An Integrated Regional Strategy for the East of England by hcj

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									5     Priorities for the East of England


       Chapter Summary:
       Drawing the discussion of Crucial Regional Issues together with the proposed decision-making hierarchy, five
       Priorities are identified. Harnessing each in a manner that will contribute to the Vision and high level
       outcomes, the intention is that these Priorities should form the core of the region’s negotiating brief with central
       government. They should provide a backdrop to regional strategies as they are revised and refreshed. They
       should also provide something of a research agenda for the region.

       In striving towards the Vision and the high level outcomes, five Priorities for the East of England are to
           achieve high quality and sustainable solutions in Growth Areas and other parts of the region facing growth
            pressures
           harness fully the region’s strengths in science, research and development and in the surrounding
            commercialisation processes
           address the causes and implications of persistent deprivation and social exclusion in both buoyant parts
            of the region and areas facing economic decline
           effect a step change in the efficiency of resource use and the management of the region’s distinctive
            natural and built environmental assets
           capture the benefits from – and manage the impacts of – the region’s international gateways and national
            transport corridors.


      Introduction


5.1   Chapter 2 set out a Vision and a series of high level outcomes for the Integrated Regional
      Strategy. Following on from this, Chapter 3 identified eight Crucial Regional Issues that the
      East of England will need to address in seeking to achieve its Vision. Recognising that trade-
      offs and compromises have to be made, Chapter 4 then set out a basis for making choices.

5.2   Drawing on these discussions, Chapter 5 sets out some Priorities for the East of England.
      These have been identified by reflecting back on the Crucial Regional Issues – and the eight
      premier league strategies from which they were identified – to pinpoint a small number of key
      regional imperatives. These Priorities have been tested and refined through successive phases
      of consultation, the principal elements of which are summarised in Annex C.

5.3   The Priorities are identified both in terms of “roles” vis-à-vis the rest of the UK and
      imperatives vis-à-vis the needs and aspirations of people living and working in the region;
      they are therefore both outward and inward facing. All are consistent with the Vision and
      High Level Outcomes defined in Chapter 2. Together they should form an agenda for action
      region-wide, galvanizing agencies/organisations – and their resources. Beyond this, the five
      Priorities seek to build on those set out in the Regional Emphasis Document such that they
      can form the basis for the region’s negotiating brief with central government. They also
      provide a research agenda for the region; in pursuing this, links to the Regional Observatory
      ought to be strengthened.

      Priorities for the East of England


5.4   In seeking to achieve the Vision and high level outcomes of the IRS, eight Crucial Regional
      Issues were identified. Across these, five Priorities for the East of England have been
      defined. These are described (in no particular order) in the paragraphs below.

      Priority 1:

      To achieve high quality and sustainable solutions in Growth Areas (recognising their
      contribution to the dynamism of the London economy) and other parts of the region
      facing growth pressures


5.5   As discussed in the context of Crucial Regional Issue 1, the East of England has committed to
      a substantial increment in housing provision and the need for this is widely recognised. In
      delivering this commitment – both across the three Growth Areas and elsewhere in the region
      – it will be essential that sight is not lost of the imperative for genuinely sustainable
      communities. Thus communities must have strong social and cultural assets and amenities,
      high levels of environmental quality and excellent design, and a robust economic base
      providing accessible and appropriate employment opportunities for all those who seek them.
      Appropriate levels and forms of infrastructure investment must also be achieved (Crucial
      Regional Issue 2). At the same time, however, steps must be taken to ensure that the delivery
      of the Sustainable Communities Plan – both through the designated Growth Areas and
      elsewhere – is not at the expense of other parts of the region. For the East of England, zero-
      sum games are not an option; achieving sustainability in one part of the region cannot be at
      the expense of another.

      Priority 2:

      To harness fully the region’s strengths in science, research and development, and in
      the surrounding commercialisation processes


5.6   Crucial Regional Issue 3 pointed to the range and scope of the region’s knowledge-based
      assets but also to the factors that need to be addressed in order to capture the associated
      benefits. A second priority within the IRS therefore reflects the need for concerted and
      synergistic action to ensure that the region’s strengths in science, research and development
      and the surrounding commercialisation processes are harnessed fully and effectively. Priority
      2 needs to shape approaches to land use planning (such that commercialisation close to the
      source of R&D is possible); to infrastructure investment (reflecting the need for appropriate
      social amenities, housing and physical communications if the potential of the knowledge base
      is to be realised) and to skills and training (recognising that high value added activities need
      high level skills). Priority 2 also therefore captures some of the challenges implicit within
      Crucial Regional Issue 4 and – in striving towards Sustainable Futures – it provides one key
      focus for them.

      Priority 3:

      To address the causes and implications of persistent deprivation and social exclusion
      in both buoyant parts of the region and areas experiencing economic decline (both
      rural and urban), and across particular social groups.


