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UNIVERSITY-OF-PISA

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UNIVERSITY-OF-PISA

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									                                                    UNIVERSITY OF PISA
                                                      http://www.unipi.it

                                Subject area: Philology, Foreign Languages and Modern Literatures
                                           Faculty of Foreign Languages and Literatures
                                                    http://lingue.humnet.unipi.it
                                                e-mail: pres.lingue@humnet.unipi.it


Subject Area Coordinator:
Prof. Guido Carpi
Dipartimento di Linguistica
via della Faggiola, 2
56126 Pisa
tel. +39-050-553089
fax +39-050-553089
E-mail: g.carpi@ling.unipi.it

Institutional Coordinator:
Professor Enrico Giaccherini
Rettorato
Lungarno Pacinotti, 43
56100 Pisa
tel. +39-50-2212227
fax +39-50-2212222

                                                            INDEX
1. GENERAL INTRODUCTION
1.1 The use of ECTS at the University of Pisa.


2. INFORMATION ON THE INSTITUTION
2.1 Name of Institution

2.2 Chancellor's Office and Administration Building
2.3 Institutional Coordinator
2.4 Subject Area Coordinator
2.5 International Relations Office

3. GENERAL DESCRIPTION
3.1 Type
3.2 Size
3.3 A short history of the University of Pisa
3.4 Characteristics of the Italian University System
3.4.1 Requirements and curricula
3.4.2 Classes of Study, Courses of Study, Faculties and Departments
3.5 The Faculty of Foreign Languages and Literatures: Location
3.6 Academic Calendar
3.7 Libraries, Laboratories and Research facilities
3.7.1 Centre for computer services (Humanities) – CISIAU
3.7.2 Italian Language courses for Foreign Students (CLI)
3.8 Accomodation – University canteens
3.9 Sports facilities

4. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS AND PROCEDURES FOR SOCRATES-ECTS STUDENTS
4.1.1 Before leaving your home country
4.1.2 On arrival
4.2 Registration, Orientation and "Student booklet"
4.2.1 Registration
4.2.2 Counselling and Orientation; the SOCRATES Board
4.2.3 Student booklet
4.3 Disabled students

5. INFORMATION ON THE SUBJECT AREA OF PHILOLOGY, MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES
AND ON THE FACULTY
5.1.1 The subject area
5.1.2 Curricula
5.1.3 Specialistic Degrees
5.1.4 Italian exams and Laurea, credits.
5.2 Courses and examinations
5.2.1 Description of courses
5.2.2 Teaching methods
5.2.3 Examinations: form of assessment
5.2.4 Examinations: grading system
5.3. Postgraduate Studies
5.3.1 Postgraduate Courses for foreign students

6. COURSES 2004-2005



1. GENERAL INTRODUCTION

1.1The wider use of ECTS at the University of Pisa
This information package describes the European Credit Transfer Scheme, the University of Pisa, and in particular it contains
descriptions of the courses offered in the Faculty of Foreign Languages and Literatures, within the Philology, Modern
Languages and Literatures Subject Area in order to help the prospective SOCRATES student to prepare his/her study period in
Pisa, promoting the transparency and efficacy of the adopted study plan in order to guarantee its integral recognition abroad.

What is ECTS?
ECTS (European Credit Transfer Scheme) is based upon the principle of mutual trust and confidence between participating
higher education institutions. The few rules of ECTS, concerning Information (on courses available), Agreement (between the
home and the host institutions) and the Use of Credit Points (to indicate student workload) are set to reinforce this mutual trust
and confidence. Each ECTS department describes the courses it offers not only in terms of content but also adding the
indication of credits to each course.

The ECTS credits
ECTS credits are a value allocated to course units to describe the students’ workload required to complete them. They reflect
the quantity of work each course requires in relation to the total quantity of work required to complete a full year of academic
study at the institution, that is lectures, practical work, seminars, private work – in the library or at home – and examinations or
other assessment activities. ECTS credits express a relative value, with respect to one year’s total workload.

60 credits represent the workload of a year of study; normally 30 credits are given for a semester. It is important that no special
courses be set up for SOCRATES students but that all courses be mainstream courses of the participating institutions, as
attended by home students under normal regulations.

Each Course of Study establishes the number of credits for each course, of which practical placements, seminars and training
periods form an integral part and also receive academic credit. Non-credit courses, such as the courses organised by CLI
(Centro Linguistico Interdipartimentale) may, however, be mentioned in the transcript of records.

Credits are awarded only when the courses have been completed and all the required examinations have been successfully
taken.

The students participating in ECTS will receive full credit for all academic work successfully carried out at any of the ECTS
partner institutions and they will be able to transfer these academic credits from one participating institution to another on the
basis of prior agreement between the institutions themselves.

Most students participating in ECTS will go to one single host institution in one single EU Member State, study there for a
limited period and then return to their home institution. Some may decide to pursue their course of study at the host institution
or to proceed to a third institution to continue their studies. In each of these three cases, students will be required to comply
with the legal and institutional requirements of the country and institution where they take their degree.
When the student has successfully completed the study program previously agreed between the home and the host institutions,
and returns to the home institution, credit transfer will then take place, and the student will continue the study course at his/her
home institution without any loss of time or credit. If, on the other hand, the student decides to stay at the host institution and
to take a degree there, he/she may have to adapt his/her study course due to the legal, institutional and departmental rules in the
host country, institution and department.
Students selected by each institution to participate in ECTS may only be awarded a student mobility grant if they fulfil the
general conditions of eligibility for the SOCRATES grant. These are:
         -           students must be citizens of one of the EU Member States or citizens of one of the EFTA countries (or
                     recognised by one of the Member states or one EFTA country as having an official status of refugee or
                     stateless person or permanent resident); in the case of EFTA nationals, students will be eligible provided
                     that they are moving within the framework of SOCRATES from the respective EFTA home country to a
                     EU Member State. EFTA nationals registered as students in other EFTA countries or in Community
                     Member states are only eligible for participation in ECTS if they have established a right of permanent
                     residence.
         -           Students shall not be required to pay tuition fees at the host institution; the student may, however, be
                     required to continue to pay his/her normal tuition fees to the home institution during the study period
                     abroad.
         -           The national grant/loan to which a student may be entitled to study at his/her institution may not be
                     discontinued, interrupted or reduced while that student is studying in another Member State and is
                     receiving a SOCRATES grant.
         -           The study period abroad can last from a minimum of 3 months to a maximum of a whole academic year (9
                     or 10 months).
         -           Students in the first year of their studies are not eligible for receiving SOCRATES grants.




2. INFORMATION ON THE INSTITUTION

2.1. Name of the Institution
Università di Pisa (University of Pisa).

2.2 Chancellor‟s Office and Administration Building
Rector: Prof. Marco Pasquali
Central Administration: Lungarno Pacinotti 43/44, 56100 Pisa, Tel. +39 50 2212111, Telex +39 50 500035, Fax +39 50 40834.

