Our Vision “Many Hearts, One Accord” We are the many hearts that

Document Sample
Our Vision “Many Hearts, One Accord” We are the many hearts that Powered By Docstoc
					                                   Child Protection Policy



                                Our Vision
                       “Many Hearts, One Accord”
          We are the many hearts that follow Jesus, the one accord.
      “Through prayer and care we become cherished and enriched”
                        (School Mission Statement)

St Mary’s fully recognises its responsibilities for ensuring the safety and well-being of all
children, in accordance with the framework of ‘Every Child Matters’.

“Because of their day-to-day contact with children during the school term, teachers and other
staff are particularly well placed to observe outward signs of abuse, changes of behaviour or
failure to develop.” (WORKING TOGETHER UNDER THE CHILDREN ACT 1989)

Rationale
Children must be given the opportunity to mature, develop and learn within a secure
environment, at school and at home, safe from physical and psychological danger. St Mary's
Catholic Primary School fully recognises its broad responsibilities for the Safeguarding of
Children in Education (2004) and the 2004 Children’s Act. This policy addresses the particular
issues of Child Protection. The protection of children is an integral part of the ethos of the
school. We aspire to a Christian environment where a child receives love, respect and
protection regardless of age, gender, race, culture or disability. We strive to create an
atmosphere in which children feel secure, their views are valued, and they are encouraged
to talk and are listened to.

There are four main elements to our policy:
   1. Safe Recruitment
   2. Raising Awareness
   3. Procedures
   4. Support

1. SAFE RECRUITMENT
We practise safe recruitment in checking the suitability of staff and volunteers to work with
children and ensure safe recruitment practices are always followed. CRB checks are carried
out on all volunteers and employed staff. Use of Supply Agency staff will be from agencies
where assurances have been received that appropriate CRB checks have been conducted.
Candidates attending interview are required to bring photographic proof of identity and any
existing CRB paperwork. Photocopies are taken. References are taken up and no offer of a
position is confirmed until these have been verified. Before taking up post a new CRB
clearance will be sought.

Student teachers working in the school are required to have had all the necessary checks
done prior to their period of teaching practice starting in the school.

The Designated Person for Child Protection and the Designated Governor each undertake the
Safe Recruitment module from the National College for School Leadership to achieve the
relevant certification
2. RAISING AWARENESS

Our teaching of personal, social and health education and citizenship, as part of the National
Curriculum, helps to develop appropriate attitudes in our children, and makes them aware of
the impact of their decisions on others. We also teach them how to recognise different risks in
different situations, and how to behave in response to them. Further resources using Social
and Emotional Aspects of Learning materials support our work in class as well as All that I am
from the Archdiocese of Birmingham

We recognise that because of the day to day contact with children, school staff are well
placed to observe the outward signs of abuse.
Abuse takes a variety of forms:

         •    Physical abuse involves the hitting, shaking or other treatment of a child that can
              cause actual bodily harm.
         • Sexual abuse involves forcing or enticing a child into sexual activities, whether or
              not the child is aware about what is happening. This includes non-contact
              situations, such as showing children pornography.
         • Emotional abuse is the persistent emotional ill-treatment of children, such as
              frightening them, or putting them in positions of danger. It is also an abuse to
              convey to children the feeling that they are worthless or unloved.
         • Children are abused also if they are neglected. This could involve failure to
              provide proper food and warmth, but it might also be failure to see to the
              emotional well-being of the child
         All adults in the school receive regular training to raise their awareness of abuse and
         their knowledge of the child protection procedures that have been agreed locally.
         Governors are also informed of and invited to such training sessions.

      All the adults in our school share responsibility for keeping our children safe. We may on
          occasion report concerns which, on investigation, prove unfounded. It is better to be
          safe than sorry, and we trust that parents, while they will naturally be upset by any
          investigation, will accept that the school acted in the child’s best interests.

3. PROCEDURES

    We will follow the procedures set out by our Local Safeguarding Children Board and take
    account of guidance issued by the Department for
    Education and Skills to:

•     Ensure we have a Designated Teacher for Child Protection who has
       received appropriate training and support for this role.

    The Designated Teacher for Child Protection at St Mary’s is:

                                Ian Beardmore HEADTEACHER

     In his absence the Deputy Headteacher or Learning Mentor:

                              Joanne Kirkham and Lorraine Murphy

will take responsibility for the school should any referrals be made by a member of the school
community.

