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					                             2009 Indonesia E-newsletter
Issue date: 4 November 2009
FEATURED ARTICLE

Ministry of Environment to Push Inspection and Maintenance Forward
By Mariana Nuradi Sam, Swisscontact Indonesia Foundation
The Ministry of Environment initiated a focus group discussion (FGD) held on October 8 2009, inviting government
agencies and stakeholders to discuss the opportunities and challenges in the creation of a legal framework as the
basis for the implementation of an integrated emission test coupled with public services such as vehicle ownership
renewal and vehicle tax payment. Private vehicles are the largest composition on the road yet private vehicles are
not required to undergo periodic roadworthiness test. Research conducted by Swisscontact in 2000 have shown that
inspection and maintenance (I&M) can effectively reduce the amount of carbon monoxide (CO) by 50%,
hydrocarbon gas (HC) by 35% and particulate matters by 15%. Thereby, the FGD served to inform participants on
the importance of a continuous maintenance system. To put it simply, the essence of emission testing is maintenance
rather than simply conducting emission test. As it was stated by Mr. Ade Palguna, Assistant Deputy Minister for
Mobile Source Emission Control, "the largest composition of vehicles on the road are old and only a small
percentage of vehicles comply with Euro II standard; thus, periodic maintenance is necessary in reducing air
pollution".
Currently, vehicle inspection/emission test is part of the roadworthiness test which is mandatory for public
transportation and commercial vehicles in accordance with Traffic and Road Transport No. 14/1992 which has been
revised to Act No. 22/2009 and Government Regulation No. 44/1993 concerning Vehicles and Drivers.
Roadworthiness test is conducted once in every 6 months by regional transportation agencies. However, emission
test is not mandatory for passenger cars. In accordance with their authority, several regional governments have taken
the initiative to impose mandatory emission test for private vehicles and 2-wheeled/3-wheeled vehicles. The
mandatory obligation is put forth in Regional Regulation (Perda) specifically: Perda No. 2/2005 (DKI Jakarta),
Perda No. 5/2007 (DI Yogyakarta), and Perda No. 3/ 2008 (Surabaya City) concerning Air Pollution Control; and
Perda No. 11/2005 concerning Public Order, Cleanliness and Aesthetic (Bandung City). Although obligation to
conduct emission test have been established, I & M system have not been carried out effectively. One of the reasons
is the absence of an integrated, efficient and effective mechanism which ensures that all type of vehicles is tested. I&
M is not able to "bind" vehicle owner to perform obligatory emission test because it is still considered "voluntary".
One of the recommendations given upon by participants in the FGD is to integrate emission test results with tax base
calculation of motor vehicles. However and most importantly, I&M can only be successfully implemented
nationwide if there is a joint collaboration between agencies and/or ministries. The inefficiency in implementing
I&M lies with a decentralized enforcement system. Thereby, it is pertinent that officials who are given the order to
monitor I&M must have a firm grasp of the problems involved and have to be able to give clear instructions to their
subordinate in the field.

LOCAL NEWS

EPA offers Breath Easy Program
By Lenny, Berita Jakarta
The Jakarta city administration will cooperate with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to develop a
program focusing on clean air, aptly title "Breath Easy Jakarta". The Breathe Easy Jakarta program could be in
accordance with some of Jakarta’s environmental programs that are already running, such as the existence of smoke-
free areas, emission tests and gas conversion. Fauzi Bowo, Jakarta’s governor, said those programs would have a
greater impact if violators of environmentally friendly regulations faced sanctions. The city administration could still
improve its enforcement of environmentally friendly bylaws. Peni Susanti, head of the Jakarta Environmental
Management Agency (BPLHD), said the Breathe Easy program is still being discussed.
Source: http://www.beritajakarta.com/2008/en/newsview.aspx?idwil=0&id=12767

Easing Traffic in the City by Fining Vehicles Turning Left on Red
By The Jakarta Globe
The Jakarta Police will begin enforcing an article in the new Traffic Management Law that prohibits motorists from
turning left on a red light. Under the old law, drivers of all vehicles — including cars, buses and motorcycles —
were permitted to turn left on a red light, often interfering with traffic flow. Sr. Comr. Condro Kirono, head of the
Jakarta Police’s traffic management directorate, said the article, which came into effect on June 1, carried a
maximum fine of Rp 250,000 ($26). However, he said the actual fine would be determined by a judge.
Bambang Susantono, chairman of the Indonesian Transportation Society, welcomed the announcement, saying that
the new rule would help to ease traffic in the city. "Traffic in Jakarta is really bad and most public transportation
drivers don’t have the right attitude," he said. "We hope the new rules will make driving around the city better."
Condro said police would immediately begin to enforce the law, which also requires motorcyclists to turn on their
headlights during the day.
Source: http://thejakartaglobe.com/home/left-on-red-pay-a-fine-say-jakarta-police/336970

Pedal Power Storage Facility to Link Jakarta Cyclists with Buses
By Putri Prameshwari, The Jakarta Globe
Could a parking lot help reduce Jakarta’s notorious pollution and traffic? Yes, analysts say — if it’s used to park
bicycles. A new facility to store people-powered transportation was unveiled on Friday near one of the city’s
busway arteries. The parking lot, which can hold up to 22 bicycles, was built near the fX Lifestyle Center, a mall in
the Senayan area of South Jakarta. It’s about a five-minute walk from the Gelora Bung Karno busway shelter on
Jalan Jenderal Sudirman.
Milatia Kusuma, the director of the United Nations-backed Institute for Transportation and Development Policy,
told the Jakarta Globe on Sunday that the initiative was the first of its kind in the city. "This is the first step of an
integration between two modes of transportation — bicycles and TransJakarta," she said. Yoga Adiwinarto, a
transportation expert at the ITDP, said bicycles could serve as a "feeder" system for Jakarta’s transportation
network, with cyclists storing their bikes somewhere in the city center before continuing on via the TransJakarta
busway or the train system.
According to a study by the ITDP, about 600,000 cars, trucks and motorcycles pour into the city each day from the
outlying areas of Bogor, Depok, Tangerang and Bekasi. But Milatia said that this influx was not supported by the
necessary infrastructure, leaving roads clogged and providing little space cyclists or pedestrians.
Source: http://thejakartaglobe.com/city/pedal-power-storage-facility-to-link-jakarta-cyclists-with-buses/334889

Living in Jakarta will Likely Drive you Crazy, Says Experts
By Andra Wisnu, The Jakarta Post
Dr. Ratna Mardiati, director of the Soeharto Heerdjan Mental Institution in Grogol, West Jakarta, says Jakarta's poor
planning has inflicted a "high level" of stress on residents, contributing to the number of patients with mental
disorders in the city. "At this hospital, we get 80 to 100 people coming in to check their stress levels every day,"
Ratna said at a discussion on Jakarta's urban planning and its psychological impact. She added at least one out of
every four of the capital's 9 million inhabitants is stressed out, while 14 percent have experienced mental disorders
following untreated stress as of last year. There were 1.4 million people treated for stress in community medical
centers across the city in 2007, she went on, and this was expected to continue increasing every year.
Jakarta faced multiple crises that continued to threaten the people’s livelihoods, forcing many to work harder to
secure a stable future or move to the city’s fringes, where commuting become a struggle all its own. The city’s
notoriously worsening traffic, annual floods, which in turn encouraged people to be aggressive and highly resilient,
are factors that cause high stress level. Most importantly, the city’s lack of space contributed directly to mental
disorders, because personal space was required in a social environment.
Economic losses from managing the city's pollution by nitrogen oxide and sulfuric oxide has been estimated at Rp
132.7 billion (US$13.8 million) and Rp 4.3 trillion, while the loss of productivity from high traffic cost an estimated
Rp 5.5 trillion in 2005. "With numbers like these, it's easy to see how the city's residents get so easily stressed out,"
said Firdaus Cahyadi from the Knowledge Sharing Office for Sustainable Development.
Source: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/10/02/living-jakarta-will-likely-drive-you-crazy-say-experts.html

Pollution Causing Allergy Cases to Soar in Big Indonesian Cities
By Nurfika Osman, The Jakarta Globe
Recent studies have shown that Jakarta residents have a heightened risk of developing allergies because of pollution.
Research from University of Indonesia indicates that the percentage of children under 12 who are allergic to
particular substances increased from 2 percent in 1980 to 8 percent in 2000. Therefore, environmental factors
present a high risk for people to develop allergies. Symptoms experienced during an allergic reaction could be
dangerous. Irritation to the nose, sneezing, itching and redness of the eyes are common, but if the deep respiratory
system is affected, asthmatic reactions such as narrowing of airways and increased production of mucus in the lungs
can be deadly.
Nia Kurniati, a pediatrician from Cipto Mangkunkusumo Hospital, asserts that " 60 percent of such allergic reactions
are caused by hereditary, and the rest are environmental."
Source: http://thejakartaglobe.com/national/pollution-causing-allergy-cases-to-soar-in-big-indonesia-cities/332565

The Space Beneath: Residents Urge Beautifying Unused Area
By The Jakarta Post
Residents of Penjaringan in North Jakarta presented their plans to turn an area below a toll road overpass near their
neighborhood into a public space for educational activities. The presentation and discussion were also attended by
representatives from the Public Works Ministry, the city’s spatial planning agency, and the city’s toll road operator,
PT CMNP. The event was held on the UN-designated World Habitat Day, which falls on the first Monday of the
month, and saw design proposals from residents of neighborhood unit (RW) 12 for the 500-meter-long stretch
beneath the overpass near their homes."This is the first time [the residents] have communicated their wishes [about
city planning] with the stakeholders," said Haryanti Koostanto, from the US-based NGO Mercy Corps, which
facilitated the planning and presenting process.The need to make something useful from the space beneath
overpasses is an urgent one, said Sofyan Jaya from the Development of Community Under Elevated Road Group
(KMPKT)."Several problems plague the space beneath elevated toll roads, including their being used as garbage
dumps and becoming crime-prone areas," he said.
The government has since 1998 allowed residents to use the space beneath the toll road, amid a lack of affordable
housing following the economic crisis.
Source: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/10/07/the-space-beneath-residents-urge-beautifying-unused-
area.html

City Starts Testing Vehicle Emissions
By Arientha Primanita, The Jakarta Globe
The Central Jakarta administration hopes residents will soon be able to breathe easier as it began testing vehicle
emissions on Thursday, starting with cars owned by municipal officials. "We started with the municipal office, to
serve as an example. We are committed to improving the city’s air quality," said Peni Susanti, head of Jakarta’s
Environmental Management Agency (BPLHD). Eighty-eight of the 109 cars tested on Thursday passed, as did 58 of
60 motorcycles. Other Jakarta municipalities are also expected to begin testing vehicle emissions this month. Peni
said for the program to be a success, officials would have to raise people’s awareness of the need to have their
vehicles tested. She said that of about 1.5 million cars in the city, only 36,000 had ever been tested. The 2005 bylaw
on air pollution control requires motor vehicles to meet gas emission standards. The bylaw states that every vehicle
must be tested for emissions at least every six months, but its implementation only began this year. Motor vehicles
that pass the emissions test will receive stickers. The tests can be done at designated government offices and
authorized private garages. The full implementation of the law would start this year. Governor Fauzi Bowo is
expected to announce the initiative after he returned from the Global Climate Change Forum in Copenhagen later
this year.
Source: http://thejakartaglobe.com/city/city-starts-testing-vehicle-emissions/33443

Jakarta to Spend 17 Billion on Monitoring Devices
By Arientha Primanita, The Jakarta Globe and Berita Jakarta
Jakarta Local Environment Management Board will allocate Rp 17 billion ($1.8 million) to buy air quality monitor
station next year. According to Peni Susanti, head of the Jakarta Environmental Management Agency (BPLHD),
said the money would be used to purchase two types of monitoring devices. The first is a fixed automatic air quality
monitoring station and the second is a vehicle equipped with an air monitoring device. Zainuddin, vice chairman of
the City Council’s Commission D, which oversees development, said the council had already disbursed Rp 5.5
billion this year to buy the devices. "This is related to improving the quality of Jakarta’s air," Zainuddin said.
However, others contend that Jakarta air quality will be better if there is an improvement in transportation.
Transportation causes 70 percent of Jakarta’s air pollution, and the city produces 13,000 tons of carbon dioxide
daily, said Ubaidillah, executive director of the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi). A 2005 bylaw on
air pollution control requires motor vehicles to meet gas emission standards. The bylaw states that every vehicle
must be tested for emissions at least every six months. BPLHD began testing the emissions of private vehicles in
some Jakarta municipalities in October.
Source: http://thejakartaglobe.com/city/jakarta-to-spend-rp-17-billion-on-air-monitoring-devices/336712 and
http://www.beritajakarta.com/2008/en/newsview.aspx?id=12746

Economy Cars: A Solution to Indonesia’s Traffic Problems ?
By Dian Arrifahmi & Dion Bisara, The Jakarta Globe
A senior official is trumpeting the possibility of even more cars rolling off assembly lines and adding to the
country’s notoriously bad traffic congestion. Edy Putra Irawadi, deputy for industry and trade at the Coordinating
Ministry for the Economy, said that the country would soon be producing economy cars for Rp. 70 million ( $7,280)
each, once the government issue a new set of regulations to encourage producers to use more local content. At such
a price, the dream of vehicle ownership would become a reality for millions of people. Currently, the cheapest price
at the showroom carries a price tag of about Rp. 100 million. If everything goes as planned, the country could be
producing some 40,000 economy cars next year and between 300,000 and 600,000 by 2014.
In addition, the government is considering offering tax incentives to producers of economy cars, such as the
elimination of the luxury sales tax. Currently, cars with engines smaller than 1,500 cubic centimeters carry
additional 10 percent luxury sales tax on top of the value-added tax. Those 3,000 ccs or larger carry an additional 75
percent luxury sales tax. Under changes to the Tax Code passed by the House of Representatives in September, the
top luxury sales tax on cars would be raised to 200 percent next year.
Gaikindo’s Chairman, Bambang Trisulo, said he expected a decline in sales of 20 percent next year from this year’s
target of 480,000 vehicles, due to recent increase in provincial government vehicle taxes and next year’s expected
increase in luxury sales tax. Under September’s Tax Code amendments, provincial administrations have already
increased vehicle taxes to up to 10 percent of the value of a vehicle, double the previous maximum rate of 5 percent.
The amendments also permit the levying of an additional local tax of up to 10 percent on second and third cars
owned by the same individual.
Vehicle sales, including commercial vehicles, amounted to 300,334 units between January and August, 27 percent
lower than the figure for the same period last year. A total of 607,805 vehicles were sold in 2008.
Source: http://thejakartaglobe.com/business/indonesia-touts-road-clogging-vision-of-cheap-cars-for-all/333512

Metro Mini Madness: Crazy Drivers and Commuter Hell
By Kafil Yamin, The Jakarta Globe
Anyone who has been on a metro mini knows it is a thrill ride. But the privately operated bus help fill the crack in
Jakarta’s woeful public transportation system. As a result motorists and commuters seem resigned to the fact that
Metro Minis are a law unto themselves.
Metro Minis add to Jakarta’s notorious jam by stopping everywhere and driving recklessly. This reckless behavior
has caused not only traffic jam but also accidents. Data from the Indonesian Transportation Society indicates that
transportation contributed to 65% of all traffic accidents in Jakarta in 2008. The lack of discipline extends to
passengers, who stand at intersections to flag down buses or minivans and then expect drivers to stop exactly where
they want, even if it’s unsafe. As a result, minivans, such as the infamous light blue Mikrolets, stop at crossroads, on
bridges, in the middle of roads and even on train tracks.
There are at least 78,000 public buses, minibuses and minivans in Jakarta, according to the city administration’s
communications office. Other transportation experts and officials put the number closer to 110,000. And most of the
vehicles are more than 20 years old. Hendah Sunugroho, an official at Jakarta’s Land Transportation Agency, said
private transportation companies didn’t want to buy new vehicles for budgetary reasons. "One big bus, for example,
costs Rp 800 million [$84,000]. Minibuses are only slightly cheaper. So the companies prefer to just repair their old
vehicles," he said.
Bambang Susantono, chairman of the Indonesian Transportation Society, points to poor law enforcement as the
source of Jakarta’s traffic problems, but Muhammad Akbar, head of road traffic engineering at the Jakarta
Transportation Agency, sees it otherwise.
Akbar said the drivers’ unruliness and bad behavior by passengers were caused by the lack of an efficient, integrated
public transportation system, and the absence of a set wage for drivers of buses, taxis, bajajs and even ojeks.
Lack of capacity at Jakarta’s bus terminals is another cause of congestion. According to Hulma Sitorus, head of East
Jakarta’s district communications office, the Kampung Melayu terminal can only hold 100 vehicles, while the
number of buses and minivans that use it is often three times higher. As a result, vehicles overflow onto the streets,
causing continuous traffic jams.
Source: http://thejakartaglobe.com/jammedjakarta/metro-mini-madness-crazy-drivers-and-commuter-hell/337349

Too Many Vehicles, Too Few Roads
By Joe Cochrane, The Jakarta Globe
Collective failure of urban leadership and planning that dates back at least to the 1960s has led to a city that is barely
tolerable because of traffic problems brought on by rapid growth, poor public transportation and too many cars. "It’s
more like California. Everybody drives," said Harya Setyaka S Dillon, a transportation expert. "It’s an urban
planning issue." Commuter trips into Jakarta from surrounding areas increased tenfold between 1985 and 2002, and
today around 1.25 million people go into or out of the city for work each day. Moreover, Jakarta’s public
transportation system is disjointed, inefficient and unsafe. It’s no wonder that only 30 percent of the people in the
city use public transportation, and 70 percent use cars or motorcycles.
By most official estimates, there are around 1.5 million motorized vehicles — cars, motorcycles, buses and bajajs —
on Jakarta’s streets each day but the road capacity is only 1 million vehicles. Less than 8 percent of those vehicles
are for public transportation which is disturbing given that one large public bus filled with passengers would remove
30 privately-owned cars from the road. Around 60 percent of all vehicles in Jakarta are motorcycles, and more than
1,000 new bikes hit the streets each day. Between 2000 and 2007, the number of motorcycles increased 250 percent,
while the average speed on roads dropped from 26 to 20 kilometers an hour, said Bambang Sustanto, chairman of
the Indonesian Transportation Society. On any given trip in Jakarta, motorists spend 60 percent of their time
stopped. If private vehicle numbers continue to grow at the same levels, by 2020 greenhouse gases in Greater
Jakarta will be 2.35 times higher than their 2002 levels, according to a groundbreaking transportation study by the
Japan International Cooperation Agency. The only time Jakarta is a pleasant place to be, city dwellers lament, is
during a major holiday, like Idul Fitri, when the population clears out.
Jakarta’s roads account for only 6.2 percent of the city, while in New York, Tokyo or Singapore it’s 15 percent to 20
percent, according to transportation experts. The present growth rate of Jakarta roads is 0.9 percent a year, but
vehicle growth is 9 percent, so by 2014, according to city officials, there will be total gridlock unless something is
done. We are in a perfect traffic storm created by the combination of inefficient public transportation, too many
vehicles, lousy drivers and encroachment onto roads by street vendors, minivans and buses. Mohammad Akbar,
head of road traffic engineering at the Jakarta Transportation Agency, said 92 percent of motorists violate traffic
rules. "It’s the principle of supply and demand," he said. "The supply of the roads and the demand of the motorists is
unequal." The city plans to implement a new "strategic package" that includes constructing a mass rapid transit
railway beginning in 2011, building more toll roads and elevated highways, and attempting to limit private vehicle
ownership through higher registration taxes for second cars and schemes such as electronic road pricing. Even with
new public transportation and traffic scheme, according to transportation experts, people have to be convinced to
leave their cars at home. A study by the Indonesian Consumer Organization found that in 10 cities, the average
Indonesian spends 12 percent to 14 percent of his or her income on public transportation, which is higher than the
international average. One of the reasons this happens in Jakarta is because there is no unified network. Seventy-
nine percent of public transportation users here change transportation modes at least once to get to their destinations,
and that costs money. "There’s a systemic problem that causes people to spend more on transport," Tulus Adadi of
the Indonesian Consumer Organization said. "A liter of gas costs Rp 4,500 (US 48 cents) but public transportation
could cost Rp 15,000 to Rp 20,000 a day. [A motorcycle] may not be the most ideal means of transportation, but it’s
the fastest and most economical."
Source: http://thejakartaglobe.com/jammedjakarta/too-many-vehicles-too-few-roads/337363


