colorado corporation s by bestman

VIEWS: 47 PAGES: 6

									Rural Case Study 

  Colorado Rural Housing Development Corporation’s Farm 
                   Worker Community 




Outcome 

Nearly any self­respecting non­profit developer can go to USDA Rural Development and 
get funding to build some housing in a cornfield, but community development 
professionals know that it takes more than new housing to create a healthy and vibrant 
community. Colorado Rural Housing Development Corporation (CRHDC) went beyond 
mere housing production and has helped create a community in Center, Colorado. As its 
name implies, Tierra Nueva is truly about new ground. The community revolves around a 
community restaurant where farm workers and townspeople can break bread together, get 
to know each other, and break down cultural, social, and economic barriers. “I call it a 
community since it ended up being almost a community in itself,” said CRHDC 
Executive Director Al Gold. 

        Built in two phases, the first wave included a dorm for 216 single workers, both 
male and female, and included a full­service kitchen and a two­bedroom apartment to 
enable the resident managers to live on site.  The first phase was so successful that a 
second phase was quickly built, containing 25 single­family units and a Head Start 
classroom.  “There was so much demand for the dormitory space, and there was no room


                                                                                        1 
for families in the dormitory.  We worked with the State of Colorado who manages Head 
Start and convinced them to build a Migrant Head Start Center on­site, not only for 
children of migrant and seasonal workers but also the community at large. Our 
philosophy was to get people sitting side by side,” said Gold, “When that happens, good 
things follow.” 

Background 
Center is an agricultural town in the San Luis Valley. As large industrial farms have 
replaced numerous small family farms, Center lost its ability to sustain local businesses. 
Not only did that mean there were only a few places to get a bite to eat, but also no place 
for the community to get together informally to get to know each other. 
        “There was a also a huge pent­up demand for farm worker housing,” Gold 
explained.  “The San Luis Valley encompasses six counties, which are all primarily 
agricultural.  The total population of these six counties is only 40,000.  When we were in 
the planning stages, we looked at other communities where we might build the dormitory, 
and decided that Center (population 2,000) was the best location.  Not only was it 
centrally located, but the largest concentration of crops and workers were there.  We 
knew we could draw from the broader area.”  The San Luis Valley produces spinach, 
carrots, and broccoli, and is one of the biggest producers of potatoes in the country. 
These are all labor­intensive crops to grow and harvest.  “Once the potatoes are 
harvested, they store, process and ship them all over the country which provides some 
year­round employment,” Gold said. 
        CRHDC and its lending arm, Colorado Housing Enterprises LLC, have always 
made farm worker housing a top priority.  Faced with a severe shortage of housing for 
both migrant and season workers, CRHDC saw the opportunity to meet that need while 
improving the community in a dramatic fashion. 

Components 

1.  Good Food, Good Times 
        “The San Luis Valley Farm Worker Housing Corporation (SLVFWHC) board 
decided that they wanted to contract out the food service,” said Gold.  “We put it out to 
bid to restaurant owners, and a family surfaced who were interested in managing the 
restaurant.”  So CRHDC and SLVWHC designed and built a fully­equipped kitchen and 
dining space and leased it out to this small family business to provide food services not 
only for farm workers, but also for the community at large. 
     “They provide excellent authentic Mexican food, buffet style,” Gold said.  “There’s 
always quite an assortment of different foods, served in a really friendly atmosphere.” 
The restaurant is open five days a week, and expands to seven days a week during the 
peak growing season—May through November.  It features an early­bird (4:00 a.m.) 
breakfast to accommodate the farm workers who must often travel 20 miles or more to 
their worksites. The restaurant provides a discount to farm workers, and the diningroom 
is usually packed and loud.  “It’s all reasonably priced,” Gold said.  “The board has made 
some concessions to the restaurant managers in order to keep the food affordable, which 
was key.  The buffet is all­you­can­eat for $7.00 per person.  They bring you out hot




                                                                                          2 
tortillas, and there’s so much food, and such a great variety—it’s very enjoyable.  I must 
admit I’ve put on a few pounds there.” 


2.  Good Buildings 




        One of the keys to success was good design and landscaping.  The Center Project, 
designed by architect Ron Faliede, is nationally recognized.  It was the only farm worker 
project selected for display at the National Museum in Washington, D.C.  As you 
approach, the first thing you see is the one­story Community Center, which includes the 
restaurant and the manager’s apartment.  The winding roadway is concrete, not asphalt, 
and it all looks very well groomed and well­maintained.  The two­story dormitories are 
divided into three buildings, with 24 units per building, and three beds to a unit. The 
second phase more of a cottage townhouse style, and are very well conceived and 
executed. 

3. Work With the Schools 
        Farm worker housing is often met with active resistance by communities who 
may fear the sometimes rough­and­tumble farm workers and try to make the argument 
that the school system will be burdened by part­time students.  CRHDC and the 
SLVFWHC Board took the wind out of their sails by working with the local school 
systems, showing them that the project would actually benefit the district.  “The school 
boards have been really supportive,” Gold said.  “Since the school gets more funding if it


                                                                                          3 
has more students, even if they’re part­time, it’s actually brought more money into the 
community rather than being a drain.  They’ve been proactive in designing a curriculum 
that fits the migrants, especially in Center.” 