2.3 Offices of the ECTS Extension Project: Coordinator
ECTS Institutional Coordinator
Prof. Enrico Giaccherini
Rettorato
Lungarno Pacinotti 43, 56100 Pisa
Tel.: +39-50-2212227, Fax: +39-50-2212222
E-mail: borlando@adm.unipi.it
e.giaccherini@angl.unipi.it

Subject Area Coordinator (Faculty of Foreign Languages and Literatures]:
Prof. Guido Carpi
Dipartimento di Linguistica
via della Faggiola, 2
56126 Pisa
tel. +39-050-553089
fax +39-050-553089
E-mail: g.carpi@ling.unipi.it

2.4 International Relations Office (Sig.ra Bruna Orlando)
Lungarno Pacinotti 43, 56100 Pisa
Tel.: +39-50-2212227
Fax: =39-50-2212222
e-mail: borlando@adm.unipi.it
Office hours: Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 9 am-12 am
                           3. GENERAL DESCRIPTION

3.1Type
LSUD (Long studies, State University, courses of three or more years leading to a "Laurea" degree).

The University of Pisa is a research and teaching institution which includes:
11 Faculties: Agricultural Sciences; Economics; Engineering; Law; Humanities; Mathematics, Physical and Natural Sciences
(including Geology, Chemistry and Information Sciences), Medicine; Foreign Languages and Literatures; Pharmacy; Political
Science; Veterinary Medicine. These Faculties include several Courses of Study, each leading to a specific Laurea degree
within a given Faculty. The Departments are research and didactic structures which may group professors of the same Subject
Area or contiguous Subject Areas, even if they belong to different Faculties.

3.2 Size:
a)    University (updated 13.2.2003)
Teaching staff: 1902
 Administration staff: 1700
Students enrolled: 48.378
b)     The Philology, Modern Languages and Literatures Subject Area:
Teaching staff: 63
Research Fellows: 20 + 5 Assistant Lecturers
Students enrolled: 2.276 (for the updating of figures see http://www.unipi.it/statistiche)


3.3 History of the University of Pisa

From the year 1000, Pisa’s cultural vitality in the Middle Ages is attested by its relationships with the Islamic and Byzantine
worlds and by the emergence of personalities of the level of Buscheto, Burgundio and Leonardo Fibonacci. The University of
Pisa was officially founded in 1334 by a Papal edict, although there had been teachers in the city for a long time. Theology,
Civil and Canon Law and Medicine were the first faculties to be founded.

The life of the University has always been closely linked to that of the city. In the fifteenth century, for instance, when
Florence subjugated Pisa, the University underwent a period of decline. The advent of Lorenzo de' Medici witnessed a revival
of interest, but Pisa's subsequent rebellion in 1494, the war with Florence and the siege of 1509 stripped the University of all
its resources. Only under the Grand Duke Cosimo I did the University, restored and reorganised, finally attain its status as one
of the pre-eminent cultural and teaching centres in Europe, a position it held at least throughout the following century thanks to
such renowned figures as Galileo Galilei. During this period, the botanist Luca Ghini established what are now the world's
oldest botanical gardens (a distinction Pisa shares with Padua). These flourishing years were followed by a few decades of
relative quiescence until, in the second half of the eighteenth century, there was a revival of interest on the part of the new
Hapsburg-Lorraine Grand Dukes, who expanded the University's libraries and museums, created an Observatory, instituted
Chairs in Physics and Chemistry, and reestablished the previously suspended teaching of Surgery. The subsequent Napoleonic
period saw the addition of new Chairs, and the foundation of the Scuola Normale Superiore. The early 1800s also witnessed
the birth of the new Faculties of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine. In 1848, a battalion of University volunteers took part in
the battle of Curtatone. This episode of the Austro-Hungarian war lies at the origin of the traditional 'goliardi", or caps with the
peak cut off, worn by University students.
The University has continued to maintain a high reputation in the world of studies, and boasts two Nobel prize winners, Fermi
and Rubbia, among its former students. In the 1960s a new university institution, the Scuola Superiore di Studi "Sant'Anna",
was established, and during the same period the University strengthened its ties with the National Research Council (CNR),
whose Pisa branch is one of the most important on a national scale.
The years of student unrest, in the late sixties and early seventies, which so deeply affected the universities and societies of
many countries of the world, saw a clear confirmation of the vitality and the spirit of renewal of the University population of
Pisa.
Since 1984, Pisa has been running the only university-run Conference Hall in Italy. The students – a population of more than
forty thousand in a city of only one hundred thousand inhabitants -- are drawn to Pisa not only from the nearby Tuscan and
Ligurian coasts, but from many other areas as well, especially from southern Italy. The number of foreign students arriving
from other European, as well as from American, African and Asiatic countries, is steadily increasing.
Since Medieval times, when the bells in the tower near the Sapienza building rang out at the starting of classes in the early
morning, the academic world has been a vital part of city life.

3.4 Characteristics of the Italian University System
3.4.1 Requirements and curricula
In Italy, the secondary school diploma (the "maturità") is granted after 13 years of curricular study.

The three-year degree (Laurea Triennale)
Students can enrol in the University after they have obtained the “maturità”. The three-year degree is intended to provide a
suitable mastery of scientific tools and contents and, in many cases, the acquisition of specific professional skills. After this
first level degree, one can either find a job connected with one’s own specific qualification, or decide to go on studying to get
a Second Level Degree or a Master. After the first level degree it is also possible – for some subject areas – to get a “Diploma
of Specializzazione” (Specialization Diploma) whose length may vary from 2 to 4 years.
For the three-year degrees offered by the Faculty of Foreign Languages and Literatures or for joint degrees with other Faculties
see www.humnet.unipi.it/lingue



The Second Level Degree (Laurea Specialistica)
It lasts two years and is intended to provide an advanced education necessary to carry on highly qualified professions in
specific areas as well as high- responsibility carreers in different fields.
For second level degrees offered by the Faculty of Foreign Languages and Literatures or for joint degrees with other Faculties
see www.humnet.unipi.it

Single course Degree (Laurea Specialistica a ciclo unico)
For some scientific subjects it is not possible to get a degree after only three years of study; the only degree obtainable is after
five years and it corresponds to a second level degree.

Master
It is a further opportunity to improve one’s own academic education. It can be obtained either after a first level degree (first
level Master) or after a second level degree (second level Master). It usually lasts one year.