Issue date: 30 September 2009
LOCAL NEWS

Environment Bill Passed by Indonesian House of Representatives
By Fidelis E Sastrianti, The Jakarta Globe
Ten factions in the House of Representatives united to pass the Environmental Protection and Management Bill on
September 8 2009. The new law would give much stronger authority to the State Ministry of Environment and
impose stricter sanctions. The bill comprehensively included all aspects needed to protect the environment including
a much tighter legal framework, allowing more room for awareness for all decision makers to protect the
environment. Most importantly, it grants authority for national park rangers to arrest environmental violators and
pass on investigative reports to prosecutors. The new bill marked a significant change in the government’s efforts to
protect the environment. "However, this will not automatically change everything", Berry Nadian Furqon from the
Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi) said. "The next challenge is to synchronize the new bill with other
regulations".
Source: http://thejakartaglobe.com/home/environment-bill-passed-by-indonesian-house/328686

Indonesian Construction Companies Vow to Go Green
By Fidelis E Sastrianti, The Jakarta Globe
Twenty-one major construction-related firms declared their commitment to produce environmental-friendly works
on Wednesday (September 9 2009), locking arms with a group calling for "greener" buildings in the country. The
companies, including PT Surya Toto Indonesia, PT Phillips Indonesia, PT Holcim and PT Intiland Development,
have signed an agreement to serve as corporate founders of the Indonesian Green Building Council. The council was
established in 2008 as a nonprofit by 50 architects and interior designers, and was acknowledged by the World
Green Building Council this year. Naning Adiwoso, president of the Green Building Council, said it took a lot of
effort to coax the companies to join the group, which originally counted individuals as members. "We were thinking
about how to design to be more friendly for health and environment, meanwhile, the corporations will always be
thinking about business," she said. "However, we have managed to reach a common vision: we all want to have
more sustainable development."
Hari Sasongko, head of Jakarta’s Building Monitoring and Control Agency, said green building techniques needed
to be employed immediately, particularly because many of the city’s buildings have ignored concerns about saving
water or energy. "We have seen how it affected the city with the land subsidence and excessive exploitation of
groundwater," he said, adding that the city’s governor, Fauzi Bowo, had declared his commitment to upgrade all
buildings in the capital to be green by 2010. However, the governor said such changes would have to come
gradually. "It is going to be enforced, but we hope it will also be a moral obligation" for developers, he said.
Source: http://thejakartaglobe.com/news/indonesia-construction-companies-vow-to-go-green/329018

Jakarta Mall Managers Promise to Provide Bicycle Parking
Kompas Newspaper
Managers of shopping malls in Jakarta and surrounding areas promised to provide bicycle parking. "I agree with the
cyclist’s community that the managers of buildings in Jakarta and surrounding areas need to provide bicycle
parking. We promise to provide it and it was not difficult, "said Chairman of the Association of Indonesian
Shopping Center Manager Stephen Ridwan to Kompas. However, Stephen hopes to meet, sit together, and discuss
with cyclists in the Greater Jakarta area concerning security. Bicycles do not have a license plate number thereby
making it difficult for security personnel to identify bike owners [in the event of a stolen bike].
Governor Fauzi Bowo requests building managers to provide bicycle parking. Fauzi asked the Jakarta parliament to
prepare special rules regarding bicycle parking. Jakarta Secretary Muhayat states that the administration is preparing
bicycle parking as a feeder to the busway, including placing bicycle parking in Kalideres, IRTI Monument Square,
Kampung Rambutan, and Ragunan terminal/bus depot.
Source:
http://megapolitan.kompas.com/read/xml/2009/08/26/07455541/pengelola.mal.janji.sediakan.tempat.parkir.sepeda

Jakarta Traffic Costs Public $2.8 Billion per Year, Says Experts
By Antara Newspaper
Traffic congestion in the capital cost Jakarta residents as much as Rp 28.1 trillion annually, an expert said. Firdaus
Ali, an environment expert at the University of Indonesia’s School of Technology, said in a discussion that the loss
was calculated based on the estimated amount of fuel wasted, lost productive time, losses incurred by public
transportation owners and the health costs resulting from congestion.
The biggest loss, according to Firdaus, was attributed to fuel inefficiency, the fuel wasted when vehicles were
trapped in traffic jams, which costs Rp 10.7 trillion ($10.7 billion) per year. In second place is the loss of productive
time, estimated at Rp 9.7 trillion per year, followed by health costs of Rp 5.8 trillion. "Public transportation owners
suffer a staggering Rp 1.9 trillion loss each year due to lost opportunities as traffic jams drastically limit the
movement of public transportation vehicles," Firdaus said. "The irony," he said, "is that public transportation has
become part of the problem, and not the solution to traffic jams in the capital," he continued.
Jakarta sees crippling traffic jams almost every day as the number of private cars on the capital’s streets continues to
rise, with the city seemingly running out of options to deal with the problem. Meanwhile, Umar Fahmi Achmadi, a
professor of University of Indonesia’s School of Public Health, said that transportation caused up to 80 percent of all
air pollution in the capital and could lead to asthma, bronchitis and pneumonia as well as cardiovascular, nervous
system, liver and kidney problems.
Source: http://www.antaranews.com/berita/1252569398/kemacetan-jakarta-timbulkan-kerugian-rp28-triliun (In
English: http://thejakartaglobe.com/city/jakarta-traffic-costs-public-28b-per-year-says-expert/329256)
City Told to Tighten Up Non-Smoking Areas
By The Jakarta Post
To reinforce the Jakarta smoking ban, NGOs urge the city to declare "absolute smoke free zones." Tulus Abadi of
the Indonesian Consumers Foundation (YLKI) said recently that the smoking ban bylaw was still only partially
implemented because people could still smoke in some parts of prohibited zones. The bylaw designates seven types
of prohibited zone including public transportation, health-care buildings, schools, children's areas, places of worship,
offices and public spaces (including malls, restaurants, terminals and stations). Out of the seven zones, only the first
five are declared as absolute smoke-free zones, while offices and public spaces are considered as partially smoke-
free because people are still allowed to smoke, but only in designated smoking rooms . Azas Tigor Nainggolan of
the Jakarta Residents Forum (Fakta) shared similar comments with YLKI, saying the administration should enforce
the smoking ban completely by dispensing with the requirements to provide designated smoking areas. "The
implementation of the current bylaw is too lenient. There should not be any space for smokers and cigarette ads, in
order to free Jakarta from cigarette smoke," he said.
Source: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/09/15/city-told-tighten-nonsmoking-areas.html

Surabaya Administration to Develop Eco-Friendly City Living
By Agnes S. Jayakarna, The Jakarta Post
To create a better environment and meet green space requirements, the Surabaya city administration has been
encouraging property developers in the region to designate at least 20 percent of their development areas as green
spaces, an official says. Head of the city administration's development planning board Tri Rismaharini claimed
Surabaya had succeeded in making more than 20 percent out of its total areas of 326 square kilometers as green
spaces. She added that her office would continue encouraging people to allocate small parts of their area as green
sites in an effort to encourage eco-friendly living in the city, thus fulfilling the requirement as stipulated in Law No.
26/2007 on spatial management. The law requires all the regional administrations across the country to allocate at
least 20 percent of their respective regions as green sites.
More than 5,000 square meters of space have been developed into green sites at a number of residential compounds
in the city. Some 135,000 square meters of other areas have been developed into public facilities. Separately,
environmental observer Suparto Wijoyo of the Surabaya-based Airlangga University highlighted the urgency for all
the administrative regions in the country to improve their eco-friendly development. Wijoyo, who was also a
member of the Environmental Affairs Ministry's working team for the drafting of the bill of the law on environment
management and protection that has been made effective since Wednesday (September 9 2009), said that the law
gave a new hope for people to have a better living. The law required the government to take into account the
environmental considerations in any of its decisions.
Source: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/09/14/surabaya-administration-develop-ecofriendly-city-
living.html

Indonesia’s Green Building Council Issues Guidelines
The Jakarta Post
The Green Building Council of Indonesia (GBCI) launched on Wednesday guidelines for environmentally friendly
buildings to increase the public's and business community's awareness of sustainability issues. Dubbed the
Greenship, the guidelines list a number of aspects to take into consideration when constructing a building, which
affect the environment and the building's users. The checklist includes energy-saving mechanisms and indoor air
quality.
The GBCI, which was established in February 2009, also endorsed - at the same event - 21 companies as the
council's "corporate founders". The companies, which include state-owned energy company PT Pertamina, property
giant PT Summarecon Agung and PT Ciputra Development, will strengthen the council's case for joining the World
Green Building Council.
The main "Greenship" guidelines are: the availability of access to public transport ,the availability of parking spaces
for bicycles and changing rooms, the management of rainwater, the protection or restoration of open spaces, the
constructing of absorption wells, the usage of water-efficient plumbing, Water quality and usage monitoring, the
recycling of "wudhu" (Islamic method of washing oneself before praying) water , the usage of grey water and black
water recycling systems , the monitoring of a building's energy usage, reporting on emission reduction, optimizing
the usage of environmentally friendly cleaning products, using recycled materials, smoke-free building, natural
lighting , surveying the building users' comfort , proper ventilation
Source: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/09/12/council-issues-green039-building-guidelines.html
Vehicle Emissions Offenders Face 3 Years in Jail
By Adianto P. Simamora, The Jakarta Post
Millions of motorists may face up to three years in jail or fines of Rp 3 billion (US$298,200) unless they bring their
vehicle emissions in line with government's standards. The jail terms and fines are included in the law on
environmental management and protection that was passed by the House of Representatives on Tuesday (September
8 2009). The yearly report on emissions tests by the government shows that half of vehicles tested failed to meet
emissions standards. "The law could be used to punish polluters including owners of cars that fail to meet emissions
standards," deputy assistant for emissions pollution control at the Office of the State Minister for the Environment,
Ade Palguna. Article 98 of the law stipulates that anyone who intentionally conducts activities that cause water and
air pollution exceeding tolerable levels faces a minimum of three years in jail and/or fines of between Rp 3 billion
and Rp 10 billion. Article 100 stipulates that anyone violating emissions level will face a maximum three years'
imprisonment and/or Rp 3 billion in fines. The 2009 Traffic Law, endorsed in May, also obliges all vehicles
operating in Indonesia to meet the government emissions standards. Motor vehicles are a major source of air
pollutants in Indonesia's big cities including Jakarta. A study by the National Development Planning Agency
(Bappenas) says regular checks of car engines could reduce energy consumption by between 3 and 10 percent; cut
carbon monoxide emissions by half; hydrocarbons by 35 percent and particulate matter by 45 percent. Jakarta is the
first province to issue a bylaw on air pollution, which requires all private vehicles to conduct emission tests twice a
year to meet emissions standards.
Source: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/09/11/vehicle-emissions-offenders-face-3-years-jail.html

Health Cost from Jakarta Pollution will Increase to Rp. 4.3 Trillion by 2015
By Nurfika Osman, The Jakarta Globe
Experts have some ill tidings in regards to Jakarta’s urban environment. This conclusion was reached during a
discussion titled "The Concrete Jungle and Pollution in Jakarta," which warned that the increasing number of
vehicles and shopping centers would continue to threaten the capital’s inhabitants. Ubaidillah, executive director of
the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi) Jakarta, said transportation caused 70 percent of the pollution in
the city. Metro Police data show that as of June the number of vehicles in Jakarta had risen to 9.9 million, including
133,000 public transportation vehicles, while the number of residents, based on data from Jakarta Population and
Civil Registration Agency, was at 8.5 million as of March. Ubaidillah said this meant the city was producing 13,000
tons of carbon-dioxide daily and that 20 percent of the city should be open green space to offset emissions.
Ubaidillah added that if the government failed to create a better public transportation system, the city would be
producing 38,322 tons of carbon-dioxide daily by 2015, which would require 32 percent of open green space. He
said based on World Bank research, Jakarta’s citizens paid Rp 1.8 trillion ($181.8 million) in 1998 for pollution-
related diseases, a figure estimated to increase to Rp 4.3 trillion by 2015 if the situation did not change.
Source: http://thejakartaglobe.com/city/health-costs-of-jakarta-pollution-to-rp-43-trillion-in-2015/329055

New Government Urged to Fix Public Transportation
By Indah Setiawati, The Jakarta Post
Indonesia’s public transportation systems need urgent reforms, an issue that should be on the immediate agenda of
the new central government, experts say. Transportation revitalization should include reforms to public transport
financial management, Harya Setyaka S. Dillon said at a journalist workshop organized by the Indonesian
Transportation Society (MTI). The current system, by which drivers pay rental fees to public vehicle owners, should
be changed to a per-kilometer rate controlled by the administration. Per-kilometer rate would guarantee drivers’ and
transportation operators’ incomes, thus improving services, which in turn would maintain loyal users and attract
private vehicle owners to switch to public transportation. Conflicts between the administration and transportation
businesses may arise, but the government needs to be firm in its resolve to bring benefits to the public. The new
government, which takes up office as of Oct. 20, should initiate public transportation reforms in its first 100 days in
office, said MTI’s Bambang Susantono. The recommendations include the finalization of government regulations
and ministerial decrees following the passing of a new law on the transportation system. Another recommendation is
a blueprint for urban transportation networks in five major cities, including the use of environmentally friendly
public vehicles. The last recommendation MTI plans to propose is a railway revitalization program for commuter
and inner-city trains in cities which have railway system like Jakarta.
Source: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/09/07/new-govt-urged-fix-public-transportation-services.html

Broken Traffic Lights Causes Worsening Traffic Gridlock
Emilius Ceasar Alexey, Kompas Newspaper and Lenny, Beritajakarta.com
Uncoordinated and broken traffic lights are one of the reasons for the capital’s traffic problems and causes massive
traffic jams at several main intersections in the city. Jakarta Provincial Government has allocated Rp. 20 million to
repair all traffic lights in Jakarta. The Transportation Agency will fix faulty underground cable networks, replacing
broken light bulbs, and repairing damage poles. Light bulbs will be replaced with light emitting diodes (LED) which
is energy efficient and brighter. Repair work will begin in early December and expected to complete by the end of
this year. By 2010, all traffic lights are expected to function properly. In addition to traffic light repair,
Transportation Agency will also repair road separators, street signs, busway lanes and cracking down reckless driver
who put other road users in harm’s way.
Source:
http://megapolitan.kompas.com/read/xml/2009/09/15/18333123/perbaikan.lampu.lalu.lintas.di.jakarta.butuh.rp.20.m
iliar and http://www.beritajakarta.com/2008/id/berita_detail.asp?idwil=0&nNewsId=35244


Issue date: 17 September 2009
Jakarta Needs 25 Air Quality Stations
Antara Newspaper and The Jakarta Globe
Only two of Jakarta’s five air quality control stations are working, making it difficult for authorities to determine
effective environmental policy in the capital. A sprawling metropolis of 12 million people should have at least 25 air
quality control stations, which could provide the necessary data for Jakarta’s Environmental Management Agency
(BPLHD) and related authorities in implementing environmental policies such as car-free days, emission tests for
vehicles and tree planting in the city.
According to BPLHD data from 2008, Jakarta residents enjoyed 104 days of healthy air through October, up from
73 days from the same period in 2007. Car-free days are held every last Sunday of the month along the main
thoroughfares of Jalan Sudirman and Jalan Thamrin. In addition to this initiative, officials say they have launched
efforts to evaluate the city’s air quality as well as introducing campaigns to educate residents about the importance
of improving air quality in the city.
Based on air quality evaluations, during car-free days the concentration of primary pollutants coming from vehicles
such as particle matter measuring 10 millimeters decreased by an average of 34 percent, while the amount of gases
like carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide declined by 67% and 80%, respectively.
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/city/capitals-green-efforts-suffering-due-to-lack-of-working-air-quality-
stations/327236 and http://www.antaranews.com/berita/1251689114/jakarta-memerlukan-25-stasiun-pemantau-
kualitas-udara

Government Calls for Help with Emission Cuts
Adianto P. Simamora, The Jakarta Post
Severe and lasting droughts may be one consequence if the country does not act quickly to stop climate change, with
a marked increase in greenhouse gas emissions expected from Indonesia in coming years. A recent study by the
government unveiled that Indonesia’s greenhouse gas emissions were expected to jump to 3.6 gigatons by 2030,
from 2.3 gigatons in 2005. The study conducted by McKinsley consultants for the Climate Change National Council
(DNPI), says emissions would increase by 2 percent annually. The main contributors to this increase would be
forestry, peatland clearing, agriculture, transportation, and the energy sector. The report also stated Indonesia is
currently the world’s third- largest CO2 emitter after the United States and China. Indonesia has the option to cut its
emissions by 2.3 gigatons by 2030, through some 150 proposed projects that could be funded by foreign countries.
The government has repeatedly warned that Indonesia is among the nation most vulnerable to global warming.
Climate change would cause longer dry spells in many areas across the country, and smaller periods of rain but in
larger volumes, increasing the risk of floods and landslides. Indonesia has been hit annually by prolonged droughts
leaving millions short of water, and threatening agriculture.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/28/govt-calls-help-with-emission-cuts.html

Watchdog Urges Green Fuel for City’s Transport
Putri Prameshwari, The Jakarta Globe
Citing its status as one of the city’s worst polluters, an environmental watchdog said that transportation in the capital
should begin making the switch to eco-friendly fuels. Ahmad Safrudin, chairman of the Committee against Leaded
Gasoline (KPBB), said that the city administration had failed to take advantage alternative fuel sources to run its
transportation system. "Yet transportation in Jakarta remains one of the biggest polluters", he said.
According to the group, carbon monoxide emitted by vehicles in Jakarta grew by 24% from 1990 to 2004, a figure
even higher than the increase in energy and industrial sectors. Millions of Jakartans use the city’s public minibuses,
minivans and motorcycle taxis to get around every day, citing cheaper prices as the main reason.
Prasetya Budi, a spokeman for Busway operator TransJakarta, said shortages on alternative fuels, such as
compressed natural gas, had created long waiting times for refueling. "There are 355 buses using CNG fuel," he
said, " but only six stations are serving them." Most TransJakarta bus use CNG, which Budi said should be more
readily available, especially for use in public transportation.
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/city/watchdog-urges-green-fuel-for-citys-transport/326062