•     Ensure we have a Nominated Governor responsible for Child Protection.

The Nominated Governor for Child Protection is :

                                         Andrew Brookes
•   Ensure every member of staff, volunteer and governor knows the name of the Designated
    Teacher responsible for Child Protection and their role. This is displayed in the Staffroom.
•   Ensure that all staff receive a summary of the main points of the Child Protection Policy.
•   Ensure all staff and volunteers understand their responsibilities in being alert to the signs
    of abuse and responsibility for referring any concerns to the Designated Teacher
    responsible for Child Protection to pursue in line with a staged procedure. If teachers
    suspect that a child in their class may be a victim of abuse, they should not try to
    investigate, but should immediately inform the named person about their concerns. Staff
    must not keep to themselves any information about abuse which a child gives them; they
    are required by law to pass this information on.
•   Ensure that parents have an understanding of the responsibility placed on the school and
    staff for Child Protection by setting out its obligations in the school prospectus. The
    school will seek parental consent for referrals to Social Services and other child
    protection organisations, however when the concerns are such that we consider the
    safety of a child may be jeopardised, we reserve the right to make a referral without
    informing the parent/carer.
•   Notify Children’s Services if there is an unexplained absence of more than one day of a
    pupil who is on the Child Protection register.
•   Develop effective links with relevant agencies and co-operate as required with their
    enquiries regarding Child Protection matters including attendance at case conferences.
•   Keep written records of concerns about children, even where there is no need to refer the
    matter immediately.
•   Ensure all records are kept securely, in the main pupil file held in the filing cabinet in the
    Main Office. They are kept in a named sealed envelope which can only be opened by the
    Designated Person. The envelope is dated and resealed each time it is accessed by the
    Designated Person

Develop and then follow procedures where an allegation is made against a member of staff or
volunteer.
We recognise that because of the day- to day- contact with children, school staff are well
placed to observe the outward signs of abuse. The school will therefore:

Establish and maintain an environment where children feel secure, are encouraged to talk,
are listened to and valued.
Ensure children are made aware that there are adults in the school whom they can approach
if they are worried.
Include opportunities in the PSCHE curriculum for children to develop the skills they need to
recognise and stay safe from abuse.

4. SUPPORT

We recognise that children who are abused or witness violence may find it difficult to develop
a sense of self worth. They may feel helplessness, humiliation and some sense of blame. The
school may be the only stable, secure and predictable element in the lives of children at risk.
 The school will therefore:
• Establish and maintain an environment where children feel secure, are
    encouraged to talk, and are listened to.
• Ensure children know that there are adults in the school whom they can approach if they
    are worried.
 The school will endeavour to further support the pupils through:
• The content of the curriculum recognising that abuse and neglect can result in
    underachievement. We strive to ensure that all our children make good educational
    progress.
• The school ethos which promotes a positive, supportive and secure environment and
    gives pupils a sense of being valued.. The atmosphere within our school is one that
    encourages all children to do their best.
• The school behaviour policy which is aimed at supporting vulnerable
    pupils in the school and ensuring that pupils knows that some behaviour is unacceptable
    but they are valued and not to be blamed for any abuse which has occurred.
•   Liaison with other agencies that support the pupil such as Children’s Services, Child and
    Adult Mental Health Service, Education Welfare Service and Educational Psychology
    Service.
•   Ensuring that, where a pupil on the Child Protection register leaves, their information is
    transferred to the new school immediately and that the child's social worker is informed

Role of the Designated Teacher
   • To keep the suffering of the child to a minimum.
   • Ensure every member of the governing body, staff and volunteers knows the name of
        the designated teacher and about the role.
   • To raise awareness of all staff in school about child protection, to ensure all staff and
        volunteers understand their responsibilities in being alert to the signs of abuse and
        their responsibility for referring any concerns.
   • To facilitate and support the development of a whole school policy.
   • To co-ordinate action when child abuse is suspected.
   • To maintain records in secure and confidential files.
   • Develop effective links with relevant agencies and co-operate as required with their
        enquiries regarding child protection matters.
   • Attend case conferences and other social services meetings when required.
   • To ensure that procedures for involving parents or guardians are known and followed.
   • Notify Children’s Services if there is an unexplained absence of more than one day of
        a pupil who is on the child protection register.
   • Ensure that all “Looked After” children have an up-to-date PEP which is written and
        maintained in accordance with local guidelines and attend all LAC review meetings.
   • To pass on appropriate records when a child, who is on the child protection register,
        leaves the school and to inform the child’s social worker.
   • Keep written records of concerns about children, even where there is no need to refer
        the matter immediately.
   • Co-ordinate support for the child during and after a referral has been made to social
        services.
   • To offer support to staff who have suspicions about a child or have handled a
        disclosure, or given evidence in court.
   • Develop and follow procedures where an allegation is made against a member of
        staff.