Research Doctorate (Dottorato di Ricerca)
After the Second Level Degree it is also possible to enter a “Research Doctorate”; access to the very limited number of posts is
by local competition, nationally advertised, for each Subject Area. Among the winners, at least 50% receive financial support
for the whole length of the course. If successful the candidate becomes a "Doctor of Research', a degree useful only for those
who desire to enter the academic career.
For Doctorate Courses offered with the contribution of the Faculty of Foreign Languages and Literatures see
www.humnet.unipi.it


3.4.2 Classes of Study, Courses of Study, Faculties and Departments
In the Italian University system, Faculties (Facoltà) provide teaching activities for different Classes of Study (Classi di Laurea)
which might comprise several Courses of Study (Corsi di Laurea): the latter are frameworks for both the teaching activity of
professors and the learning activity of students. Professors carry out their scientific research in the Departments (Dipartimenti),
which are also important centres for information on didactic activities.

Thus a University professor is a member of a Faculty (for example, that of "Foreign Languages and Literatures”), his/ her
course of lectures and seminars (for example "Lingua e Letteratura Francese") pertains to a Course of Study belonging to a
certain Class of Study offered by the Faculty or by more Faculties of the University. His /her scientific research is carried out
in a Department (for example, the 'Dipartmento di Lingue e Letterature Romanze").
On the other hand, when enrolling, the student chooses a Faculty and a Course of Study within it. For this course he must
possess some prerequisites which are verified after enrolment Ascertained gaps, expressed as “formative debts”, will have to
be bridged within the first year through specifically organized activities.

To be awarded a Laurea, the student has to successfully take a fixed number of examinations within the relevant Course of
Study (see 6); only after the examination at the end of each course of lectures is the student actually credited with the relative
number of credits and given a mark on a scale of 30.
The acquisition of all credits – 180 for a three-year degree or 300 (including the former 180) for a second level degree – leads
the student’s carreer to its conclusion.
The “formative credit” (CFU) measures the student’s actual amount of work in all the activities connected with the
preparation of an exam and corresponds to 25 hours work/student including:
     -      contact hours at the University (lectures, seminars, exercise courses);
     -       laboratory activities and other practical activities (training periods, stages) also carried out outside the University;
     -       individual study.
Credits can be transferred from one Course of Study to another within the same Subject Area; from one University to another
in Italy, and in a near future, in Europe as well.
At the end of his/her course of study the student submits a final work – which might be a short dissertation or a project or
whatever else – to a Faculty Board. Only for the Second Level Degree is the writing of a proper dissertation required.
The Laurea is an academic qualification recognized by the State, it has the same legal value all over the home territory, no
matter which University (Pisa, Milan, Rome, Naples ….) has awarded it. It is very important to enter jobs in both the public
and private sectors.

3.5 The Faculty of Foreign Languages and Literatures: location

The University is located in many separate buildings, some historic and some new, in and around the centre of Pisa.
Especially relevant to the Subject Area Students are the following:

1. Palazzo Boileau, via Santa Maria 85.
This is the seat of the Preside (Dean) of the Faculty of Foreign Languages and Literatures, and is the location of many
classrooms and of the following Departments and Institutes:

 - Department of Linguistics
          Institute of Linguistics: tel. +39 50 553104
          Institute of German Philology tel. +39 50 553020
          German Institute: tel. +39 50 553090
- Department of Romanistics
          Spanish Institute : tel +39 50 2215140
           Institute of Romance Linguistics: tel. +39 50 2215150
2. Palazzo Curini-Galletti, via Santa Maria 89.
- Department of Romanistics
          French Institute: tel +39 50 2215106
3 . Palazzo Scala, via S. Maria 67
- English Department:
           English Institutes (Modern Languages and Letters and Philosophy): tel +39 50 8006701-702
4. Palazzina Feroci, via della Faggiola 2
- Department of Linguistics
          Applied Linguistics: tel. +39 50 554746
          Russian Institute: tel. +39 50 553089
- Department of Human and Environmental Sciences
         Institute of Geography: tel. +39 50 560064
- Department of Classical Philology
          Latin Institute: tel +39 50 560060
- Department of Romanistics
          Rumenian: tel +39 50 564800

5.Ex Salesiani, via Santa Maria 44:
- Department of Italian Studies
        Italian Institute: tel. +39 50 553088

6. Via Paoli 11:
- Department of Philosophy, tel. +39 50 911471

7. Piazza San Matteo 2:
- Department of Art History: tel. +39 50 578741

8. Via Santa Maria 42
C.L.I (Centro Linguistico Interdipartimentale)

Central office tel: +39 50 23000
Laboratories: Via Santa Maria 89, III floor.

All these buildings are in the heart of the town, at easy walking distance from each other and from the main libraries.

3.6 Academic Calendar
The Academic Year officially begins on November 1st and ends on October 31st. Lectures, spread over two semesters, start in
the first week of October and end around December 15; they start back in the last week of February till the end of May.
Christmas vacations usually last from December 22 to January 7. Easter vacations last about one week.
Examinations take place in three sessions, beginning after the end of courses in June-July (Summer session) continuing
through September-October (Autumn session) to the following January-February (Spring session).

3.7 Libraries, Laboratories and Research Facilities
There are many libraries and research facilities in Pisa. Of specific interest for the Philology, Foreign Languages and
Literatures Subject Area are the following:
Departmental Libraries. Each Department has its own Departmental Library. Furthermore, students may take advantage of a
number of other important libraries and archives:
University Library. (600.000 works.). Opening hours: Monday-Friday: 8:30 a.m. to 7:15 p.m.; Saturday: 8:30 a.m. to 1:30
p.m. Closed: first or last 2 weeks of August . Address: via Curtatone e Montanara, 15. Tel. 050-913411 Fax. 050.42064.
Scuola Normale Superiore. (350.000 works, specialized in Ancient and Modern Literature, Arts, History, Mathematics,
Philosophy, Physics). Open only to Professors and students of the SNS itself and to the Faculties of Letters and Philosophy,
and Mathematics, Physics and Natural Sciences. Opening hours: Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-7.30 p.m., Saturday: 9 a.m.-1.45 p.m;
possible changes in the timetable during summer, Christmas and Easter time. Address: Piazza dei Cavalieri 7 Tel.: 050.509205
Fax. 050-509102.
Library of the Domus Mazziniana (10.000 works. specialized in Contemporary History and Risorgimento History). Opening
hours: 8 a.m. - 2 p.m., Saturday: 8 a.m. - 12 noon. Address: via Mazzini, 71. Tel/Fax: 050.24174.
Other important libraries and archives are to be found in Florence, Lucca and Livorno, within one hour's travel by train or bus.
Language labs are located in Via S. Maria, 89 and in the CLI -Interdepartmental Language Centre - Via S. Maria 42.

3.7.1 Centre for computer services (Humanities) – CISIAU
Students of the Faculty of Letters and Philosophy and of Foreign Languages can benefit from the services offered by the
Centro Interdipartimentale di Servizi Informatici per l’Area Umanistica (CISIAU), Via del Collegio Ricci, 10 – 56126 Pisa;
fax: +39 50 2215030; tel: +39 50 2215019 (from Mon to Fri, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.)
Students can presently use the computers on appointment, every morning, from 9.30 to 12.30 and on Mondays and
Wednesdays also from 2 p.m. to 4.30 p.m., in the Aula Informatica on the I floor Palazzo Ricci.
The computer centre also provides students who need it with an email account for the whole period of their stay in Pisa.