New Government Urged to Fix Public Transportation Services
Indah Setiawati, The Jakarta Post
Indonesia’s public transportation systems need urgent reforms, an issue that should be on the immediate agenda of
the new central government, experts say. Transportation revitalization should include reforms to public transport
financial management, Harya Setyaka S. Dillon said at a journalist workshop organized by the Indonesian
Transportation Society (MTI). The current system, by which drivers pay rental fees to public vehicle owners, should
be changed to a per-kilometer rate controlled by the administration. Per-kilometer rate would guarantee drivers’ and
transportation operators’ incomes, thus improving services, which in turn would maintain loyal users and attract
private vehicle owners to switch to public transportation. Conflicts between the administration and transportation
businesses may arise, but the government needs to be firm in its resolve to bring benefits to the public.
The new government, which takes up office as of Oct. 20, should initiate public transportation reforms in its first
100 days in office, said MTI’s Bambang Susantono. The recommendations include the finalization of government
regulations and ministerial decrees following the passing of a new law on the transportation system. Another
recommendation is a blueprint for urban transportation networks in five major cities, including the use of
environmentally friendly public vehicles. The last recommendation MTI plans to propose is a railway revitalization
program for commuter and inner-city trains in cities which have railway system like Jakarta.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/09/07/new-govt-urged-fix-public-transportation-services.html

Indonesia House Set to Pass Environment Bill
Fidelis E. Satriastanti, The Jakarta Globe
A bill aimed at empowering the State Ministry for the Environment is finally expected to be endorsed by the House
of Representatives today (September 7 2009). One of the changes that may be introduced if the bill is passed is the
granting of new powers to national park rangers so they can investigate and arrest violators of environmental laws.
At present, the role of civilian rangers is limited to conducting investigations and passing on criminal reports to the
police. The new bill, however, would enable rangers to arrest suspects and pass on investigative reports to
prosecutors. Ilyas Asaad, the ministry’s deputy for environmental compliance, said a number of substantial changes
were being proposed. New terms have been included in the bill, Ilyas said, pointing to stricter environmental-
management standards and new strategic environmental assessments, as well as a range of new economic
instruments and stronger roles for ministry officials.
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/news/indonesia-house-set-to-pass-environment-bill/328626

Indonesia Construction Companies Vow to Go Green
By Fidelis E Satriastanti, The Jakarta Globe
Twenty-one major construction-related firms declared their commitment to produce environmental-friendly works
on Wednesday (September 9 2009), locking arms with a group calling for "greener" buildings in the country. The
companies, including PT Surya Toto Indonesia, PT Phillips Indonesia, PT Holcim and PT Intiland Development,
have signed an agreement to serve as corporate founders of the Indonesian Green Building Council. The council was
established in 2008 as a nonprofit by 50 architects and interior designers, and was acknowledged by the World
Green Building Council this year. Naning Adiwoso, president of the Green Building Council, said it took a lot of
effort to coax the companies to join the group, which originally counted individuals as members. "We were thinking
about how to design to be more friendly for health and environment, meanwhile, the corporations will always be
thinking about business," she said. "However, we have managed to reach a common vision: we all want to have
more sustainable development."
Hari Sasongko, head of Jakarta’s Building Monitoring and Control Agency, said green building techniques needed
to be employed immediately, particularly because many of the city’s buildings have ignored concerns about saving
water or energy. "We have seen how it affected the city with the land subsidence and excessive exploitation of
groundwater," he said, adding that the city’s governor, Fauzi Bowo, had declared his commitment to upgrade all
buildings in the capital to be green by 2010. However, the governor said such changes would have to come
gradually. "It is going to be enforced, but we hope it will also be a moral obligation" for developers, he said.
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/news/indonesia-construction-companies-vow-to-go-green/329018

Health Costs from Jakarta Pollution will Increase to Rp. 4.3 Trillion by 2015
Nurfika Osman, The Jakarta Globe
Experts have some ill tidings in regards to Jakarta’s urban environment. This conclusion was reached during a
discussion titled "The Concrete Jungle and Pollution in Jakarta," which warned that the increasing number of
vehicles and shopping centers would continue to threaten the capital’s inhabitants. Ubaidillah, executive director of
the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi) Jakarta, said transportation caused 70 percent of the pollution in
the city. Metro Police data show that as of June the number of vehicles in Jakarta had risen to 9.9 million, including
133,000 public transportation vehicles, while the number of residents, based on data from Jakarta Population and
Civil Registration Agency, was at 8.5 million as of March. Ubaidillah said this meant the city was producing 13,000
tons of carbon-dioxide daily and that 20 percent of the city should be open green space to offset emissions.
Ubaidillah added that if the government failed to create a better public transportation system, the city would be
producing 38,322 tons of carbon-dioxide daily by 2015, which would require 32 percent of open green space. He
said based on World Bank research, Jakarta’s citizens paid Rp 1.8 trillion ($181.8 million) in 1998 for pollution-
related diseases, a figure estimated to increase to Rp 4.3 trillion by 2015 if the situation does not change.
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/city/health-costs-of-jakarta-pollution-to-rp-43-trillion-in-2015/329055

Jakarta Mall Managers Promise to Provide Bicycle Parking
Kompas Newspaper
Managers of shopping malls in Jakarta and surrounding areas promised to provide bicycle parking. "I agree with the
cyclist’s community that the managers of buildings in Jakarta and surrounding areas need to provide bicycle
parking. We promise to provide it and it was not difficult, "said Chairman of the Association of Indonesian
Shopping Center Manager Stephen Ridwan to Kompas. However, Stephen hopes to meet, sit together, and discuss
with cyclists in the Greater Jakarta area concerning security. Bicycles do not have a license plate number thereby
making it difficult for security personnel to identify bike owners [in the event of a stolen bike].
Governor Fauzi Bowo requests building managers to provide bicycle parking. Fauzi asked the Jakarta parliament to
prepare special rules regarding bicycle parking. Jakarta Secretary Muhayat states that the administration is placing
bicycle parking in Kalideres, IRTI Monument Square, Kampung Rambutan, and Ragunan terminal/bus depot as
feeder to the busway.
SOURCE:
http://megapolitan.kompas.com/read/xml/2009/08/26/07455541/pengelola.mal.janji.sediakan.tempat.parkir.sepeda

Jakarta Fails to put out Smoking on Buses
Nurfika Osman, The Jakarta Globe
Smoking is continuing on nearly 90 percent of public transportation vehicles in the city, despite a four-year-old
bylaw banning lighting up in public places, the Indonesian Consumers Foundation said. The high rate of non-
compliance "means that the city administration has failed to implement its 2005 bylaw on air pollution control," said
Tulus Abadi, managing director of the foundation, also known as the YLKI. The city enacted a bylaw on air
pollution control four years ago that bans smoking in enclosed public places, including all trains, buses, vans,
offices, restaurants and cafes. A survey conducted in July with a total sample of 549 public mikrolet (minibuses),
Patas express city buses, and the smaller Metromini and Kopaja buses from five municipalities indicated that 43
percent of drivers smoked while en route, while 40 percent of the passengers and 17 percent of the drivers’ assistants
lit up while on board. "Forty-two percent of the violations occurred in minivans, followed by express city buses,
including air-conditioned buses, with 21 percent, Metromini with 19 percent and Kopaja with 18 percent," Tulus
said. "Twenty-four percent of those caught smoking said that they did so because officials did not monitor them,
while the remainder said that they were addicted to smoking and simply could not stop," he said.
The foundation conducted a survey last year to study how people felt about smoking in public vehicles. Out of 1,000
residents interviewed, 77 percent said they were bothered by people smoking inside public vehicles.
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/home/jakarta-fails-to-put-out-smoking-on-buses/329250
Jakarta Traffic Costs Public $2.8 Billion per Year, Says Experts
Antara Newspaper
Traffic congestion in the capital cost Jakarta residents as much as Rp 28.1 trillion annually, an expert said. Firdaus
Ali, an environment expert at the University of Indonesia’s School of Technology, said in a discussion that the loss
was calculated based on the estimated amount of fuel wasted, lost productive time, losses incurred by public
transportation owners and the health costs resulting from congestion.
The biggest loss, according to Firdaus, was attributed to fuel inefficiency, the fuel wasted when vehicles were
trapped in traffic jams, which costs Rp 10.7 trillion ($10.7 billion) per year. In second place is the loss of productive
time, estimated at Rp 9.7 trillion per year, followed by health costs of Rp 5.8 trillion. "Public transportation owners
suffer a staggering Rp 1.9 trillion loss each year due to lost opportunities as traffic jams drastically limit the
movement of public transportation vehicles," Firdaus said. "The irony," he said, "is that public transportation has
become part of the problem, and not the solution to traffic jams in the capital," he continued.
Jakarta sees crippling traffic jams almost every day as the number of private cars on the capital’s streets continues to
rise, with the city seemingly running out of options to deal with the problem. Meanwhile, Umar Fahmi Achmadi, a
professor of University of Indonesia’s School of Public Health, said that transportation caused up to 80 percent of all
air pollution in the capital and could lead to asthma, bronchitis and pneumonia as well as cardiovascular, nervous
system, liver and kidney problems.
SOURCE: http://www.antaranews.com/berita/1252569398/kemacetan-jakarta-timbulkan-kerugian-rp28-triliun (In
English: http://thejakartaglobe.com/city/jakarta-traffic-costs-public-28b-per-year-says-expert/329256)

Surabaya Administration to develop Eco-Friendly City Living
Agnes S. Jayakarna, The Jakarta Post
To create a better environment and meet green space requirements, the Surabaya city administration has been
encouraging property developers in the region to designate at least 20 percent of their development areas as green
spaces, an official says. Head of the city administration's development planning board Tri Rismaharini claimed
Surabaya had succeeded in making more than 20 percent out of its total areas of 326 square kilometers as green
spaces. She added that her office would continue encouraging people to allocate small parts of their area as green
sites in an effort to encourage eco-friendly living in the city, thus fulfilling the requirement as stipulated in Law No.
26/2007 on spatial management. The law requires all the regional administrations across the country to allocate at
least 20 percent of their respective regions as green sites.
More than 5,000 square meters of space have been developed into green sites at a number of residential compounds
in the city. Some 135,000 square meters of other areas have been developed into public facilities. Separately,
environmental observer Suparto Wijoyo of the Surabaya-based Airlangga University highlighted the urgency for all
the administrative regions in the country to improve their eco-friendly development. Wijoyo, who was also a
member of the Environmental Affairs Ministry's working team for the drafting of the bill of the law on environment
management and protection that has been made effective since Wednesday (September 9 2009), said that the law
gave a new hope for people to have a better living. The law required the government to take into account the
environmental considerations in any of its decisions.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/09/14/surabaya-administration-develop-ecofriendly-city-
living.html

Indonesia’s Green Building Council Issues Guidelines
The Jakarta Post
The Green Building Council of Indonesia (GBCI) launched on Wednesday (September 9 2009) guidelines for
environmentally friendly buildings to increase the public's and business community's awareness of sustainability
issues. Dubbed the Greenship, the guidelines list a number of aspects to take into consideration when constructing a
building, which affect the environment and the building's users. The checklist includes energy-saving mechanisms
and indoor air quality.
The GBCI, which was established in February 2009, also endorsed - at the same event - 21 companies as the
council's "corporate founders". The companies, which include state-owned energy company PT Pertamina, property
giant PT Summarecon Agung and PT Ciputra Development, will strengthen the council's case for joining the World
Green Building Council.
The main "Greenship" guidelines are: the availability of access to public transport ,the availability of parking spaces
for bicycles and changing rooms, the management of rainwater, the protection or restoration of open spaces, the
constructing of absorption wells, the usage of water-efficient plumbing, Water quality and usage monitoring, the
recycling of "wudhu" (Islamic method of washing oneself before praying) water , the usage of grey water and black
water recycling systems , the monitoring of a building's energy usage, reporting on emission reduction, optimizing
the usage of environmentally friendly cleaning products, using recycled materials, smoke-free building, natural
lighting , surveying the building users' comfort , proper ventilation
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/09/12/council-issues-green039-building-guidelines.html

Vehicle Emissions Offenders Face 3 years in Jail
Adianto P. Simamora, The Jakarta Post
Millions of motorists may face up to three years in jail or fines of Rp 3 billion (US$298,200) unless they bring their
vehicle emissions in line with government's standards. The jail terms and fines are included in the law on
environmental management and protection that was passed by the House of Representatives on Tuesday (September
8 2009). The yearly report on emissions tests by the government shows that half of vehicles tested failed to meet
emissions standards. "The law could be used to punish polluters including owners of cars that fail to meet emissions
standards," deputy assistant for emissions pollution control at the Office of the State Minister for the Environment,
Ade Palguna. Article 98 of the law stipulates that anyone who intentionally conducts activities that cause water and
air pollution exceeding tolerable levels faces a minimum of three years in jail and/or fines of between Rp 3 billion
and Rp 10 billion. Article 100 stipulates that anyone violating emissions level will face a maximum three years'
imprisonment and/or Rp 3 billion in fines. The 2009 Traffic Law, endorsed in May, also obliges all vehicles
operating in Indonesia to meet the government emissions standards.
Motor vehicles are a major source of air pollutants in Indonesia's big cities including Jakarta. A study by the
National Development Planning Agency (Bappenas) says regular checks of car engines could reduce energy
consumption by between 3 and 10 percent; cut carbon monoxide emissions by half; hydrocarbons by 35 percent and
particulate matter by 45 percent. Jakarta is the first province to issue a bylaw on air pollution, which requires all
private vehicles to conduct emission tests twice a year to meet emissions standards.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/09/11/vehicle-emissions-offenders-face-3-years-jail.html

City Told to Tighten Up on Non-Smoking Areas
The Jakarta Post
To reinforce the Jakarta smoking ban, NGOs urge the city to declare "absolute smoke free zones." Tulus Abadi of
the Indonesian Consumers Foundation (YLKI) said recently that the smoking ban bylaw was still only partially
implemented because people could still smoke in some parts of prohibited zones. The bylaw designates seven types
of prohibited zone including public transportation, health-care buildings, schools, children's areas, places of worship,
offices and public spaces (including malls, restaurants, terminals and stations). Out of the seven zones, only the first
five are declared as absolute smoke-free zones, while offices and public spaces are considered as partially smoke-
free because people are still allowed to smoke, but only in designated smoking rooms . Azas Tigor Nainggolan of
the Jakarta Residents Forum (Fakta) shared similar comments with YLKI, saying the administration should enforce
the smoking ban completely by dispensing with the requirements to provide designated smoking areas. "The
implementation of the current bylaw is too lenient. There should not be any space for smokers and cigarette ads, in
order to free Jakarta from cigarette smoke," he said.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/09/15/city-told-tighten-nonsmoking-areas.html

Motorcycle Popular Because of Money, Status and Freedom
Kinanti Pinta Karana, The Jakarta Globe
Despite the safety perils of traveling long distances on motorbikes, many people returning to their hometowns from
Indonesia’s big cities this weekend for the annual ‘mudik’ exodus will shun buses and trains in favor of the two-
wheeled people mover. Bambang Susantono, the chairman of Indonesian Transportation Community (MTI), said on
Tuesday that there were four main reasons why people prefer to travel by motorbikes when they return home to
celebrate the Idul Fitri holiday at the end of Ramadan. The money bikers spend for gas is 40 to 50 percent cheaper
than the cost of bus ticket," Bambang said. Secondly, traveling by motorbike is more flexible because bikers can
decide when or where they will stop to rest. "If they travel by bus or train, they have to follow the schedule," he said.
A cultural factor is also at play. "People who work in big cities like Jakarta want to show their friends and family
back home that they have made it and a motorbike is seen as a symbol of success," he said. In small towns or
villages, public transportation is scarce, and people who want to visit their friends and family around town need
transportation, Bambang said.
The MTI have called on the police to be firm on law enforcement over the holiday season. "Everyone has to realize
that once you are on the road, you are affecting other people’s safety, so please drive safely," he said.
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/home/dangerous-motorcycle-mudik-popular-because-of-money-status-and-
freedom/329982

MRT Development Must Improve Quality of Life, Experts Say
Desy Nurhayati, The Jakarta Post
The City administration should make the most of its plan to develop underground spaces in the city to give citizens
more facilities, spatial planning experts said in a discussion. Underground spaces should be developed not only to
support the construction of the Mass Rapid Transit (MRT) train, but also to improve the city's use of space and
provide a better quality of life for Jakartans, said Hendricus Andy from the University of Indonesia. "Using Jakarta’s
underground space can address traffic congestion through the construction of the MRT network, but it can also
provide long-term solutions to the other problems in the city," he said. Underground space could not only solve the
issue of limited space overground, but also free up precious land to provide more green areas and create business
opportunities.
The administration is currently drafting a bylaw that will allow the construction of public facilities underground, as
well as provide the legal framework for the MRT project that will kick off next year. The rail-based public
transportation mode will start operating by 2016.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/09/15/development-must-improve-quality-life-experts-
say.html

Broken Traffic Lights Causes Worsening Traffic Gridlock
Emilius Ceasar Alexey, Kompas Newspaper and Lenny, Beritajakarta.com
Uncoordinated and broken traffic lights were one of the reasons for the capital’s traffic problems and caused
massive traffic jams at several main intersections in the city. Jakarta Provincial Government has allocated Rp. 20
million to repair all traffic lights in Jakarta. The Transportation Agency will fix faulty underground cable networks,
replacing broken light bulbs, and repairing damage poles. Light bulbs will be replaced with light emitting diodes
(LED) which is energy efficient and brighter. Repair work will begin in early December and expected to complete
by the end of this year. By 2010, all traffic lights are expected to function properly.
In addition to traffic light repair, Transportation Agency will also repair road separators, street signs, busway lanes
and cracking down reckless driver who put other road users in harm’s way.
SOURCE:
http://megapolitan.kompas.com/read/xml/2009/09/15/18333123/perbaikan.lampu.lalu.lintas.di.jakarta.butuh.rp.20.m
iliar and http://www.beritajakarta.com/2008/id/berita_detail.asp?idwil=0&nNewsId=35244