    Role and responsibilities of all staff.

        •   In the event of a member of staff (whether teaching or non-teaching) having a
            concern about a pupil the designated teacher will be informed and record
            accurately the event/s giving rise to the concern.
        •   Provide a positive, supportive and secure environment and give the pupils a
            sense of being valued.
        •   Where abuse leads to challenging behaviour or being withdrawn, staff will
            endeavour to support the pupil through the content of the curriculum and by
            implementing the school’s behaviour policy consistently.

Confidentiality

The purpose of confidentiality is to protect the child. It is the responsibility of each individual
working with the children to respect any information which may be disclosed unless it is felt
that the child is ‘at risk’. When children disclose an abusive situation, they need to know that
the information they are sharing must be passed on to others, but this needs to be addressed
sensitively. They must be told WHO the information will be passed on to and the reasons
WHY this needs to happen. The adult will then follow the guidelines laid down under “Role
and Responsibility of Staff.”

Record Keeping and Monitoring

    Records will include:
                 •   Copies of letters
                 •   Notes from individual class record books
                 •   Current PEP when appropriate
                 •   Reports
                 •   Details of phone conversations
                 •   Details of any contact with parents/guardians/carers
                 •   Medical Reports
                 •   Details of behaviour in a range of settings, noting where/ when/frequency
                     /others involved/ antecedents and consequences

    Records must;
                     •   Have note of dates times and members of staff involved
                     •   Be relevant, factual and objective.
                     •   Subjective comments must be labelled as such
                     •   Be kept separately from the pupils’ academic record and in a secure
                         place
                     •   Be shared with parents/guardians as part of good practice
                     •   Be immediately passed on to the child’s next school when he/she
                         leaves


Role of the Governing Body

The role of the governing body is only in the monitoring and review of the Child Protection
Policy. Governors do not have a role in individual cases and should not attend Child
Protection Case Conferences. Governors should receive an annual report on current Child
Protection measures in place in the school. This is signed by the Chair of Governors and
Recorded in the minutes.
All governors at St. Mary’s have been CRB cleared.

Abuse by staff

Because of their daily contact with children in a variety of situations, head teachers and other
staff are vulnerable to accusations of abuse.
Our policy applies to all staff, governors and volunteers working in the school. The protection
of the children is paramount and it is the responsibility of all adults within the school
regardless of their role to pass on any concerns.
If any person has a concern about the Headteacher this should be passed directly to the
Chair of Governors
DfES guidance, Safeguarding Children in Education: Dealing with allegations of abuse
against teachers and other staff (2005) will be followed.

Further details are in the specific Whistle Blowing Policy

In certain circumstances school staff are entitled to use reasonable force to restrain a pupil in
line with DfES guidance 10/98. This is detailed in the specific Use of Restraint Policy. (School
handling policy)
       WHAT IS A CHILD IN NEED?

       Children who are defined as being ‘in need’, under the Children Act 1989, are those whose
       vulnerability is such that they are unlikely to reach or maintain a satisfactory level of health or
       development, or their health and development will be significantly impaired, without the
       provision of services (s17(10) of the Children Act 1989). The critical factors to be taken into
       account in deciding whether a child is in need under the Children Act 1989 are what will
       happen to a child’s health or development without services, and the likely effect the services
       will have on the child’s standard of health and development.

This policy was agreed by staff on October 2009

This policy was approved by Governors on October 2009

This policy will be reviewed by the Governors on October 2010


Signed_________________________________Chair of Governors

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:12
posted:3/7/2010
language:
pages:6
Description: Our Vision “Many Hearts, One Accord” We are the many hearts that