 5 teams
for each template. Up high on the white board write
“Team 1, Team 2, Team 3, Team 4, Team 5”. You will
tally the scores for each team under their team title. Put
an addend into each template, ie. +4. Have the students
stand back from the white board with their white board
markers in their hand. On the given signal, they rush to
the board and complete their template. They cap the
marker, place the marker on the tray, and step back from
the white board. As each person finishes the teacher
puts a digit above the template as to how they finished.
1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th.
The teacher then checks the problems for each student.
If they complete the template correctly they get the
points based on how they finished.

    1st...5 pts.
    2nd...4 pts.
    3rd...3 pts.
    4th...2 pts.
    5th...1 pt.

Use tally marks to keep the team scores. The game
continues until everyone has had a chance to complete a
template. There is one additional rule: if a student
misses one or more problems on the template then they
                     Math Games Workshop 2007
           Math Games Workshop
                    Joe Horyza-Green Oaks School
are dropped to a lower finish. Example: a student
finishes 2nd place, but misses a problem on the
template then that student is dropped to 5th place and
the other teams are moved up one spot.
White Board Speed Drill (cont.)
Template
  4            0                  9

5                                   6
            +4
            sample addend


1                                   2

 8             3                  7
Use a 12 x 18 tag board to make the templates and then
have them laminated. They will hold up for years.
                     Math Games Workshop 2007
           Math Games Workshop
                    Joe Horyza-Green Oaks School




Little Shot
object: As numbered sticks are pulled from a cup,
players write the digits in the cells of a 3 X 3 grid.
Players calculate scores by adding the numbers in the
grid’s rows, columns, and diagonal.

number of players: two to the whole class

materials: sticks with numerals on the ends, copies of
the game sheet for each player, and pencils

preparation: pass out the game sheets, get pencils, pull
sticks

PLAYING:
1. Each player gets a game sheet and a pencil.

2. Players may NOT look on their neighbors or copy
where they place their numbers on the playing sheet.
Also, players may NOT erase or move their numbers
once they have been entered on the game sheet.

3. The sticks are pulled from the cup. The number on
the end of the stick is announced. The students write
the called number on their game sheet. The stick is
replaced into the cup. The next number is called and
then replaced until all nine pulls have occurred.
                     Math Games Workshop 2007
           Math Games Workshop
                    Joe Horyza-Green Oaks School


4. After the nine numbers are written, the players find
the sums of the numbers across the three rows, down
the three columns, and through the diagonal.
They record the sums into the corresponding circles.


5. Players cross out any sum that appears in only one
circle.

6. The number of sums that are not crossed out is a
players score.

Winning: the player with the largest score or the
score of zero wins the game. Zero is actually a harder
score to get than 7 or 6.




                     Math Games Workshop 2007
    Math Games Workshop
        Joe Horyza-Green Oaks School




3   4   2                      9
2   3   4                      9       Score

6   3   5                    14          5

                         11
11 10 11




         Math Games Workshop 2007
            Math Games Workshop
                    Joe Horyza-Green Oaks School



PIG with Paper Dice
Materials: “Pig” sheet for each student. A pencil for each
student. Overhead projector for teacher. Pig bowl and 6
sets of paper dice. Place the paper dice into the pig bowl
and stir or shuffle them around.
(directions for paper dice on next page)

Object of Pig: To get the highest score or most points
for the first round Subtotal A, the second round Subtotal
B and the over all Total of Subtotal A and B combined.
There are five games for each round of play.

To Play:
Teacher pulls a paper dice from pig bowl one at a time.
Place the paper die on the over head projector. The
students turn their pig sheet over to add their scores.
They write down each die that is pulled from the pig
bowl. The students may stop at any time and total their
score for the game. They record their score on the front
of the pig sheet. If the student chooses to STOP, they
must notify the others in the area or the teacher that they
are STOPPING. Once the students chooses to stop,
that is then end of that particular game for them they
must take the score that they stopped with. Failure to
notify the others that you are stopping indicates that you
are still in the game and must suffer the consequences
or reap the rewards of staying in the game, thus
becoming a PIG by continuing to play. The teacher
continues to pull the paper die from the pig bowl one at a
time until the die of one (1) is pulled. Once the die of
                     Math Games Workshop 2007
              Math Games Workshop
                    Joe Horyza-Green Oaks School
one is pulled the game ends and all players who are still
in the game must put a ZERO on their score sheet for
that game. If the teacher pulls a die of one on the first
pull, the game is over an all students must put a score of
Zero for that game and a new game begins. Play
continues until 5 games have been played. After 5
games have been played. The students then total their
scores for Subtotal A. Once 5 more games have been
played the students total their scores for Subtotal B. At
the end of both rounds A and B the students total their
scores for both round A and B for their over all score.