Ozone Layer Still a Worry: Ministry
Fidelis E Sastriastanti, The Jakarta Globe
While there was no official celebration to mark International Ozone Day on Wednesday, the State Ministry for the
Environment sent out letters to various government bodies warning them against the use of banned ozone-depleting
chemicals, an official said. "The warning letters were to remind officials that importing and using ozone depleting
substances has been banned since December 31, 2007," said Sulistyowati, who is the assistant deputy minister for
climate change impact at the Environment Ministry. Sulistyowati said such chemicals had long been banned in
industrial activities, although they were still allowed when carrying out repairs on air-conditioners and refrigerators.
Indonesia ratified the Montreal Protocol in 1992, joining around 200 other countries in agreeing to halt the use of
ozone-depleting chemicals by 1996. These chemicals covered by the protocol consisted of CFCs
(chlorofluorocarbons), CTC (carbon tetrachloride), methyl bromide — a pesticide used to treat rice crops — and
halon, which is used in fire-fighting. "Currently, we can say 100 percent that large-scale industries and
manufacturers are no longer using the banned substances," Sulistyowati said. "However, we’re still having problems
controlling small industries, some of which illegally import products such as aerosol or sprays that contain the
banned chemicals."
According to a report from the Indonesian National Institute of Aeronautics and Space (Lapan), there are several
areas over Indonesia that shows signs of ozone depletion, including over Java and Papua. A depleted ozone layer,
which exposes the planet to dangerous levels of UV light, can have several effects on human health, including
causing cataracts and skin cancers, as well as negatively affecting crops such as rice.
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/national/ozone-layer-still-a-worry-ministry/330318
Indigenous People Must be Involved in Carbon Reduction Scheme
Fidelis E Sastriastanti, The Jakarta Globe
Tribal groups have been faithfully protecting and preserving rain forests for hundreds of years, but their input at
national and global talks on the highly anticipated carbon trading mechanism has been constantly denied, a
representative of the country’s indigenous people said. The 15th UN Climate Change Conference is scheduled to
take place in Copenhagen, Denmark, from Dec. 7 to 18 to determine several international deals in tackling climate
change issues, including setting new emission targets for developed countries and funding mechanisms for
developing countries in mitigating the effects of climate change. Given Indonesia is home to the world’s third
largest area of forested land, after Brazil and the Democratic Republic of Congo, its main focus at the conference
will be on the carbon trading mechanism — also known as REDD — used to reduce emissions from deforestation
and forest degradation.
Abdon Nababan, secretary general of the Indigenous Peoples Alliance of the Archipelago (AMAN), said REDD had
two implications for indigenous people here: the scheme could exacerbate land conflicts or it could ease the burden
in protecting forests. "The REDD scheme could threaten indigenous people if it follows the same land concession
system used now, because that system is the source of ongoing conflicts with both forest concessionaires and
industrial forest estates," Abdon said. "On the other hand," he said, "it could be a good opportunity because it puts
the indigenous people and the scheme on the same page — we both want to prevent deforestation and forest
degradation."
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/national/indigenous-people-must-be-involved-in-carbon-reduction-scheme-
experts/330314


Issue date: 9 September 2009
FEATURED ARTICLE

Indonesia has the Potential to Cut its Emissions by 2030
By Dewan Nasional Perubahan Iklim (DNPI) or National Council on Climate Change (NCCC)
A draft report of a study underway at the National Climate Change Council (DNPI) shows that Indonesia has the
potential to reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by as much as 60% by 2030, with the right mixture of
domestic policies and international support. Policy and institutional changes in the forestry, power and
transportation sectors, as well as in peatland management, are keys to Indonesia’s opportunity to shift to a more
sustainable economic path, along with higher efficiency in the use of energy, carbon and natural resources.
The DNPI study has analyzed emissions and reduction potential in six sectors, and has involved more than 150
government, private-sector and NGO participants in sectoral working teams. The objective of the study is to analyze
and determine the costs of GHG mitigation initiatives Indonesia could potentially pursue. "The study can serve as a
platform for a conversation on how we as a nation best address the issue of climate change", said Agus Purnomo,
Head of the Secretariat of DNPI. The study, which is expected to be completed by year-end, estimates Indonesia’s
annual GHG emissions in 2005 at 2.3 Giga tons. Emissions will increase to an estimated 3.6 Giga tons by 2030 if
there are no chanes in the way several sectors are managed, maintaining Indonesia’s position as one of the world’s
largest emitters. Global warming, which is caused by excessive GHG emissions, would create many risks for future
generations of Indonesians such as increased air pollution, loss of biodiversity, changed rain patterns and more
frequent flooding.
By adopting a more sustainable pathway in key sectors- forestry, cement, power, agriculture, transportation, and
buildings- Indonesia has the opportunity to provide up to 2.3 Giga tons of GHG reduction opportunities by 2030 and
by doing so deliver important benefits to Indonesia, including improved quality of life, greater energy security, new
employment opportunities and reduced economic and social risks from global warming.
To realize the GHG reduction opportunities, Indonesia needs to 1) actively shape the international negotiations on
forestry and peat-related emissions on the basis of equity, 2) develop and pilot regional strategies at home, and 3)
increase public awareness of climate change risks and opportunities; as it was suggested by the Minister of
Environment and Executive Chair of the DNPI, Rachmat Witoelar.

LOCAL NEWS
Jakartans Question the Effectiveness of Progressive Vehicle Tax
By The Jakarta Post and The Jakarta Globe
A progressive vehicle taxation system to be put into practice next year will likely prove insignificant in addressing
Jakarta’s woeful traffic jams, transportation experts said. The new system will allow the government to impose
vehicle tax progressively to people with more than one motorized vehicle.Critics contend the progressive tax should
be levied along with other traffic-restriction policies and the improvement of public transportation to ease the city’s
traffic woes. "Limiting car ownership is only a band-aid solution for traffic problems" said Bambang Susantono
from the Indonesian Transportation Society (MTI). "The key solution is to revitalize public transportation and
restrict traffic, including through an ERP (Electronic Road Pricing System (ERP)". Furthermore, the key is to
restrict car use, not ownership. Darmaningtyas, from the Institute for Transportation Studies (Instran), said the new
tax would have limited contribution, because of its application on an individual, not group basis. He contends "A
family with more than one car can register their cars under different family members". However, others are
optimistic stating that the new system would have significant impact on the city’s traffic problems. Damantoro of
Urban Transport Forum said that the tax is "one way to address congestion… another way is to give more incentives
to public transportation".Before the system takes effect, Governor Fauzi Bowo said that the administration should
talk it over with the administration of surrounding cities in Greater Jakarta.
Source: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/20/progressive-vehicle-tax-won039t-matter-much-
experts.html and http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/24/jakartans-question-effectiveness-new-policy.html
and http://thejakartaglobe.com/opinion/raising-taxes-wont-fix-the-traffic-problem/325619

Car Free Day Gives Breath to Crowded Denpasar
By Westi Atmodjo, The Jakarta Post
Denpasar has launched a car-free-day campaign prohibiting private and public transportation means from passing a
number of major roads in the city, in an attempt to reduce serious air and noise pollution that has reached an
alarming situation. The drive started last Sunday (August 16 2009) from 6 AM to 11 AM in certain areas. However,
the car-free-day program would be expanded in terms of time and place.
Denpasar is facing rapid development of various public facilities including new offices, housing complexes,
business centers and tourist-related establishment. The city is also facing serious population problem. Denpasar now
shelters 1.3 million residents out of Bali’s total population of only 3.2 million people. "The city is now too crowded
and it is expected that in the next few years, it can no longer accommodate new transportation facilities. The
development of new roads and rise in the number of vehicles is uneven", as the Mayor explained.
Source: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/19/car-free-day-gives-breath-crowded-denpasar.html-0

No Option But to Drive Slowly on Jakarta’s Death-Trap Roads
By The Jakarta Post
Accidents are a common sight on Jakarta’s road- almost as common as traffic jams. Data from Jakarta Police Traffic
Division shows that from January to July 2009, the number of traffic accidents reached 3,907, or 558 accidents per
month on average. The monthly average rose from 532 in 2008, despite police having intensified their traffic
operations. There were 642 deaths on roads in Jakarta in the first half of 2009, while in 2008 the number of fatalities
was 1,169. Based on this information, an average of three people was killed on Jakarta’s streets everyday during that
period. But this data may have been under reported because many motorists involved in minor accidents prefer not
to report them to police. North Jakarta is the municipality that saw the most accidents, with 910 reports, making up
around 14% of the 6,393 accident reports in the whole Greater Jakarta last year.Street daredevils, the motorcyclists,
have often been labeled as primary factor in the traffic mess that has led to many mishaps. According to Jakarta
Police Traffic Division, there are more than 5 million motorcycles registered in Jakarta. Adding to those from areas
outside of Jakarta, there may be 6 million motorcycles flooding the streets of Jakarta everyday. It seems impossible
to curb the growth of motorcycle ownership. According to 2008 data, more than 1,000 new motorcycle registrations
were filed with the traffic division everyday.
Source: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/07/no-option-drive-slowly-jakarta’s-deathtrap-roads.html

Cyclists Demand Support Facilities
By Hasyim Widhiarto, The Jakarta Post
Hasyim Widhiarto, The Jakarta Post
In an effort to encourage more Jakartans to cycle to work, the Jakarta Bike to Work (B2W) community has urged the
city administration to require developers to build supporting facilities for cyclists as part of the green building
standardization regulations currently being deliberated.B2W chairman Toto Sugito said although an increasing
number of workers in the city are cycling to work, the management of many buildings are reluctant to provide them
with the facilities the need, such as parking areas, lockers and showers. Toto said providing cyclists with parking
areas would not be a great deal of trouble for building mangers. Established in August 2005, the B2W community
currently has more than 11,000 members across the nation, including 5,000 in greater Jakarta alone.With more than
2 million cars and 3.5 million motorcycles on the city's streets everyday, Jakarta has long been at the top of the list
of the world's most polluted cities, competing with Beijing and Mexico City for the dubious honor. Every year, the
city consumes at least 6 million kiloliters of fuel. Governor Fauzi Bowo said early last week that he welcomes the
idea to provide supporting facilities for cyclists, promising to require building managers to provide them.
Source: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/12/cyclists-demand-support-facilities.html

Vehicle Emission Rule Remain Stalled
By The Jakarta Globe
Four years have passed since Jakarta introduced regulations requiring vehicle emission tests, but officials said the
test itself and how to implement it, is still languishing in the discussion stage. Under the 1992 Law on Traffic, all
motorized vehicles must meet specific quality standards, including a maximum level of emissions. In 2005, a local
regulation was passed in Jakarta that was supposed to grant police the authority to ticket drivers whose vehicles had
not been tested. But implementation of emission standards remains up in the air. Cars would be tested each time
they are taken in for maintenance, and the stickers would be issued to cars that pass. A sticker would be valid for six
months or a set number of kilometers driven.After the Jakarta regulation passed in 2005, officials launched a short-
lived public education campaign to encourage drivers to get their vehicles tested. Free emission testing was offered
to drivers to promote compliance with the rule. But implementation has been hamstrung by a jurisdictional dispute
between the Ministry of Transportation and police over who would enforce the law, and whether the law has any
legal teeth. The law already states that vehicles which have not been tested for emission levels are not permitted to
operate, but nothing has really happened since 2005- not even issuing tickets for violators.
Source: http://thejakartaglobe.com/justAdded/vehicle-emissions-rules-remain-stalled-/273003

Corporate Contributions for Green Space are Crucial
By The Jakarta Post
The Jakarta Parks and Cemeteries Agency is calling on companies to take part in expanding green areas in the city
by allocating some of their space or supporting communities in re-greening their neighborhoods. By 2010, the
administration is targeting to have 13.9 percent of the city dedicated to green space, and has so far reached 9.7
percent. Jakarta has a total land area of 66,152 hectares. For this year, the agency plan to add 20 hectares of green
spaces in 15 locations throughout the city. Nine of the 15 spots are allocated for parks, while six others are for
cemeteries. Several parks in the city have been contributed by companies, including the Toyota Park in Perintis
Kemerdekaan, East Jakarta, and the Summarecon Jogging Park in Kelapa Gading, North Jakarta. Agency head Ery
Basworo recently said it would be hard for the administration to meet the target without contribution from the
private sectors, including property developers. The 2007 spatial planning law stipulates 30 percent of a city's area
must be green space - two-thirds of it public and one-third private. Ery said the administration faced hurdles in
acquiring land to be converted into green areas. "Some areas don't have clear ownership status, and some are not
good for growing plants," he said. He maintained the administration is continuing to acquire more land to meet the
target by prioritizing those with a clear ownership status to be developed into parks and green lanes.
Source: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/15/corporate-contributions-green-space-are-crucial-city.html

The Wait for More Reliable Transportation
By The Jakarta Post
With the city lacking an adequate public transportation, being a responsible traveler in Jakarta becomes a challenge.
To reduce one’s carbon footprint, one can opt to use public transportation or non-motorized vehicles. The challenge,
however, begins here. Using bicycles may be noble but is very hard work, as there are no bicycle lanes in the city.
Meanwhile, a trip on public transportation from the outskirts of the capital to business districts downtown would
include minivan rides before transferring to public minibuses like Metromini, or Kopaja, or the Trans Jakarta.
Mini van drivers pick up passengers from wherever they want along their route. The driver often halts for a couple
of minutes to wait for passengers, at the expense of other passengers’ time. On a bus, the conductor pushes people
like sardines in a can, despite the bus being overcrowded. The Metromini and Kopaja minibuses, which don’t have
their own lanes, crawl along in traffic jams alongside air-conditioned private cars. Bus passengers are left cramped
and sweating profusely.The Trans Jakarta is only slightly better. However, an increase in passengers and no new
buses added to the fleet mean there are more long and dangerous queues where people push and shove to get into the
bus.The government is to blame as they are unable to provide adequate, reliable and safe transportation for the
public. "There is no political will from the government to prioritize public transportation over private vehicles," says
the Head of Land Transportation Owners (Organda). For now, residents have to bear with sadly iconic features of
the capital: poor transportation services and traffic jams.
Source: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/07/31/the-wait-more-reliable-public-transportation.html

Carmakers Eager for "Green" Incentives
By The Jakarta Post
The planned fiscal incentives to encourage the production of eco-friendly low-cost vehicles will take effect in 2012
as the need to address climate change issues by lowering carbon emissions and pollution becomes more pressing
The government will provide fiscal incentives to produce eco-friendly low-cost cars in 2012 as part of its targets to
minimize carbon emissions and pollution," the Industry Ministry’s director general for transportation,
telecommunications and informatics industries Budi Darmadi said.
Car manufacturers have long said the lack of incentives was partly responsible for making eco-friendly automobiles
relatively more expensive than ordinary cars. By comparison, eco-friendly cars like hybrids cost above Rp 550
million each, while the cost of a multi-purpose vehicle (MPV) for instance ranges from Rp 100 million to Rp 250
million.
Source: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/07/27/carmakers-eager-%E2%80%98green%E2%80%99-
incentives.html

Project’s Impact on Traffic to be Gauged
By Putri Prameshwari, The Jakarta Globe
Property developers will now be required to analyze traffic patterns around proposed construction sites before they
break ground on a project.
A new law on traffic and road transportation would require developers to produce impact studies for all projects
across the country, said Suripno, Director for Road Safety - Ministry of Transportation. The traffic impact analysis
will start with Jakarta and other big cities. The law, which the House of Representatives approved in May, would
also establish a road transportation committee that meet every three months to review traffic conditions across the
country. The forum, Suripno said, would be comprised of government officials, academics and other experts. The
traffic impact analysis would be submitted to the forum which would then determine whether or not the project
could proceed. Surveys would outline the developers’ strategies for avoiding traffic congestion around the
construction site, particularly during peak hours. However, others have criticized that the new law does not go far
enough to ensure the safety of pedestrians. According to a study from the National Development Board, traffic
congestion in Jakarta caused a loss of about Rp 12.8 trillion ($1.28 billion) per year.
Source: http://thejakartaglobe.com/city/projects-impact-on-traffic-to-be-gauged/319429

Public Demands Car Free Day Hours to be Extended
By Beritajakarta.com
The public received Car Free Day (CFD) held on August 9 2009 along the Rasuna Said Road- Kuningan with
enthusiasm. The public even demands for CFD to be extended from 4 hours (08:00-12:00) to 6 hours (08:00-14:00).
CFD have been proven to effectively reduce pollution. According to South Jakarta Environment Agency, during the
implementation of CFD, dust pollution decreased by 64%, also the amount of carbon monoxide pollutant (CO2) and
nitrogen dioxide pollutant (nitric acid) decreased by 37% and 18% respectively.There are 40 office buildings located
in Rasuna Said area and many of the office staffs/employees attended the event. Moreover, an estimated 1,200
residents living in the Rasuna Said area participated in the event that include activities like fitness, biking, and
marching band.
Source: http://www.beritajakarta.com/2008/id/berita_detail.asp?idwil=0&nNewsId=34707

As Traffic Worsens, Trains Fail the Needed Cure
By Hasyim Widhiarto, The Jakarta Post
The city’s railway operator must do more to improve services and develop its existing infrastructure to help prevent
total gridlock in traffic. Bambang Pujantiyo, a member of Jakarta Transportation Council, said that with more than 2
million privately owned cars in the city, it was no longer possible for Jakarta’s 6,500 kilometers of streets to
accommodate the smooth flow of traffic. Each car measures an average 4 meters long, he said. Just imagine what
would happen if all 2 million cars took to the street at the same time. Although railway operator PT KA Commuter
Jabodetabek (KCJ) currently provides electric trains for residents commuting between Jakarta and the suburbs,
Bambang said this service was yet to have any significant impact on reducing traffic congestion, with many people
deeming it unreliable. The current commuter train is notorious for running late, inconvenient coaches, and
unexpected accidents. Moreover, commuters spend extra money on other public transportations, like ojek
(motorcycle taxi) or public minivan, in order to get to the train station. Most transportation experts agree that rail-
based transportation is the best solution to the city’s severe traffic problems. The city’s daytime population swells to
more than 20 million on weekdays. Only 406,000 of those who commute, or less than 3 percent, travel by train.
Source: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/11/as-traffic-worsens-trains-fail-provide-needed-cure.html


Issue date: 28 August 2009
Jakarta Considers Setting Aside Street Vendor Attractions
Arientha Primanita, The Jakarta Globe
The Jakarta administration is looking to move thousands of the city’s street vendors to designated areas meant to be
magnets for tourists in the future. Setting aside special areas for vendors would also clear streets and open pedestrian
walkways that are often chocked with stalls.
The effort to centralize the vendors is in part an effort to improve management of the stalls, which sometimes
disrupt traffic and operate largely outside of the law. With the vendors grouped in designated areas, the sellers might
be able to boost their income because tourists in the capital currently lack such street attractions like those in
Yogyakarta’s Malioboro district.
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/city/jakarta-considers-setting-aside-street-vendor-attractions/324197

Indonesia to Reign in Local Levies
Don Bisara & Janeman Latul, The Jakarta Globe and Aditya Suharmoko, The Jakarta Post
A new law passed by the House of Representatives sets limits for the first time on the amount of taxes local
governments can levy on businesses operating in their areas. The law, which becomes effective on Jan 1st 2010, is
aimed at raising local revenues while at the same time eliminating unauthorized and unreasonably high regional
taxes. As a consequence, the prices of new vehicles and cigarettes are likely to increase significantly.
An important article of the law will allow local governments to increase taxes on car and motorcycle owners who
buy second or additional vehicles. The new law will allow local governments to annually impose a levy of between
2 percent and 10 percent on the owners of second and successive vehicles based on the vehicle’s sale value and the
region’s road conditions. The higher prices for new vehicles would reduce traffic congestion. "Hopefully the growth
of roads and public transportation services will be able to match the growth in the number of cars on the road" Hary
Aziz, a Golkar Party legislator who helped draft the bill, said in a statement. After the passing of the bill, shares of
PT Astra International, the country’s biggest automobile retailer, fell 3.5 percent to Rp. 28, 800 by market close.
Cigarette prices are also likely to rise, with local governments allowed to charge a maximum of 10% on top of the
current duty on cigarettes starting 2014. Of this, 50% of revenue is required to be allocated to health care.
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/business/indonesia-to-reign-in-local-levies/324736 and
http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/18/law-empower-regional-governments-taxes-levies.html

Busway Project Moves Forward Despite Service Flaws
The Jakarta Post
Jakarta is moving forward with its Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) project, which includes the TransJakarta busway, many
reforms are still needed to ease congestion in the city, transportation experts said in a recent workshop. Experts from
the Institute for Transportation Development Policy (ITDP) said more comprehensive reforms were needed to give
Jakarta a better public transportation system, rather than just relying on new modes like the TransJakarta busway.
Harya Setyaka of ITDP asserts that the most urgent problem to address is the older transportation modes, including
public buses that still used a revenue sharing system, where a bus operator leased a bus to a driver whose daily
revenues are shared between two parties. With this system, bus crew maximizes their income by loading as many
passengers as possible. This results in poor service that makes private vehicle users reluctant to use public transport.
On the other hand, people who don’t have their own vehicles have to endure these unpleasant conditions. The
government and bus operators should get rid of the revenue sharing system and start applying a contract system, as
with the TransJakarta busway. Standard service for passengers should also be set up, and guarantee the rights of
passengers using a special legal framework.
Tory Damantoro of ITDP said the BRT system has yet to significantly address traffic problems because the
government only focuses on building infrastructure without thinking about integrating different public transportation
modes.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/06/08/busway-project-moves-forward-despite-service-
flaws.html

Busway Management Hold Campaign to Empty Busway Lanes
Indah Setyawati, The Jakarta Post and Kompas Newspaper
The TransJakarta Management Body (BLU) held a peaceful campaign to encourage passerby and motorists to empty
the busway lanes on Wednesday (19 August 2009) morning. The campaign was held in eight busy spots, including
Glodok in West Jakarta, traffic lights at the Coca-Cola intersection, Central Jakarta, Jl. Pemuda Senen and
Mampang. "If the lanes are clear (from any motorists or passerby), then passengers waiting time can be reduced"
Daryati Arsining Rini, head of the BLU, said.
Data from BLU recorded 120 traffic accidents in 8 corridors from January to July this year which around 35.25%
are motorcycle accidents. Moreover, 12 people have died in traffic accidents involving TransJakarta, while 20
people suffered heavy injuries and 91 people experienced light injuries. In 2008, the number of accidents in seven
corridors reached 169.
The high number vehicles using Busway lanes illegally had prompted Deputy Governor Prijanto to ask for public
opinions to build automatic gates that would restrict access to busway lanes to TransJakarta buses only, the plan has
yet to gain approval from the transportation agency.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/20/busway-lanes-are-just-buses-transjakarta.html and
Kompas Newspaper, August 20th 2009.

