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KEEPING KIDS SAFE AT THE BIG DAY OUT

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					MEDIA RELEASE
31 January 2007



  KEEPING KIDS SAFE AT THE BIG DAY OUT
To help ensure the Big Day Out (Friday 2 February) is safe, fun and enjoyable for everyone, the Children,
Youth and Women’s Health Service is encouraging parents to discuss safety awareness and ground rules
before kissing their teenager goodbye.

While the event is all about the music, drinking excessive amounts of alcohol and sun exposure can both
be risky.

Youth Services Manager Dorian Marsland-Smith suggests parents talk to their teenagers about:
   • using public transport to get to and from the event or having a designated driver who isn’t going to
       drink alcohol
   • safe drinking
   • the dangers of drink spiking and how to minimise the risk
   • knowing who to contact and how if a friend becomes unwell (There is a first aid tent at the venue).
   • the importance of friends looking after each other and staying in a group.

“Teenagers can party to excess at events such as the Big Day Out and this can put them in risky
situations,” Ms Marsland-Smith said. “As parents we can’t protect them at all times, and teenagers don’t
always heed our advice. However we can talk to them about what to do to stay safe.”

Sun exposure can also be dangerous, particularly if young people are drinking alcohol and are not
consuming enough water.

“Stress to your child the importance of covering up, wearing a broad-brimmed hat and regularly applying
sunscreen,” Ms Marsland-Smith said. “It doesn’t have to be a really hot day for the sun to cause damage.”

On a hot day, heat stroke can be a risk. Symptoms can include exhaustion, weakness, dizziness,
headache, rapid pulse and clammy skin. Make sure your child can recognise these signs and help friends
who appear to be suffering from heat stress by encouraging them to lie down and sip water until medical
care is available.

“Suggest that your child carries a bottle of water throughout the day to sip on regularly,” Ms Marsland-
Smith said.

“Encourage teenagers to eat enough throughout the day and to sit down from time to time, preferably in a
shady area.”

The Children, Youth and Women’s Health Service will have two stalls at the Big Day Out. The Second
Story youth service and Headroom positive mental health program will provide young people with health
information, and program and service details.




For more information, contact Kirsty Mudge, Communication Consultant on 8161 8313 or 0421 611 188.
Email: kirsty.mudge@cywhs.sa.gov.au. After hours: 0401 125 630

				
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