3.7.2 Italian language courses for foreign students
Italian as a foreign language is taught at Centro Linguistico Interdipartimentale, via S. Maria 42. Courses (beginners or other
levels) designed for Socrates, Lingua, Tempus students are free. Courses usually start in October and March.
Applications must be addressed to Centro Linguistico Interdipartimentale. Students should inform their Subject Area
Coordinator of their intention to attend an Italian course.

3.8 Accommodation and university canteens
Rents for rooms vary from 200 to 300 euro per person a month. Students usually rent either a room or a flat to share with other
students. Students are warmly recommended to see to their own accommodation.
They can contact Sportello Informagiovani, Via Silvio Pellico 6 - 56100 Pisa. Tel.: 050-23601; email:
informagiovani@comune.pisa.it (opening hours: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9 am- 1 pm.; Tuesday and Thursday 3 pm-5.30
pm) for help.
Useful information about accomodation and cultural activities is also available on the University website, link to Erasmus
Student Network, Pisa. http://www.unipi.it/esn

There are two University Refectories: one in via Martiri (tel. 050-567397), open Mon to Fri: 11.45-14.45, 19.00-21.30, Sat-Sun:
12-14.30; one in via Betti open Mon to Fri: 11.45-14.30, 19-21.30, Sat-Sun: 19-21.30.


3.9 Sports facilities
Students who are interested in sports can contact the Centro Universitario Sportivo, Via Napoli 46, tel. 050 564065.


4. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS AND PROCEDURES FOR SOCRATES STUDENTS

4.1.1 Before leaving your home country
Students must contact both the Subject Area Coordinator and the International Relations Office (see above 2.4 and 2.5) and
inform them of their arrival date, the period of time they intend to spend in Pisa, whether they wish to attend an Italian
language course (see above 3.8). Students with special needs should contact their Subject Coordinator.
Under no circumstances should students forget to bring with them the following documents:
         their passport or identity card;
         two passport-size photos;
         an El28 Form or equivalent for health service; or copy of a private insurance policy.
            a statement by their home institution certifying their SOCRATES student status;
            for citizens of non EC countries a statement from the nearest Italian Consulate in the Home Country
             certifying their SOCRATES student status.

4.1.2 On arrival
Students are requested to:
         contact the Subject Area Coordinator who will receive statement A and two passport size photos. Students
             will be given also further instructions on enrolment and on filling out a Registration Application Form necessary
             to get their "student's booklet" from their Faculty Central Off ices;
         in case the student is a citizen of a non EC Country, he/she is requested to contact the Subject Area Coordinator
             who will provide a certificate to be presented (together with four passport-size photos and xerox copy of all the
             written pages of the student's Passport or Identity card) to the local Police Headquarters (Questura di Pisa, via
             M. Lalli, tel. 050 583511) in order to obtain a "Temporary Residence Permit";
         take their E 128 Form to the A.S.L. (Azienda Sanitaria Locale: local branch of the National Health Service,Via
             Zamenhof ), where a certificate entitling to medical treatment will be issued (of course, students may also take out
             a private insurance policy or be enrolled in the National Institute of Social Insurance - I.N.P.S. - by paying a
             certain sum of money);

4.2 Registration, Orientation and “Student Booklet”

4.2.1 Registration

SOCRATES students are exempted from the usual tuition and enrolment fees and do not register for a whole Course of Study,
but rather for individual courses of lectures for a total of 60 credits if they are staying for a whole academic year, 30 credits if
they will attend lectures only for a semester. When applying for Registration (see above 4.1.2) they must fill in the Application
Form with the Courses of lectures they wish to attend and the related examinations they mean to take (the Courses of lectures
are listed below, see 6). Hence it is advisable that they consult the Pisa Subject Area Coordinator before presenting their
Application - should any course not be available as foreseen (in case of sabbatical leave for example).
Moreover, students should be aware that when in Pisa they may be attracted by courses different from those originally chosen.
Hence it is expedient for them to fill in the Registration Application Form listing a greater number of examinations than they
actually plan to take, in order to have a greater range of possible choices. Students will naturally discuss their needs and
preferences with their Departmental Coordinator and their Tutor(s) at their home Institution before leaving their country. The
final choice of courses to be attended and examinations to be taken must be approved by the Coordinators of both the home
and the host Institutions in order to finalise the Learning Agreement.

4.2.2 Counselling and orientation: the Socrates Board
All members of the Socrates Board [Prof. Carla Dente - English, Prof. Roberta Ferrari - English, Dr Elena Rossi - Latin] are
available during their office hours and by appointment to meet incoming students for information and advise. Also an Italian
student, appointed to this task, will meet foreign students in the Aula Studenti , Via S. Maria 87.
The Subject Area Coordinator is Prof. Guido Carpi, Professor of Russian, whose office is in Via della Faggiola 2, I floor, tel.
050.553089, fax 050.553089, e- mail g.carpi@ling.unipi.it
Other members of the Socrates Board are Prof. Carla Dente, Department of English, I floor, room 10, e-mail:
dente@angl.unipi.it, tel.: +39 050 8006735; and Dr.Elena Rossi, Department of Classical Philology - via della Faggiola 2, tel.
050-560060 fax 050-20054, email e.rossi@flcl.unipi.it
The Faculty of Foreign Languages and Literatures also organises an Orientation Course for foreign Students at the beginning
of October, each academic year. This short course is intended to provide information about specific contents of individual
courses and help students to settle in. In collaboration with Italian students, the guests will be shown around town to visit
places relevant for their activities in Pisa. Attendance is recommended.

4.2.3 The „Student Booklet‟
A “Student Booklet" ("Libretto") will be issued to SOCRATES students by the Secretary of the Faculty of Modern Languages,
Via Buonarroti, upon presentation of their Registration Application Form. Courses of lectures attended and examinations taken
are recorded in the 'Booklet'.
Before leaving Pisa, students must report to the Subject Area Coordinator and subsequently return the "Booklet" to the Faculty
Secretary, so that the official Transcript of Records can be made.
The “Booklet” is also the student’s pass to Libraries (see 3.7) and to the University Refectory (see 3.9). A temporary pass may
be given to the student while the Booklet is being prepared.