Car Free Day Gives Breath to Crowded Denpasar
Wasti Atmodjo, The Jakarta Post
Denpasar has launched a car-free-day campaign prohibiting private and public transportation means from passing a
number of major roads in the city, in an attempt to reduce serious air and noise pollution that has reached an
alarming situation. The drive started last Sunday (August 16 2009) from 6 AM to 11 AM in certain areas. However,
the car-free-day program would be expanded in terms of time and place.
Denpasar is facing rapid development of various public facilities including new offices, housing complexes,
business centers and tourist-related establishment. The city is also facing serious population problem. Denpasar now
shelters 1.3 million residents out of Bali’s total population of only 3.2 million people. "The city is now too crowded
and it is expected that in the next few years, it can no longer accommodate new transportation facilities. The
development of new roads and rise in the number of vehicles is uneven", as the Mayor explained.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/19/car-free-day-gives-breath-crowded-denpasar.html-0

Indonesia Tight-Lipped as Region Prepares for Worsening El Niño Haze
Nopporn Wong-Anan, The Jakart Globe
Indonesia appeared to bat away offers from other Southeast Asian countries on Wednesday (August 19 2009) to help
contain haze caused by forest fires, leaving the region facing worsening skies as a result of a brewing El Niño
weather pattern.
Worried about the potential impact, environment ministers of the region met in Singapore on Wednesday (August 19
2009) to discuss ways to mitigate haze pollution, which caused more than $9 billion in damage to the region’s
tourism, transport and farming sectors when El Niño struck in 1997-1998. Singapore, Malaysia, Brunei and Thailand
offered help to Jakarta to combat outbreaks of fire, but gave no details of concrete funding or measures such as
providing firefighters. Asean has a policy of nonintervention in its members’ domestic affairs and is seen by some as
all talk and no action. Forest fires are a regular occurrence during the dry season in Sumatra and Kalimantan, but the
situation has been aggravated recently with farmers, paper and palm oil plantation firms using fire to clear land. The
result is a smog-like haze in cities such as Singapore, Kuala Lumpur and Thailand’s Hat Yai. The ministers
acknowledged thought that Indonesia had made progress over the past three years to reduce fires.
Environmental groups have called President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono to put forest protection at the top of his
agenda ahead of an international meeting in Copenhagen in December to agree on action against climate change.
"Everyday, more precious forest and peat land is being destroyed, burned and cleared… leading to an exponential
increase in greenhouse gas emissions that is causing climate change" Greenpeace said in a statement.
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/news/indonesia-tight-lipped-as-region-prepares-for-worsening-el-nino-
haze/324964

Businesses Still Slow to Embrace CDM Projects
Benget Besalicto Tnb., The Jakarta Post
Despite intense campaigns, Indonesia has been slow on the uptake Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) program,
with the UN only approving 23 projects so far, a far cry from China’s 422, India’s 395 and Malaysia’s 41. One of
the main reasons so few projects have been implemented in Indonesia is their small profit margin hovering around
10 to 15%, said Agus Purnomo, the secretary-general of Indonesia’s National Council on Climate Change (DNPI),
the government-authorized body in charge of tackling the particularly through the implementation of CDM projects
in Indonesia.
In addition to the small margins, CDM projects are still relatively unfamiliar to most -businessmen. Agus said the
carbon market-where each ton of non-emitted carbon, which is also equivalent to a certified reduction emission
(CER), is traded as a commodity-is relatively new and different from other commodity markets.
More campaigns were needed to deepen people’s understanding about the importance of environmentally
sustainable business practices, and about the need to factor in the longer term when seeking profits. Perhaps as most
of Indonesian businessmen were only short-term investors, they were not interested in looking at the long-term
benefits of projects. Despite the small amount of benefits in the short-term, projects under CDM program will reap
larger benefits over the long term.
From 2008-2012, Indonesia has the potential to trade about 125 million tons of non-emitted carbon or 25 million
tons per year from the energy sector, and up to 23 million tons per year from the forestry sector.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/07/businesses-still-slow-embrace-cdm-projects.html

Indonesia may lose Natural Forest By 2015
Adianto P. Simamora, The Jakarta Post
Indonesia may lose its status as the world’s third-largest forest nation by 2015 as teh country’s natural forest are
likely to disappear due to deforestation and lax efforts to replant logged forest areas. Rinekso Soekmadi, a forestry
expert from the Bogor Institute of Agriculture (IPB) said the government should take tough action to force forest
concession holders (HPH) to replant logged forest areas. "Otherwise, all natural forests will be lost by 2015. This is
the worst case scenario based on current rates of deforestation", he said.
The forests are the natural habitats of wild animals and plants that make Indonesia’s biodiversity so rich. Indonesia
is world renowned for its biodiversity, with nearly 3,700 species, or 15% of the world’s total fauna found within the
archipelago.
With severe impact of climate change, calls for forest nations to preserve forests continue to grow in order to
prevent the emission of carbon dioxide retain in tress. The Guinness Book of World Records claims that Indonesia’s
rate of deforestation is the highest in the world, with the equivalent of three football fields cleared every hour.
Around 1.8 million hectares of rainforest were cut down in 1997, with figures jumping to 2.8 million hectares per
year between 1998 and 2000. Since then, clearance rates have remained high at 1.8 million hectares.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/07/30/ri-may-lose-natural-forest-2015-says-enviro-
expert.html

Jakartans Question the Effectiveness of Progressive Vehicle Tax
The Jakarta Post and The Jakarta Globe
A progressive vehicle taxation system to be put into practice next year will likely prove insignificant in addressing
Jakarta’s woeful traffic jams, transportation experts said. The new system will allow the government to impose
vehicle tax progressively to people with more than one motorized vehicle.
Critics contend the progressive tax should be levied along with other traffic-restriction policies and the improvement
of public transportation to ease the city’s traffic woes. "Limiting car ownership is only a band-aid solution for traffic
problems" said Bambang Susantono from the Indonesian Transportation Society (MTI). "The key solution is to
revitalize public transportation and restrict traffic, including through an ERP (Electronic Road Pricing System
(ERP)". Furthermore, the key is to restrict car use, not ownership.
Darmaningtyas, from the Institute for Transportation Studies (Instran), said the new tax would have limited
contribution, because of its application on an individual, not group basis. He contends "A family with more than one
car can register their cars under different family members"
However, others are optimistic stating that the new system would have significant impact on the city’s traffic
problems. Damantoro of Urban Transport Forum said that the tax is "one way to address congestion… another way
is to give more incentives to public transportation".
Before the system takes effect, Governor Fauzi Bowo said that the administration should talk it over with the
administration of surrounding cities in Greater Jakarta.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/20/progressive-vehicle-tax-won039t-matter-much-
experts.html and http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/24/jakartans-question-effectiveness-new-policy.html
and http://thejakartaglobe.com/opinion/raising-taxes-wont-fix-the-traffic-problem/325619

Palembang’s Air Pollution
Khairul Saleh, The Jakarta Post
Air pollution in Palembang has exceeded the acceptable standard, says governmental official. The dust particle level
at Charitas Hospital and Jl. Kapten A Rivai intersections exceeded the normal limit of 150 micron. Palembang
Environmental Agency blamed vehicles at two intersections and the dry season for the high level of dust particles.
High level of dust particles can cause acute respiratory infections. But the levels of other components such as SOx
(sulphur oxide) and NOx (nitrogen oxide) remained normal.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/20/palembang-air-polluted.html

New Rule Bans 3 or More on Bikes
Putri Prameshwari, The Jakarta Globe and Dion Bisara, The Jakarta Globe
Motorcyle riders will face stricter safety regulations during this year’s holiday season after the passage of a revised
law on road traffic. Motorcyclists returning to their hometowns next month during the post-Ramadan holiday of Idul
Fitri will not be allowed to carry more than one passenger. The rule also applied to drivers carrying children on their
motorcycles. 6.6 million travellers would likely travel by road this holiday season, up from 6.4 million last year.
Around 2.2 million of those travelers were expected to use motorcycles.
Millions of people across the country travel to their hometowns every year to celebrate Idul Fitri. Last year, an
estimated 22 million- 3.5 million of them Jakarta residents- returned to their hometowns by air, land and sea. Every
Idul Fitri, state-owned railway operator Kereta Api provides trains that are customized to carry motorcycles. Besides
the rule on passengers, the law also required motorcyclists to turn on their headlights during daytime. This rule was
introduced in 2006, but it was only a verbal regulation and was poorly monitored. In addition, motorcyclists are also
urged to wear helmets that meet the requirements established by the Ministry of Transportation. Such helmets will
be marked with a sticker stating they meet the Indonesian National Standard.
According to data from the Transportation Ministry, more than 600 people died in traffic accidents last Idul Fitri,
and two out of every three accidents involved motorcycles. Of 2,400 vehicles involved during last year’s holiday,
1,600 of them were motorcycles. Some 3.2 million people used motorcycles to return home last year for Idul Fitri, a
significant increase from 2.9 million in 2007.
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/city/new-rule-bans-3-or-more-on-bikes/325216 and
http://thejakartaglobe.com/home/nearly-a-million-more-to-travel-for-idul-fitri/325909

Extreme Measures Urged to Save City
Dessy Sagita, The Jakarta Globe and Desy Nurhayati, The Jakarta Post
City planning experts called on Jakarta administration to tighten supervision of land use, building permits, and
development to prevent worsening floods and traffic jams, two traditional woes in the capital. "Jakarta is like a
severely obese person and it needs a super strict diet to get healthier", Yayat Supriyatna, a city planning expert at
Trisakti University, told a media discussion.
Jakarta, a city of 12 million people, is experiencing a green area problem as malls and other commercial buildings
continue to gobble up vacant land. "Jakarta is probably the biggest mall city in the world with 130 malls, or 173 if
you want to count satellite cities such as Depok, Tangerang, and Bekasi" he said, adding that the city only has four
public parks.
The steady conversion of green areas for commercial purposes such as shopping centers and office buildings has led
to a plague of floods in the capital over the past few years. City records in 2008 alone showed that more than 3,400
buildings in the city violated planning regulations. The city administration has dismantled some buildings found to
have violated land-use permits, but their numbers seem to have outpaced city public order officers working to tear
them down.
The development of Jakarta should be carried out with a view toward reducing the excessive burden on downtown
areas.
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/city/extreme-measures-urged-to-save-city/325870 and
http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/25/stop-commercial-projects-add-more-green-says-group.html

Teachers, Students Must Bike to School in South Jakarta
Bati Kartini, The Jakarta Globe
The South Jakarta administration is now requiring teachers and students to cycle to school. The policy is only
applicable to those living within five kilometers of their school. In addition to reducing traffic jams, the policy was
aimed at lowering air pollution and transportation expenses, as well enhancing the health of teachers and students.
Authorities were still considering possible penalties for those failing to conform to the regulation. The policy should
be implemented as widely as possible in order to raise people’s awareness about the environment. A similar effort,
by the South Jakarta administration, requiring all administrative unit heads from the subdistrict level down to cycle
to work, has not been completely successful. The regulation has been only partially followed and some officials still
use official or personal motor vehicles to make public visits, even over short distances.
Jakarta, a city over 11 million people, has been fighting a losing battle against traffic jams and extremely high levels
of air pollution.
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/city/teachers-students-must-bike-to-school-in-south-jakarta/326097

Corrupt City Officials to Blame for Decline in Green Spaces, Experts Say
Nurfika Osman, The Jakarta Globe
Industry experts blamed corrupt city officials for the sharp decline in the amount of green space in the capital.
Nirwono Joga, head of the Indonesia Landscape Architecture Study Group, said that some officials at Jakarta’s
Spatial Planning Agency were susceptible to bribes from developers who wanted to construct projects on land
mandated to remain as green space. "Businessmen can easily bribe officials at the city planning agency and get
permits to construct their buildings" he said, adding that some buildings in the Sudirman Central Business District
and Mega Kuningan area did not fulfill the standard requirement to designate 30 percent of the property to green
spaces. Wiriyatmoko, head of city administration’s Spatial Planning Agency, however, denied all allegations of
dishonesty.
Jakarta’s Urban Spatial Planning (RTRW) plan for 1965-1985 aimed to keep green 37.2 percent of Jakarta. But city
planning data for 1985-2005 shows the city’s green spaces stood at 25.85%. Today, green spaces make up a mere
9.97 percent or equivalent to 6,826 hectares of the city’s 650 square kilometers. But the plan for 2000-2010
mandates that urban green spaces should comprise a minimum 13.49 percent of Jakarta’s total area.
The City need to make some breakthroughs to expand green areas by using idle spaces such as riverbanks, strips
along railway lines and under elevated roads. Without this, the 14 percent green-area target citywide could only be
reached in 680 years, considering the present expansion rate of green space is only 4 hectares per year.
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/city/corrupt-city-officials-to-blame-for-decline-in-green-spaces-experts-
say/326533 and http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/28/time-go-green-or-wait-680-years-achieve-
target.html


Issue date: 18 August 2009
Tangerang to have Special Bus Lanes Next Year
The Jakarta Post
The Tangerang city administration has announced plans to construct a special lane for buses to reduce traffic
congestion in the city.
"Our first special lane will connect to the TransJakarta busway system in Jakarta," head of the Tangerang
transportation agency, Erlan Rusnarlan, said Tuesday.
A second lane will link the Poris Terminal to the Ciledug terminal, via Cipondoh, he said, adding his agency would
widen Jl. Daan Mogot and Maulana Hasanudin to accommodate bus lane.
He said the integration between the Tangerang and Jakarta bus networks will help Tangerang residents commute to
Jakarta with greater ease.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/12/tangerang-have-special-bus-lanes-next-year.html
New Law to Tighten Business Permits to Protect Environment
Adianto P. Simamora, The Jakarta Post
A new law will allow the government to enforce a more restrictive licensing mechanism on business activities that
are vulnerable to environmental destruction.The draft law on environmental protection and management requires an
investor to secure an environment license for the issuance of his or her business permit.
The House of Representatives is slated to pass the bill into law in September to replace the outdated 1997
environmental law, which obliges investors to obtain environmental impact analysis (Amdal) documents before
doing business.According to the draft law, environment licenses could be issued by mayors, regents, governors or
the environment minister, depending on the size of the business.It says the environment permit is a must for
companies that generate air and water pollution, hazardous waste, greenhouse gas emissions and companies that
dump their tailings.
To get an environmental license, companies should first secure the Amdal documents to determine whether or not a
given business activity is environmentally feasible for a particular area. "With this law, we want all companies to
fulfill their responsibilities in protecting the environment," Ilyas Asaad, the environment ministry’s deputy for
environmental compliance, said Tuesday. He said many companies were running businesses without Amdal
document.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/11/new-law-tighten-business-permits-protect-
environment.html

Electronic Road Pricing (ERP) is Planned to be in Operation by Next Year
The Jakarta Post
After a series of scheme and tricks aimed at easing the city’s notoriously crazy traffic, the administration is planning
to trial a new project next year involving surveillance cameras and microchips, called the Electronic Road Pricing
(ERP). "This system will replace the three in one system currently in use" Land Transportation Agency Head
Hendah Sunugroho said at a seminar on public transportation.
City authroities introduced the three-in-one system 15 years ago, on several of Jakarta’s main roads. For the past 10
years, authorities have also been considering to introduce a system in which cars with odd and even license plate
numbers would take turn using the road, but the idea have never been implemented.
Now, however, authorities seem optimistic about the ERP plan. The ERP system will force drivers carrying less than
three passengers to pay extra fees for using certain roads. "Those who break the law may not be charged
immediately, but may be charged extra when renewing their vehicle ownership (STNK)," the land transportation
agency said.
But, Muhammad Akbar, the Head of Transportation Agency Traffic Scheme Management who manages the project,
was not as certain as Hendah that Jakarta could have the ERP system up and running by next year.
"This system will have to wait until the city has adequate public transportation facilities to support those residents
shifting from private vehicles to public transport," Akbar told The Jakarta Post. "and I am not sure such facilities
will be available by next year."
Jakarta Transportation Council head Tubagus Haryo Karbyanto said authorities must take into account the
importance of informing the public of any new systems long before putting them into place. "Residents must be
notified well before a new system is introduced, and must be given a trial period, because all previous failures of
traffic solutions have stemmed from a lack of transparency, information and law enforcement," Tubagus said.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/06/agency-upbeat-erp-operational-2010.html

City to Set Up Feeder System for TransJakarta Next Year
Desy Nurhayati, The Jakarta Post
In a bid to overhaul the city’s public transportation system, the city administration will develop feeder lines to
integrate the TransJakarta bus system with regular public buses starting next year. The development of feeder lines
will begin by restructuring the routes of regular buses. Regular buses that will be reorganized are those whose routes
overlap with existing TransJakarta corridors along more than half of their routes. The integrated ticketing system
will allow passengers to buy ticket just once along the entire route, even if they may have to transfer between regular
buses and TransJakarta buses.
Head of Land Transportation division- Jakarta Transportation Agency added that the overhaul would face many
challenges, particularly from bus drivers, because it would require them to change their habit of receiving cash from
passengers. The restructuring would also affect passenger behavior, so it’ll require great effort to publicize.
The integrated system would provide better services for the public, since crews of feeder bus would earn monthly
income, thus, eliminating the revenue-sharing system.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/07/23/city-set-feeder-system-transjakarta-next-year.html