5.7   The continuing juxtaposition – at regional and local scales – of prosperity and opportunity,
      and systemic and inter-generational deprivation across multiple dimensions (health, income,
      education, etc.) is unacceptable. A third Priority identified within this Integrated Regional
      Strategy is therefore concerned with addressing the causes and implications of persistent
      deprivation and social exclusion in both buoyant parts of the region and areas experiencing
      economic decline (both urban and rural), and across particular social groups. Priority 3 links
      inherently to Crucial Regional Issues 4, 5, 6 and 7. It demands creative, innovative and
      joined-up solutions across the array of local, regional and national agencies engaged in
      addressing disadvantage: both mainstream service providers and agencies with discretionary
      funding. In addressing deprivation, social networks and cultural enrichment may have an
      increasing role to play. There will also be a need for better engagement of social groups that
      have been wholly or partially excluded from the labour market; this includes older people,
      people living in isolated communities without access to transport, people with disabilities, and
      people from black and minority ethnic groups.

      Priority 4:

      To effect a step-change in the efficiency of resource use and the management of the
      region’s distinctive natural and built environmental assets


5.8   Within the East of England, current consumption patterns are inequitable and unsustainable,
      and innovative solutions will be needed, particularly given the range and scope of issues
      relating to climate change. As discussed in the context of Crucial Regional Issue 8, there will
      be a need to reduce the region’s consumption of fossil fuels and water, and its emissions of
      carbon dioxide. There will also need to be a serious commitment to renewable energy. In
      addition, it will be important that the significance of the region’s distinctive natural and built
      environmental assets is recognised; in this context, biodiversity is a particular issue and some
      of the challenges linked to it were identified in the discussions around Crucial Regional
      Issues 1 and 7. Drawing together these different strands, the purpose of Priority 4 is to effect
      a step-change in the efficiency of resource use and the management of the region’s distinctive
      natural and built environmental assets.        The challenge this represents should not be
      underestimated; concerted efforts will be needed to achieve it.
       Priority 5:

       To capture the benefits from – and manage the impacts of – the region’s international
       gateways and national transport corridors


5.9    With further growth proposed for both the Haven and Thames Gateway ports, and for
       Stansted and Luton airports, the region’s role as an international gateway will increase. At a
       regional scale, this has both positive and negative aspects, but in moving forward, it will be
       important that appropriate and effective infrastructural investments are made in response.
       There will be a need for considerable improvement in the strategic road network, but there is
       also great potential scope to invest creatively in the rail network, focusing especially on east-
       west connections. Currently these are poor on any measure and they are wholly inadequate in
       terms of the role the region is required to play vis-à-vis international communications and the
       movement of both passengers and freight (Crucial Regional Issue 2). Capturing the benefits
       from – and managing the impacts of – the region’s international gateways and national
       transport corridors is the fifth Priority for the Integrated Regional Strategy.

       Sustainable Futures: The Integrated Regional Strategy for the East of England


5.10   Having defined the key Priorities for the East of England, the Integrated Regional Strategy is
       summarised in Figure 5.1 overleaf.
Figure 5.1
Sustainable Futures: The Integrated Regional Strategy for the East of
England (including the High Level Objectives set out in the Regional
Sustainable Development Framework)


      The Vision is to improve the quality of life for everyone who lives or
      works in the East of England
      High Level Outcomes:
      1. An exceptional knowledge base and a dynamic economy in the region
      2. Opportunities for everyone to contribute to – and benefit from – the region’s economic dynamism
      3. Strong, inclusive, healthy and culturally rich communities
      4. A high quality and diverse natural and built environment
      5. A more resource-efficient region




     In seeking to achieve the Vision and High Level Outcomes, Priorities for the East
     of England are to:
                   •        achieve high quality and sustainable solutions in Growth Areas and other parts of the region
                            facing growth pressures
                   •        harness fully the region’s strengths in science, research and development, and in
                            surrounding commercialisation processes
                   •        address the causes and implications of persistent deprivation and social exclusion
                   •        effect a step-change in the efficiency of resource use and the management of the region’s
                            distinctive natural and built environmental assets
                   •        capture the benefits from – and manage the impacts of – the region’s international gateways
                            and national transport corridors



                                       Regional Sustainable Development Framework

                                                Premier League Regional Strategies
                                                                                                                    Development Framework
   Development Framework




                                                                                                                     Regional Sustainable
    Regional Sustainable




                            Regional Environment            Regional Economic                  Regional
                                  Strategy                       Strategy                   Spatial Strategy

                           Regional Housing       Regional Social       Regional Cultural      Regional Health
                               Strategy              Strategy               Strategy           Strategy (2005)

                                                  First Division Regional Strategies

                                       Regional Sustainable Development Framework



                                           Sub-Regional and Local Strategies and Plans

								
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