4.3 Disabled students
For some years, Pisa University has been involved in a project of removal of all kind of obstacles which may affect disabled
students, trying to better their conditions and to give them the opportunity of taking active part in university life.
 In 2000, USID (Office for the support and integration of disabled students) was created: it coordinates all the services offered
by Pisa University to disabled students:
                   • planning of rooms and timetables;
                   • didactic tutoring (help in taking notes during lectures, in finding teaching material, help in actual
                   studying );
                     • transport from and to some key points in town (railway station, bus stops etc..);
                  • special means of transport;
                    • counselling/evaluation of technological support available on the market.
USID is located in Via Fermi 8 - 56126 Pisa.
Contacts:
Nicola Gini e Federica Gorrasi
e-mail: usid@adm.unipi.it
tel.: +39 0502212006 / 0502212007 - fax: +39 050 2212001
Opening hours:
Mon, Tue, Thur, Fri 8:30 - 13
Thur 15:30 - 17:30
Any other time may be fixed by appointment.



5. HUMANITIES: THE PHILOLOGY, FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND MODERN LITERATURES SUBJECT AREA

At Pisa University the Philology, Foreign Languages and Modern Literatures Subject Area coincides with both the Faculty of
Letters and Philosophy, and the Faculty of Foreign Languages and Literatures.
At the moment, the Faculty of Foreign Languages and Literatures offers three Courses of Study referring to different Classes
of Study: one within Class XI named “Modern languages and cultures”, one within Class V, named “Literary disciplines”; one
within Class XIV named “Communication Sciences”.
Classes of Study may be divided into different Courses of Study which represent the teaching organizational structure (see
3.4.2). Departments are first and foremost to be considered as research structures.
Most of the Professors teaching in the Faculty belong to the Departments listed above (see 3.5). Lectures are usually held and
seminars usually take place in classrooms in Palazzo Boileau, Palazzo Curini-Galletti and in rooms in the departments.
The basic purpose of the faculty is to educate high school teachers of foreign languages, cultures and literatures, specialised
professional workers in foreign languages., as well as specialists in the various research areas at University level. "Laureati"
are admitted to competitions for employment in schools, in local and national government agencies, as journalists, in any
branch of the tourist management system.
Professors cultivate many different areas of research. Their research interests are mirrored in their lectures. Distinctions regard
the object of their research and the methodologies utilised. In this package the courses of lectures available are described; a
booklet is issued at the beginning of every new academic year with details on the specific topics of courses.
Naturally not all courses fall rigidly into one of these sub-sectors, and students are advised to read through the entire package
in order to become familiar with all the courses available.
Some courses of lectures related to the Subject Area are taught in other faculties, such as Letters and Philosophy, Political
Science, Economics. These courses are described in the related packages.

5.1.2 Curricula
Within Class of Study XI, “Modern languages and cultures”, a Course of Study is offered in Foreign Languages and
Literatures, divided into three different curricula:
     1. European         languages and literary cultures addressed to those who intend to specialize in literary and
         philological studies;
     2. Linguistics, European and non-European languages designed for students with specific interests in linguistics and
         foreign language teaching;
     3. European languages and history of visual and performing arts for those students whose cultural interests are
         principally related to artistic disciplines and the performing arts.

Within Class of Study V, “Literary Disciplines”, a Course of Study is offered in European literatures for publishing and for
cultural production, run together with the Faculty of Letters and Philosophy.

Within Class XIV, “Communication Sciences”, a Course of Study is offered in Public, Social and Business Communication.

THE COURSE OF STUDY IN FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

The graduate of this Course of Study will possess, besides a good grounding in theoretical linguistics and Italian language and
literature, a full mastery of two foreign languages and an adequate knowledge of the cultural inheritance of the civilizations of
which these languages are expression, as well as a grounding in the computer and information skills essential to any future
jobs.
These competences will allow the graduate to:
        - teach the foreign languages in private institutions and, after fulfilling the relative due obligations, in Italian
        schools;
         - perform tasks of international communication in industrial and trade firms and companies;
         - work for public and private institutions within the field of cultural services and of publishing and press activities;
          - work as cultural operator for different Italian institutions abroad (Embassies, Consulates, Cultural Institutions);
           - pursue one’s academic studies enrolling in a Second level Degree in Linguistic, Literary-Philological or
        Historical-Artistic subjects or progress in one’s own professional career.


    1.   EUROPEAN LANGUAGES AND LITERARY CULTURES

The curriculum is addressed to the acquisition of cultural and professional qualifications aimed at careers in the fields of
cultural services, of journalism and publishing, as well as in the field of literary translation.


Study plan suggested by the Faculty:

Courses                                                                          Credits
First Year
1. Italian Literature or Contemporary Italian Literature                         8
2. Glottology and Linguistics and Foreign Language Teaching                      8
3. Language and Translation A                                                   10
4. Literature A                                                                 10
5. Language and Translation B                                                   10
6. Contemporary History or Modern History                                       6
7. Literary Criticism and Comparative Literatures                               8
Total                                                                           60




Second Year
1. Language and Translation A                                                   6
2. Literature A                                                                 10
3. Language and Translation B                                                   6
4. Literature B                                                                 10
5. Latin Language and Literature or Greek Language and Literature or
Classical Philology                                                             6
6. Theoretical philosophy, or Moral Philosophy or Logic and Philosophy of
Science, or History of Philosophy or Philosophy and Theory of Languages         6
7. Performing arts disciplines                                                  6
8. Computer skills                                                              4
9. Scientific writing laboratory                                                6
Total                                                                           60




Third Year
1. Language and Translation A                                                   6
2. Language and Translation B                                                   6
3. Literature B                                                                 10
4. Romance Philology and Linguistics or Germanic Philology or Slavonic
Philology                                                                       8
5. Language and Translation C                                                   4
6. Free subjects                                                                10
7. Training                                                                     6
8. Final test                                                                   10
Total                                                                           60
Grand Total                                                                     180



    2.   LINGUISTICS, EUROPEAN AND NON-EUROPEAN LANGUAGES

The curriculum is addressed to the acquisition of cultural and professional qualifications in the fields of cultural services, of
journalism and of multi-media information, in activities connected with the education of professional figures possessing
specific linguistic and textual competences and in projects aiming at the development and diffusion of foreign language
knowledge.

Study plan suggested by the Faculty:

Courses                                                                                  Credits
First Year
1 . Italian Literature or Contemporary Italian Literature                                6
2. Glottology and Linguistics and Foreign Language Teaching                              12
3. Language and Translation A                                                                  12
4. Language and Translation B                                                                 12
5. Contemporary History or Modern History                                                 6
6. Geography or Economic and Political Geography                                               6
7. Computer skills                                                                            6
Total                                                                                    60



Second Year
1. Language and Translation A                                                                       10
2. Literature A                                                                                      8
3. Language and Translation B                                                                       10
4. Literature B                                                                                      8
5. Glottology and Linguistics                                                                       12
6. Theoretical philosophy, or Moral Philosophy or Logic and
Philosophy of Science, or History of Philosophy or Philosophy and
Theory of Languages                                                                                 6
7. History of Modern Art or History of Medieval Art or Methodology
of Art Criticism                                                                                     6
Total                                                                                               60




Third Year
1. Language and Translation A                                                                       10
2. Language and Translation B                                                                       10
3. Glottology and Linguistics                                                                       12
4. Romance Philology and Linguistics or Germanic Philology or
Slavonic Philology                                                                                   4
5. Language and Translation C                                                                        4
6. Free subjects                                                                                    10
7. Final test                                                                                       10
Total                                                                                           60
Grand Total                                                                                       180




    3.   EUROPEAN LANGUAGES AND HISTORY OF VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS
The curriculum is addressed to the acquisition of cultural and professional qualifications in the field of cultural services, in
trade business, as well as in all the activities connected with tourism and the valorization of the cultural heritage requiring
mastery of foreign languages and competences in the historical and artistic field.