Bandarlampung Plans to launch Busway
Oyos Saroso H.N., The Jakarta Post
Bandarlampung municipality plans to replace the city’s 4,500 angkot (public minivans), with public buses, in a bid
to deal with rush-hour traffic jams.
The shift to buses was needed because of the city’s booming population combined with limited development of
roads. There are an estimated 2,500 minivans serving the city, and 2,000 in the suburbs. Bandarlampung Mayor
Eddy Sutrisno said the replacement of minivans with the busway will be implemented before the end of 2010.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/06/13/busway-yes-angkot039-no-bandarlampung.html

South Jakarta will Conduct Free Emission Test in October
Beritajakarta.com
To minimize air pollution level in South Jakarta, South Jakarta Environment Agency will perform free emission test
in October. Emission test is considered one of the effective ways to overcome the problem with high level of air
pollution in Jakarta. By conducting emission test, it is expected that the air pollution will reach low level thereby
increasing quality of life in Jakarta.
It is expected that a total of 300 private vehicles and vehicles belonging to governmental officers will perform the
free emission test. Head of South Jakarta Environment Agency, Supardiyo, is confident that the free emission test
will attract a large number of people as it will normally cost Rp. 55,000 to conduct emission test in a workshop.
Private vehicles are required to conduct emission testing twice a year in accordance with Governor Instruction No.
95/2000 concerning the Obligation of Private and Public Vehicle to Conduct Emission Test and DKI Jakarta
Governor Decree No. 1041 concerning the Threshold of Vehicle Exhaust Gas Emission. In South Jakarta, there are
78 workshops that are certified to conduct emission testing. These certified workshops usually have two technicians
which have been trained by South Jakarta Environment Agency and by the Japanese Government.
SOURCE: http://www.beritajakarta.com/2008/id/berita_detail.asp?idwil=0&nNewsId=34744

The Increasing Number of Private Vehicles Need to be Controlled
Eri Kartiadi, Green Radio
The sale of private vehicles in May was recorded the highest for this year. Sales figures reached almost 36 thousand
units. These new cars create an even chaotic traffic condition in Jakarta.
Yayat Supriyana, a transportation expert, asserts that public transportation is far beyond the public expectations. Due
to the high number of private vehicle sale, Yayat predicts that Jakarta will be in total gridlock by the year 2014-
2015. Governmental officers are dependent and influenced by automotive manufactures thereby hindering officers
to solve the ever increasing traffic chaos.
Road level of services (LOS) has long been decreasing. The average vehicle speed in Jakarta is 20-40 km per hour.
Moreover, traffic congestion increase fuel used. Thereby, the more time vehicles spend idling on the road, the higher
dangerous particles produced from combustion process is emitted to the air. Vehicle owners spend an average of Rp.
2,5-3 million per month on fuel, parking, upkeep and others. This is the accumulation from the absence of cheap and
effective mass transportation.
The government should immediately regulate the number of vehicles. Yayat gives three recommendations to curb
vehicle population: 1) Improve the effectiveness of 3-in-1 system, 2) urge businesses to provide buses for
employees, 3) introduce tax for second, third and fourth vehicles purchased.
SOURCE: http://www.greenradio.fm/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=555:perlu-pengendalian-
jumlah-kendaraan-pribadi&catid=71:public-transportation&Itemid=298

No Option but to Drive Slowly on Jakarta’s Death-Trap Roads
The Jakarta Post
Accidents are a common sight on Jakarta’s road- almost as common as traffic jams. Data from Jakarta Police Traffic
Division shows that from January to July 2009, the number of traffic accidents reached 3,907, or 558 accidents per
month on average. The monthly average rose from 532 in 2008, despite police having intensified their traffic
operations. There were 642 deaths on roads in Jakarta in the first half of 2009, while in 2008 the number of fatalities
was 1,169. Based on this information, an average of three people was killed on Jakarta’s streets everyday during that
period. But this data may have been under reported because many motorists involved in minor accidents prefer not
to report them to police.
North Jakarta is the municipality that saw the most accidents, with 910 reports, making up around 14% of the 6,393
accident reports in the whole Greater Jakarta last year.
Street daredevils, the motorcyclists, have often been labeled as primary factor in the traffic mess that has led to
many mishaps. According to Jakarta Police Traffic Division, there are more than 5 million motorcycles registered in
Jakarta. Adding to those from areas outside of Jakarta, there may be 6 million motorcycles flooding the streets of
Jakarta everyday. It seems impossible to curb the growth of motorcycle ownership. According to 2008 data, more
than 1,000 new motorcycle registrations were filed with the traffic division everyday.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/07/no-option-drive-slowly-jakarta’s-deathtrap-roads.html

Cyclists Demand Support Facilities
Hasyim Widhiarto, The Jakarta Post
In an effort to encourage more Jakartans to cycle to work, the Jakarta Bike to Work (B2W) community has urged the
city administration to require developers to build supporting facilities for cyclists as part of the green building
standardization regulations currently being deliberated.
B2W chairman Toto Sugito said although an increasing number of workers in the city are cycling to work, the
management of many buildings are reluctant to provide them with the facilities the need, such as parking areas,
lockers and showers. Toto said providing cyclists with parking areas would not be a great deal of trouble for
building mangers. Established in August 2005, the B2W community currently has more than 11,000 members across
the nation, including 5,000 in greater Jakarta alone.
With more than 2 million cars and 3.5 million motorcycles on the city's streets everyday, Jakarta has long been at the
top of the list of the world's most polluted cities, competing with Beijing and Mexico City for the dubious honor.
Every year, the city consumes at least 6 million kiloliters of fuel. Governor Fauzi Bowo said early last week that he
welcomes the idea to provide supporting facilities for cyclists, promising to require building managers to provide
them.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/12/cyclists-demand-support-facilities.html

As Traffic Worsens, Trains Fail the Needed Cure
Hasyim Widhiarto, The Jakarta Post
The city’s railway operator must do more to improve services and develop its existing infrastructure to help prevent
total gridlock in traffic. Bambang Pujantiyo, a member of Jakarta Transportation Council, said that with more than 2
million privately owned cars in the city, it was no longer possible for Jakarta’s 6,500 kilometers of streets to
accommodate the smooth flow of traffic. Each car measures an average 4 meters long, he said. Just imagine what
would happen if all 2 million cars took to the street at the same time. Although railway operator PT KA Commuter
Jabodetabek (KCJ) currently provides electric trains for residents commuting between Jakarta and the suburbs,
Bambang said this service was yet to have any significant impact on reducing traffic congestion, with many people
deeming it unreliable. The current commuter train is notorious for running late, inconvenient coaches, and
unexpected accidents. Moreover, commuters spend extra money on other public transportations, like ojek
(motorcycle taxi or public minivan, in order to get to the train station.
Most transportation experts agree that rail-based transportation is the best solution to the city’s severe traffic
problems. The city’s daytime population swells to more than 20 million on weekdays. Only 406,000 of those who
commute, or less than 3 percent, travel by train.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/11/as-traffic-worsens-trains-fail-provide-needed-cure.html

Buildings Maybe In for Green Makeover
Nivell Rayda, The Jakarta Globe
All of the capital’s multistory office buildings would have to be redesigned to save energy and cut green house gas
emissions starting next year, Jakarta Governor Fauzi Bow said. The scheme was still being discussed by the city’s
building inspection office and although concise details were yet to be finalized, it was scheduled to be implemented
from 2010. The governor said the city has yet to set a standard which buildings must follow to cut their energy
consumption and carbon and green house emissions.
Architect and urban planning expert Marco Kusumawijaya added that by imposing bigger levies on buildings that
are not up to the city’s standards, the city can afford more green technologies to allow more natural air conditioning
and lights.
"Jakarta has greatly damaged its own environment, It’s time that the city do something to reverse the damage," as
said by Marco
But, others have deemed the project to be premature and not well-planned. According to Hasbi Azis from
International Initiative for a Sustainable Built Environment, 6 months of research and study is needed before a
building is certified as "green." In addition, the public must also give input to the implementation of the project.
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/city/buildings-may-be-in-for-green-makeover/314506 and
http://www.greenradio.fm/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=588:program-green-buiding-2010-
terlalu-prematur&catid=83:smart-living&Itemid=197

Bekasi Pledges to Continue Conducting Car-Free Day
The Jakarta Globe
Jakarta’s neighboring district of Bekasi has decided to continue having "car-free days" on the last Sunday of each in
an effort to reduce air pollution. Bekasi first introduced the car-free day on March 8 to celebrate the district’s 12th
anniversary, which falls on March 10. Residents had taken the opportunity to stroll along the road, play football and
badminton and play music.
Air quality evaluation conducted during car-free days have shown significant drops in pollutant concentration levels
along the routes, with dust particles reduced by 34%, carbon monoxide by 67% and nitrogen monoxide by 80%.
Environmental groups have blasted the idea for failing to tackle over air pollution, saying the city’s efforts only
displaced vehicles and worsened congestion.
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/news/bekasi-pledges-to-continue-conducting-car-free-days/276712

New tax to Boost Regional Funds for Roads
Aditya Suharmoko, The Jakarta Post
A bill requiring local governments to tax the purchase of vehicles will generate additional funding for provinces and
municipalities to improve public transport, repair damaged roads and build new ones. The regional tax and levies
bill will be endorsed next week and stipulates that at least 10% of revenue obtained from vehicle tax should be
allocated to constructing new roads, repairing damaged roads and improve large-scale public transport.
Under the bill, a car owner will pay between 1 and 2 percent tax for the first vehicle and between 2 and 10 percent
for any additional vehicles. For owners of a two or three-wheeled vehicle only 1 to 2 percent tax will be imposed.
The tax rate for public transport vehicles, ambulances, fire-fighting trucks, as well as vehicles used by social or
religious groups, the police, military and governmental officers will be between 0.5 and 1 percent.
The bill is expected to come into effect next year, but certain regions might need up to a year before they could fully
implement the new tax. As said Finance Minister’s Director, this new tax does not have to be fully implemented
until 2011, but the Finance Minister wants funds to be allocated to various projects next year.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/13/new-tax-boost-regional-funds-roads.html

Jakarta’s Traffic Gridlock: The Malady of "Macet"
Pandu Anugrah, The Jakarta Post
The term macet, meaning traffic gridlock or deadlock, is synonymous with Jakarta. This, however, should come as
no surprise given that domestic automotive sales have grown an average annual rate of 11 % per year since 2002,
according to the data published by the Indonesian Automotive Body (GAIKINDO). In 2008 alone, sales of four-
wheel vehicles reached 607,000 up to 40% from 2007. With 50% of sales in the Greater Jakarta area, the total
number of vehicles registered in the local authority has reached more than 3 million. Even worse the number of
motorcyclists in Jakarta, reportedly reached 3.5 million in 2007. Motorcycle per year ranged from 250,000 to
350,000 over the past six years. The total number of vehicles (cars plus motorcycles) registered in Jakarta will now
be approximately 9 million. This number could potentially increase given the Indonesian domestic automotive
market predicts that by 2015, the number of car sales will reach 1 million vehicles per year. Which means that
vehicle sales are expected to grow at a compounded annual growth rate of close to 9% per year in the next six years.
This will undoubtedly only complicate and worsen Jakarta’s notorious gridlock. Several transformation plans have
been designed and implemented but no significant improvements have materialized thus far. This could be seen by
analyzing the volume of vehicles passing on the Cawang-Tomang-Cengkareng toll road, which today remains at
high density of 180 million vehicles per year or around 500,000 vehicles per day. This figure that has remained
unchanged since 2004, suggests full capacity. Many roads in Jakarta have already reached maximum capacity.
The only real solution for combating traffic congestion is the development of a new transportation system. Concrete
evidence of this would be the realization of the Transjakarta Busway as a new form of rapid transportation in 2004.
But the existence of busway has not triggered any significant shifts as individuals continue to use their cars and
motorcycles more than ever. Thus, a major overhaul through the establishment of a new transportation network, with
a high level of suitability, is a necessity for unlocking Jakarta’s gridlock problem.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/06/24/jakarta039s-traffic-gridlock-the-malady-macet039.html

City’s ‘Jockeys’ Eke Out a Living by Helping Beat Traffic Scheme
Christiane Oelrich, The Jakarta Globe
The term jockey has nothing to do with horse racing, but instead is the job description for thousands of poor people
who offer their services as additional car passengers. In order to manage the city’s daily traffic chaos, Jakarta’s
authorities restrict private car access to certain roads during rush hour if they carry less than three passengers.
Some 12 million people live in the Greater Jakarta area, with an equal number of daily commuters from surrounding
areas to match. About six million cars clog the streets every day and this figure annually increases by 11 percent,
according to the Ministry of Transport. The system initially succeeded to halve the traffic in the restricted zones. But
with the steady increase in cars, even in the three-in-one, traffic lanes have reverted back to its former sluggishness.
Pylons for a monorail have been erected, but the project has been all but abandoned due to "legal and financial
obstacles." A rapid mass-transit system is planned, but has been mired in difficulties and delays. A first stretch
might open by 2016.
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/city/citys-jockeys-eke-out-a-living-by-helping-beat-traffic-scheme/319086

Bikes on Tollways May soon be a Reality
Muhammad Al-Azhari & Dion Bisara, The Jakarta Globe
In the near future a new ministerial decree is expected to authorize motorbikes to use toll roads. However, cars and
trucks will be separated for safety reasons, but Public Works Minister declined to say how soon this could occur.
The idea that motorbikes might be allowed on toll roads gathered pace last month when the government agreed that
bikers could use the recently open 5.5-kilometer Suramadu bridge linking the East Java City of Surabaya with
Madura island. But PT. Jasa Marga, the country’s largest toll road operator, had a lukewarm response to the news.
The firm welcomes the planned regulation in principle but allowing bikers on existing toll roads was unlikely. There
is not enough space to accommodate bikers on existing toll roads.
Looking ahead, if we are designing more toll roads, we can contemplate the possibility of special lanes for bikes, but
it has to be planned at the outset and there also would have to be calculations done for tariffs," said PT. Jasa Marga’s
company director. "The bikes have to be separated from cars otherwise the traffic will very disordered and
dangerous."
Despite a population of 230 million, Indonesia currently has only 649 kilometers of toll roads, with Jasa Marga
operating about 500 kilometers.
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/news/bikes-on-tollways-may-soon-be-a-reality/316143

Heavily Trafficked Road to get Concrete Upgrade
Arientha Primanita, The Jakarta Globe
The city administration plans to reinforce heavily trafficked roads with a layer of concrete, Jakarta Governor Fauzi
Bowo said at a plenary meeting to mark the city’s 482nd anniversary. The project is scheduled to begin in 2010.
Jakarta roads do not have the capacity to keep up with the amount of traffic on the streets, and that improved road
conditions would help ease some of the congestion. The upgrade would only cover heavily traveled roads such as Jl.
RE Martadinata in North Jakarta, which connects the center of the city with Tanjung Priok harbor. The city would
draw up an inventory of roads before determining which routes would be reinforced.
Funds to pay for the project would be taken from the city’s budget, but contributions from the central government
would be necessary to cover any potential shortfalls. Deputy Governor Prijanto did not provide figures on how much
the project would cost.
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/city/heavily-trafficked-roads-to-get-concrete-upgrade/313996

City Government Must Solve Crowd and Traffic
Arientha Primanita, The Jakarta Globe
Overpopulation and the daily streams of commuters funneling into Jakarta from neighboring towns are the major
reasons behind the capital’s problems. Overpopulation has led to uncheck construction, which exacerbated the
flooding problem. The huge number of people who commute into the city everyday, meanwhile, has worsened the
city’s notoriously bad traffic problems. The capital’s population rises from about nine million people at night to
about 12 million by day, as people from Bekasi, Depok, Bogor, and Tangerang travel into the city to work.
The city administration is planning to maximize the use of Transjakarta busway system, with the aim of opening
busway routes 11 to 15 by 2012. Other forms of transportation, such as trains, would be integrated with other
transport modes. The Mass Rapid Transit system, for example, is set to open in 2016. "We hope Jakarta can develop
into a modern city with a comfortable, secure and clean environment, so it can compete with other cities in the
world," as said by Jakarta’s Governor Fauzi Bowo.
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/city/city-govt-must-solve-crowds-traffic/313832

Green Drive Hit as City Cancels Land Purchases
Arientha Primanita, The Jakarta Globe
The Jakarta administration has suffered a setback in its attempts to increase the amount of public green space in the
nation’s capital, with one legislator saying the government had been forced to cancel land-acquisition plans worth
Rp. 65 billion ($6.6 million). Muhayar Rustamudin, deputy chairman of the City Council’s Commission D, which
oversees public works, said that the decision to drop the land acquisition plans would affect the city’s attempts to
increase the amount of public green space to 13.9% of the city’s total area, up from the current green-space level of
9.6%.
Currently, the total amount of green space in Jakarta only represents 9.6% of the city’s total area. According to
municipal laws, Jakarta should have 19,500 hectares of green space, accounting roughly 30% of the city’s total area.
Property developers are also required to establish green space in their residential and commercial projects.
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/city/green-drive-hit-as-city-cancels-land-purchases/321754

Vehicles Emission Rule Remain Stalled
The Jakarta Globe
Four years have passed since Jakarta introduced regulations requiring vehicle emission tests, but officials said the
test itself and how to implement it, is still languishing in the discussion stage. Under the 1992 Law on Traffic, all
motorized vehicles must meet specific quality standards, including a maximum level of emissions. In 2005, a local
regulation was passed in Jakarta that was supposed to grant police the authority to ticket drivers whose vehicles had
not been tested. But implementation of emission standards remains up in the air. Cars would be tested each time
they are taken in for maintenance, and the stickers would be issued to cars that pass. A sticker would be valid for six
months or a set number of kilometers driven.
After the Jakarta regulation passed in 2005, officials launched a short-lived public education campaign to encourage
drivers to get their vehicles tested. Free emission testing was offered to drivers to promote compliance with the rule.
But implementation has been hamstrung by a jurisdictional dispute between the Ministry of Transportation and
police over who would enforce the law, and whether the law has any legal teeth. The law already states that vehicles
which have not been tested for emission levels were not permitted to operate, but nothing has really happened since
2005- not even issuing tickets for violators.
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/justAdded/vehicle-emissions-rules-remain-stalled-/273003

Corporate Contributions for Green Space are Crucial
The Jakarta Post
The Jakarta Parks and Cemeteries Agency is calling on companies to take part in expanding green areas in the city
by allocating some of their space or supporting communities in re-greening their neighborhoods. By 2010, the
administration is targeting to have 13.9 percent of the city dedicated to green space, and has so far reached 9.7
percent. Jakarta has a total land area of 66,152 hectares. For this year, the agency plan to add 20 hectares of green
spaces in 15 locations throughout the city. Nine of the 15 spots are allocated for parks, while six others are for
cemeteries.
Several parks in the city have been contributed by companies, including the Toyota Park in Perintis Kemerdekaan,
East Jakarta, and the Summarecon Jogging Park in Kelapa Gading, North Jakarta. Agency head Ery Basworo
recently said it would be hard for the administration to meet the target without contribution from the private sectors,
including property developers.
The 2007 spatial planning law stipulates 30 percent of a city's area must be green space - two-thirds of it public and
one-third private. Ery said the administration faced hurdles in acquiring land to be converted into green areas.
"Some areas don't have clear ownership status, and some are not good for growing plants," he said. He maintained
the administration is continuing to acquire more land to meet the target by prioritizing those with a clear ownership
status to be developed into parks and green lanes.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/15/corporate-contributions-green-space-are-crucial-
city.html


