Coastal Fisheries Resource Management and Issues in Sri Lanka - PowerPoint by svh16277

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									     Efforts being made by the Government
of Sri Lanka to promote responsible Small scale
       fisheries & the rights of small scale
               fishing communities




                            Shantha Bandara,
                            Senior Assistant Secretary (Dev)
                            MFAR
                            Sri Lanka.
    Marine
   Fisheries
    Sector
Length of the Coastal Belt 1,770 km
Territorial Sea      21,700 sq. km2
Contiguous Zone      22,600 km2
Continental shelf    27,800 km2
Exclusive Econ; Zone 517,000 km2
                                   AT A GLANCE


                              THE FISHERIES RESOURCES

•   Fresh Water Bodies                         - 255,000ha

•   Perennial Tank                             - 155,000ha

•   Seasonal Tanks                             - 100,000ha

•   Rivers                                     -103

•   Coastal Districts                          - 14

•   Marine Fishery Villages                    - 2637

•   Inland Fishery Villages                    - 1300

•   Total Fishers
    Marine/Inland/Lagoon fishing               - 200,000
    Trade/Services/Input Supply                - 600,000

•   Dependents on fishery industry             - 2,400,000
                     AT A GLANCE
       THE FISHERIES SECTOR FACILITIES
•   Major Fishery Harbours           - 14

•   Anchorages                       - 34

•   Fish Landing sites               - 650

•   Cold rooms                       - 60

•   Boatyards                        -29

•   Fishing Gear Factories           - 06

•   Fishery co-operative societies   -900

•   Fish Processing Factories        -22
         Fishery Resources
                Estimated
                                   Current
                Resource
                                   Production
                Potential (tons)

   Coastal         250,000          164,000

Offshore Deep
                   150,000          91,000
     Sea
  Inland &
                   100,000          30,000
 Aquaculture
           Trends in Coastal Fisheries
         1980      1985      1990      1995      2000      2001      2002      2003      2004      200     2006
                                                                                                   5


No of    23,742    24,818    25,311    25,630    26,165    25,577    26,521    28,164    28,986    35350   39000

boats


Fish     165,264   140,270   134,130   157,500   175,280   167,530   176,250   163,850   154,470   63690   121360

produc
tion
mt.
Catch    6.96      5.65      5.29      6.14      6.69      6.55      6.45      5.81      5.32      1.8     3.36

per
boat
(kg.
mt.)
        Types of fishing crafts




Non-motorized Traditional craft                        FRP with OBM




                                  3 1/2 ton boat




           Multy-day craft                         Motorized Traditional craft
  Key Management Institutions
• Ministry of Fisheries & Aquatic Resources (MFAR) -line
  Ministry
     Policy & project formulation
      Planning & monitoring
      Control of the Budget
• Provincial Ministries of Fisheries
    Fisheries within the territorial waters &inland areas
• Department of Fisheries & Aquatic Resources (DFAR)
     Management, Regulation, Conservation & development of
  fisheries & aquatic resources in Sri Lanka
 Key Management Institutions Cont.
• Cost Conservation Department
   – Conservation and management of coastal zone of Sri Lanka.


• National Aquatic Resources Research & Development Agency (NARA)

     Promote and conduct research activities directed towards      the
  identification, assessment management, conservation       and development
  of aquatic Resourced.


• National Aquaculture Development Authority (NAQDA)
      Development & management of aquaculture & Inland              fisheries
       Management Initiatives.
•   All countries have laws & Regulations to ensure
    the sustainable utilization of fish resources
    through two approaches.
        i. Limiting the number of boats, fishermen, fishing
           gear (nets, hooks etc.) in a fishery to ensure that
           the resource is not depleted through excessive
           fishing. (limiting the effort to avoid over
           exploitation)
        ii. Prohibiting the use of fishing gear & methods
           harmful to the resource and/or habitats
      Management measures under the
     Fisheries & Aquatic Resources Act-
                   1996
• Registration of fishing crafts.(s.15 &16)
  Regulations published in the gazette No.109 (03.10.1980),
  No.1055/13 (26.11.1998), and No. 948/24 ( 07.11.1996)
• Fishing Operation license (s. 6 -14) Regulation 948/25
    ( 07.11.1996)
• Prohibition of dynamite or poisonous fishing (s.- 27)
•   Prohibited fishing gears & fishing nets (s.-28-29)
•   Prohibition or Regulation of export & import of fish (s.30)
•   Declaration of closed or open seasons for fishing (s.34)
•   Declaration of fisheries reserves (s.36-37)
•   Aquaculture Management license (s.39-43)5
Important Regulations Framed under the Act

• Lobster fisheries Management Regulations -2000 Gazette No. 1123/2

  on 13.03.2003

• Purse-seine net Fishery Regulations Gazette No. 437/46 on

  19.01.1987,     No. 859/3 on 20.02.1995 (Amendment)

• Chank Fisheries Management & export Regulation 2001

• Beach Seine Regulation 1984

• Export & Import of Live Fish Regulation 1998 1036/13 on 16.07.1998
Community based fisheries management
through fisheries Committees( Fisheries and
Aquatic Resources Act . No 02. of 1996)
•Section 31
  –Declaration of management areas (inland
  Water body, lagoon & Sea area)
  • Section 32
  –Establishment of Fisheries Committees &
  Authorities
  –Committees can be transformed In to fisheries
  management authorities.
    Role of Fisheries Management
             Committees
•    Preparation & implementation of        management plan
      for the area.
           • Plan has to be approved by DG-DFAR.

Role of Fisheries management
authority
    It can make recommendations to the
ministry/ minister on,
•Fishing Gear to be used in the area
•Close Seasons
•Species to be taken
•Fishing time
       Gazetted Fishery
      Management Areas
Marine Areas               -02
Major Lagoons              -04
Inland Water bodies         -05
Proposed Inland Water Bodies -18
   Coastal Zone Management Plan –
   2004 (Gazzetted on 24th. 01.2006.)
    Special Area Management Sites
• SAM is a locally based geographically specific
  planning process.
• Highly participatory practice.
• Allows fro the comprehensive management of
  natural resources with the actual involvement of
  local community
  – Gazetted SAM Sites               – 05
  – Identified potential SAM sites   - 27
      Fisheries Cooperative Societies
•   FCS in Sri Lanka can be define as a collective organization which are working to find Solutions to
    socio economic and cultural issues of fishing community.
•   No. of FCS                                               982
•   Membership                                           161,000

•   Role of Cooperative in Fisheries management-

     – Many of FSC (Marine & Inland Sector) are active in
       Management of Fisheries conducted by their members.

     – Management initiatives,
           •   To avoid racecourses conflict.
           • Recommending of resource friendly fishing gear.
           • Community empowerment.
           • Restricting entry (inland Fisheries and Lagoon Fisheries).
           • Introduction of New Technology for their members.
           • Awareness on resource management.
                        Major Issues
•   Non availability and update fish resource data (The last fish resource survey
    were carries out over 25 years ago)

•   Fisheries management has been weak &           despite there being
    comprehensive laws and associated regulations management of coastal
    fisheries is yet weak.

•    Thus there is a urgent need for promote co – management; requires
    awareness building and Community empowerment and strengthening of
    community based organizations.
•   Lack of monitoring control and surveillance

•   Socio political pressures.

•   Lack of participation of other stakeholder groups.

•   Community responsibility towards sustainable resource management.

								
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