Study plan suggested by the Faculty:

Courses                                                                                          Credits
First Year
1. Italian Literature or Contemporary Italian Literature *                                           10
2. Language and Translation A                                                                        10
3. Language and Translation B                                                                        10
4. Literature A                                                                                      10
5. Contemporary History or Modern History                                                             6
6. Geography or Economic and Political Geography                                                      6
7. Methodology of Art Criticism                                                                      10
Total                                                                                                62
*Students of this curriculum who decide to take the Contemporary
Italian Literature examination must also take (in place of the
corresponding parts of the Contemporary Italian Literature
programme) an examination assessing either the general or the
seminar section of the Italian Literature course.




Second Year
1. Language and Translation A                                                                            8
2 Language and Translation B                                                                         8
3. Glottology and Linguistics and Foreign Language Teaching                                                  8
4. Literature B                                                                                   10
5. History of Modern Art or History of Medieval Art                                               10
6. Classical Archeaology, or Etruscology and Italic Antiquities, or
History of Modern Art, or History of Contemporary Art, or History of
Architecture, or Museology and Artistic and Restoration Criticism, or
Musicology and History of Music, or Performing Arts Disciplines, or
Cinema, Photography and Television                                                                  6
7. Aesthetics                                                                                      6
8. Computer skills                                                                                 4
Totale                                                                                           60




Third Year
1. Language and translation A                                                                    4
2. Language and translation B                                                                    4
5. Language and translation C                                                                    6
4. Romance Philology and Linguistics or Germanic Philology or
Slavonic Philology                                                                               6
5. Two disciplines to be chosen among those listed at point 6 of
second year (different from the one already chosen)                                              12
6. Free subjects                                                                                 10
7. Training                                                                                      6
8. Final test                                                                                    10
Total                                                                                            58

Grand Total                                                                                      180
LANGUAGES WHICH CAN BE STUDIED AT THE FACULTY OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES


The languages (and relative literatures) which are the object of specialisation and which the student can choose as Language A
or B, are English, French, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Rumenian, Russian. Arabic is also available for the Linguistics and
European and non-European Languages curriculum.
One might also study Bulgarian, Czech, Danish, Japanese and Polish as Language C, besides all the above quoted languages, if
not chosen as Language A and B.
Thanks to the expected updating of the new Courses of Study, further options might be available in the future, both within
Nordic and Eastern European Languages, and within non-European Languages.


OPTIONAL SUBJECTS

The new order of academic studies includes the possibility of integrating the disciplines of each specific curriculum with
others chosen by the student and amounting to a total of 10 credits. Besides those listed in the table of each curriculum,
the Faculty presently offers the following courses:


Aesthetics
Anglo-american Languages and Literatures
Applied Linguistics
Arabic language and literature
Archaeology and History of Late-Ancient Art
Archaeology and History of Roman Art
Bibliography and Library Science
Bulgarian language and literature
Celtic philology
Cinema History and Criticism
Comparative literatures
Contemporary English Literature
Contemporary French Literature
Contemporary History
Contemporary Italian literature
Contemporary Spanish Literature
Critical writing laboratory
Czech language and literature
Dramaturgy
Economic geography
English language
English literature
Epistemology of Human Sciences
Etruscology
Foreign language teaching
French language
French literature
Gallo-Romance Philology
General Linguistics
General Pedagogy
Geography
Geography of a European or extra-European Area
German language
German literature
Germanic philology
Glottology
Hermeneutics and rhetoric
Hispanic philology
History of architecture
History of Classical Culture and Tradition
History of Contemporary Art
History of Criticism and Literary Historiography
History of Eastern Europe
History of English Culture
History of English theatre
History of Medieval Art
History of Modern and Contemporary Music
History of Modern Art
History of North America
History of Philosophy
History of Russian Culture
History of Spanish Culture
History of Spanish language
History of theatre and the performing arts
Iconography and Iconology
Istitutes of Italian Literature
Italian Dramatic Literature
Italian Literature
Language philosophy
Latin literature
Literature of English-speaking countries
Medieval English Literature
Methodology of Art Criticism
Modern History
Moral philosophy
Musical dramaturgy
Phonetics and phonology
Polish language and literature
Portuguese language
Portuguese literature
Romance Linguistics
Romance philology
Rumanian language
Rumanian language and literature
Russian language
Russian literature
Semiotics
Semitic philology
Slavonic philology
Spanish language
Spanish language teaching
Spanish literature
Theoretic philosophy
Theory of Literature

THE COURSE OF STUDY IN EUROPEAN LITERATURES FOR PUBLISHING AND CULTURAL PRODUCTION


Run together by the Faculty of Foreign Languages and Literatures and the Faculty of Letters and Philosophy, it is intended to
form graduates whose mastery of foreign languages, literary competence and groundings in computer skills, law, sociology and
economics will allow them to enter the world of publishing and advertising, or work for public and private Institutions with
specific cultural functions.
They will be also qualified to teach in Italian schools, after fulfulling further formative obligations.
Although the workload concerning linguistic studies is slightly reduced in comparison with the Course of Study in Foreign
Languages and Literatures, the graduate of the Course of Study in European Literatures for Publishing and Cultural
Production will nevertheless possess a full mastery of a foreign language and a good knowledge of a second one, and will
have a solid methodological and historical grounding in literary studies as well as a thorough knowledge of the European
literary civilization and of the interrelations between national literatures. This will qualify him/her to work in the field of
cultural production with specific competence in the management of the relationships between different cultural and linguistic
worlds.