Issue date: 11 August 2009
The Issues with Feeder Bus
Kompas Newspaper
The presence of feeder busway system could ease prospective passengers to ride the busway; hence, consumer
interest to ride the Trans Jakarta busway increase. But feeder buway system is not yet available in Jakarta.
There are many buses roaming around the streets of Jakarta with "Feeder Busway" written on them. These so-called
"Feeder Busway" provide direct service and not integrated with the Trans Jakarta Busway. Feeder buses, mainly
operated by housing developers such as BSD City, Cibubur, Lippo Cikarang and many others, take passengers
directly to Jakarta but not to the nearest Trans Jakarta shelter/bus stop. The increasing number of inter-
province/inter-city buses clogged the city; thus, adding to traffic chaos.
Transportation experts criticized that Jakarta regional government is not consistent in applying regulation. In May
2009, the regional government through an agreement with transportation agency prohibits inter-province buses to
enter the city. The prohibition is based on the Letter from Head of Transportation Agency DKI Jakarta, signed 14
May 2009. The letter clearly states that buses or public transportation from outside of Jakarta may not enter city and
remain only in the inter-city bus terminal.
Regional government have to work with housing developers in terms of integrating bus fares with Trans Jakarta so
that passengers do not have to buy ticket when they interchange to Trans Jakarta bus.
SOURCE: Kompas Newspaper, 24 July 2009 and Kompas Newspaper, 30 July 2009

New Traffic Law Legalizes ‘Ojek’, Adding To Traffic Chaos
Prodita Sabarini, The Jakarta Post
A new traffic law that legalizes motorcycle taxis (ojek) will add to the chaos on Jakarta’s road and undermine
passenger safety, as commented by transportation experts.
Chairman of the Institute for Transportation Studies (Instran) noted that articles on the recently passed bill
acknowledge motorcycles as a form of public transportation. He pointed out that the new law define a public motor
vehicle as " any vehicle used for transporting people or goods for a fee." Another article in the law states that public
transportation includes motorcycles. He objected the legalization of ojek as a form of public transportation as it
would increase traffic chaos. Most importantly, ojek do not assure the safety of passengers. Most traffic accidents in
Indonesia involve motorcycles. According to Jakarta Statistics Agency, the death toll from traffic accidents in the
capital stands at 1,000 people per year, mostly aged between 22 and 40. Traffic accidents are the number three killer
in Indonesia (after heart attack and stroke) with some 30,000 deaths related to traffic accidents annually.
Ojek is popular among Jakartans as it charges less than taxis and can navigate between cars during traffic jam.
However, transportation experts criticized that instead of legalizing ojek as a form of public transportation, the
government should fix the public transportation system, including the feeder system, so that the need for door-to-
door transportation is fulfilled.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/06/06/new-traffic-law-legalizes-ojek039-adding-traffic-chaos-
expert.html

Paratransit network still stuck in slow lane
Anissa S. Febrina, The Jakarta Post
The Jakarta city administrator focuses solely on plans for modern subways, rapid-transit buses and express trains,
but nothing is done about the existing semi-formal modes of public transportation- "the paratransit system."
The key to overhauling the city’s transportation system lies not in modern technology alone, it is about addressing
the system as a whole, while slowly introducing a new transportation backbone. This involves harmonizing existing
means into a working network- not an overlapping one.
Jakarta’s last effort to synchronize existing microbuses and public minivans involved trying to introduce a single-
ticket system for the feeder and BRT buses- an approach that failed not long after its introduction and which has
never been replaced by other initiatives. Transportation in Jakarta is tied with conflicting interests that overhauling
has become extremely complicated.
The City Transportation Agency grants route licenses valid for five years; licenses that can be proposed by
cooperatives and individuals at supposedly no cost. There is also no tender process involved in granting these
licenses, prompting uncontrolled public service quality and overlapping routes. These licenses are then sublet to any
interested investors, mostly individual micro entrepreneurs. As a result of route subletting, one route can involve
many individual owners- on average between 20-56 individual owners per route.
When the agency tried to include these into the BRT system, it had to deal with hundreds of fleet owners, making
negotiation process difficult in the effort to find an approach to work for them to serve as feeders. Moreover, there
are other issues affecting this challenge like illegal levies.
The official response to all these problems has been minimal; thus, the BRT system will never reach its capacity.
One possible solution is to discipline and integrate paratransit system operators by providing financial incentives
and disincentives.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/04/25/paratransit-network-still-stuck-slow-lane.html

Government Does Not Support Public Transportation Reformation
Kompas Newspaper
The government has been criticized for not supporting public transportation reformation. Existing policies and
government programs are not in favor of automotive technology that supports operational efficiency, especially in
terms fuel consumption.
Ideally, inter-province/inter-city bus adopt Euro 2 standard. The issue with adopting Euro 2 standard is that vehicle
has to consume Pertamina Dex ( sulphur content is lower than 300 ppm) which is not subsidized like diesel fuel and
only a limited number of gas stations sell Pertamina Dex. Furthermore, most importantly, the government does not
provide tax remission for the purchase of Euro 2 engine.
However, Elly Sinaga, the Director of Land Transportation- Ministry of Transportation, states the government has
tried to help fuel conversion for public transportation.
Gas converter will be installed in 1,700 unit of public transportation by the end of August 2009 in Palembang and
Bogor. By the end of this year, gas installation will be available in several gas stations. The 1,700 unit installed is
part of a pilot project, Elly Sinaga states that the government can not help every Indonesian citizens, hence there is a
need for public support.
SOURCE: Kompas Newspaper, 8 July 2009

The Wait for More Reliable Transportation
With the city lacking an adequate public transportation, being a responsible traveler in Jakarta becomes a challenge.
To reduce one’s carbon footprint, one can opt to use public transportation or non-motorized vehicles. The challenge,
however, begins here. Using bicycles may be noble but is very hard work, as there are no bicycle lanes in the city.
Meanwhile, a trip on public transportation from the outskirts of the capital to business districts downtown would
include minivan rides before transferring to public minibuses like Metromini, or Kopaja, or the Trans Jakarta.
Mini van drivers pick up passengers from wherever they want along their route. The driver often halts for a couple
of minutes to wait for passengers, at the expense of other passengers’ time. On a bus, the conductor pushes people
like sardines in a can, despite the bus being overcrowded. The Metromini and Kopaja minibuses, which don’t have
their own lanes, crawl along in traffic jams alongside air-conditioned private cars. Bus passengers are left cramped
and sweating profusely.
The Trans Jakarta is only slightly better. However, an increase in passengers and no new buses added to the fleet
mean there are more long and dangerous queues where people push and shove to get into the bus.
The government is to blame as they are unable to provide adequate, reliable and safe transportation for the public.
"There is no political will from the government to prioritize public transportation over private vehicles," says the
Head of Land Transportation Owners (Organda).
For now, residents have to bear with sadly iconic features of the capital: poor transportation services and traffic
jams.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/07/31/the-wait-more-reliable-public-transportation.html

Carmakers Eager for "Green" Incentives
The Jakarta Post
The planned fiscal incentives to encourage the production of eco-friendly low-cost vehicles will take effect in 2012
as the need to address climate change issues by lowering carbon emissions and pollution becomes more pressing
The government will provide fiscal incentives to produce eco-friendly low-cost cars in 2012 as part of its targets to
minimize carbon emissions and pollution," the Industry Ministry’s director general for transportation,
telecommunications and informatics industries Budi Darmadi said.
Car manufacturers have long said the lack of incentives was partly responsible for making eco-friendly automobiles
relatively more expensive than ordinary cars. By comparison, eco-friendly cars like hybrids cost above Rp 550
million each, while the cost of a multi-purpose vehicle (MPV) for instance ranges from Rp 100 million to Rp 250
million.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/07/27/carmakers-eager-%E2%80%98green%E2%80%99-
incentives.html

Manufacture Fewer Cars to Cut Jams? That’s a Funny one, says Auto Industry
Dian Arrifahmi, The Jakarta Globe
The government has struggled for years to solve traffic problems plaguing Jakarta and other big cities. But one
recent proposal to ease congestion by forcing the nation’s car companies to cut production has been met with
derision.
The Transportation Ministry’s Director General of Land Transportation, Suroyo Alimoeso, said he wanted the
Ministry of Industry to issue a regulation asking vehicle producers to reduce output, especially in five largest cities.
The plan was part of "good public transportation management" and limits were needed to ease traffic problems. The
Industry Ministry, however, gave the idea a thumb down, saying it would issue no such ruling. The problem is not
vehicle numbers, but poor traffic management by the Transportation Ministry and local governments.
The chairman of the Indonesian Automotive Industry Association (Gaikindo), Bambang Trisulo, said the idea of
cutting auto production to reduce traffic jams is "hilarious." The government should fix damaged roads, traffic
lights, and crack down harder on bad drivers.
If the middle classes have efficient, comfortable public transportation, then the demand for cars will decrease and
car manufacturers will produce fewer cars.
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/business/manufacture-fewer-cars-to-cut-jams-thats-a-funny-one-says-auto-
industry/313351

Project’s Impact on Traffic to be gauged
Putri Prameshwari, The Jakarta Globe
Property developers will now be required to analyze traffic patterns around proposed construction sites before they
break ground on a project.
A new law on traffic and road transportation would require developers to produce impact studies for all projects
across the country, said Suripno, Director for Road Safety - Ministry of Transportation. The traffic impact analysis
will start with Jakarta and other big cities. The law, which the House of Representatives approved in May, would
also establish a road transportation committee that meet every three months to review traffic conditions across the
country. The forum, Suripno said, would be comprised of government officials, academics and other experts. The
traffic impact analysis would be submitted to the forum which would then determine whether or not the project
could proceed. Surveys would outline the developers’ strategies for avoiding traffic congestion around the
construction site, particularly during peak hours.
However, others have criticized that the new law does not go far enough to ensure the safety of pedestrians.
According to a study from the National Development Board, traffic congestion in Jakarta causes losses of about Rp
12.8 trillion ($1.28 billion) per year.
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/city/projects-impact-on-traffic-to-be-gauged/319429

Public Minivans to Use Gas by 2011
The Jakarta Post
All public minivans in Palembang will run on gas by 2011, in an effort to create an environmentally friendly city.
Palembang Transportation Agency head Edi Nursalam said the administration would no longer issue permits for
public minivans that do not run on gas. Nursalam added the administration would start the program in September
this year, giving gas converters to 543 public minivans in the city.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/07/13/public-minivans-use-gas-2011.html

Environment Agency Plans to Shame Polluter Companies
Prodita Sabarini, The Jakarta Post
The City Administration plans to shame companies for violating environmental laws, by releasing their names to the
public. The City’s Environmental Management Agency’s head of law enforcement, Ridwan Panjaitan, said that by
next year the administration would begin naming companies that violated environmental laws at the annual
environment appreciation night.
Ridwan said BPLHD has yet to announce companies this year because some were still facing trial. This year more
than 40 companies in Jakarta have been given sanctions and are currently on trial or have been summoned.
The agency has blocked waste channels of six companies, covered up 63 illegal ground water wells made by 38
companies and has sent 66 smokers and building managements to trial for public smoking or not facilitating
smoking areas. Twenty-seven companies are facing charges for the violations.
The administration presented awards during the appreciation night to companies for best environmental
management, best vehicle mechanical shops for emission testing, best company for self-emissions testing, best no
smoking area, and others.
The program is one of the efforts to reach out to 83 companies on the north coast, urging them to fix their waste
management systems. Thus far, BPLHD has carried out the program with 19 companies last year and 18 in 2007.
This year, the agency has reached out to 15 companies, but only 8 responded to the invitation.
However, BPLHD’s attempt to reduce water, air and ground pollution has made little progress, with pollution still at
life threatening.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/06/26/environment-agency-plans-shame-polluter-
companies.html

Public Demands Car Free Day Hours to be Extended
Beritajakarta.com
The public received Car Free Day (CFD) held on August 9 2009 along the Rasuna Said Road- Kuningan with
enthusiasm. The public even demands for CFD to be extended from 4 hours (08:00-12:00) to 6 hours (08:00-14:00).
CFD have been proven to effectively reduce pollution. According to South Jakarta Environment Agency, during the
implementation of CFD, dust pollution decreased by 64%, also the amount of carbon monoxide pollutant (CO2) and
nitrogen dioxide pollutant (nitric acid) decreased by 37% and 18% respectively.
There are 40 office buildings located in Rasuna Said area and many of the office staffs/employees attended the
event. Moreover, an estimated 1,200 residents living in the Rasuna Said area participated in the event that include
activities like fitness, biking, and marching band.
SOURCE: http://www.beritajakarta.com/2008/id/berita_detail.asp?idwil=0&nNewsId=34707

Tobacco Bill- Same Old Story of another Toothless Regulation
The Jakarta Post
Indonesia has a dozen of regulations on tobacco control, from the central to the local administrative levels.
However, little is seen of their effectiveness.
Questions abound over how effective the current tobacco bill promises to be, but anti-tobacco activists remain
upbeat that it will be a pancea for the Pandora’s box of ills that tobacco has unleashed on society. Several activists
argue that the bill is needed because existing regulations on tobacco control are subjective by nature and applied
within limited scope at regional level.
Indonesia must pass the bill to ratify the World Health Organization (WHO) Framework Convention on Tobacco
Control (FCTC), signed along with 175 other countries. Today, Indonesia and North Korea are the only countries
that have not yet ratified the FCTC.
Based on figures from the Central Statistics Agency (BPS), a high incidence of smoking is found those aged
between 15 and 19 years old, having increased from 12.9% in 2001 to 17% in 2004. However, plans and regulations
on tobacco control in Indonesia are likely to end up in smoke in the near future, due to the country’s high
dependency on the industry. Indonesia, where cigarette prices are the cheapest in the world, has more than 600,000
workers directly employed by 3,000 cigarette producers, and about 10 million in supporting industries. However,
some would argue that a bill on tobacco control will not have as severe an impact on tobacco farmers and producers
as feared, pointing out smokers tend to be loyal consumers, making it difficult for them quit smoking instantly or
switch to other brands.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/05/special-report-tobacco-bill-same-old-story-another-
toothless-regulatio.html

Air Quality Control Drops, Minister Vows to do Squat
Adianto P. Simamora, The Jakarta Post
The air quality in several cities across Riau province dropped to dangerous levels Tuesday (August 4 2009) due to
thick haze from forest fires that also disrupted flights and forced schools to close. The thick smog also leads to eye
irritations and respiratory difficulties among local residents.
Readings of PM10 particulates ranged from 120 to 404 microns per cubic meter, far higher than the tolerable level
of 100. The head of city’s environmental agency, Dedi Gusriadi, said residents of Pekanbaru had only two days of
healthy air throughout July. "These are the worst levels of air pollution in Pekanbaru in the past two years", he said.
WWF Indonesia has reported a rise in the number of hotspots in Riau, from less than 1,000 in January to nearly
2,400 in July- the highest number anywhere in the country. Forestry Minister M.S. Kaban, in mind-boggling
statement, said the government would only take firm action to control fires if the haze disrupts flights and sparks
protests in neighboring countries.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/08/05/air-quality-drops-minister-vows-do-squat.html

Building Developers Must Provide Bicycle Parking
Beritajakarta.com
A large number of employers/ workers start leave their cars behind and cycle to work; therefore, DKI Jakarta
Provincial Government need to create policies supporting bikers. According to Jakara’s Governor, developers are
now required to provide bicycle parking area to receive building licenses. The governor vows to provide bicycle
lane if bicycles outnumbers motorcycle riders.
In the meantime, bicycle lane will be constructed in the housing developing area of Kapuk Naga Indah, North
Jakarta. "Bicycle lane has not yet been built until the city center, but slowly we have to promote cycling lifestyle to
the public," says Fauzi Bowo.
Chairman of Jakarta’s Bike to Work (B2W) community, Toto Sugiarto, says that the community wants to promote a
lifestyle where riding a bicycle to work is healthy, fast, and cost-effective. "I do not know when bicycle lane will be
realized, but the more we (B2W) campaign, the higher the chances of Jakarta having a bicycle lane," he says.
The B2W community is hoping that supporting facilities for bicycle users will be available in the office buildings
and public places in the near future. Currently, there are only 10 office buildings in Jakarta that provide showers and
lockers.
SOURCE: http://www.beritajakarta.com/2008/id/berita_detail.asp?idwil=0&nNewsId=34704


Issue date: 27 July 2009
City Eyes More Park and Ride Areas
Arientha Primanita, The Jakarta Globe
The City’s Transportation agency plans to add more areas where citizens can park their vehicles and get on the
Trans Jakarta busway, an official said on Sunday (5 July 2009).
Riza Hasyim, Deputy Chief of the Transportation Agency, said that his office wanted to add more Park and Ride
spaces at terminals throughout the city, but faces difficulty due to the lack of available spaces.
Park and Ride areas were meant to encourage people, especially those living in the outskirts of Jakarta, to park their
vehicles and use mass transportation like the Trans Jakarta busway, instead of driving into the city and contributing
to traffic problems.
Presently, there are three park and ride areas located in Ragunan, Kalideres, and Kampung Rambutan.
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/city/city-eyes-more-park-and-ride-areas/316396

City Seeks New Management Model for Trans Jakarta
Desy Nurhayati, The Jakarta Post
The City Administration is considering a new system of management for Trans Jakarta busways in order to improve
services.
The administration, with support from the Institute of Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP), has hired
consultants to conduct a study to determine the best model of management for Trans Jakarta, said the Deputy
Governor for Transportation Issues, Sutanto Soehodo.
Trans Jakarta is touted to be the best public transportation available in the city. However, long waits and
overcrowding is the subject of common complaints.
Despite the inadequate services, Trans Jakarta is in high demand, with the number of passengers increasing on a
daily basis according to ITDP consultant Harya Setyaka.
According to ITDP data, 250,000 people rode Trans Jakarta buses every day last month (June 2009), an average
increase of 3,000 per day from the previous month.
"There is still room for improvement as long as the administration and the operator are committed to fulfilling the
minimum level of services" Harya said. "The administration should focus making operational costs more efficient
without neglecting the level of services."
The business study on Trans Jakarta will be conducted by Ernest and Young, while the LOS study will be conducted
by Inresh and Logit.
The results of the LOS study will be used to form a draft of gubernatorial regulation.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/07/15/city-seeks-new-management-model-transjakarta.html

Palembang Welcomes Car Free Day
Environment Minister, Prof Ir. Rahmat Witoelar, officially launched Car Free Day in Palembang on June 13 2009.
Other activities organized during Car Free Day include "Fun Bike" where an estimated 600 people participated.
"Fun Bike" was held in conjunction with the Anniversary of Palembang and in the event of promoting sustainable
"Green Transportation" and aiming to make Palembang an International City by 2013. Prior to Car Free Day event,
the Environment Minister planted trees in Kambang Iwak area.
SOURCE: http://www.sumeks.co.id/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=12938&Itemid=12