        Head Start completes the picture. CRHDC and the SLVFWHC Board took the 
Head Start program and pushed it the extra mile. The program starts at infancy, so both 
parents can work in the fields.  Soon after birth, babies are cared for in a well staffed, 
secure facility. 

4.  Line Up Community Support Beforehand 
        As someone who grew up in the San Luis Valley, Al Gold understands the 
challenges faced by both the farm worker families and community leaders. That 
understanding helped Gold to stretch the various program designs to meet Center’s needs. 
But successful development is never a one­man show.  CHRDC and the SLVFWHC, 
have strong and diversified boards that include representatives from the health and 
agricultural industries, as well as members of city council.  They worked hard during the 
predevelopment stage to line up community support, with a big payoff.  “Since Center is 
pretty much agricultural, there wasn’t a lot of resistance,” Gold said.  “The Mayor at that 
point was a grower himself and ran the potato warehouse. He was very supportive.” 
CRHDC’s solid reputation locally helped assuage any lingering NIMBY fears.  “We have 
very strict policies and procedures, and so far there’s been no trouble.  Naturally the 
growers were in strong support and contributed financially for some of the 
predevelopment costs. One of our biggest hurdles was finding land, so one of the growers 
agreed to sell us the eight acres,” said Gold. 
        They met some resistance from existing landlords who had dilapidated units that 
they offered to the migrants, but that proved a hard argument to make stick at a planning 
board meeting.  Since rural people generally recognize the need for decent, safe and


                                                                                              4 
affordable housing for farm workers, the project was generally embraced.  The bustling 
restaurant and waiting list for Head Start slots shows the community’s ongoing support 
for the project. 

Results 
        The project is beautiful; there’s a waiting list, and it cash flows—three sure signs 
of success.  But there’s far more to the Tierra Nueva story than simply housing and 
feeding farm workers.  “As a result of having housing available, some migrants are now 
staying year round and are becoming part of the community,” Gold said.  “The restaurant 
has had to expand to include another room which is helpful for people who want to have 
meetings and luncheons.  And you often see townspeople sitting elbow­to­elbow with 
farm workers, enjoying some of the best Mexican food North of the border.” 

Financing 
        The major lender for the project was the USDA Rural Development, under the 
514­516 farmworker labor housing program.  Other partners include the Federal Home 
Loan Bank of Topeka, the Colorado Housing and Finance Authority, the Mercy Housing 
Loan Fund and a $125,000 grant from Neighborhood Reinvestment which is structured as 
a loan to the project.   CRHDC was the technical assistance provider under a contract to 
provide assistance to local governments and was responsible for packaging, getting it 
funded, built, and leased.  “We created a separate organization—the SLV, with its own 
board of directors, to run the project,” Gold said.  “We continue to provide technical 
assistance to them.  It’s a strong board, which includes a local judge/attorney, the town 
manager, growers, representative from the district attorney’s office, and a banker. 
Because they were so successful with managing Tierra Nueva, we’ve used them as the 
sponsor for a new 36­unit family project currently under construction 30 miles east of 
Center in Alamosa.” 
        The growers not only helped with the land acquisition, they also paid for a third of 
the water share which is required in Colorado.  The town paid a third, and the project 
paid the final third.   “The town was really helpful,” Gold said.  “They provided most of 
the services, including bringing the gas and electric service to the site.” 

Lessons Learned 

1.  Don’t Isolate Your Project 
        “One of the most important points is making sure that you don’t isolate these 
projects,” Gold said.  “Bring them into the community ­ allow them to be part of the 
community.  The public is far more willing to accept that kind of approach.” Workers 
with limited resources, who often don’t have good transportation, won’t come into town 
to buy products and services if they’re located too far out of town.   Once you layer in 
services that actually draw townspeople to the project, such as an excellent restaurant or a 
full­service Head Start center,  you’ve created a valuable community asset that’s visible 
to everyone.




                                                                                            5 
2.  Provide Appropriate Amenities 
        It’s important to bring the right services to the right people.  “We provided a 
learning center and were able to get some computers on site, which is a nice feature,” 
Gold said.  “We have financial literacy classes for the workers, and the manager does an 
excellent job of bringing in services such as doctors and social workers to help the 
families.” There is also a laundry facility on site, and Tierra Nueva contracts out with a 
local laundry business to bring the machines to the project. 
        Anything you’d do differently next time? 
        “Since a lot of the farm workers like to cook in the rooms, the next time we’ll 
incorporate 3­4 rooms and have a central kitchen for them to do their own cooking,” Gold 
answered.  “We do provide microwaves and hotplates, so if they want to open up some 
food and cook it they can.  That’s 20­20 hind­sight, and one of the things you learn along 
the way.  At the time it met the RD requirements because we do have a restaurant on site. 
You live and learn.” 




For more information, contact: 

Al Gold, Executive Director                         David Dangler, Director 
Colorado Rural HDC                                  NeighborWorks® Rural Initiative 
3621 West 73rd Ave., Suite C                         855 Boylston Street, 6th Floor 
Westminster, CO  80030                              Boston, MA 02116 
(303) 428­1448 x 203                                (617) 585­5011 
agold@crhdc.org                                     ddangler@nw.org 




Text by Jack Jensen 
Jjensen2@twcny.rr.com 
Editing & lay­out by David Dangler 
Photos by CR HDC staff and David Dangler 
January 2005




                                                                                         6 

								
To top