Paper Dice:




                     Math Games Workshop 2007
           Math Games Workshop
                    Joe Horyza-Green Oaks School


Paper Dice: 2” X 2” square tag board, punch the circles
out with a hole punch.




                     Math Games Workshop 2007
            Math Games Workshop
                     Joe Horyza-Green Oaks School

Knock Out
This is a multi use game. Multi use means it can be
adapted to any subject matter. For the purposes of this
workshop, “math” is the chosen subject.

Object: One team to “knock out” the other team. This
game is about listening and responding to questions
without any extra talking. This game takes patience and
self control.

Materials: Two (2) items for designating whose turn it is.
I usually use two white board erasers, but any object
that can be passed from student to student can be used.
Chairs, one for each student.

There are two (2) teams in the game of Knock Out.
Each team sits in a line facing the other team with their
chairs side by side.

Divide the class into two teams. Have them move their
chairs side by side. Once the game has begun, the
children must sit on their chairs and NOT TALK.
Any student who talks is sent to the knock out area. The
knock out area is the floor right in front of their chair. Any
student who talks while in the knock out area causes
two (2) other students from their team to join them in the
knock out area. It is important for the teacher to make
sure that the NO Talking rules are clear for the students.

To Play:
The teacher flips a coin to determine which team will go
first. The first student in each team is holding the
                      Math Games Workshop 2007
           Math Games Workshop
                    Joe Horyza-Green Oaks School
“passing object” (white board eraser). The teacher asks
the first student a question. The student who is asked
the question must respond. If the student has the
question correct, they have the choice of either knocking
out a student from the other team, or bringing a student
back from their own team. If the student answers the
question incorrect, then they are knocked out. They
must sit without talking and wait to be either brought
back in the game or just wait until the game ends.




See Game layout on next page:




                     Math Games Workshop 2007
          Math Games Workshop
              Joe Horyza-Green Oaks School


         KNOCK OUT
TEAM 1
                          TEAM 2




                                             KEY:
                                                = chair



                                              = student




               Math Games Workshop 2007
               Math Games Workshop
                    Joe Horyza-Green Oaks School



I have __________.
Who has __________?
This a universal game that can be adapted to spelling,
math, high frequency words, etc.

To play this game you must first prepare the game cards.
I count the amount of children playing and determine
how many cards I need. I always include my self in the
game. This allows for good modeling. Later the children
could play by themselves as a group.

Choose 21 cards. Begin the first card with
“ I have ___one____.”
“Who has ___2____?”

next card...

“I have __two__.”
“Who has __3___?”

next card...

“I have __three__.”
“Who has ___4____?”

etc. until you get to 20. Then you make the last card to
look like this.
“I have __twenty__.”
“Who has ___1___?
                     Math Games Workshop 2007
           Math Games Workshop
                   Joe Horyza-Green Oaks School



To Play:
Pass out the cards random to the children. Each child
gets one card. Teacher keeps a card also. Then begin
by saying “I have __one__.” Note: say the word “one”
and then spell the word o-n-e.
Then read the next part “Who has __2__?”
The child who has “two” responds to the question.
“I have ___two__.” Note: don’t forget to spell the word
t-w-o before you read the question.
The game should continue around the class until
everyone has had a turn and the last child should ask
“Who has __1__?” And the beginning person should
respond with “I have __one__.


Sample set of blank cards on the next
page.




                    Math Games Workshop 2007
           Math Games Workshop
                    Joe Horyza-Green Oaks School




I have ___________________.           I have ___________________.

Who has __________________?          Who has __________________?




I have ___________________.           I have ___________________.

Who has __________________?          Who has __________________?




I have ___________________.           I have ___________________.

Who has __________________?          Who has __________________?




I have ___________________.           I have ___________________.

Who has __________________?          Who has __________________?




I have ___________________.           I have ___________________.

Who has __________________?          Who has __________________?

                     Math Games Workshop 2007

								
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