For detailed information on course programmes see http://lingue.humnet.unipi.it
THE COURSE OF STUDY IN PUBLIC, SOCIAL AND BUSINESS COMMUNICATION

The Course of study in Public, Social and Business Communication aims at forming graduates who will possess a sound basic
knowledge in the fields of communication sciences, of modern languages, of linguistics, philosophy, ethics, history, sociology,
law, economics, political sciences, information and communication sciences and technologies. In order to face the rapid
technological and market transformations, the graduate in Public, Social and Business Communication will have to acquire a
firm methodological basis in the above quoted fields, in order to be able to keep him/herself up to date in both the
technological and the humanistic field. The graduate will also master Italian and English, both in the oral and the written
forms, and will acquire a specific competence in writing and in professional communication in these two languages. A sound
knowledge of a third language is also required. Of extreme importance within this Course of Study is the professional
experience acquired through the relationship with public and private institutions and subjects.
The course of study is divided into three different curricula:
     Public communication
     Business communication
     Social communication

For detailed information on course programmes see http://comunicazione.humnet.unipi.it

Each individual study plan has to be officially approved by the Faculty Council (Consiglio di Facoltà) and, once approved, it is
binding for the student for the current academic year. The same is true for the Learning Agreement of the Socrates student.
Foreign students are allowed to attend lectures and take examinations in any Course, no matter what Class of Study or level it
is designed for; they can do this both as SOCRATES, TEMPUS, ALFA students and as students enrolled in singular courses.


5.1.3 Specialistic Degrees

    A. SPECIALISTIC DEGREE IN MODERN EURO-AMERICAN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES
    Class: Modern Euro-American Languages and Literatures
    Objectives:
    The graduate of this Course of Study will possess an advanced knowledge of European cultural and literary history,
    together with a full mastery of at least two foreign languages.
    He/she will also acquire an extensive knowledge of two European literary cultures or, alternately, of one of these together
    with a good knowledge of non-European literatures within homogeneous linguistic areas. He/she will also possess a good
    grounding in the computer and information skills within the specific competence area.
    These competences will allow the graduate to:
              hold highly responsible positions in international cultural cooperation institutions and in various Italian
                  institutions abroad (Embassies, Consulates, Cultural Institutions);
              work as an expert for international organizations;
              hold highly qualified jobs in the publishing industry or in institutions for cultural promotion;
              pursue one’s academic studies enrolling in a PhD Course in Linguistic, Literary-Philological or
                  Historical-Artistic subjects;
              teach foreign languages in private institutions and, after fulfilling due obligations, in Italian schools.
    Requisites for admission:
    Admission to the Specialistic Degree in Modern Euro-American Languages and Literatures is granted to all graduates
    who possess a three-year degree with at least 150 credits recognised as valid for this Specialistic Degree. The 180 credits
    corresponding to the Degree in Foreign Languages and Literatures, Class XI, Curriculum “European languages and
    literary cultures” are totally recognised. Also graduates in other degrees might have access, provided their formative debt
    does not exceed the established limit.
    Credits are acquired after passing the final exam or, when no final exam is required, after positive assessment of seminar
    and laboratory work.
    Structure
    The course is intended to allow students to broaden their knowledge of two European foreign languages. As for their
    competence in the literary field, the Course offers the opportunity to acquire a deeper knowledge of the European literary
    civilizations connected to the studied languages, or to specialize in the study of one specific European literary
    civilization, or even in non-European literary cultures which have developed within the horizon of the studied European
    languages.
    To do this, the student will be allowed to choose one of the following solutions:
    a. to attend two courses within the national literary field of each of the chosen foreign languages;
    b. to attend four courses within the literary field of one of the two chosen foreign languages;
     c.   to attend two courses within the national literary field of one of the two studied foreign languages and two
          concerning the literatures (colonial and postcolonial) developed within the horizon of the other studied foreign
          language;
     d. to attend two courses concerning the literatures (colonial and postcolonial) developed within the horizon of each of
          the studied foreign languages.
     Activities and evaluation
     For courses mainly consisting of lectures and with final assessment, the student’s individual study corresponds to 75% of
     the whole workload. For seminars, individual study amounts to 80%.
     Final assessment might be in the form of either an oral or a written exam, which is specified for each single course in the
     general didactic plan for the academic year.
     For seminars, the final evaluation takes into account the student’s work and participation during contact hours, usually
     leading to a final paper (either written or oral according to the different courses).
     Final test
     The final test consists in writing and discussing a dissertation (at least 30.000 words) on a literary-philological or
     linguistic topic. The final grading system is based on 110 possible points. The best students might graduate with honours.



    B. SPECIALISTIC DEGREE IN LITERARY TRANSLATION AND ESSAY TRANSLATION (HUMAN
        SCIENCES)
    Class: Literary Translation and technical-scientific translation (104/S)
    Curricula: 1. Literary Translation
                  2. Essay Translation (Human Sciences)
    Objectives
    The graduate of this Specialistic Degree will possess:
         a thorough knowledge of the Italian language;
         full mastery of two foreign languages and of their typological specificities acquired through a close comparison
             with the source language;
         a high competence in the field of translation, with experience of the publishing world and of its techniques, as well
             as of information and telematic technologies to be applied to literary and essay translation;
         knowledge of the techniques of documentation, writing, editing and revision of texts.
     Specifically for the Literary Translation Curriculum, the graduate will possess:
          a broad humanistic knowledge, together with specific competence in the written translation of literary texts and
              skills in the rendering of their aesthetic and historical values;
          knowledge of the deep mechanisms of linguistic comparison in relation both to the genre and the stylistic qualities
              of the text.
     As for the Essay Translation Curriculum, the graduate will possess:
          an adequate knowledge of the contents of the specific field he/she has chosen;
          a deep knowledge of its specific language, particularly its vocabulary and its preferential structures;
          knowledge of the differences of the textual reference type, in relation to the communicative medium, the
              objectives and the target, as well as to the characteristics of register and style.

     This competence will allow him/her to:
           perform activities of translation, editing and revision of texts at publishing houses or public and private
                institutions, in the field of specialization and related fields;
           work in advertising and multimedia with specific reference to the translation competence;
           work for European and International institutions as experts in translation and interlinguistic dynamics;
                teach the chosen foreign language in private institutions and, after fulfilling due obligations, in Italian schools;
           pursue one’s academic studies enrolling in PhD Courses and Specialisation Schools.
Structure:
The course consists of two curricula: Literary Translation and Essay Translation (Human Sciences), designed to carry on and
develop, with particular reference to translation, the cultural and linguistic competence acquired during the three-year degree in
Foreign Languages and Literatures.
Requisites for admission:
Admission to the Specialistic Degree in Literary Translation and Essay Translation is granted to all graduates who possess a
three-year degree with at least 120 CFU recognised as valid for this Specialistic Degree. The 180 credits corresponding to the
Degree in Foreign Languages and Literatures are totally recognised.
Final test :
The final test consists in the translation of a literary text or an essay and a commentary on it, which will be orally discussed.
    C. SPECIALISTIC DEGREE IN EUROPEAN LITERATURES AND PHILOLOGIES
    Class: Modern Philology (Class 16S)


The study course consists of three curricula:
                               1. Modern and Contemporary
                               2. Theoretic and Comparative
                               3. Medieval and Humanistic


Objectives:
The graduate of this specialistic degree will possess:
        Sound knowledge of the historical and literary contexts and of texts belonging to the entire panorama of European
            literatures (Medieval, Modern and Contemporary);
        full mastery of the main problems tackled by the historical and theoretical debate on literary texts;
        a sound knowledge in the fields of Medieval, Modern and Contemporary Philology, aimed at developing
            autonomous critical skills;
        knowledge of some specific languages and literatures of the Middle Ages, and of the Modern and Contemporary
            age.
        the basic knowledge of language theory.
        Knowledge, both written and oral and with reference to specific disciplinary lexicons, of two languages, of which
            one at least has to be a EU language;
        ability to use the main informatic and communication instruments in the specific fields of competence.