City Mulls Taking Over Entire Busway, Blames Problems on Private Operators
Arientha Primanita, The Jakarta Globe
Private companies might be excluded altogether from busway operations under possible changes now being
considered by the city administration.
Sutanto Suhodo, the governor’s assistant for Industry, Trade and Transportation Affairs, said there had been many
problems with the present arrangement, which involves the city’s own Trans Jakarta Management Body (BLU)
working in tandem with four private operators.
The city owns only part of the fleet buses, currently 426-strong and growing, while the four private operators- each
actually consortiums of several companies- own the rest.
Milatia Kusuma Mukmin, the director of the Institute of Transportation and Development Policy, told the city’s
official news portal, BeritaJakarta.com, that the possible takeover of the entire fleet by the city administration
"cannot guarantee better busway management".
Nurmansjah Lubis, the secretary of City Council’s Commission B, which covers transportation issues, however, said
that the possible change in management arrangements would provide better service to the public.
He said the idea of a single operator would result in both better service and better business orientation, citing state-
owned railway operator, PT Kereta Api, as a good example of this because it had managed to maintain a quality
public service while also running an efficient business.
The directors would be more independent, Nurmansjah said, and would need to be more creative and innovative as
they would be encouraged to increase the quality of the management of the busway.
"The implications of such a legal entity change is that TransJakarta’s management body would also no longer
receive a subsidy from the regional budget," he said, which would relieve the burden on the state.
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/city/city-mulls-taking-over-entire-busway-blames-problems-on-private-
operators/317053

City Planning to Build Fences Along Bus Lanes
Arientha Primanita, The Jakarta Globe
The Jakarta city administration is planning to erect fences along some sections of the TransJakarta bus lanes to keep
private vehicles out of the dedicated lanes, Deputy Governor Prijanto said on Tuesday.
Prijanto said the administration wanted the bus lanes to be similar to railway routes, with fixed schedules and free of
traffic. "Busway lanes need to be fenced so that the buses can run smoothly and fast without any disturbance," he
said. However, he declined to say when the building of the fences might begin.
Earlier, city authorities erected automatic gates on several sections of busway lanes, but they have not succeeded in
keeping private motorists out of the lanes. Prijanto cited Jalan Daan Mogot in West Jakarta as one of the routes that
must be fenced. "The busway Corridor III [linking Kalideres in West Jakarta to Harmoni in Central Jakarta] is prone
to accidents as many private vehicles get into the busway," he said.
There was no data on busway accidents since they were constructed in 2004. However, the official Web site of the
Jakarta Police’s Traffic Directorate says one woman was killed by a bus in June when she tried to cross the lane. It
also says five people were killed in busway lanes in May, while dozens were injured. Most of the victims were
motorcycle riders. Prijanto said many pedestrians also jaywalk along the busway lanes, putting their lives in danger.
Patterned after the TransMillenio busway system in Bogota, Colombia, the TransJakarta busway lanes were
introduced by former Jakarta Governor Sutiyoso in January 2004 as part of efforts to ease crippling traffic jams in
the capital. Five years later, however, most transportation experts suggest that the TransJakarta busway system,
which currently includes seven corridors crisscrossing the city, has failed to live up to its hype. Severe traffic jams
continue to plague the city during the morning and evening rush hours.
SOURCE: http://thejakartaglobe.com/city/city-planning-to-build-fences-along-bus-lanes/316833

New spatial master plan to focus on public transport
Desy Nurhayati, The Jakarta Post
The city administration is discussing a draft on a spatial master plan for next year that will focus on the development
of public transportation by building interconnections between means of transport. Head of the city’s development
agency Nurfakih Wirawan told reporters Monday the new plan would be public-transportation-oriented, in order to
address the capital’s chronic traffic jams.
"Transportation will be a decisive factor to build the city in the future, as we aim to develop the Mass Rapid Transit
[MRT] network and improve the existing railway system, so that all transportation networks will be interconnected."
The administration had also discussed the master plan with two surrounding provinces, Banten and West Java.
Environment activists have also asked the city administration to accommodate more green spaces in the next year’s
spatial master plan. The administration is targeting to allocate only 13.9 percent of the city for green spaces in the
new master plan, lower than the minimum 30 percent as regulated in the 2007 Law on Spatial Planning. The law
stipulates the proportion of green spaces in a city should be at least 30 percent of the total area, 20 percent of which
should be public green spaces.
The Park and Cemetery Agency maintained it would be difficult to provide as much as 30 percent, citing most of the
city’s land structure made it possible for dwellers to build homes, moreover with the influx of people from rural
areas. The agency has so far managed to allocate 9.7 percent out of the 13.9 percent targeted until 2010. It said that
the remaining 4.2 percent would only be available by the end of this year, due to technical problems in taking over
the land. By the end of this year, the city is targeting 20 hectares of green spaces.
SOURCE: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/06/30/new-spatial-master-plan-focus-public-transport.html

Yes, We don’t Provide Good Public Transportation
Prodita Sabarini, The Jakarta Post
Jakarta Governor, Fauzi Bowo, admitted that his administration has yet to provide an adequate public transportation
system needed to manage Jakarta’s notorious traffic jams.
The Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP) has voiced concern over the growing number of
vehicles in the city. ITDP stated that if the vehicle growth rate in Jakarta continues to hover around 10% annually,
without any upgrades in public transportation and traffic management, the city will be paralyzed by total gridlock by
2014.
Jakarta roads are growing, but only by 0.01% per year. Entering two years of his tenure, Fauzi’s administration
efforts to provide public transportation is still far from accommodating the public needs.
Source: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/06/17/%E2%80%98yes-we-don%E2%80%99t-provide-good-
public-transit%E2%80%99.html


Issue date: 28 May 2009
Folding Bikes in TransJakarta
By The Jakarta Post
Bikers in Jakarta on Saturday, May 23rd 2009, had fun on Trans Jakarta Busway as for once they were allowed to
carry their folding bikes with them on a tour in the bus. Running between fX Lifestyle Center and Taman Menteng
Pulo, the Tour de Busway program was a result of cooperation between TransJakarta, Peta Hijau Community, Id-
Foldingbike Indonesia and Coca-Cola Cycling Community.
Source: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/05/27/folding-bikes-transjakarta.html

Do or Die- Bandung Seeks Route out of Traffic Mess
By Yuli Tri Suwarni , The Jakarta Post
With the recent construction of a toll connecting Jakarta to Bandung, and cheap international flights
from Malaysia, the West Java capital is busier than ever, but not everyone is happy.
The Cikampek- Purwakarta- Padalarang turnpike, better known as Cipularang, has virtually turned
Purwakarta into a ghost town and disrupted the Jakarta-Bandung railway service.
Source: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/05/14/do-or-die-bandung-seeks-route-out-traffic-
mess.html

Basement Malls in Bekasi monitored for Air Quality Standard
By Pikiran Rakyat
A number of basement malls in Bekasi will be monitored for air quality standard, in accordance with the
provision of Bylaw 41/1999 which states, “Air in the basement must be healthy and not hazardous to
the health of the people residing in the area even for a short while”
The parameters that will be tested will include nitrogen monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide,
dust and heat level. If the test results shows that the parameters exceed air quality standard therefore
there must be an attempt from management of respective building to control air quality.
Source: http://www.pikiran-rakyat.com/index.php?mib=news.detail&id=76731

Jakarta Vulnerable to Climate Change
By Adianto P. Simamora, The Jakarta Post and Kompas Newspaper
High density population is one of the many problems facing Jakarta as evidence by recent surveys
conducted by the Economy and Environment Program for Southeast Asia ( EEPSEA) and Mercer.
 A study by the Economy and Environment Program for Southeast Asia (EEPSEA) concludes Jakarta as the
most vulnerable city in Southeast Asia to the impact of climate change when compared to 530 cities
across the region.
Source: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/05/07/minister-urges-jakarta-administration-
control-population.html and Kompas Newspaper ( Print Edition, 7 May 2009)

Jakarta Clamps down Illegal Parking
By Anton and The Jakarta Post
Officers from the East Jakarta Transportation Agency successfully fined 25 cars for illegal parking on May
25 2009. Three cars were clamped and two trucks were impounded to a nearby car shelter. For 2009,
the East Jakarta Transportation Agency has clamped a total of 10 vehicles. Wheel clamps has been
conducted by Jakarta City Administration since May 2008.
Source: http://www.beritajakarta.com/2008/id/berita_detail.asp?idwil=0&nNewsId=33650 and
http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/05/26/e-jakarta-administration-raids-illegal-parking-
areas.html

New Traffic Bill Makes Government Liable for Road Damage, Injuries and Deaths
The Jakarta Post
The government can no longer ignore potholes dotting the country’s road now that a newly passed bill
allows citizens to file lawsuits against it for accidents resulting from poor road maintenance. The House
of Representatives unanimously passed the traffic bill into law during a plenary meeting Tuesday,
replacing the old law enforced in 1992.
Source: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/05/27/new-traffic-bill-makes-government-liable-
road-damage-injuries-and-deaths.html

Sustainable Transportation System Needed
By Ratna Yunita, The Jakarta Post
Paralyzing traffic jams and severe air pollution are the most frequent answers when people are asked
what they know about Jakarta. Motorized vehicle ownerships increase in line with a rise in income per
capita. The more income raises, the more cars and motorcycles are on roads. Motorized vehicle
ownership is growing at 9 percent every year, with more than 1,500 new registrations being filed a day
for motorcycles and 500 a day for cars.
Source: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/05/27/sustainable-transportation-system-
needed.html

Bali’s Public Transportation Struggles to Survive
By Ni Komang Erviani, The Jakarta Post
Public transportation companies in Bali are struggling to survive as an increasing number of their
potential customers abandon their services for the convenience and flexibility of privately owned
motorbikes and cars. In the last five years, the number of bemo ( public minivans) operated by the
public transportation companies has shrunken by nearly 60%, from 1,003 to 403.
Source: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/05/06/bali039s-public-transport-struggles-
survive.html




Issue date: 11 May 2009
The Issues with Bus Rapid Transit System in a Congested Indonesian Cities
The existence of Bus Rapid Transit or BRT in major cities in Indonesia, like Bogor, Semarang, Batam,
Yogyakarta, and Bandung has not been maximized. As a result, congestion continues to occur. The
development of BRT system in Jakarta, also known as Busway, is considered slow. Additional BRT buses
and corridors are not congruent with the increasing number of motor vehicles.
In Semarang, the BRT system, known as Trans Semarang, has been operating since May 2nd 2009, but
received protest from mini bus drivers because of the overlapping route. According to the Department
of Transportation, Elly Sinaga, the Regional Government commitment to build a BRT system is still not
certain. There are many issues that need to be discussed regarding the additional of buses and corridors
so that BRT can reach every corner of a city.
The implementation of BRT in Bogor is considered a success. BRT occupancy rate has reached 70% and
Corridor II of Trans Pakuan, from Rancamaya to Cidangjang, will soon be operating. However, the
existence of Trans Pakuan can not be proven to reduce congestion since Corridor I of Trans Pakuan is
not on the mini buses route.
BRT network system faces serious opposition from mini bus operators due to competition. But the
transformation of public transportation from “lease-based” system to “service-based” system must be
continuously supported.
Two cities are planning to launch Bus Rapid Transit system in the coming days. The city of Manado will
launch Trans Kawanua on May 11 in conjunction with the World Ocean Conference. While Trans Metro
Pekanbaru will be launched on June 23rd 2009. The effectiveness of the BRT system in Manado and
Pekanbaru remains to be seen.
Source: Kompas Newspaper, Department of Transportation and http://www.saturiau.com

Train as an Alternative Public Transportation
Population growth has pushed the development of suburban sprawl on the edges of the city zone. Many
residents who live in the suburban areas of Jakarta, namely Bogor, Bekasi,Tanggerang and Depok,
commute to the city center for work and leisure. Thus, increasing the ridership number of long-distance
transportation, namely trains. The Department of Transportation reported that train ridership in June
2009 for Jabodetabek (Jakarta, Bogor, Depok, Tanggerang, and Bekasi) increased by 12. 72%. The
National Center for Statistics recorded that train ridership reach up to 11.3 million people for the month
of March. Trains are also popular outside of the Jabodetabek area. Cumulatively, train ridership in
Indonesia for the period of January to March 2009 amount to 49 million people or an increase by 7.68 %
compared to last year for the same period (45.5 million people).
It is worth noting that Jakarta railway transports 500 thousand people per day while Busway only
transports 238 thousand people per day. With the increasing number of vehicles clogging the streets of
Jakarta, trains can provide an alternative mode of public transportation. A train with eight carriages can
transport as many as 1,500 people, equivalent to an armada of 20 buses. Furthermore, train is more
energy efficient. Train transportation need three liters of fuel per kilometer compared to a bus which
requires ten liters per kilometer.

In other related news, the City Administration had planned to build monorail but it was shortly
abandoned for Mass Rapid Transit (MRT) network, also known as subway. City Administration hoped to
sign basic engineering design contract in May. The MRT project is expected to be operational by the year
2016.
Despite being the fastest mode of land transportation, Indonesian trains are not safe and not reliable.
The outlook of railroad industry requires the government’s commitment to inject development funds
and also, most importantly, the commitment to do it in a timely and reliable manner.
Source: Andhika Suryadharma, Research Analyst for PT Bahana Securities, Department of
Transportation, The Jakarta Post and Republika Online Newspaper

Promoting Public transportation for Cleaner air, Fuel Savings and Economic growth
The Institute for Transportation and Development Policy reported that from January to March 2009, on
average 204,000 people per day ride the Trans Jakarta Bus. Cleaner air and fuel saving will be realized if
the number continue to increase.
Moreover, based on the results of a survey conducted by ITDP in the year 2008, Trans Jakarta users save
more than Rp. 62 billion of fuel cost and reduce 61 million kg of CO2. Non-Trans Jakarta users consume
as much as 57.730 liter per day and spend a total fuel cost of Rp. 259.784.624 per day. By riding Trans
Jakarta, users can save by as much as 19.927 liter with a total fuel cost saving of Rp. 52.309. 568.
Meanwhile, other pollutant substances that can be minimized are NOx, PM, CO, and HC.
In addition to improving air quality, mass transportation can also facilitate economic growth. Economic
growth relies on an improved transportation. In other words, the economy can grow if the flow of goods
to consumers runs smoothly. Residents can easily find food and access to shops because of an improved
public transportation.
However, many Trans Jakarta users complain of overcrowded buses, damaged shelters and long delays.
The Department of Transportation offer solution to the problems facing Bus Rapid Transit System in
Indonesia. The following are recommendations from the Department of Transportation;

       Reduce the distance between bus shelters by 400 m. Place bus shelters in crowded locations,
        like train stations, schools, bus terminals and others.

       Increase fare for more than 7 km trip

       Provide service information on every bus and shelter

       Avoid detour and bus route should not cover areas with low population density

       Reduce headway with a target of 5 minutes

       Evaluate ticketing system and access to shelter to avoid unpaid passengers and create passenger
        data.

Source: Kompas Newspaper, Department of Transportation (“Masa Transisi”)

Jakartans Enjoy Car Free Day despite Shortened Duration
Following the deadly accident, City Administration has decided to reduce the hours dedicated for Car
Free Day starting 26 April 2009. Five year old Hari Ardiansyah died after a speeding bus hit him while he
was crossing the road to chase his ball. The twice-a month event would now run from 6 AM to 12 PM
rather than from 6 AM to 2 PM.
The Environmental Agency will ask for more traffic police to be deployed to ensure the safety during the
event. Furthermore, the Agency will also place more lane dividers and road markers for operating public
buses.
Survey conducted by the Environmental Agency concludes that most Jakartans prefer shorter hours for
Car Free Day event. Many motorists complained that they had to look for alternative roads, as more
roads were closed for motorized vehicles during the event. This often led to gridlocks in other roads not
included in the event.
Despite the reduced hours, Jakarta residents remained enthusiastic to take part in Car Free Day.
Hundreds of residents enjoyed taking a stroll and participating in events, like futsal matches, bicycle
races, fun games and music performances.
Source: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/04/26/jakartans-enjoy-carfree-day-despite-
shortened-duration.html
Smoking Raid
The Provincial Government of Jakarta implemented a smoking raid in accordance with Bylaw No. 2/2005
concerning air pollution control and Governor Regulation No.75/2005 concerning non-smoking area.
The raid was implemented by the Environmental Agency in cooperation with the Regional Government
of Central Jakarta. 21 were caught smoking in non-smoking area and were given light sanction by
attending court trial and having to pay Rp. 24,000. The smokers that were caught ranges from mini bus
drivers to guest staying at a hotel.
The raid was implemented for the purpose of achieving a healthier city and giving disciplinary action to
smokers. Smokers caught smoking outside of the designated area will be sanctioned.
In other related news, The City of Palembang implemented a littering raid in accordance with Bylaw No.
12/2006. 12 people were caught throwing garbage and cigarette butt on the main road of Palembang.
Those who are caught will be fined up to Rp. 5 million and jailed for at least three months.
Source: Viva News and Tempo Interaktif

Paid Parking will be expanded to 109 locations in Jakarta
After a successful pilot test in four locations, the Provincial Government of Jakarta will expand paid
parking to 109 locations in Jakarta starting mid-May. The parking mechanism, with the promotion of
free one-time parking for 5 parking, is expected to increase regional financial earning and also promote
discipline to Jakarta residents.
The implementation of paid parking is only valid on “legal street” or streets under the supervision of
Parking Technical Service Unit of Provincial Jakarta. Official parking officers of Provincial Jakarta wear
uniform and an identity card or posses a letter from the Provincial Government.
Last February, the Provincial Government of Jakarta implemented paid parking in four locations covering
2 areas in Central Jakarta, 1 area in North Jakarta, and 1 area in South Jakarta; but the deputy Governor
of Jakarta does not know the exact 109 locations that the paid parking will be implemented in mid-May.
Source: http://www.beritajakarta.com

The high cost of CNG Autorickshaws
14 thousand out of 16 thousand two-stroke-wheelers or bajaj in Jakarta have not been converted to
compressed natural gas (CNG). Jakarta Provincial Government initiated a program to replace petrol fuel
bajajs with CNG bajajs to combat air pollution from vehicle emissions. Additionally, the old bajaj is not
suitable on the road as they often break down and emits noise pollution. The new bajaj, on the contrary,
is able to provide a sense of comfort for passengers because it doesn’t emit a loud mechanic noise thus
enabling some bajaj operators to provide music for passengers.
However, current supplier of CNG fleet is not able to produce CNG bajaj in greater amount. CNG bajajs
are much more expensive than regular petrol bajaj. At this moment, the Department of Transportation
is searching for new supplier of CNG bajajs.
Source: Kristianto Purnomo, Kompas Newspaper

Bandung Welcomes Car Free Day
The City Administration of Bandung will implement Car Free Day on May 30 th 2009 along Dago road.
Dago will be closed from 7 AM to 11 AM every Saturday for motorized vehicles. The road will exclusively
be used for pedestrian and environmental-related activities, such as tree planting.
The introduction of Car Free Day in Bandung coincides with Environment Day on June 5 th 2009.
Environmental campaign is taking place throughout the province of West Java, including Bandung.
Source: Pikiran Rakyat

				
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