 The graduate of this specialistic degree will be able to operate, with high responsibility functions, in such fields as:
           publishing and communication;
           specific institutions as Records Offices, libraries, superintendencies, cultural centres, foundations, newspapers
              editorial staff, etc.;
           companies and Italian or foreign public and private institutions;
           new technologies of communication.
Requisites for admission:
The 180 credits corresponding to the three-year Degree in European Literature for Publishing and Cultural Production (Class V)
as well as the 180 credits corresponding to the three-year Degree in Letters, Modern Curriculum (Class V) are totally recognised
for the access to this specialistic degree in European Literatures and Philologies.
Moreover, the access to this specific specialized degree is opened to the graduates in the European Languages and Literary
Cultures curriculum, part of the three-year Degree in Foreign Languages and Literatures, with a debt of less than 10-20 CFU,
and to the graduates in any three-year or four-year degree consisting in at least 120 credits recognised as valid by the Study
Course Council.

    E. SPECIALISTIC DEGREE IN ART HISTORY
    Class: History of art – Class 95/s –

    The course consists of 6 curricula:
    1. Medieval art
    2. Modern art
    3. Contemporary art
    4. Museology and artistic and restoration criticism
    5. Compared Arts
    6. History of architecture


   Objectives:

The 5-year specialistic degree in history of art aims to form graduates with specialistic competence in the methodologies and
techniques of analysis and research within the field of historical–artistic discipline, a specific and sound knowledge of art
history, architecture, museology, artistic and restoration criticism from the Middle Ages to the contemporary age in the western
area (depending on the chosen field of study) . Graduates will also have a good mastery of at least one language of the European
Union (written and oral level), besides Italian, will possess basic computer skills in the specific field of study.

   Final Test:
The final text consists in discussing a written dissertation on a particular subject chosen by the student within a certain
disciplinary area , provided the student has acquired, during the 5–year degree, at least 20 credits in that specific area.
The dissertation must reveal a thorough knowledge of the chosen topic as well as adequate methodological and critical skills that
will lead to at least partly original results.
The final grading system is based on 110 possible points. The best students might graduate with honours.

Graduates‟ possible job careers

The course is specifically addressed to the aquisition of professional qualifications in order to allow graduates to hold positions
of high responsibility in the activities of specific Institutions such as superintendences, museums, local and official bodies etc.,
and also in the field of services, of cultural and tourist business, of cultural and scientific research institutes, in public or private
centres of studies and research. Among the specific possibilities of employement one might mention, for example, the activity of
teaching and research in high schools and universities, the management of restoration laboratories and yards, the organization
and co-ordination of activities within museums and activities connected with the fruition and administration of the cultural
heritage.



5.1.4 Italian examinations and Laurea, ECTS credits.
 Each course of lectures leads to one examination: each examination successfully taken corresponds to a certain amount of
credits within the total 180 which are necessary to be allowed to take the final examination and get the degree.
Although theoretically the Laurea Course is a three-year course, in practice it is possible that a student may require more than
three years to pass the examinations and to complete his/her final dissertation. Students prepare examinations both through
attendance and through individual reading and study of assigned bibliography.
 Also for SOCRATES students, the completion of the work-load of an academic year – 60 CFU that is 1.500 hours work --
seems to be a reasonable expectation.

5.2 Courses and examinations
5.2.1 Description of the Courses
 Guest students are free to choose the order in which they wish to attend the different courses and take the examinations. In
their choices however they may be guided by the Subject Area Coordinator and by members of the Faculty teaching staff.
In teaching their courses, each year a professor deals with a different specific problem or theme, which lies within the general
disciplinary area referred to in the course title.
Each year detailed course descriptions are available on the University web-site before the summer vacation.

5.2.2 Teaching methods
Professors give lectures three times a week, for two hours each time from the first week of October to the end of December for
the first semester, and from the last week of February to the end of May for the second semester.
Lectures are often given in seminar form, that is, students are urged to participate actively in the discussion. Field work,
laboratory, and visits to archives and monuments are also part of the course in a number of cases.

5.2.3 Examinations: form of assessment
In final tests, which might be in the form of either an oral or a written examination, the assimilation and critical understanding
of lectures and assigned bibliography and other related activities (field work, written or oral reports, etc.) are assessed.

5.2.4. Examinations: grading system
The Italian grading system is based on 30 possible points.
30 is the highest grade. 30 is sometimes given with lode, with honours, when performance is considered exceptional. 18 is the
lowest passing grade.
In actual fact, in our faculty 18 is rarely given, and most grades are quite high on the scale. This occurs in part because if
performance is not entirely satisfactory professors usually suggest that the student being examined devote further study to the
subject and invite him/her to take the examination again at a future date. Students themselves may refuse a grade which they
consider too low and decide to take the examination at a subsequent session when they judge themselves better prepared.
Students usually prefer higher grades - in view of their future employment opportunities - even though re-taking one or
more examinations means prolonging their period of University study.
Therefore, Italian grades are not strictly comparable to those given where examinations may be taken only once (or a
limited number of times) at the end of the relevant courses, as in other University systems.
More generally, the different function of Italian examinations - which are a measure of achievement after varying periods
of time, rather than a test given at a particular point in the academic year - must always be kept in mind.
The closest approximation of Italian grades to an A-B-C-D-E-F scheme with its verbal explanations is probably as follows:
A, Excellent: outstanding performance fully meeting requirements: 30, 30 and lode;
B, Very good: a very good performance with only minor shortcomings: 27-29;
C, Good: a good performance with a few notable shortcomings: 25-26;
D, Satisfactory: fair with significant shortcomings: 23-24;
E, Sufficient: performance only meeting the minimum requirements: 18-22;
F, Fail: preparation totally inadequate: 17 and below.

5.3 Postgraduate Studies
PhD Courses are intended to provide the necessary competence to carry on highly specialized research activity at Italian
and/or Foreign Research Institutions as well as in private and public sectors. The course length may vary from three to four
years and activities are carried out under the supervision of one or more tutors, ending up with the discussion of a final
dissertation, written either in Italian or in a foreign language, constituting an original scientific contribution in its field.

The Faculty of Foreign Languages and Literatures is involved in the following PhD courses:
PhD Course in Philosophical Disciplines
PhD Course in Foreign Modern Literatures
PhD Course in Linguistics
PhD Course in Slavonian
PhD Course in Italian Studies

								
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